Autism & Casein from Cow’s Milk

Autism & Casein from Cow’s Milk
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Casomorphins—breakdown products of the milk protein casein with opiate-like activity—may help explain why autism symptoms sometimes improve with a dairy-free diet.

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Below is an approximation of this video’s audio content. To see any graphs, charts, graphics, images, and quotes to which Dr. Greger may be referring, watch the above video.

In my last video series on autism and diet, I talked about the benefits of broccoli sprouts. But the most commonly studied nutritional and dietary interventions for autism and diet involve variations of gluten-free and casein-free diets. Where did that even come from?

In the 80s, a team of respected Norwegian researchers reported a peculiar finding. They were comparing the urine of autistic children to the urine of normal children, in hope of teasing out any differences that could lead to hints as to what the cause is. This is a urine profile, which shows spikes for each of the various components. This is what normal urine comes out like, with the peptides region pretty quiet. (Peptides are like small pieces of proteins, and normally, we shouldn’t be peeing out much protein). But this is the urine profile from a child with autism, with all sorts of peptide spikes. Here’s another one.

This raised the question: “Can the Pathophysiology [the dysfunction] of Autism be Explained by the Nature of the[se] Discovered Urine Peptides?” First, they had to answer: “Where do the peptides come from?” They didn’t know. But, there was a clue: most of the parents of autistic kids reported that they got worse when they were exposed to cow’s milk. Huh? Well, there are these two proteins: gluten, a protein in wheat, and casein, a protein in milk, that break down not only into peptides, but exorphins.

Exorphins are “opioid peptides derived from food proteins”—”called exorphins…because of their exogenous origin [meaning from outside of the body] and morphine-like activity,” as opposed to endorphins, which are morphine-like compounds we produce inside our bodies. So, maybe some of these food peptides represent like “A New Class of Hormones?”

So, is that what the kids were peeing out? Apparently so, as some of those peptides had opioid activity. Okay. So, maybe they were onto something.

There are “[t]wo types of opioids [that] have been found in milk.” One is the “casomorphins in view of their morphine-like activity and their origin.” They are breakdown products, fragments of the milk protein casein. What’s the other one? The other opioid is the actual opiate: morphine. There appears to be actual morphine in milk. This can’t just be a coincidence. “It is [hard] to believe that these, or other types of opioids found in the milk, are devoid of physiological or nutritional significance.” And, think about it; it makes total sense. “Morphine and the opioid peptides may…have an important role in the mother-infant bond…” We want infants to be “’addicted’ to their own mother’s milk.” Okay. But, what about the milk of another species?

“Human [breast] milk is markedly different from that of other…species [in that it] has the lowest” casein content, and human casein is a markedly different protein in terms of its sequence of amino acid building blocks.

Human milk has 15 times less casein than bovine milk, and differs sequence-wise by about half, and so breaks down into peptides differently. Twenty-one bioactive peptides have been recovered from cow casein, including multiple casomorphins, compared to only five active peptides identified in human milk, and only one casomorphin. And, the casomorphins “from bovine casein are more potent.” This is a graph of opioid activity, where lower means more potent. Here’s the potency of straight morphine. And, here’s bovine casomorphin—significantly more potent than the weak opioid peptide from gluten, which is more comparable to the human casomorphin from breast milk.

And indeed, when you expose human nerve tissue to bovine casomorphin, it acts more like morphine than the casomorphin from human breast milk in terms of epigenetic changes—changes in gene expression, not only providing “a molecular rationale for recommending breastfeeding” over cows’ milk formula, but also providing a possible explanation why “[c]asein-free…diets have been reported to mitigate some of the…[symptoms of] autism.”

“What is good for the goose may be good for the gander, but what is good for the cow could be harmful to the human.”

Please consider volunteering to help out on the site.

Image credit: Sander van der Wel. Image has been modified.

Motion graphics by Avocado Video

Below is an approximation of this video’s audio content. To see any graphs, charts, graphics, images, and quotes to which Dr. Greger may be referring, watch the above video.

In my last video series on autism and diet, I talked about the benefits of broccoli sprouts. But the most commonly studied nutritional and dietary interventions for autism and diet involve variations of gluten-free and casein-free diets. Where did that even come from?

In the 80s, a team of respected Norwegian researchers reported a peculiar finding. They were comparing the urine of autistic children to the urine of normal children, in hope of teasing out any differences that could lead to hints as to what the cause is. This is a urine profile, which shows spikes for each of the various components. This is what normal urine comes out like, with the peptides region pretty quiet. (Peptides are like small pieces of proteins, and normally, we shouldn’t be peeing out much protein). But this is the urine profile from a child with autism, with all sorts of peptide spikes. Here’s another one.

This raised the question: “Can the Pathophysiology [the dysfunction] of Autism be Explained by the Nature of the[se] Discovered Urine Peptides?” First, they had to answer: “Where do the peptides come from?” They didn’t know. But, there was a clue: most of the parents of autistic kids reported that they got worse when they were exposed to cow’s milk. Huh? Well, there are these two proteins: gluten, a protein in wheat, and casein, a protein in milk, that break down not only into peptides, but exorphins.

Exorphins are “opioid peptides derived from food proteins”—”called exorphins…because of their exogenous origin [meaning from outside of the body] and morphine-like activity,” as opposed to endorphins, which are morphine-like compounds we produce inside our bodies. So, maybe some of these food peptides represent like “A New Class of Hormones?”

So, is that what the kids were peeing out? Apparently so, as some of those peptides had opioid activity. Okay. So, maybe they were onto something.

There are “[t]wo types of opioids [that] have been found in milk.” One is the “casomorphins in view of their morphine-like activity and their origin.” They are breakdown products, fragments of the milk protein casein. What’s the other one? The other opioid is the actual opiate: morphine. There appears to be actual morphine in milk. This can’t just be a coincidence. “It is [hard] to believe that these, or other types of opioids found in the milk, are devoid of physiological or nutritional significance.” And, think about it; it makes total sense. “Morphine and the opioid peptides may…have an important role in the mother-infant bond…” We want infants to be “’addicted’ to their own mother’s milk.” Okay. But, what about the milk of another species?

“Human [breast] milk is markedly different from that of other…species [in that it] has the lowest” casein content, and human casein is a markedly different protein in terms of its sequence of amino acid building blocks.

Human milk has 15 times less casein than bovine milk, and differs sequence-wise by about half, and so breaks down into peptides differently. Twenty-one bioactive peptides have been recovered from cow casein, including multiple casomorphins, compared to only five active peptides identified in human milk, and only one casomorphin. And, the casomorphins “from bovine casein are more potent.” This is a graph of opioid activity, where lower means more potent. Here’s the potency of straight morphine. And, here’s bovine casomorphin—significantly more potent than the weak opioid peptide from gluten, which is more comparable to the human casomorphin from breast milk.

And indeed, when you expose human nerve tissue to bovine casomorphin, it acts more like morphine than the casomorphin from human breast milk in terms of epigenetic changes—changes in gene expression, not only providing “a molecular rationale for recommending breastfeeding” over cows’ milk formula, but also providing a possible explanation why “[c]asein-free…diets have been reported to mitigate some of the…[symptoms of] autism.”

