Avoiding Fish for 5 Years Before Pregnancy

Avoiding Fish for 5 Years Before Pregnancy
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The problem with fish advisories that tell pregnant women to cut down on fish is that it may be too late for certain persistent pollutants.

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Below is an approximation of this video’s audio content. To see any graphs, charts, graphics, images, and quotes to which Dr. Greger may be referring, watch the above video.

If you intentionally expose people to mercury by feeding them fish, like tuna, for 14 weeks and then stop, this is what happens to the level of mercury in their bloodstream: it goes up, up, up, and then as soon as you stop fish, it drops back down, such that you can detox down half in about 100 days. So, the half-life of total mercury in your blood is approximately 100 days. So, even if you eat a lot of fish, within a few months of stopping, you can clear much of it out of your blood. But what about out of your brain?

“Modelling studies” are all over the place, suggesting half-lives similar to blood at 69 days all the way up to 22 years. But when you put it to the test, autopsy studies suggest it may even be longer still. Once mercury gets in your brain, it can be decades before your body can get rid of even half of it. So, better than detoxing is to not “tox” in the first place.

That’s the problem with these fish advisories, where they tell pregnant women to cut down on fish. For pollutants “with long half-lives [like PCBs and dioxins,] temporary…decreases in [fish consumption] daily contaminant intake, will not necessarily translate to appreciable decreases in maternal [persistent organic pollutant] body burdens, [which is what helps determine the dose that the baby gets].”

For example, here’s how much exposure an infant gets to a tumor-promoting pollutant called PCB 153 if their mom ate fish. But if, for one year, mom ate only half the fish, or no fish at all, it wouldn’t budge levels much. Only if mom cut out all fish for five years before do you see a really substantial drop in infant levels. So, that’s the fish consumption caveat. “[T]he only scenarios that produced a significant impact on children’s exposures required mothers to eliminate fish from their diets [completely] for 5 years before their children were conceived.” “[S]ubstituting [plant foods] instead of fish would reduce prenatal and breastfeeding exposures by 37% each and subsequent childhood exposures by 23%.” So, “a complete ban on fish consumption may be preferable to targeted, life stage-based fish consumption advisories…”

But if you are going to eat fish, which is less polluted—wild-caught or farmed fish? In this recent study, researchers measured the levels of pesticides like DDT, PCBs, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, and toxic elements like mercury and lead in a large sample of farmed and wild-caught seafood. And, in general, they found farmed was worse. Think of the suspect as “farmed and dangerous.” The measured levels of most organic and many inorganic pollutants were higher in the farmed seafood products, and consequently intake levels for the consumer, if such products were consumed. So, for example, this is for polycyclic hydrocarbons, persistent pesticides, and PCBs: significantly more contamination in all the farmed fish samples for all the contaminants; the salmon and sea bass, though it didn’t seem to matter for crayfish, and the wild-caught mussels were actually worse. And, if you split adult and child consumers into only eating farmed seafood or only eating wild-caught seafoods, the level of pollutant exposure would be significantly worse from the farmed seafood.

Overall, they investigated a total of 59 pollutants and toxic elements, and “[t]aking all these data as a whole, and based on the rates of consumption of fish and seafood of the…population [in Spain where the researchers hailed from], [the] results indicate that a theoretical consumer who chose to consume only [farmed fish] would be exposed to levels of pollutants [about] twice [as] high” than if they would have chosen instead wild-caught fish. So, you could eat twice the amount if you stuck to wild-caught. Easier said than done, though. Mislabeling rates for fish and other seafood in the U.S. are between 30 and 38 percent. So, the average fraud rate is like one in three.

Please consider volunteering to help out on the site.

Image credit: pauofficial via pixabay. Image has been modified.

Motion graphics by Avocado Video

Below is an approximation of this video’s audio content. To see any graphs, charts, graphics, images, and quotes to which Dr. Greger may be referring, watch the above video.

If you intentionally expose people to mercury by feeding them fish, like tuna, for 14 weeks and then stop, this is what happens to the level of mercury in their bloodstream: it goes up, up, up, and then as soon as you stop fish, it drops back down, such that you can detox down half in about 100 days. So, the half-life of total mercury in your blood is approximately 100 days. So, even if you eat a lot of fish, within a few months of stopping, you can clear much of it out of your blood. But what about out of your brain?

“Modelling studies” are all over the place, suggesting half-lives similar to blood at 69 days all the way up to 22 years. But when you put it to the test, autopsy studies suggest it may even be longer still. Once mercury gets in your brain, it can be decades before your body can get rid of even half of it. So, better than detoxing is to not “tox” in the first place.

That’s the problem with these fish advisories, where they tell pregnant women to cut down on fish. For pollutants “with long half-lives [like PCBs and dioxins,] temporary…decreases in [fish consumption] daily contaminant intake, will not necessarily translate to appreciable decreases in maternal [persistent organic pollutant] body burdens, [which is what helps determine the dose that the baby gets].”

For example, here’s how much exposure an infant gets to a tumor-promoting pollutant called PCB 153 if their mom ate fish. But if, for one year, mom ate only half the fish, or no fish at all, it wouldn’t budge levels much. Only if mom cut out all fish for five years before do you see a really substantial drop in infant levels. So, that’s the fish consumption caveat. “[T]he only scenarios that produced a significant impact on children’s exposures required mothers to eliminate fish from their diets [completely] for 5 years before their children were conceived.” “[S]ubstituting [plant foods] instead of fish would reduce prenatal and breastfeeding exposures by 37% each and subsequent childhood exposures by 23%.” So, “a complete ban on fish consumption may be preferable to targeted, life stage-based fish consumption advisories…”

But if you are going to eat fish, which is less polluted—wild-caught or farmed fish? In this recent study, researchers measured the levels of pesticides like DDT, PCBs, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, and toxic elements like mercury and lead in a large sample of farmed and wild-caught seafood. And, in general, they found farmed was worse. Think of the suspect as “farmed and dangerous.” The measured levels of most organic and many inorganic pollutants were higher in the farmed seafood products, and consequently intake levels for the consumer, if such products were consumed. So, for example, this is for polycyclic hydrocarbons, persistent pesticides, and PCBs: significantly more contamination in all the farmed fish samples for all the contaminants; the salmon and sea bass, though it didn’t seem to matter for crayfish, and the wild-caught mussels were actually worse. And, if you split adult and child consumers into only eating farmed seafood or only eating wild-caught seafoods, the level of pollutant exposure would be significantly worse from the farmed seafood.

Overall, they investigated a total of 59 pollutants and toxic elements, and “[t]aking all these data as a whole, and based on the rates of consumption of fish and seafood of the…population [in Spain where the researchers hailed from], [the] results indicate that a theoretical consumer who chose to consume only [farmed fish] would be exposed to levels of pollutants [about] twice [as] high” than if they would have chosen instead wild-caught fish. So, you could eat twice the amount if you stuck to wild-caught. Easier said than done, though. Mislabeling rates for fish and other seafood in the U.S. are between 30 and 38 percent. So, the average fraud rate is like one in three.

Please consider volunteering to help out on the site.

Image credit: pauofficial via pixabay. Image has been modified.