“What is good for the goose may be good for the gander, but what is good for the cow could be harmful to the human.”

Please consider volunteering to help out on the site.

Image credit: Sander van der Wel. Image has been modified.

Motion graphics by Avocado Video

Doctor's Note

This is the first in a six-video series on the role of gluten- and dairy-free diets in the treatment of autism. Stay tuned for:

My last autism series explored the amazing story of broccoli sprouts put to the test for the treatment of autistic boys:

Other neat videos on milk and child and infant health include:

If you haven’t yet, you can subscribe to my videos for free by clicking here.

131 responses to “Autism & Casein from Cow’s Milk

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    1. “And, the casomorphins “from bovine casein are more potent.” This is a graph of opioid activity, where lower means more potent. Here’s the potency of straight morphine. And, here’s bovine casomorphin—significantly more potent than the weak opioid peptide from gluten, which is more comparable to the human casomorphin from breast milk.” From the transcript above.




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    2. I hope the next video delves into the morphine effects of gluten. “Casein-free gluten-free diets have been reported to mitigate some of the inflammatory gastrointestinal and behavioral traits associated with autism”. When Dr. G narrated this line from the journal abstract in this video (4:48) he said “casein-free” and skipped “gluten-free”. Just because gluten’s morphine effects are less than that of casein, doesn’t mean that they are insignificant.




      4
    3. Bovine milk contains all of the hormones, anti-biotics, and toxins that are in the cow from which it comes.

      Bovine insulin is foreign to humans, and provokes an immune response. Sometimes this response affects the pancreas; thus Type One Diabetes.

      Why do Icelandic children not suffer from Type One? Their cows are native breeds which have insulin similar to human.




      4
      1. I agree with your first sentence. However, your theory of bovine insulin provoking an immune response doesn’t hold ‘milk’. By the time insulin makes it to the small intestine, where it is absorbed, it has been broken down from a poly-peptide, relatively large molecule, to a single peptide, which would not be recognized by our immune system as anything related to the insulin molecule. Please cite your sources if you disagree with this conclusion.




        6
  1. This video is misleading. Countries that consume a lot of dairy such as Iceland, Ireland, Israel. France, etc, have low rate of autism. And countries that have low milk consumption such as Japan, S Korea, Hong Kong, etc. have high rate.

    In fact, there is no correlation whatsoever. Some countries have high rate for whatever reason but it has nothing to do with dairy.This is a case of cherry picking so called research to fit an agenda. Just like the saturated fat and cholesterol theories.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_countries_by_milk_consumption_per_capita

    https://www.focusforhealth.org/autism-rates-across-the-developed-world/




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    1. I disagree. This video isn’t positing that casein causes autism, but that autistic children may benefit from avoiding it. So your argument that casein is not correlated is beside the point.




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      1. There is a subtle message in each video to confuse the issue and drive an agenda.

        “What is good for the goose may be good for the gander, but what is good for the cow could be harmful to the human.”




        4
        1. Nowhere does the video or transcript state or even imply that dairy causes autism. Right at the top, it says, “…autism *symptoms* sometimes improve with a dairy-free diet” (my emphasis). If you want to argue with that, fine. But your argument appears to be instead an attempt at distraction.




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          1. Exactly susan. Cow’s milk is for baby cows. Even super-duper pure-bred Icelandic ones.

            All you’ve got to do on the milk isle is move your hand a few inches and pick up a carton of Oat/Almond/Soy/Hemp/Hazelnut/Cashew etc etc “milk”.




            19
        2. Hi Jerry. The community here does like good, friendly discussion here and is always looking for constructive feedback.

          However, I must point out that this notion of “subtle messages” being contained “in each video” that you suggested above is rather your own interpretation.

          This is not my personal experience, as many others can attest to. I have watched hundreds of videos on this site over the years, and nearly consistently see that Dr. Greger carefully cites and summarises the research, leaving it up to the viewer to interpret.

          NutritionFacts.org publishes video summaries of the latest in nutritional research. It does not make ungrounded claims, advertise supplements, and it certainly does not have the goal of covertly converting people to a “vegan” diet. (A term which you continue to reference, whether intentionally or unintentionally, as a straw man argument against plant-based diets). (By the way, this site is just as critical of vegan junkfood diets as it is of any other. See more below.) In cases where there appear to be recommendations made, it is usually Dr. Greger paraphrasing the author’s discussion of the findings.

          If I were to make my own interpretation of your comments over the last many months, you are actually in agreement with the large body of evidence that this website cites in its videos. Principally, that the most supported diet for longevity and health is one that includes a wide variety of whole plant foods (note that I did not say a vegan diet nor an animal-free diet). I don’t think any of the videos have said “completely stop eating meat” or “don’t ever drink milk.” Please, correct me if I’m wrong here.

          The point is to incorporate MORE fruits and vegetables into our diets. I think you are doing just fine Jerry. I don’t question your diet if it works for you, because you appear to do this. As you said, like any “health conscious person such as me and a lot of people, who eat more plant foods than a lot of vegans do.” I am in total agreement with you that veganism can, in certain cases, be unhealthful (as I cited above).

          So I’m not questioning your diet, but rather questioning the principles of your arguments.

          What we need to do is stop debating about nit-picky details, and start getting the message out that people need to be eating more whole fruits and vegetables. If just half of the U.S. population increased their intake of fruits and vegetables by 1 SERVING PER DAY, an estimated 20,000 cancer deaths might be avoided each year.

          We ought to stop fighting amongst ourselves over who has the “best” diet, and realize that the vast majority of Americans are at risk for chronic disease, particularly our #1 killer, heart disease. If we can convey, in simple terms, the large body of research supporting a whole food plant-based diet to just a few more at-risk individuals, think about the difference we could make for the quality of their lives.

          Incorporating more whole plant foods is the concept that this site recognises and supports via the research, one that is promoted in the updated USDA dietary guidelines, supported by the American Institute for Cancer Research, the American College of Cardiology, the Harvard School of Public Health, as well as one of the nation’s largest healthcare organisations, Kaiser Permanente, among many others.

          Finally, one note on what “whole-food, plant-based” means:

          As quoted by Dr. Greger himself in his book:

          Sometimes people’s diets take on a religiosity of their own. I remember a man once telling me that he could never “go plant based” because he could never give up his grandma’s chicken soup. Huh? Then don’t! … The problem with all-or-nothing thinking is that it keeps people from even taking the first steps. … It’s really the day-to-day stuff that matters most. … This book is not about vegetarianism, veganism, or any other “-ism.”

          From a nutritional standpoint, the reason I don’t like the terms vegetarian and vegan is that they are only defined by what you don’t eat. When I used to speak on college campuses, I would meet vegans who appeared to be living off french fries and beer. Vegan, technically, but not exactly health promoting. That’s why I prefer the term whole-food, plant-based nutrition.