Motion graphics by Avocado Video

Doctor's Note

In my previous video on this topic, How Long to Detox from Fish Before Pregnancy, I mentioned a study that suggests detoxing from fish for one year to see mercury levels decrease, but other pollutants take longer to leave our system.

For optimum brain development consider a pollutant-free source of omega 3 fatty acids: Should Vegan Women Supplement with DHA during Pregnancy?

There are also non-pollutant reasons you may want to avoid excessive amounts of any animal protein. See The Effect of Animal Protein on Stress Hormones, Testosterone, and Pregnancy.

If you haven’t yet, you can subscribe to my videos for free by clicking here.

154 responses to “Avoiding Fish for 5 Years Before Pregnancy

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  1. Hey Dr. G.

    It wouldn’t be a bad idea to use someone proffesional to do voice overs for the Nutritionfacts videos. Let them read the text you write. Something like the voice in those Kurzegezagt videos… Way more proffesional! It’s just a different proffesion really, the videos deserve it.

    But keep on doing your own interviews offcourse :) a stand in would be rediculous and we love seeing you talk with all that enthousiasm.

    1. I happen to like hearing Dr Greger, himself, explaining the videos. He shows so much enthusiasm through his voice. Those unprofessional voice-overs are a real turn-off for me.

        1. Of all the presentations I have seen in videos anywhere near this type, I have to rate Michael Greger’s as number one. The diction is very clear and is easily aided with a rewind if we haven’t finished the morning coffee. The cadence is high but with the clarity the cadence actually makes it more accessible if we are not just super excited to listen to something on “toxins in dead fish” first thing in the morning. (smelly subjects are never my favorite first thing in the morning.) Those, along with the visuals and the obvious enthusiasm for the acquisition and sharing of knowledge, strikes me as an ideal presentation and presenter.

          Also, I gotta say that I am particularly appreciative of the easy access to the “sources cited” that help me continue to learn.

          1. I love his videos especially the bits of humor he adds occasionally. He’s “el-super doctor”.

            Just wish he had some information on which if any fish or shellfish could be eaten relatively safely say once a month as a treat for being good the rest of the month. That would help with dining out with friends and there is no other decent options.

            1. Hi, Matt Masiello! The safest is probably not to eat seafood at all. More on that here: https://nutritionfacts.org/topics/fish/ Instead of thinking of fish as a “treat for being good the rest of the month,” perhaps consider that the “treat” you are giving yourself every day is the good health you gain by living a healthy lifestyle all the time! When dining out with friends, you can usually get something healthy made for you, especially if you call ahead and arrange it. I hope that helps!

    2. Netogate,

      I enjoy hearing Dr. Greger speak; I love his excitement and enthusiasm.

      I heard a “professionally” spoken video recently, and it sounded just like a robot. A huge turn-off, even though the subject matter (archeology, and evidence of ancient grain consumption and even bread making) was fascinating.

      I would miss him if he stopped narrating his videos. Immensely.

      1. Netgogate,

        I agree with the rest of them. I love listening to him. I love how he takes these dry (or wet) scientific topics and adds so much passion and energy and sense of humor.

        Dr. J., I agree with you. More professional can really sound more sterile and more boring.

        I was never ever interested in health or science before coming here and it is Dr. Greger who has kept my interest every single day for heading toward 2 years.

        1. Netgogate,

          Back when Dr. McDougall was going through things, I thought about it with him, would a “cleaned up” version of Dr. McDougall who acted professional all the time be “better” at his job? Not likely. It is likely that his great big controversial personality is what kept him in the public eye and drew more people to the diet and was just way more effective at stealing people’s hearts or alienating others completely. Same with Dr. Fuhrman.

          Dr. Greger could not be replaced. His personality would be missed. His audience is emotionally bonded with him in a trust relationship.

          It would destroy his life-calling by creating a separation between him and his core audience.

          Newer people would stop coming to his live speaking engagements.

          It would not make him more popular.

          It would make him less popular.

    3. No robot voices for me . If you have listened to Dr Gregor as long as i have, Dr Gregor IS the voice of Nutritionfacts.org. He has already “put it to the test”

      1. I agree, John. I come here for Dr. Greger.

        I listen to other doctors, too, but this is the most entertaining version of science there is and I wouldn’t ever have learned enough to listen to some of the “talking heads” doctors if I hadn’t been here first.

    4. A professional reader is a good idea from a practical standpoint, as long as they both love and understand the subject. I don’t at all agree that that would make for an improved video. Dr. G understands the subject and loves his work, so that makes him the most qualified. But practically it frees up Dr. G.’s time and would allow more videos to be done or re-done on a daily basis as the site and subject gains greater influence around the world.

        1. Michael,

          Yes, different languages might make sense, and freeing up his time might make sense.

          Some of us know that we are getting such an amazing deal having this man do this service and I don’t take one video or one blog for granted.

          But what I will say is that I have a friend who believed that Bob Dylan and Kris Kristopherson and Janis Joplin should not have been allowed to sing their own songs and I, personally, liked their songs better when they sang them. They had something beyond their voice. Grit. Soul. It was something I connected with deeper than when more “polished” singers sang their songs.

          1. If only the Mona Lisa was a little prettier. If only that antique dresser was re-finished a little better. If only I could take my kid’s picture off of the refrigerator and replace it with your kid’s picture who already knows how to draw.

            There is such a missing of the value of this man.

      1. Bad choice, Michael. Even for freeing up Dr. Greger’s time, people trust Dr. Greger for a reason. His whole creation would lose its heart and the voice that people have come to trust–it would lose its authenticity.

        1. As for languages, how many professional linguists are you talking here? Sounds like a ton of work and ton of videos per each video. If anything, subtitles or transcripts would be a much more practical option.

    5. Dr G. We LOVE your narration.
      It’s personal and charming.
      Asking you to use a professional is unreasonable considering everything you do is free! Keep up the good work don’t change a thing, we look forward to your videos every day.
      Regards, Happy Joanne

      1. I agree that it is personal and charming.

        And it is successful at entertaining.

        Plus, I do not find it lacking professionalism.

        I watch doctors’ videos every single day and night and Dr. Greger’s have much higher production value than any of the doctors I see out there and much, much higher entertainment value.

        The visuals are better. The jokes exist. The studies are placed before our eyes and the links are on the page.

        His process is so much higher than everybody else’s.

        As far as his voice goes, I genuinely enjoy it.

        My greater concern is that people are going to cause him to be self-conscious and will cause that to be a bigger problem.

        I had a boyfriend once who would watch my speedometer when I drove and if I went 2 miles an hour over the speed limit, he would say, “You are driving too fast.” and when I drove 2 miles an hour under the speed limit, he would say, “You are driving too slow.” and fifteen minutes later, he would say, “Now, you are driving all over the place. Too slow, too fast back and forth.” I became too nervous to ever drive with him in the car. After we parted ways, he said, “I have never had someone give me so much grace.” and I said, “Thank you. It is more that I always felt like a frog being dissected under a magnifying glass.”

    6. I really enjoy hearing Dr. Greger narrate the videos. I enjoy all his lectures. I wouldn’t be as interested if it was a fake voice over. Keep up the great work Dr. Greger!!!!!