          And from Kaiser Permanente’s guide “The Plant-Based Diet: A Healthier Way to Eat:”

          If you find you cannot do a plant-based diet 100 percent of the time, then aim for 80 percent. Any movement toward more plants and fewer animal products can improve your health!




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          1. I’ve said it before and I’ll say it again… Jerry knows a lot of stuff, he just has an abrupt manner when presenting it. I don’t eat probably as good of a diet as he does, but then, I rely on supplements for most of my nutrition.

            I doubt, as some have suggested, that Jerry will live a shorter life than most of the others here (me excluded of course… I’ll bury every one of you ‘-) And by learning about him from his posts, I don’t think he will spend much of his later years in anything other than good health.

            As an interested observer, I get the sense that most who comment here regularly fail to consider that anyone who doesn’t toe the WFPB line can still be healthy as their regimen can offset or overcome any health problems with other parts of their diet that do not qualify as WFPB.




            1
            1. People smoking a few cigarettes a day can potentially still be healthy. Dr. Greger is not interested in what’s permissible but what he understands to be optimal. He presents the research and then allows the viewer to decide to what degree he/she wants to follow it.




              11
            2. Lonie, I’ve said it before, & I’ll say it again. The ‘stuff’ you say that he knows is not based on scientific evidence. You can find that ‘stuff’ all over the internet. That’s why we come here – to get away from the noise from all the ‘stuff’ that’s out there & that we’re not interested in. So excuse us for getting annoyed when this site gets polluted with ‘stuff’.

              If you want to use the same kind of defective logic (which some call intuition) as the smokers do at Ignatius’ friend’s funeral, that’s your choice. And I would defend your right to make that choice. But please don’t ask me to understand it. And please don’t try to shove your opinion about it down my throat, which, by the way, you never do. I’m sure you know that I’m referring to someone one else.




              9
              1. Zygomaticus said:

                If I were to make my own interpretation of your comments over the last many months, you are actually in agreement with the large body of evidence that this website cites in its videos. Principally, that the most supported diet for longevity and health is one that includes a wide variety of whole plant foods (note that I did not say a vegan diet nor an animal-free diet).

                I said:

                As an interested observer, I get the sense that most who comment here regularly fail to consider that anyone who doesn’t toe the WFPB line can still be healthy as their regimen can offset or overcome any health problems with other parts of their diet that do not qualify as WFPB.

                Then Nancy said:

                The ‘stuff’ you say that he knows is not based on scientific evidence. You can find that ‘stuff’ all over the internet. That’s why we come here – to get away from the noise from all the ‘stuff’ that’s out there & that we’re not interested in. So excuse us for getting annoyed when this site gets polluted with ‘stuff’.

                I rest my case, even though the NF jury is stacked against me. ‘-)




                0
                1. Lonie, I said nothing about WFPB. It’s no one’s fault that the preponderance of scientific evidence points in that direction & that you or someone may not like that fact. Defending the science is not towing a WFPB line. It’s merely defending the science. When someone comes here & purports to have scientific evidence, then shows none & then still keeps trying to ram it down everyone’s throats in obnoxious, arrogant, manipulative & deceptive ways, people here will point it out. I don’t understand why you have problem with that. Maybe it’s because you prefer to hear the ‘stuff’ more than science? Which I’ve said over & over is fine by me.

                  But if people don’t care about scientific evidence, then why would they come here? It’s not like this is the only place where people can go, & that we’re shutting them off from all the other ‘stuff’ that’s out there. They can go wherever they want to hear & believe whatever ‘stuff’ they want. Why do you have a need to hear it here on a site that promotes actual scientific evidence. It’s kind of like going to a seminar on astronomy & then complaining that they’re not talking about astrology.




                  7
                  1. I said nothing about WFPB. It’s no one’s fault that the preponderance of scientific evidence points in that direction & that you or someone may not like that fact. Defending the science is not towing a WFPB line. It’s merely defending the science.

                    Reminds me of a discussion I had with a friend regarding religion. I asked him where was the evidence that supported religious beliefs? He said the Bible is the evidence. I asked where was the evidence the Bible was accurate? And he answered “Because the Bible says it is.”

                    Beginning to sound like NF is a religion, and to some Dr. Greger is the Messiah. ‘-)

                    …then why would they come here? It’s not like this is the only place where people can go, & that we’re shutting them off from all the other ‘stuff’ that’s out there. They can go wherever they want to hear & believe whatever ‘stuff’ they want. Why do you have a need to hear it here on a site that promotes actual scientific evidence.

                    Again, you are saying that only anything that TOES the WFPB line is the one true science. Your mind is closed to any other line of thinking.

                    And for me personally, I do not come here to learn, although I pick up a tidbit here and there, mostly from the comments section by people who may or may not be WFPB.

                    I come here to offer some of what I’ve learned over the years that has worked for me and I offer it as a story to put it into perspective.

                    I do sometimes play the rube so I can see why you think I’m here as a student. ‘-)




                    1
                    1. Amazing how you got that completely backwards, Lonie. Religious people don’t rely on science & reason to believe in God. They rely on the stories of other people’s experiences as well as their own & then use their intuition to decide if those stories sound believable or not. Kind of like you do with your diet. And I can’t tell you how many times I’ve heard religious people accuse non-believers as being close minded. And you just did the same thing! How funny…

                      And thanks for admitting that you don’t come here to see or hear the evidence OF THE SCIENTIFIC STUDIES because your mind is already made up before you come here, kind of like a creationist confronted with scientific facts.
                      No one ever said anything about a ‘one true science’. There’s a difference between truth & facts. This site isn’t called nutrutiontruth.org. It’s nutritionfacts.

                      And please stop trying to make Dr. Greger into our messaiah just because he’s a bearer of news that you don’t really want to hear.




                      7
                    2. To quote Ronald Reagan during one of the Presidential Debates with Jimmy Carter, “There you go again.”

                      That is, there you go twisting what I said into something else. Chubby Checker would be envious of your twisting ability. ‘-)

                      By that I mean you skirted the point that many on this board have a religious fervor when it comes to defending WFPB dogma. And you can deny that you believe that dogma to be the “One True Science” but your words and actions belie that.

                      And to be clear, I come here with an open mind and attentively watch or read almost every post or video Dr Greger puts up. It’s true I don’t often subscribe to dedicating my life to what he preaches, but if he reveals something I think I can use, I use it. I’m agnostic when it comes to where I get my information.

                      As I’ve said before I am expecting answers to my health and longevity to be discovered by science. We’ve been practicing medicine and nutrition the old way for big numbers of years and we’ve only incrementally lengthened lifespan.

                      Discoveries are being made that will prolong our lives and health to a point we may just become bored with living so long and choose to check out of our own accord. Not here yet, but if you love life keep your mind open.




                      1
                    3. In response to your comment below (there’s no more reply button), Lonie, the fact that you think there is a dogma here or a ‘one true science’ is proof that you don’t come here with an open mind. And all the back-peddling that contradicts what you said above doesn’t change that:
                      “I do not come here to learn, although I pick up a tidbit here and there, mostly from the comments section by people who may or may not be WFPB.