    7. Netogate,

      Dr G is the professional voice (of science, medicine and the best source for the content). He is the reason I listen, his knowledge of the science and biology and his humor set off the entire presentation from the mundane. His content and presentation are more professional than some actor coming in and not knowing what in the world this content is all about. When I first began listening, his presentation was so very professional that I was surprised to learn that he was the doctor. So impressed I went back and listened to every video on this site from the beginning. So much GREAT information, I give out the website to people almost daily. So listen again to his videos, his is a labor of love not money, this is the real deal!

    8. Netgogate, please do not make this kind of suggestion in the face of millions of Dr. Greger’s fans who would be horrified to have to listen to some actor drone on hollowly. In fact, that would be FAR from more professional considering the profession is medicine, science, and the facts and not entertainment. The fact that Dr. Greger’s genuinely, personality, humor, and passion is engaging and entertaining for us is a huge bonus and one that so often comes along with a person who stands for what they know and what they believe in. I actually find your suggestion incredibly offensive because his success in doing things this way is clear, the fact that he’s doing it for free is something we should be grateful for, and who do you think you are to take away something that brought in so many grateful viewers who enjoy it. For the nitpickers who demand personalized everything to their liking, there is a transcript to settle on or for those who just prefer to read.

      Obviously Dr. Greger is a very smart man and doesn’t need the irony of mini suggestions like this being pointed out to him considering his massive and growing success.

  2. This is off-topic but some may find it welcome to know even if it is just an observational study. Well, I do anyway since both my parents died from heart disease around my age. It sounds a lot cheaper and more effective than opting for statins.

    ‘A study of more than 12,000 people found those who ate mostly plant-based foods were 32 per cent less likely to die from heart disease.
    Opting for vegetables, whole grains and nuts also reduced their risk of dying from any cause by a quarter over 29 years, scientists found.’

    https://www.dailymail.co.uk/health/article-7331285/Eating-plant-based-foods-lowers-risk-dying-heart-disease-32.html

        1. I wonder who funded that study?
          ——————————————–
          Good question. I don’t know how things work in Finland but I’m curious if their University studies aren’t similar to our NIH work. Still, it’s strange they arrive at opposite conclusions without knowing funding for either approach.

          1. I think that that particular study only had government funding. however, it’s possible that the chief investigator had previously received grant funding from the local egg industry. I have a hazy recollectiion of this from a few years ago but can’t be sure that it was actually this person. Funding isn’t the only possible driver of bias though. The PURE study was done with WHO money but the McMaster team thatdesigned/ led the study were all committed satfat/cholesterol advocates for example.

        2. I don’t think it’s been shown that high choline is unhealthy. It’s probably just a marker for a diet high in animal products. When choline is given to people who don’t eat meat, etc., it does not raise TMAO.
          Choline is an important nutrient, especially for the brain.

          Those who choose to raise their children vegan need to make sure they get enough for good brain development. In the distant past this wasn’t a problem as most were breastfed for a long time.

          This is a fairly balanced article on importance of choline for good health.

          https://veganhealth.org/choline/

      1. Not shooting the messenger, but they are recommending eggs for Alzheimer’s based on people taking a memory test during the study, but when we go to atherosclerosis found in that exact same study, https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/3196222

        Look at these rates:

        Examining the prevalence of atherosclerosis in the Eastern Finnish men ages 42, 48, 54, or 60 years who were examined between February and December 1987 in the Kuopio Ischaemic Heart Disease Risk Factor Study. Carotid atherosclerosis was assessed with high-resolution B-mode ultrasonography. Of the participants, 37% had thickening of the intimal or medial layer of the arterial wall, 10% had plaques, 2% had stenosis in the right or left common carotid artery or in the carotid bifurcation, and only 51% were free of any detectable carotid atherosclerosis.

        The prevalence of atherosclerosis was 14.1%, 32.0%, 67.7%, and 81.9% in the four age groups, respectively.

        By the age 60, they found a prevalence of atherosclerosis rate of 81.9% and THAT is going to CAUSE more people to have Alzheimer’s, rather than prevent it.

        https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3994432/

        Plus, choline from eggs and the carnitine from beef are part of the TMAO series with causing an increase in Cancer and Heart disease by the bad gut bacteria.

        Also, it seems to me that they didn’t prove anything. It wasn’t that the men who were lower in choline from not ingesting eggs and meat were shown to have more dementia.

        1. Also, it seems to me that they didn’t prove anything. It wasn’t that the men who were lower in choline from not ingesting eggs and meat were shown to have more dementia.
          ————————————————————————
          Heh, heh. Deb, if the ones who had the higher choline in their diet had what, 28% less dementia, that actually translates to the ones with not ingesting eggs and meat as having MORE dementia. ‘-)

          But never mind that… good job on the follow up on the study.

          1. Well, Lonie,

            81.9% of them have Arteriosclerosis by 60 and that is likely to kill them and give them dementia eventually and the country has the highest levels of Alzheimer’s and back as of that study they also had the highest ever measured coronary mortality in any population in the world. People in North Karelia were dying from heart attacks at the age of 40 and 50 and cholesterol was one of the highest risk factors, so recommending cholesterol from eggs still seems odd.

            1. Dairy products were one of their highest risk factors.

              Here is what they were told to do to lower saturated fat and cholesterol:

              They were told to switch from high-fat dairy to low-fat dairy

              They were told to cut down the amount of butter or margarine on bread and change to soft margarine or soft butter (mixture of butter and oil)

              They were told to cut off visible fat in meat, choose lean meat and sausages, and prefer fish and poultry

              They were told to prepare food without adding extra fat, in cooking prefer boiling and baking

              They were told to use vegetable oil in salad dressing and when baking

              They were told to restrict the use of eggs

              They were told to increase intake of whole-grain cereals, vegetables, roots, berries, and fruits

              Lowering their fat and cholesterol, Coronary mortality reduced in middle age population by 84% from 1972 to 2014, but they STILL have the #1 spot when it comes to Alzheimer’s.

              I would tend to agree now with Tom that they didn’t do enough.

            2. Deb, I t’ink we are comparing apples and oranges… in other words, “pick your poison.”

              But if I had a choice of arteriosclerosis or dementia, I’d take the first. Reason is, I think I can ameliorate arteriosclerosis easier than dementia. But that’s just me personally.

              The Hoi Polloi rely on doctors to do no harm… while hoping they can beat the odds and do some good.

              1. Lonie, they were dying between age 40 and 50 and lowering cholesterol from eggs was considered one of the biggest factors.

                Yes, pick your poison.

                Die at 40 to 50, which my male relatives who were indeed beef and egg eaters did or risk dementia which might be from switching to fish, instead of going vegan.

                1. Yes, pick your poison.

                  Die at 40 to 50, which my male relatives who were indeed beef and egg eaters did or risk dementia which might be from switching to fish, instead of going vegan.
                  ———————————————————————
                  Were they under a Dr’s care? Just sayin’ even current medical care standards should be able to keep people of that age alive.

                  1. In my family, a whole lot of the meat and egg-eating males have died in their 40’s and 50’s. The fruit and vegetable and beans and grains eating women were like the Blue Zones living into their 90’s. Those women did eat junk food in moderation. They liked to bake food and give it to other people.

                    My mother was an exception. She died at 53. Like her elder generation women, she ALSO was someone who ate moderation and didn’t become heavy. She ate chicken or fish with a small serving of green beans or salad or other vegetables for dinner. Lunch was a bologna or tuna or egg salad or liverwurst sandwich and maybe a fruit cup. Breakfast was eggs or cereal or oatmeal or cream of wheat (instant oatmeal, not steel cut)

                    My father also had a heart attack in his 50’s, but got to a hospital in time to save his life. His second wife got him to eat salad.

                    1. But back to Finland.

                      The reason they did that study is because the men were dying age 40 to 50.

                      Heart disease is STILL the biggest reason males die in Finland.

                      If I am reading the right statistics. They were 3 times more likely to die from heart problems than Alzheimer’ even after that public initiative.

                    2. So, not big on regular Dr visits then.

                      That was pretty much the same with my family except for my mother who after having 5 kids, working her fingers to the bone and having to have blood transfusions every few months before discovering she had a thyroid problem.

                      The Dr tried to treat her with bovine thyroid but it put her in such a state that he finally discontinued the treatment and went back to giving her blood.

                      In later years, once synthroid was discovered and her dosage was fine tuned, she lived to be a few months short of 102.

                      Dad died @ 65 from complications of open heart surgery.

                      Things are different now… even I visit a (VA) Dr. regularly, but I don’t listen to them… I just make appointments to get blood tests. ‘-)

                    3. OH.MY.DOG…

                      It just occurred to me that all the time my mother was getting blood transfusions it would likely be from younger donors. Like in the old “Young Blood makes older mice young again studies.”

                      I remember we were leaving a funeral once and were walking uphill to where the car was parked. She was ~ 90 at the time. A younger cousin of mine was walking behind us and said when we got to the parking area, “Myrtie, (Her name was Myrta but everyone called her Myrtie) We’ve been walking behind you and could hardly keep up!”

                      I’m sellin’ a small patch of farmland… I think a portion of that is going either to cord blood transfusion or 7 units of a young person’s blood plasma transfusion.

                    4. Lonie,

                      That is a great story about your mother.

                      You are lucky to have her that long and in that good of shape.

                      Good genes? Or a good lifestyle? Or both?

                      Either way, having a mother live into her elderly years is a blessing.

                      I am watching the 90-year olds die the same time as the 50 and 60-year-olds.

                      I think I said it on the site, but two of my cousins from different parts of the family both died on the same day both were on the year of their 50th birthdays. Different causes and one was an extremely health-oriented person and the other was a hippie who used to smoke a lot of pot and kind of dropped out of society.

                      What I remember about the health-oriented one was that we went to a family event with them and they ate fruit instead of the cake.

                      Inconceivable to me back then.

                      Nice people, but I remember thinking they were so odd.

                      He is another one who had 5 kids and his youngest was close to 5 when he died. Devastating.

          2. Actually, I have looked up supplementing choline versus the risk of TMAO but it is in beans and nuts and those ARE protective without cholesterol or saturated fat risk.

            The Adventist Study it was nuts which was most related to longevity and nuts do have choline. Beans, too.

            1. Linus Pauling shared an interventional study where Choline and they said that Betaine was positively correlated to test scores regarding construction, sensory motor speed, and executive function. Betaine helped and Choline didn’t.

              Might depend on whether people are sufficient or insufficient to begin with.

              1. They also shared that in a lab test study, the results were the opposite.

                High choline in lab tests helped.

                High betaine in lab tests didn’t help.

                High choline in the interventional study didn’t help.

                High betaine in the interventional study helped.

                1. “….working her fingers to the bone.”\

                  — – – – —

                  I’ll bet she also slaved over a hot stove too, right Lonie? :-)

                  1. I’ll bet she also slaved over a hot stove too, right Lonie? :-)
                    ————————————————————————————-
                    Indeed she did. Especially when all 5 of us were home and working in the fields (including my sister, who sadly just died a few days ago… correction: sadly for us but happily for her as she has been praying for death a couple of years now… wheelchair bound from a stroke and in some pain.)

                    Anyway, mom would feed us all three meals. Eventually, her mother came to live with us and help out after her husband was killed in a kerosene stove accident used in their cafe. My “granny” continued running the cafe for a time but finally closed it and moved in.

                    But the most tedious work I remember her doing was washing clothes and cranking them through a wringer before hanging them out on the clothes line. Of course after they dried, everything got ironed. Eventually, things got easier after my sister and older brothers and finally me, moved out.

                    But thinking back on it now, Glen Campbell’s song “Everyday Housewife” leaves me wondering what my mother thought about her life. She never told any of us… but I think she might if we had just asked.

                    1. “She never told any of us… but I think she might if we had just asked.”
                      – – – – –

                      Now she’s waiting for you to do this….a sort spill your guts book. A “Life with Mama.” Seriously! (I kinda think it’s in the back of your mind anyway!)

                    2. “including my sister, who sadly just died a few days ago… correction: sadly for us but happily for her as she has been praying for death a couple of years now… wheelchair bound from a stroke and in some pain.)”
                      – – – – –

                      Most people are expected to say how sorry they are to hear this, but I’m very happy for all of you! (And that’s all I’m sayin.)

                    3. Now she’s waiting for you to do this….a sort spill your guts book. A “Life with Mama.” Seriously! (I kinda think it’s in the back of your mind anyway!)
                      ————————————————————————————–
                      Not really, to be honest I’m not all that sentimental… although I did do a little booklet for her 90th birthday that was sorta sentimental.

                      I do sometimes look back on how I could have done things different but more as a guide for how to go forward. I strive for a level of perfection… but perfection based on my interpretation (which wouldn’t pass the smell test of what is considered mainstream.)
                      ____________________________________________________
                      Most people are expected to say how sorry they are to hear this, but I’m very happy for all of you!
                      —————————————————————————————————-
                      Yes, death is a fact of life (but I’m gonna be really pissed if I die young ‘-) so we bury our dead then move on… occasionally remembering them. Thanks for the sentiment.

      2. Yes, i saw that but unfortunately the article is behind a paywall. Also, the lead investigator JK Virtanen has published a previous article or two painting eggs in a positive light. I can’t remember if he had previous financial links with the egg industry.

        However, these are all observational studies and it’s not clear how well they adjusted for possibly confounding variables eg what foods did eggs replace in people’s diets This is an issue since other studies have found links between egg consumption and cardiovascular/stroke risk eg
        ‘the Northwestern University researchers found that, from eating one egg daily, the risk of heart disease spiked by 18 per cent and the risk of premature death from a stroke rose by 17 per cent.’
        https://www.reuters.com/article/us-health-heart-eggs/new-study-ties-egg-and-cholesterol-consumption-to-heightened-risk-of-heart-disease-idUSKCN1QW250
        https://www.atherosclerosis-journal.com/article/S0021-9150(12)00504-7/fulltext

        I supect that if people eat eggs in place of bacon/burgers/beef/sausage/luncheonmeat etc, then they are relatively ‘protective’. However, studies don’t usually compare egg eaters to people WFPF diets …. rather they look at egg consumption in people eating standard western diets.

        consequently, how these studies are designed, and the variables they control for, can make all the difference to the results.