                      I come here to offer some of what I’ve learned over the years that has worked for me and I offer it as a story to put it into perspective.

                      I do sometimes play the rube so I can see why you think I’m here as a student.”

                      Your words not mine. No twisting on my part, but I see a lot on yours. You believe you know it all already. You also said you believe that a certain someone knowledgeable, but based on what? What we’ve all observed is that he a) is incapable of backing up most of his claims, b) obviously doesn’t even understand what he’s read 90% of the time, & c) often sites studies that say the opposite of what he’s claiming. This what you call knowledgeable? It definitely says something about your judgment.




                      6
                    4. Nancy, I’m quoting your last post in its entirety below in this post. I’m doing that in order to give you the last word on the subject. Thnks for the discussion. ‘-)

                      In response to your comment below (there’s no more reply button), Lonie, the fact that you think there is a dogma here or a ‘one true science’ is proof that you don’t come here with an open mind. And all the back-peddling that contradicts what you said above doesn’t change that:
                      “I do not come here to learn, although I pick up a tidbit here and there, mostly from the comments section by people who may or may not be WFPB.

                      I come here to offer some of what I’ve learned over the years that has worked for me and I offer it as a story to put it into perspective.

                      I do sometimes play the rube so I can see why you think I’m here as a student.”

                      Your words not mine. No twisting on my part, but I see a lot on yours. You believe you know it all already. You also said you believe that a certain someone knowledgeable, but based on what? What we’ve all observed is that he a) is incapable of backing up most of his claims, b) obviously doesn’t even understand what he’s read 90% of the time, & c) often sites studies that say the opposite of what he’s claiming. This what you call knowledgeable? It definitely says something about your judgment.




                      0
                    5. The funniest part is that I think you really do believe that you come here with an open mind. However, your words say otherwise.




                      2
                  2. Should have explained in my last post… I’m not blowing you off, I’ve just got some outside projects to work on and I wouldn’t be able to give our discussion the time and attention it deserves. Ciao.




                    0
                  3. “It’s kind of like going to a seminar on astronomy & then complaining that they’re not talking about astrology.”
                    Excellent analogy WFPB Nancy! LOL! :-)




                    3
            3. How can you or anyone learn from Jerry? All he does is express his – frankly often bizarre – opinions. He very seldom deigns to provide scientifci sources for those opinions. When he does, those sources often contradict his claims or don’t support them.

              On the other hand, Jerry can be a learning tool. I often go away and check out his claims in the scientific journals. Unfortunately in many cases, he just seems to uncritically accept claims made by people selling stuff on the internet and prefers those claims to the evidence presented by genuine experts in the professional literature.

              We also have to bear in mind Jerry’s agenda at all times. He said in a previous post many, many videos/blogs ago, that he was here to attack Dr G and to promote his own pseudoscientific beliefs about saturated fat, cholesterol and statins. Which makes his own accusations of bias, cherry-picking and “disinform” particularly hypocritical.

              As for your remarks about WFPB, I have to disagree although we may be arguing about semantics. All the major health reports argue we should eat mostly plants and eat more vegetables, fruits and whole grains, They just don;t call them WFPB diets. The question though is what is plant based – 75% plants, 85%, 95% etc? That I think is where the science is unclear and there is scope for legitimate debate.




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              1. How can you or anyone learn from Jerry

                Tom, I’m saying he knows a lot of “stuff” based on some things he espouses that agree with what I already know. I can’t give you an example offhand because frankly, I mostly retain memories of new stuff I learn like the tomatoes as treatment for prostate cancer and such. I’ve got a low PSA number but continuing to eat tomatoes as often as I do should be helpful in keeping that number low.

                And I’ve suggested before that much of his value lies in the repudiation links he engenders from posters like yourself.

                As to any agenda that Jerry may have, I haven’t a clue. It’s not important to me as I do believe his value is in the debate he fosters irregardless of any agenda.

                I have no issue with plant based diet. I somewhat practice that myself with the exception of my almost daily herring filet consumption. I say somewhat because in my world plant based supplements qualify as eating fruit and vegetable.

                And yes I do supplement with Pasture Fed Goat Whey Protein two or 3 times a week… this video and attending comments have re-in-forced my decision to do so.

                And what I’m about to say is not aimed at you Tom, but there are some here who appear to believe that if you deviate from the path of eating plant based, you are unworthy of… whatever?




                1
          2. Thank you for your thoughtful, well-measured response to Jerry Lewis, Zygomnaticus! I have also replied at length to him. A thought occured to me while reading your comment was that – perhaps HE has a hidden agenda and secretly works for one of the animal product industries. Often when one accuses another they are mirroring, essentially pointing the finger back at themselves. Afterall, Dr. Greger has made it abundantly clear that what is shown on the site represents the PREPONDERANCE of science done on a topic – not his opinion.
            Or, we can give him the benefit of the doubt-that he is simply an unclear, but well-meaning individual playing devil’s advocate. This serves a greater purpose as we are given the opportunity to respond to off-base thoughts which many watching or reading may have, but would not write about in the comments.
            Ultimately, I agree – Just inspiring folks to eat MORE whole plant-based foods overall is a worthy mission.
            However, what I have found with my clients is that once they go for 3 weeks with NO animall products in their diet is that they feel so GOOD with increased energy and the dissapearance of “nuisance” health issues, they do not want to return to the old way of eating. Unfortunately, many miss out on this by keeping small amounts of animal products in their diets.




            2
    2. This is kind of amateur science. Autism is not very reducible to a single number. Probably the different countries just measure and diagnose the spectrum far differently.




      6
      1. It’s so unscientific and misleading “theory” with a simplistic mindset, like autism spectrum is some kind of “disease” and there is one size fit all “cure” which is to eat WFPB and avoid dairy. It is so amateurish to the point of being ridiculous.




        3
          1. I am no match for you for your daily insults to people, anger and multiple IDs. Oh I envy your WFPB diet and I am going to switch diet to be like you. Not.




            0
            1. Jerry, I like you. I really do. But I think you should seriously ask yourself why the only way you can handle simple facts is with more lies and dishonesty, and why a little humour makes you respond with aggression. It’s not leading to anything positive. It’s OK to admit your mistakes – it won’t kill you. I’m totally serious, it’s not meant to be snarky or sarcastic. Please give it some thought, for your own sake.

              PS: For the record, I’ve only used one ID so far, if anyone really cares :)




              8
    3. More shoddy logic and false claims.

      There is no universal definition of autism and nor are there are any comparable statistics for autism rates world wide. The source you referenced made this quite clear. You are simply cherry picking poor quality statistic data to support your agenda.