        1. I supect that if people eat eggs in place of bacon/burgers/beef/sausage/luncheonmeat etc, then they are relatively ‘protective’. However, studies don’t usually compare egg eaters to people WFPF diets …. rather they look at egg consumption in people eating standard western diets.

          consequently, how these studies are designed, and the variables they control for, can make all the difference to the results.
          ———————————————————————————————————————————–
          I concur… another example: If a person has low cholesterol to start with, what effect does eating an egg have… and if the egg is poached (what I used to eat) does that change the out come when compared to a fried or even scrambled egg?

          As you say… too many variables.

      1. Yeah, I couldn’t find the actual study itself and none of the half dozen articles I found gave a link to the actual study so I gave up. I don’t have all that much time – gotta get to the airport.

        So touche.

        The other point is that saturated fat is the nutrient most commeonly linked to dementia cognitive risk, so more eggs and fewer sausages/burgers/steaks/slabs of cheese might well reduce Alzheimer’s risk in people eating standard omnivorous diets.

        1. Tom,

          Yes, the instructions allowed for so many variations.

          The fact that their rates became so bad after going toward Dairy from farming tells me that dairy is in that risk-factor equation.

          Just dropping the cheese and butter could have accomplished so much

    1. Tom,
      Having arrived at this epiphany recently I can only hope that it is not too late considering my age to affect me positively as well.

      Cheers!

    2. Well and it seems we are almost heart attack proof if we have a LDL cholesterol between under 1 g/l, wondering if much peoples or anyone already had heart attack or similar with these levels what do you think about it?

    3. Mr Fumblefingers,

      From the article you linked to:

      “The highest plant-based consumption was defined as an average of 4.1-to-4.8 pieces of fruit and vegetables a day and just 0.8-to-0.9 portions of red or processed meat.

      Those with the lowest intake of fruit and vegetables ate an average of 2.3 servings a day and 1.2 portions of meat.”

      I wonder what a “portion” of red or processed meat is? And what a “piece” of fruit or vegetable?

      btw, the difference between 0.8 to 0.9 and 1.2 portions of meat does not seem like much; the bigger difference is in veggie consumption. But even that difference is still somewhat small.

      And what would the results be if meat consumption was essentially zero, with consumption of beans and whole grains considered?

      1. Dr J

        Exactly ….. if relatively small changes deliver significant benefits, how much more benefit would larger changes deliver?

        1. how much more benefit would larger changes deliver?
          ————————————————————————
          Without pictures… it didn’t happen.

          (Meaning, that’s a false premise without data to back it up.)

            1. It was a question.
              ———————
              Tom, you ol’ obfuscater you. ‘-)

              Being one myself, I recognize when someone is trying to push something as fact by posing it as a question. The average reader will not remember the punctuation but will remember the words as a statement.

              A tip of the hat to you. ‘-)

  3. Okay, I am thinking about Finland.

    “Once mercury gets in your brain, it can be decades before your body can get rid of even half of it.”

    Could that be why Finland was able to lower their saturated fats enough to improve mortality but stay #1 on the list of Alzheimer’s?

  4. Deb, in the documentaries and ted talks I have been watching about research in Alzheimer’s and improving cognition as we get older, the two things that are rated #1 by neuroscientists I watch are sleep, and exercise. Exercise makes the difference… helps to build new brain cells. I have been posting these talks the past couple of weeks.

    1. Thanks, Barb, yes.

      I have watched some with exercise and the hippocampus and exercise and brain plasticity.

      Sleep is when the brain gets cleaned up. The fact that I still don’t sleep is one of those risk factors, which I don’t know how to respond to. I can use the gamma waves to get my microglia to do a cleaning, but the synapse people believe that overcleaning by microglia and messing up the synapses is more important than the misfolded proteins.

      1. Barb,

        They put those as #1 and yet clogged arteries/heart problems and uncontrolled Diabetes and mold and aluminum in the brain and high Homocysteine are probably the things, which I have as higher up on my list.

        Can you just eat meat and foods with aluminum and mercury and PCB’s or let your Diabetes get out of control and just not deal with any of that and just exercise and be okay?

        Mostly that is what my brother and his wife are doing.

        I asked my brother about his Diabetes and he said, “No, I am just pretending it doesn’t exist now.” and that is what another friend is doing with her Diabetes and her tremors. They are all getting exercise, but I don’t have a sense of the choline in the meat and eggs as being protective or that as long as they walk fast enough, they don’t have to worry about any of it.

          1. Just wondering- on vacation recently there were a group of four 70’s ladies staying there. Got to talking and they were commenting on their lifestyle. One had no diet control, a type 2 diabetic, but was in a 3x a week exercise group. She was heavy but was functional and looked fairly good. Another very careful on diet, but no exercise, she looked awful, bent over, very fragile. Another did just a bit of both. The 4th good diet and high exercise. She looked and acted far younger. The waitress assumed she was a younger sister.
            Of course, very limited study group!
            But it got me thinking, diet is cumulative and maybe exercise becomes very important with age?

            1. Marilyn,

              Exercise is important the whole time, but, yes, it increases brain plasticity and brain size and does help Diabetics lower blood sugar, etc.

              Dr. Greger has a video where being sedentary is a strong risk factor on its own. (That is why he got the treadmill desk set up)

              1. Yes Deb, what we are eating plays a major role too. I mention the sleep and the exercise because they were factors teased out in the studies as being important in preserving brain function, and because they are free! I found this to be good news. I suffer from lack of sleep, but there’s lot of resources available free to assess ‘sleep hygiene ‘ and improve the situation. Same with exercise. A half hour of walking per day resulted in improvements.

          2. Deb, maybe you misunderstood my comments about the ted talks I have been posting. They have been on the topic of Alzheimer’s, other causes of dementia, stroke recovery, brain injury. Sleep and exercise were shown to be 2 of the best things we can do to prevent Alzheimer’s. They have studied the impact of these two factors on preventing brain shrinkage and preserving function. I was not referring to diabetes.

  5. I can’t believe the “Dr’s voice” debate when the real issue is the Dr’s Politics. He claims to be free from influence, but he is obviously a shill for the Pro-Choicers.

    That is, should a woman get with child before the 5 year wait period, she will obviously want an abortion. The Pro-Choicers are getting pretty creative in their lobby efforts.

  6. I’ve started eating a small amount of wild salmon (50g) most days for the Omega 3 – so we’re saying this is bad for me? I’d love to see what the actual figures are on how this will increase my chances of dementia…

    1. David, I would suggest reading “How Not To Die” and watching Dr. Greger’s videos pertaining to fish. As he says, food is a package deal. So once you understand all the harmful things in the fish you’re eating and what it does to the human body when we eat it, you can decide how bad for you you think it is. Certainly it is not healthy or necessary for us to consume so why would we want to? It is also not sustainable and it’s cruel and since it’s not necessary, we therefore shouldn’t consume them. Leaving out morals and ethics, it just seems silly to eat an animal that causes inflammation, is loaded with heavy metals and horrible pollutants simply for one ingredient which you can get from a pure source such as algae oil or even to lesser amounts, purslane (a land plant) which I hope to hear more on in the future.
      Certainly there’s a reason Dr. Greger chooses to not suggest eating fish and choosing algae oil over fish oil supplements.