      You are also using the opportunity to push your crackpot theories about dietary staurated fat and blood cholesterol. It is quite clear that dietary saturated fat and blood cholesterol are risk factors for cardiovascular ad certain other diseases. These are facts
      https://academic.oup.com/eurheartj/article/38/32/2459/3745109
      http://circ.ahajournals.org/content/early/2017/06/15/CIR.0000000000000510

      Pretending as you do that all this evidence – thousands of papers from around the world for over 50 years – has been “faked” as you put it, is just crazy. There is no reason why anyone would do such a thing and there is no evidence that anyone has. This really is crackpot stuff but you repeat it at very opportunity presumably on the Joseph Goebbels principle that a lie told once remains a lie but a lie told a thousand times becomes the truth




      8
  2. The morphine-like effects of milk must be a bit subtle. A warm milk is supposed to help sleep. I don’t recall noticing much effect after drinking milk. Maybe a slight anti-coffee effect. Maybe having been milk free for a year I might notice something now, but it might be placebo effect. I’ll just skip the milk to avoid atherosclerosis promotion.




    4
    1. For me it is different. That is, if I eat ice cream, especially at night, I become drowsy and ofter nod off sitting at my computer. I can’t say if the video categorically links casein to autism, but I think the evidence is such that is rates follow-up, autism being on the rise at it appears.

      I also think it means i have about a year’s worth of ice cream (Two half-gallons) in my freezer… I have trouble throwing away food, and the cats won’t eat it, so I guess I’ll have to force it down next summer when I’m hot. ‘-)




      3
      1. Lonie
        it might not be the casein , it might be the over million somatic cells per tablespoon in American milk on average that make you sleepy . pus or somatic cells is very high in milk and i’m sure your immune system is taxed when you ingest such horrid things .




        5
  3. Dr. Greger,

    Will you please do a video on glutathione and the relationship to diet? I have searched your videos and did not find anything about glutathione and diet. The relevance here is that raw milk contains cysteine that metabolizes into glutathione. I have seen some emerging ‘nutraceutical’ companies claiming to produce whey powder that contains high levels of cysteine sufficient to improve glutathione levels.

    My understanding is that glutathione is the essential antioxidant protecting our brains.

    If the claims of the emerging whey products is true, couldn’t this be a very important development to avoid dementia?

    I am wondering if you have a opinion.




    4
    1. Glutathione is dubbed the “Mother of antioxidants” and “Brain foods”. There is a huge difference between drinking raw, non homogenized, full fat milk and drinking heavily processed milk such as 2% or no fat, or homogenized and to a lesser extend pasteurized milk. It’s like eating processed food versus eating whole food. If you eat the wrong form of foods then don’t blame on the food itself. It’s the 50 year old obsolete saturated fat and cholesterol theory that makes people drink processed milk and that’s the root of the problems.




      1
        1. Hi DEB,

          While you may be right that today’s raw milk being consumed by today’s humans may not be wise, back in the day my family and many of our neighbors drank raw milk 2 or 3 times a day and never came down with any of the diseases you mention. Maybe it was because we were exposed to those things in small amount causing our immune systems to strengthen against them.

          Case in point… when I went into the army they noticed I had no scar left by a smallpox vaccination, so they vaccinated me. When the medics checked me for a scar later on and found none, they asked me if I lived on a farm and milked cows? When I answered yes, they concluded that I had been exposed to cowpox to the point I built up resistance to its cousin, smallpox.

          But today’s humans have been raised so antiseptically that raw milk just might do them in, rather than like back in the day when it would do a body good. ‘-)




          0
      1. “It’s the 50 year old obsolete saturated fat and cholesterol theory that makes people drink processed milk and that’s the root of the problems.”

        Once again, you are making stuff up Jerry. Nothing you say can be trusted. But we know that anyway.

        People have been drinking processed milk for over 100 years. The reasons have nothing to do with saturated fat or cholesterol. The processing kills potentially pathogenic microbes and extends product shelf life. That’s why people drink processed milk.

        Your whole way of thinking is disordered by your obsession with saturated fat and cholesterol and your desire to revert back to the 100 year old hypotheses that high saturated fat foods are healthy and having high cholesterol is “normal” and healthy. The evidence shows that these beliefs are completely wrong but what is your response? 50+ years of evidence from around the world – thousands and thousand of studies – have been “faked”! Really? How? By whom? And why? Doesn’t that claim sound absurd even to you?




        7
      1. This is all old stuff when they compared vegetarians with omnivores who eat mostly animal foods and find that vegetarians have less oxidative stress. That’s real old stuff and every informed health conscious people know about the benefits of eating plant foods. You need to look at the informed health conscious person such as me and a lot of people, who eat more plant foods than a lot of vegans do, plus certain amount of animal foods to get the necessary essential and conditional amino acids (Glutathione, glycine, proline, etc.), collagen, DHA/EPS/DHHA, ALA, quality protein, selenium, zinc, etc. It’s a waste of time comparing 7th day adventists with those who eat a SAD diet, just like we never compared people who eat a SAD diet with vegans who eat potato chips. It’s apple and orange comparison and a waste of time.

        http://jacknorrisrd.com/oxidative-stress-take-3-selenium-satus-of-german-vegans/




        0
        1. Gosh Jerry, . . you recently stated that you used to be a fan of Dr. Gregers (implying you are no longer). I think you’re lying . . . or you wouldn’t still be here.




          7
        2. More misleading piffle, Jerry.

          The 7th Day Adventists study compared 7th Day Adventists eating vegetarian diets with 7th Day Adventists eating meat. The study did not compare healthy 7th Day Adventists to random SAD-eating North American. You have been told this before but yet you still choose to lie about it. Why?

          You are not “informed” Jerry, you are misinformed. You choose to believe all sorts of pseudoscientific claims you find on the internet by people selling stuff and choose to ignore major scientific reports on nutrition and health by real experts ….. because internet marketers are so much more knowledgeable and credible, I suppose.




          3
    2. Hi, Tom Samek. The most important nutrient to consider with regard to glutathione is riboflavin, a B vitamin. Exercise also affects the activity of glutathione-producing enzymes, as shown here. The richest plant-based sources of riboflavin are yeasts, fortified foods such as cereals, dried chili peppers and herbs, and even muscadine grapes. I don’t think you need milk or a whey supplement to produce glutathione. I hope that helps!




      1
  4. Beta-caesin occurs in an A1 and A2 form in cows’ milk, whereas the A2 form is found in human breast milk and most other mammalian milk, including goats and sheep. “The difference between A1 and A2 proteins is subtle: They are different forms of beta-casein, a part of the curds (i.e., milk solids ) that make up about 30 percent of the protein content in milk. The A2 variety of beta-casein mutated into the A1 version several thousand years ago in some European dairy herds…When digested, A1 beta-casein (but not the A2 variety) releases beta-casomorphin7 (BCM7), an opioid with a structure similar to that of morphine. Studies increasingly point to BCM7 as a troublemaker. ” http://www.motherjones.com/environment/2014/03/a1-milk-a2-milk-america/#




    3
    1. And more: “Numerous recent tests, for example, have shown that blood from people with autism and schizophrenia contains higher-than-average amounts of BCM7. In a recent study, Richard Deth, a professor of pharmacology at Northeastern University in Boston, and his postdoctoral fellow, Malav Trivedi, showed in cell cultures that the presence of similarly high amounts of BCM7 in gut cells causes a chain reaction that creates a shortage of antioxidants in neural cells, a condition that other research has tied to autism. The study, underwritten in part by A2 Corp., is now undergoing peer review in the Journal of Nutritional Biochemistry.”




      5
      1. Lonie, it is not definitive that A1 casein causes any problem because all studies were observational and done on a small number of people. However goat milk contains only A2 casein as mother milk. So drink it to your heart content and ignore the fear monger on this board.

        I like goat milk myself because by definition, goats are raised running freely and feeding on grass. Goat milk is not homogenized and 100% fat (not processed and the nutrients are in the fat). (Fat and not oil, old and grouchy).




        0
        1. Jerry Lewis, All the people I know that eat a diet like you recommend, with saturated fat, meat, eggs, dairy products and a handful of supplements, they are all sick with various diseases including clogged arteries, type 2 diabetes, overweight, arthritis, and even declining mental issues. When they eliminate the saturated fat, meat, eggs and dairy and quit taking the supplements which throw their metabolism out of balance, they all get better and reverse their disease. Good luck in your unhealthy eating.




          18
            1. Jerry Lewis
              YOU CAN’T HANDLE THE TRUTH !
              Recently about two weeks ago went to a funeral of someone who i used to work with . after awhile i went out back of the funeral home just to get some fresh air . well out back was a group of 3 smokers talking away . one said “i know one thing for sure , i will never quit smoking , everybody that quits dies ” since i was only a few feet away i asked , ” why had charlie quit ?”
              “oh yes he quit almost a year ago ”
              People can’t handle the truth , they have to make up lame excuses for the things that deep down they know is wrong .
              the easiest person to fool is yourself .




              11
              1. Ignatius, I can’t believe the number of people I see smoking in their cars on my way to work. Every day. With all the information there is out there about the dangers of smoking, it just astounds me to see people making such bad choices. And they’ll tell themselves anything to justify their bad choices, just like the 3 people you were talking to at the funeral.




                7
            2. You always seem to be angry at something Jerry …. Dr G, his popularity, your lack of popularity, the scientific facts about saturated fat and cholesterol etc. is this why you are always accusing other people of being angry?




              5
        2. Hey Jerry, From other comments with links… (I’m typing this on my email and can’t go back and see who posted) I read data that suggests the A1/A2 difference is real.

          Growing up on a farm we avoided Holstein’s as our milk cow and Dad bought Jerseys or Guernseys as the family got smaller and the high production from a Holstein was no longer needed to feed our larger family.

          I saw on a TV show… Texas Country Reporter, about a woman in the Hill Country of Texas I think, who only milks Guernsey’s and makes and sells butter. People come from Miles Around and other towns ‘-) to buy her butter, so there is something intuitive in them telling them her butter is o.k. to eat.

          It makes perfect sense and I’ve suspected all along that goat milk is a good choice. I’ve also read that camel milk is close to mother’s milk but I’m not milkin’ no stinkin’ camel!… just to make camel milk ice cream ‘-)

          I do however consume goat whey mixed with my Raw Organic Cocoa powder on a fairly regular basis. I do that for the C-6, C-8, C-10, medium chain triglycerides (and the C-12 that’s sorta on the cusp of being an MCT) as much as I do for the protein from the goat whey.




          1
          1. Lonie, I think that dairy with casein both A1 and A2 are beneficial as long as you consume the least processed, grass fed and with the fat where the nutrition resides. I think that casein type A1 may cause some indigestion to some people with immune deficiency similarly to gluten or lectin intolerance to some people. It’s called in common term as lactose intolerance. But people who consume goat milk for instance, do not run into this problem and I think it’s because goat milk contains A2 casein. this indigestion may cause other problems such as inflammation, very similar to gluten or lectin to some people.

            And so casein A1 is not particularly bad for all people nut only to some people.

            http://cdrf.org/2017/02/09/a2-milk-facts/

            I consume goat milk simply because I am a city person and I can buy it from Trader Joe. By default, I drink milk with casein type 2, but that’s what comes with goat milk which I like because it is grass fed (actually hay fed) and non homogenized.

            https://www.summerhilldairy.com/goat-milk/

            https://www.summerhilldairy.com/our-goats-2/

            https://www.summerhilldairy.com/our-dairy/




            1
            1. Jerry Lewis, Regarding your comment: “Lonie, I think that dairy with casein both A1 and A2 are beneficial as long as you consume the least processed, grass fed and with the fat where the nutrition resides.”

              Have you seen the validated science on how casein causes and promotes the growth of cancer? T Colin Campbell has presented the scientific evidence many times. Here are the links:

              https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xEWAf6sOGv0

              https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mguepudBoYA

              https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2BylKnJaOzE

              What are your qualifications and scientific evidence for saying that “dairy casein is beneficial”?




              8
              1. WFPB Hal, I’d like to corroborate what you just said with my own experience. Obviously it isn’t a big test with a lot of people, but I still find it meaningful.

                In 2006-7 I studied nutrition in a course which emphasized getting clean, “properly” raised meats, raw milk, etc. I’d been an avid reader of nutrition since the early 1960s, and found popular books on the subject were becoming more and more contradictory. So I took this course, which seemed like the answer to the confusion.

                My diet had never been full of junk food, but I ate the usual milk, butter, eggs, meat, fish, and fowl, extra virgin olive oil, whole grain breads, with veggies on the side. With what this course taught I found sources of pastured eggs, beef, chicken, ate lots of wild-caught salmon, and even made my own yogurt, cottage cheese and even brie from the raw milk of a small pastured-only dairy. As much of this as possible was organic. With “good” pastured beef in the freezer, we ate more of that than we had in the past. As I had all my life, I gained weight easily and struggled to keep to a healthy BMI.

                After two years of this “healthful” eating, I found a huge lump in my breast – a rapidly growing cancer (aggressive and rare, in that it didn’t have female hormone receptors) that had not been detectable a year earlier.

                It was only after this wake-up call that I read The China Study and learned how animal protein causes cancer to grow, and cutting down to 10% or less of animal protein calories stops cancer growth. This led me to find doctors, such as Greger, Esselstyn, McDougall, Goldhamer, etc., who use real science, not marketing cloaked as scientific research, in their quest to help people become and stay healthy.

                Three other women I’ve known who had the same type of cancer only lived about 18 months following diagnosis, and all were much younger than me. Two of them went on a ketogenic diet, but I don’t think the third one did.

                Since finishing many alternative and a few standard treatments, I’ve been cancer free for the last four years and my BMI is now 21 and I maintain that easily. I plan to stay healthy by avoiding animal protein.




                6
                1. Rebecca, thank you for sharing your story. I’m so glad you’re still here with us. Keep up the good work & may you continue to be here with us for many, many years to come!




                  1
                2. Congratulations on beating this awful disease.

                  Ketogenic diets seem designed to make cancers more aggressive. They are high in cholesterol and many cancers seem to cause cholesterol to decline. Perhaps because they use it to build new (cancer) cells. Providing dietary cholesterol may be throwing fuel on the fire ………………..