  7. Off topic, but regarding that nonsense about the “study” (it was not really a study) of the guy and the arterial function and the nut eating? I posted a ridiculous youtube video about it here and there was a bit of discussion… Anyways, I was excited to see Dr. Greger address, explain, and debunk that in this interview!! https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qg9LmfdwHQM Vegains makes it easy to go straight to the subject if you don’t want to watch the full interview (though I personally recommend it), just click on the time link to the subject under the video.

        1. Vegsource didn’t bother me that he posted that “results” as if it was a study, without understanding how the technology works.

          He is so anti-nut and anti-supplement that he is encouraging people to be in symptomatic deficiency.

          Plus, he misrepresents Dr. Greger so much and just went for the jugular at Dr. Fuhrman.

          Dr. Fuhrman put up more responses to more of the points and he said enough for me to not throw him under any buses and Colin said enough for me to not want to throw him under any buses either. I totally respect how Dr. McDougall handled the interview with Dr. Fuhrman.

          I just don’t understand that Colin needed to wait that long and then try to ruin Dr. Fuhrman’s career in a public forum.

          I will say that I respect Colin’s integrity. I respect him for having such strong integrity that with his career, he was willing to go homeless rather than be part of science which gave the wrong answer (and that is not regarding Dr. Fuhrman, that was more his University career) but that is how strongly he feels about science being accurate, whether it agrees with your assumptions or not and whether it makes you money or not.

          Even if it was a legitimate error on behalf of a researcher other than Dr. Fuhrman himself and even if it was using wrong data sets, Colin was willing to go homeless before that point and having his name on inaccurate science had to feel like an utter betrayal. He hung up without even listening to what happened and that is because it was the single most important thing to him and his name was on it.

          I suspect if his name hadn’t been on it, he might not be doing this process so long after.

        2. Thanks for posting the link S! That was a thoroughly enjoyable interview with lots of great questions answered. My impression re the nut thing was that vegsource was voicing dr mcdougall’s stance on the nuts. vegsource himself eats nuts daily and says so at the start of the videos. I do also think he gets irritated at industry funded studies.
          All in all, I really believe that Dr Greger has master-minded a winning approach in his Daily Dozen. Whether you keep it ultra simple, or create magnificent whole food delights, it is transformative. I never tire of reading the success stories posted in this forum, and I add my thanks to the many others Dr Greger receives.

          1. No problem, Barb! I loved the whole interview as well.

            I do not have such an easygoing outlook on the vegsource guy, I find that kind of loud and lacking-in-understanding soap boxing to be fear mongering and harmful. Slow down and look at the collective evidence before scaring a large audience I say. And for the love of kale, stop using catchy angry looking Dr. Greger photos the lure in an audience.

            1. I agree S with your comments about the photos etc.. it silly, and it reminds me of the ridiculous video dr mcdougall produced showing pics of the major personalities on the “other side” (like dr atkins fior example) vs pics of popular plant based docs. And same with his overly dramatic video about the “barley men” etc. To me it does not reflect well on him. Different strokes, I guess, but then that’s why I esteem Dr Greger so highly. He maintains his focus while going about sharing his knowledge and wisdom.

              1. Yeah it’s not my style either. I too like the way Dr. Greger just sticks to the science, the facts are WAY more powerful than any gimmick.

    1. Eating EPA/DHA once a month is not going to be very helpful. One can eat more walnuts that supply the oil the human body can make EPA out of but it is not very efficient at this. Many people take EPA/DHA from algae sources to bypass the fish and get it from the same place the fish so. Luckily these algae that oil is extracted from is grown in tanks not in the polluted ocean.

      1. Reality bites,

        “the human body can make EPA out of but it is not very efficient at this.”

        By what flimsy evidence? The only studies on this have been focused on fish oil supplementation. I have not found any good or thorough research on this. I’m not aware of any studies of WFPB persons who take flax daily being tested and you would want it to be a large group of varying types of people and long term, ideally. My brain certainly hasn’t suffered form relying on my body’s own natural function and consuming plenty of ALA as I personally choose not to supplement with algae oil, but it is a good option for people who want to and it may indeed be beneficial particularly to some people.

        I would be interested in more research completely independent of the supplement industry and fish industry. In the meantime, for those supplementing, not only is algae oil the safer (and more direct) choice, it’s also the only sustainable choice. Elizabeth Blackburn recommends algae oil as a source for EPA/DHA and she is no vegan, ARA, or even WFPB or plant based person, but simply because fish oil is so unsustainable.

        I would also like to hear more about purslane. Purslane is a land plant that grows like a weed and actually contains EPA.

    2. Matt, a fish FLY perhaps, but I wouldn’t hurt the little fellow! Just make some chickpea “tuna.”

      Sorry, I know it was a serious question but I couldn’t resist wasting 15 seconds of my time to post a mildly amusing (to me) meaningless comment… although I do hear chickpea tuna is good.

  8. First the fish! More than 20 years ago, transitioning to a WFPBD, I ate a lot of fish and developed mercury poisoning with a level of 38 ppb with below 9 ppb being normal. Neuropathy, falls, forgetfulness, less mental acuity and more. The neuropathy is still there but only slightly better about 20 years later. My wife feels that I am myself again mentally balanced against aging to 70. I learned just stick to the plants, mostly organic. I am a physician and remain quite impressed with Dr Gregors knowledge, rationality, ability to summarize, and present the information in a clear, enjoyable manner. Over my 70 years of life, medical practice of 40 years, research and study in medicine, science, and religions, I have met some brilliant and inspiring people. Most were a little quirky, but that is exactly what made me like them the most. Thank you Dr Greger.

    1. Glad you came out of it. You may still be improving. If the mercury data is correct. 22 years+ you might find your mind even clearer by the end of this decade.

        1. Theoretically, making sure you have adequate dietary zinc, and good zinc-copper ratio
          ——————————————————————————————————————
          Thank you for the link Marilyn Kaye. This is the kind of an accompanying post I wish Dr. Greger would give us. That is, instead of just exposing us to the fearful problem, providing us with the best practices for addressing that problem… other than the obligatory “eat your veggies children.”

          Sycophants are welcomed and cherished, but free-willed posters may be our best path to wellness.

          1. Greger bases his recommendations on good evidence or occasionally weaker studies where the substance used is unlikely to cause any harm

            I for one am grateful that he doesn’t recommend approaches based on relatively weak evidence.

            As for free-willed posters, I think YR used the term ‘oddballs’ which may be an equally appropriate descriptor. depends upon your perspective I think.

            There are plenty of sites promoting oddball approaches to health. This one is based on a hard-headed approach to the evidence which suits me fine

            1. As for free-willed posters, I think YR used the term ‘oddballs’ which may be an equally appropriate descriptor. depends upon your perspective I think.

              There are plenty of sites promoting oddball approaches to health. This one is based on a hard-headed approach to the evidence which suits me fine
              ———————————————————————————————————————–
              I got a chuckle out of reading that. Reason is “oddballs” is one of the nicer terms the outside world assigns to proponents of this site.

              I’m not sayin’ I agree as I have one foot in this world and the other foot in the outside world. I’m just reporting that the way you see the non true believers might keep you up at night if you knew how you are perceived outside of NF.o.