                  “But Dr Hill said the research reinforced to cancer patients how vital it was to maintain low cholesterol.”
                  http://www.abc.net.au/news/2016-08-09/cancer-rate-how-fats-cholesterol-increase-aggressive-tumours/7710738

                  Further, high fat diets may supercharge certain cancers
                  “. Monoacylglycerol lipase (MAGL) is elevated in aggressive human cancer cells
                  . Loss of MAGL lowers fatty acid levels in cancer cells and impairs pathogenicity
                  . MAGL controls a signaling network enriched in protumorigenic lipids
                  . A high-fat diet can restore the growth of tumors lacking MAGL in vivo”
                  http://www.cell.com/abstract/S0092-8674(09)01439-1

                  ,




                  2
                1. Nice one Jerry. If you can’t refute the arguments by Dr Greger or Professor Campbell (and clearly you can’t), then just make unsubstantiated allegations about the individuals. That’s much easier and safer than getting a drubbing from trying to argue about the scientific facts.




                  3
                  1. TG, you have been in several parts of the world right, in particular at least The Philippines and possibly other parts of Asia, and U.K. and Australia. And you do know that people in the world eat all kind of foods, including meat and seafoods and vegetables, and a lot of herbs and in particular your so called “saturated fat”. So Campbell novel is all fantasy, like he sat in the U.S. or another planet and wrote about what foods people in China eat. Just go to any Chinese or Asian restaurants in the U.S. or Australia and you can see exactly what people of the world eat. Not all those fantasy stories. Like Okinawans munching on sweet potatoes. You go to Japan and tell the Japanese these stories and they will laugh in your face. It’s all fantasy from the West to push for an agenda and to sell vegetable oil and low fat foods and diet and more drugs that you actually fell victim to and you ignore like it is nothing or actually “good” for your heart, after you fried your liver and pancrea.

                    I will post later but the new push now from Big Pharma to sell more drugs is to call blood pressure of 130/80 high BP.




                    0
            2. Jerry – I encourage you to keep drinking your raw milk. The more, for you, the merrier. Have a nice life.

              The rest of us well go about our own dietary business – and enjoy it for ourselves. No need for you to worry about us. We’re fine.
              WFPB.




              8
        3. Jerry Lewis
          you said goats run free and feed on grass ? where did you get your info from? i live 2 miles from the largest goat dairy in canada and i can testify they are inside a barn 24 hours a day summer and winter . they used to have a small paddock for the young goats to run outside , but there was no grass in that paddock , since then they have built more barn , now no goat is ever outside . a2 milk might have some benefits , but you still have the hormone , somatic cells , bio accumulation factors of chemicals in the milk , blood , pus , fecal etc .




          7
              1. Lone, have you ever seen goats jump around & play out in a wide, open field? I have. My neighbors have goats. It’s wonderful to watch. My heart goes out to the goats that are unable to experience that playfulness & joy all because of human greed & selfishness.




                1
                1. Nancy, I read research once that raised a set of kittens in a room with horizontal stripes and another set in a room with vertical stripes. The outcome was that the kittens in the vertical striped room saw the world in a vertical manner and the kittens in the horizontal striped room saw the world in a horizontal aspect. (don’t know how they determined that but I’m sure they had some way of doing so.)

                  What I’m saying here is that if the goats are raised in a domesticated state rather than a wild state, how do we know they long to be free? I’ve read nothing in the news of a goat breakout from captivity.

                  Most animals that get separated from the life they are used to usually seek out that same kind of life elsewhere if they cannot get home. That’s what my momma cat did. She was perfectly capable of fending for herself in the wild but she took up with me.

                  Apparently she missed having her own human to do her bidding. ‘-)




                  1
                  1. Lonie, those striped cats were still able to run around & act like cats. There is no way that anyone can argue that animals living in a closed up barn, with little or no room to move, or cooped up in a box, standing in feces, & never seeing the light of day is a good & healthy way to live. I repeat, go find a goat farm & watch them run around & kick up their hooves, especially the little kids. Or find them on the internet. Just because animals are resilient & able adapt to all kinds of horrific conditions doesn’t mean they’re too stupid to know that they’re suffering. They don’t necessarily have to live in the wild, but give them some space to move around out in open air where they can behave like they would if they were in the wild. It’s the least we can do as a species if they’re going to be in our care.

                    And there’s no way that anyone can argue that the sole purpose for keeping them cooped up isn’t purely economic. It’s never for the benefit of the animal.




                    1
                    1. Wellllllll… I think the situation you speak of is somewhat a figment of your imagination.

                      Farmers that I have known are some of the more caring people on earth. Sure, they work with livestock as their livelihood, often as a husband and wife team, and perhaps because of that they see to the well-being of their livestock.

                      The problems arise when big corporations buy up little producers and from their offices in the city, determine how to maximize profits.

                      You have a legitimate reason to take issue with those corporate types… at least the worst offenders, but I don’t think you are being fair when you lump an entire industry together because of some bad apples.




                      0
                    2. No, Lonie. The dairy farm over the hill from me is not a figment of my imagination. And neither is the bellowing of the mother cows for their calves after they’ve been separated. And neither is the goat farm down the road from me where they are able to roam free & kick up their hooves whenever they want. So I’m not lumping them all together. That’s just you making assumptions again. Besides, the situation Ignatius spoke of (“the largest goat dairy in Cananda”) sounds a corporate farm factory. Hence my initial comment to him.




                      0
            1. WFPB Nancy
              yes it is , but i would challenge anyone to step into a goat barn and then into a cow dairy barn , to see first hand . cows too are left inside and it is much worse for cows than goats . goats are much easier to keep clean than cows , cow barns are gross. one time i was in a cow barn where they milked 1500 cows , the cows were washed automatically , yet i could see discoloured water running off the teats , which had to have been coloured from the manure that clung to each cow hard to stomach . today if you set foot on their property you would immediately be arrested for trespassing unless you had prior permission . dairy farmers have become very selective who they let in and no cameras allowed .




              2
              1. Ignatius, my heart goes out to cows, too. There’s a dairy farm over the hill from me. They’re grass fed & not kept permanently in a barn like those you mentioned. But they separate the calves from their mothers (something they don’t always do with goats). I can sometimes hear the mothers calling out to their babies. Sometimes it’s really loud & bellowing. It’s so sad & barbaric. And again, it’s man’s inhumanity to animals.




                2
          1. I boycotted CAFO farming a long time ago. And so are all health conscious people. This is very old stories.

            Don’t be hypocrite and pretend that you don’t harm animals by killing insects, torture the bees, kill lab rat to prove that blueberry can prevent cancer, and take away wildlife land to grow your kale and nut. Just because you kill small animals or big animals indirectly do not mean that you don’t kill.

            Do the goats look to be tortured in the following videos?

            https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZUbySd4giWA

            https://www.summerhilldairy.com/goat-milk/

            https://www.summerhilldairy.com/our-goats-2/

            https://www.summerhilldairy.com/our-dairy/




            0
            1. Oh dear! Comedy gold really to see the usual Tomie & Jerry [weaklings] who come on here desperately trying to educate themselves but can never make the break from the filth they eat. Pitiful.