              But personally, I don’t subscribe to those nasty things they assign to you. ‘-)

              1. I’m aware of what the nuts say but, given the mainstream views about plant-based diets expressed by the US dietary guidelines, the AHA and pretty much every other credible health authority out there, it is clear that advocating eating more fruits, vegetables and whole grains/plant based diets as Greger does is actually the mainstream position.

                1. I’m aware of what the nuts say but, given the mainstream views about plant-based diets expressed by the US dietary guidelines, the AHA and pretty much every other credible health authority out there, it is clear that advocating eating more fruits, vegetables and whole grains/plant based diets as Greger does is actually the mainstream position.
                  ————————————————————————————-
                  Almost everyone I know or converse with on other forums have never heard of this site and have no idea who Dr. Greger is. Yes, slowly we are as a people turning more to adding more vegetables and fruits to recommendations but they still allow for some of the “no-no’s” preached on this venue.

                  Not only that, but the vegetable crowd are embracing things like Impossible Meat as a way to dial down the number of cows that are “methaning” our atmosphere. I don’t see Dr. Greger giving credence to that movement.

                  On the other hand, I give him props for allowing the comments section to run wild. In many ways, the comments section may be equal to (or dare I say it?)… or even somewhat more important than the actual videos or blogs.

          2. Lonie,

            Dr. Greger summarizes his recommendations in his Daily Dozen App, and in his book “How Not to Die.” Especially in the second half, which discusses the different food groups, what they are, why we should eat them, and how much we should eat. There is also an eating guide on this website, about 20 pages long, I think.

            I don’t think that nutrition science is any more detailed than what he recommends.

        2. It needs to be pre-treatment with zinc before the Mercury exposure and it only helps in some of the parameters and, yes, that was an animal study, but if people are going to eat fish, taking zinc before eating it might be a good idea.

          Not sure it would be highly effective.

          I am still wondering why Finland got so much better in heart disease and the Alzheimer’s rates are getting worse and worse.

          Lake fish with toxins seems likely to be the answer.

          1. It needs to be pre-treatment with zinc before the Mercury exposure and it only helps in some of the parameters and, yes, that was an animal study, but if people are going to eat fish, taking zinc before eating it might be a good idea.
            ————————————————————————————————————-
            Shouldn’t we be taking zinc on a more or less regular basis regardless of eating fish? My regimen is ~ 5 times a week.

          2. Deb, actually if you look at the Periodic Table of Elements, it’s fairly obvious that zinc should help. I just looked to see if someone had done a formal study on the topic.

    2. Neuropathy, falls, forgetfulness, less mental acuity and more. The neuropathy is still there but only slightly better about 20 years later. My wife feels that I am myself again mentally balanced against aging to 70.
      —————————————————————————————————————
      Able to continue practicing medicine, sounds like it may not have been as bad as it sounds. ‘-)
      _______________________________________________________________________________
      Over my 70 years of life, medical practice of 40 years…
      ————————————————————————-
      On the other hand, if your mental acuity was as compromised as you state… should you have been practicing medicine at all?

    1. Cats actually shouldn’t have tuna. I worry about the mercury, but my understanding is that it is too high in protein. So don’t feed your cats tuna. I’m not sure if a little as a treat would hurt them, it just shouldn’t be used as a meal and personally the mercury is a huge concern, I say don’t feed it to anyone.

      1. Cats actually shouldn’t have tuna.
        ———————————————–
        I mentioned this to the cats as I was feeding them Special Kitty (which I think may have tuna as an ingredient.)

        They all began milling around, hissing, and when I mentioned it was a suggestion from you… one of them momentarily reared up on its back feet and bearing its claws made a swipe through the air at the suggestion.

        Not me… but the cats have spoken… and it wasn’t pretty. ‘-)

        1. Laughing.

          They aren’t exactly scaredy cats, then, are they?

          I know that being an owner of a cat is such a big responsibility.

          They can’t go WFPB vegan.

          One of my young men who used to work here came to show me a photo of a cat he is fostering. The cat may have cancer, but he now has an owner who will not let go. It is a highly affectionate cat, which wrapped his arms around the young man’s arm, literally holding onto him and slept like that.

          I am going to tell you something that I am a bit of a scaredy-cat. I think the culture and money scare me right now.

          Though I am closer to finished with my house. It will be one thing left and that is it for the rest of my life, except replacing furniture as it wears out.

          I am coming out the other side without debt, but I am watching more and more and more women in their 50’s and 60’s on the verge of going homeless and men, too, but it isn’t drug addicts or alcoholics or gamblers. It is terrifying to me.

          I also mostly look at the phenomenon of Amazon and Uber. I know people who drive vans to deliver Amazon’s Prime products and the company can afford to pay over-time even though it is Prime and people aren’t paying for shipping. I looked and a woman’s clothing store had some of their clothing on Amazon and I could buy it cheaper from Amazon and have it delivered for free than I could buy it from them. Mathematically, I don’t understand how things like Uber will lose billions and yet make billions and underpay their drivers and put the taxis out of business. Both of them are going to put so many companies out of business and right now, I could get a job just delivering packages for them for a sub-contractor and I could make just as much as I am making now, but it is going to be harder to hire anybody no matter how loyal or good you are to them. The person at the company got a raise after 3 weeks work and all the rules of business are upside-down. Employers who actually care and are protective of their employees can’t probably compete anymore and it was never hard to compete until now because most employers are not good and not loyal at all and I don’t think Amazon will be either. I just do know that I will have a house with no mortgage and it will be fully renovated and I will have not debt at all, but the cost of living goes up so high no matter what. Taxes and insurance and food and gas and utilities are all things which genuinely terrify me.

          But I have energy star level insulation and triple-pane windows with Krypton. When I was renovating, I had no choice to do most of it. Most of the house was illegal, but when I looked at the windows, they said, that triple-pane wasn’t worth it financially, that their only benefit was that you would be seriously comfortable and elderly people get cold and turn up the thermostat is the thought that went through my mind. For the price of a couch extra, I have a house which is not that hot in the Summer and not that cold in the Winter and I pretty much know that I will be poor, but warm when the time comes.

          The reason I am sharing it is that fear has affected my brain and I have been looking at all of these videos and it is comforting, but tonight, I came clean with myself that when I get fearful, I mentally still do lose my bearings and I have been less mentally sound.

          1. The reason I am sharing it is that fear has affected my brain and I have been looking at all of these videos and it is comforting, but tonight, I came clean with myself that when I get fearful, I mentally still do lose my bearings and I have been less mentally sound.
            ——————————————————————————————————————————————————-
            Deb, building a house may have left you strapped for cash (personally, I spend little or no money on my own house so I can afford health stuff) but if not I’ll tell you of a couple of things kinda new to my regimen that may be of help to you.

            While I’m not necessarily fearful, I do find a drop or two of CBD oil under my tongue seems to level me out. I may only do that once a week or so as it is not a daily thing, more of an afterthought.

            Another thing I’m doing is the NMN regimen I’ve mentioned in the comments section of another video that I’m sure you are aware of. I take two of the under-the-tongue dissolvable tablets spaced out during the day.

            Either one or both of these have made a noticeable change in my comfort level.

          2. “I know that being an owner of a cat is such a big responsibility”

            – – – – –

            Deb, you don’t own the cat, the cat owns you!

              1. they don’t even need animal rights activists like me telling them so.
                —————————————————————————————
                S, I would have contacted you privately but there is no option for that on this site… so forgive me for posting this in a public place.

                Further, in the hopes of not sounding like the information applies to you now or in the future, being aware of it may help you identify someone you know who is falling into the pattern that the link below addresses.

                I hope you take this in the spirit which it is offered.

                https://neurosciencenews.com/animal-work-mental-health-14684/

                1. Lonie, thanks for your concern and offering something you thought might be helpful, but I don’t agree with that as an issue. I think typically when you help anyone whether you’re an animal rights activists or a veterinarian or a medical doctor or a police officer or a military member or a volunteer in any regard or even a personal care taker, these are some of the most meaningful things and whenever you’re confronted with loss and sadness and going against an uncaring world, certainly you can become depressed or whatever else. But I would imagine that holding up statistics of those caring and dedicating a portion of their existence to caring for others vs. those dedicating the vast majority of their existence to their own well-being that the depression rates sky rocket in comparison in those with priorities of their own convenience and immediate pleasures and all that. In fact, in Elizabeth Blackburn and Elissa Epel’s book The Telomere Effect, it actually shows that when people retired, those who did volunteer work for a meaningful cause, despite reporting stress over it and being in a more stressful situation, had longer telomeres than the other retired group who did not volunteer. It also shows in the book that those who do feel a calling for something typically have healthier telomeres as well. And for that matter it shows that someone can be in the exact same type of stressful situation and their cellular body can react entirely differently based on mentality. Those who see things as more of a challenge and look at it in a more positive and empowered way are not negatively impacted at a cellular level. It’s all about mentality in everything we do.

          3. “One of my young men who used to work here came to show me a photo of a cat he is fostering. The cat may have cancer, but he now has an owner who will not let go. It is a highly affectionate cat, which wrapped his arms around the young man’s arm, literally holding onto him and slept like that.”

            That is so beautiful, Deb!! So grateful to that man for helping him and all those like him.

            Deb, the world is a messed up, scary place in a lot of ways, but remember to have faith because the fear isn’t going to do any good and I know you know you have every reason to have faith. I don’t know much about the vagus nerve but I’m guess the fear and your mentality has something to do with that and the way our body acts in either a stress response or a challenge response when confronted with a challenge or source of anxiety.

        2. That’s cute, Lonie lol. But in all seriousness, a lot of people think they can just feed their cats tuna to live off of and this is dangerous for them, I’ve had vets explain this and I’m not able to give the in-depth reasons but I’m sure it’s easy enough to look online at a good source or even ask a vet for those concerned.

  9. What algae oil do you recommend for pregnancy? I’ve ordered quite a few, but they have carageenan in them. I know that is a controversial ingredient and am curious to know your thoughts.

    1. Stefani, Dr. Greger has answered questions about carageenan and it’s really nothing to worry about unless you have some kind of inflammatory bowel disorder he named which I can’t remember… if anyone remembers his exact response to the carageenan question that was in a couple of his interviews/Q&A’s, that would be helpful. In the supplement, you would be hardly getting any, but I understand fully wanting a supplement as pure as possible. I know nutru makes a liquid dropper of EPA/DHA so you avoid all those additives that are in the capsules. If memory serves, I believe the only addition is some organic or natural raspberry flavor which personally I’d prefer it to taste like crap, but unfortunately supplement industries are far behind in regards to the priorities of probably the majority of customers which is to just get the good quality ingredient and as pure as possible–we don’t all want things to taste like spoonfuls of sugar anymore, we just want things to be healthy and real.

  10. I would highly recommend this website limit posts as entire discussion boards are being overtaken by 2-4 profiles per day who fill them with so much benign off topic ranting that it makes reading the video discussions little more than wasted time.

    1. I would highly recommend this website limit posts as entire discussion boards are being overtaken by 2-4 profiles per day who fill them with so much benign off topic ranting that it makes reading the video discussions little more than wasted time.
      —————————————————————————————————————
      You mean posts like the one below? ‘-)
      ___________________________________

      Cats are meant to eat what they can kill. Not many kitties swimming deep in the ocean going after tuna.

    2. I agree. Too much off topic clutter by one or two makes for tedious reading. Dr G has informative videos but many posters do not stay on topic.

      Mercury in fish is a problem, but consider all the nuclear waste the USSR dumped in the Arctic Ocean in barrels plus 100+ above ground nuke tests over arctic waters. If the mercury doesn’t do us in, the radiation will.

      1. The discussion boards on this site are the most useful discussion boards I have ever come across in my history of internet use. I have learned some pretty extraordinary, relevant information from some of the so-called “benign off topic ranting” in these discussions. If you don’t like the discussion boards here, you are as free to not read them as the people posting their questions and comments.

        And Lonie, touché. One could call the suggestion of changing the setup of the discussion boards “benign off topic ranting,” for that matter and definitely it kind of is.

        1. One could call the suggestion of changing the setup of the discussion boards “benign off topic ranting,” for that matter and definitely it kind of is.
          ——————————————————————————
          nice parry. ‘-)

  11. There are a few studies suggesting that vitamin B12 supplementation increases the risk of lung cancer : https://doi.org/10.1002/ijc.32033 and Brasky TM, White E, Chen CL. Long-Term, Supplemental, One-Carbon Metabolism-Related Vitamin B Use in Relation to Lung Cancer Risk in the Vitamins and Lifestyle (VITAL) Cohort. J Clin Oncol. 2017;35(30):3440–3448. doi:10.1200/JCO.2017.72.7735
    What do you think about that?

    1. There are a few studies suggesting that vitamin B12 supplementation increases the risk of lung cancer : https://doi.org/10.1002/ijc.32033 and Brasky TM, White E, Chen CL. Long-Term, Supplemental, One-Carbon Metabolism-Related Vitamin B Use in Relation to Lung Cancer Risk in the Vitamins and Lifestyle (VITAL) Cohort. J Clin Oncol. 2017;35(30):3440–3448. doi:10.1200/JCO.2017.72.7735
      What do you think about that?
      —————————————————————-
      What do I think about that? I think one continues taking B-12 supplements but also Milk Thistle as a lung cancer preventative.

      https://coloradocancerblogs.org/021511-agarwal-silibinin-lungcancer/

    2. Research from that study indicated that taking high doses of vitamins B6 and B12 for many years is linked to an increased risk of lung cancer in men, particularly smokers. While that might sound alarming, further studies are certainly needed before we all stop taking our B12, which has been demonstrated to be necessary for those on a whole food plant- based diet have important benefits. Although B12 supplementation is important, do remember that obtaining other B vitamins from one’s diet is the preferred method (The study only looked at supplements)
      If you have been a smoker and take B6 as a supplement with B12 you may want to review with your health care professional how this study might relate to your individual risk. As the authors of that study mentioned “Generalizability of our results to populations not represented in the data used for the current analyses should be made with caution.” I hope this puts this issue into perspective.

  12. After viewing the video on Mercury and Aluminum just wondered your thoughts on getting the flu shot my wife and I are 69 and 71 and have been WFPB for two years we are not taking any meds and are very healthy, we have both had flu shots for the last 15 years with no adverse effects or the flu. would you recommend that we continue to get the flu shot?

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