              1
  5. Thank you Dr. Greger… I follow the reasoning that bovine milk is not suitable for humans and has an opioid affect. I didn’t see an explanation for why children with autism are affected differently than children without autism, when it comes to consuming milk products. Why are children with autism excreting peptides that children without autism are not? Can you help shed some light on this? Thanks again.




    10
    1. I believe it has to do with their microbiome being distorted – sometimes from a C-Section birth, where newborns normally get their mother’s healthy bacteria secretions as they go through the birth canal. Some are caused when they get a lot of antibiotics that kill off the healthy bacteria. Others have probably been affected by the mercury and other toxins in the many, many vaccines given newborns and small children before their own immune systems are mature (around age 2). I don’t have time to look up the science behind what I’m saying, but you can find it if you look. So I’m saying this is my opinion.




      1
    2. Mary,

      please wait for the upcoming videos as they explain the problem more in-depth:

      “Gluten-Free, Casein-Free Diets for Autism Put to the Test (11/20)
      Are Autism Diet Benefits Just a Placebo Effect? (11/22)
      Double-Blind Clinical Trial of Diet for Autism (11/24)
      Pros & Cons of Gluten-Free, Casein-Free Diets for Autism (11/27)”

      Thanks for your question!

      Moderator Adam P.




      0
  6. I came across Reichelt’s research in the 90’s, and as a result I left out both gluten and dairy products from my diet. My intestinal problems were quickly cured, and my mental abilities improved a lot too.




    8
  7. Friends, “Jerry Lewis” is best ignored, life is too short (especially his, methinks :) ). Unlike most of us, the purpose his regular visits here obviously is something besides learning. Maybe he’s on the National Cattlemen’s Beef Association’s or National Dairy Council’s payroll? :)




    13
    1. I don’t think Jerry is on anybody’s payroll. He is a bit like a British journalist in that respect …..

      “You cannot hope to bribe or twist
      (thank God!) the British journalist.
      But, seeing what the man will do
      unbribed, there’s no occasion to.”

      Humbert Wolfe




      2
  8. You may want to ‘exclude Jerry from the Club’, even though I do not agree with his views on consuming oils and animal products…I do like the way he ‘stirs the pot’ and challenges many of us (perhaps even Dr. G), and for those of us who don’t have a complete understanding of true health…that’s healthy!

    Rant on Jerry, you ‘shit disturber you’…!




    1
    1. so you are a fan of fake facts ? because that is all jerry has ever provided .
      you and jerry are both amazing and not for positive reasons




      10
      1. Agreed, Ignatius. I prefer people who like to bring out the best in people, not the worst. Take Lonie for example. He has opinions that are different from the science presented here, but he doesn’t go about expressing his opinions in an obnoxious, manipulative & deceptive way.




        6
    2. Igking, I think he’s more of a $hit slinger than a stirrer. That’s why I no longer read his comments. It’s a waste of my time. Especially since I’ve heard everything he has to say over & over & over again.




      2
  9. What about the global pandemy of lactose tolerance apparently born in the cold climates of Northern Europe, historically ?

    Lactose intolerance is considered to be a medical condition, but it rather appears that lactose tolerance after infancy is the real medical condition.

    Lactose intolerance may be naturally activated by the body with specific genes after weaning. And the desactivation of those genes, perhaps due to hight animal milk consumption may lead to lactose tolerance after weaning…

    Lactose tolerance may be the more widespread genetic disease in the world today with a high prevalence in occidental countries.




    0
      1. Yes, you can see in the world maps that it kind of radiates from northern Europe. The more we move towards countries with a traditionally plant-based diet, the less the incidence of lactase persistence…

        In the cold climate of northern Europe, people relied more on animal foods and milk than in plant-based foods, it seems to one, that there is a correlation between the overall diet and the apparition and development of lactase persistence.




        0
        1. When you rely on animal foods to live, particularly milk, the body has to adapt itself, and that is why it developed lactase persistence… It appears to be strong in all regions of the world where animal milk consumption was important and not in regions where plant-based foods are more important.

          But naturally, in human beings, there is the disabling of the lactase enzyme as a feature of the organism that tells it that it needs to switch from breast milk to plant-based foods.

          Lactase persistence, by disabling this feature, makes the body to lose this “natural switch” and therefore it exposes the body to all the health’s risks associated with animal milk consumption.

          Like if you lost the ability to sense heat, then when you put your hand into fire, you would’nt have the signal to remove your hand… Exactly the same when consuming animal milk, which contains addictive opioids and a bunch of unhealthy stuff too.




          1
  10. I know of a lovely boy aged 5 who suffers from a relatively mild form of autism. His parents were unaware of the relationship between casein and autism. The boy himself first refused to drink milk, then yoghurt, then cheese. He only consumes limited amount of butter. I think natural self preservation has guided him in the right direction.




    3
  11. I’ve recently moved my family to a plant-based diet and my toddler still drinks a lot of milk (2-3 bottles being 250ml bottles) what plant based milk is best for him? So far I give him soy and almond, but I keep seeing articles about how bad soy is. I’m really confused? Please help




    0
    1. To Alyssa and Courtney :
      One of the NF volunteers may get around to answering your question, but until then, I would like to offer these resources. First, from the highly reputable Physicians Committee for Responsible Medicine there is this write-up on vegan diets through the various life stages http://www.pcrm.org/health/diets/vegdiets/vegetarian-diets-for-children-right-from-the-start You will see there they have no qualms about suggesting soy or other plant milks, but you will want to read the whole article. And secondly, this website has numerous videos and articles on the healthful aspects of soy and soy milk https://nutritionfacts.org/topics/soymilk/ These links will get you started. https://nutritionfacts.org/video/treating-infant-colic-by-changing-moms-diet/




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      1. Hi Susan,

        Thankyou for your prompt reply, I’ve read all of the articles you suggested and they have helped tremendously.

        Thankyou

        Alyssa Thomas




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    2. Hy Alyssa !

      In Europe, many parents have changed the diet of babies for so-called plant milks, but the consequences have sometimes been dramatic! so for the children who still drink milk, I think to go to the milk of small animals like the sheep or the goat and perhaps a better solution than the juice of plants … obviously this answer against the values of the people who wish to be on an exclusively vegetarian diet, however for this is a hypothesis to suppress cow’s milk which is harmful for the human being. An expert opinion will confirm or refute this hypothesis: it’s up to you to play the NUTRITION FACT team

      http://www.leparisien.fr/faits-divers/mort-d-un-bebe-nourri-au-lait-vegetal-les-parents-condamnes-a-de-la-prison-avec-sursis-14-06-2017-7051173.php




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    3. All mammals drink their mother’s milk…until they don’t. Then they drink water. Plant based milks are processed, which usually means that all the important healthy fiber is removed and thrown away. Try to break out of the incorrect paradigm that milk is somehow a requirement for a weened child. Don’t forget that health benefits are seen with a WHOLE FOOD plant based diet. Plant milks are not whole foods.

      Dr. Ben




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