Benefits of Turmeric Curcumin for Inflammatory Orbital Pseudotumor

Benefits of Turmeric Curcumin for Inflammatory Orbital Pseudotumor
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From conjunctivitis, to uveitis, to a low-grade form of non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma, there is something in the spice turmeric with dramatic anti-inflammatory effects.

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Below is an approximation of this video’s audio content. To see any graphs, charts, graphics, images, and quotes to which Dr. Greger may be referring, watch the above video.

In 1989, ophthalmologists in India found that eyedrops made from the spice turmeric, known as haridra in India, seemed to work just as well as antibiotic eyedrops in the treatment of conjunctivitis, or pink eye. So, researchers decided to give turmeric a try against more serious inflammatory eye diseases—like uveitis, which blinds tens of thousands of Americans every year. Uveitis is often an autoimmune or infectious inflammation of the central structures in the eye. Steroids, to knock down people’s immune systems, are the standard treatment, but carry a slew of side effects.

So, researchers tried giving uveitis sufferers oral supplements of curcumin, the yellow pigment in turmeric—thought responsible, in part, for the spice’s anti-inflammatory effects. Eighteen patients given curcumin alone, and all 18 improved. Efficacy “comparable to corticosteroid therapy,” but without any side effects.

A larger, follow-up study was similarly encouraging. 106 patients, all of which had a uveitis relapse in the year before starting curcumin. But, in the year after? Only 19 did. Altogether, the 106 patients relapsed 275 times in the year before. So, multiple relapses—but in the year on curcumin, a total of just 36.

Well, if turmeric curcumin works for mild eye inflammation, and serious eye inflammation, what about really serious eye inflammation?

“Idiopathic inflammatory orbital pseudotumors.” Let’s break that down: idiopathic means doctors have no idea what causes it—from the Greek idios, as in idiot. Inflammatory—orbital, referring to the bony cavity that houses our eyeball, and pseudotumor, as in not really a tumor. But, a lot has changed since this was published in 2000. “Inflammatory orbital pseudotumour is now generally attributed to low-grade non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma.” So, it does actually appear to be a form of cancer. Well, what can curcumin do about it?

They decided to look at the spice compounds, because the available treatments are so toxic—steroids, radiation, and chemotherapy. In fact, initially all the patients in the study were put on steroids, but had to stop them because they either didn’t work, or “had to be withdrawn [because of]…complications.” And, they didn’t want to use radiation, because they didn’t want to blind anyone. But, you’ve got to do something. All the patients had such swelling that they couldn’t move their eye as they normally would. If only there were some cheap, simple, safe solution.

Four out of the five patients who completed the study had a full response—defined as complete recovery, with no residual signs or symptoms. Actually, complete regression of the eye dislocation and swelling occurred in all five out of five patients, though one of the patients continued to suffer some residual effects.

Please consider volunteering to help out on the site.

Below is an approximation of this video’s audio content. To see any graphs, charts, graphics, images, and quotes to which Dr. Greger may be referring, watch the above video.

In 1989, ophthalmologists in India found that eyedrops made from the spice turmeric, known as haridra in India, seemed to work just as well as antibiotic eyedrops in the treatment of conjunctivitis, or pink eye. So, researchers decided to give turmeric a try against more serious inflammatory eye diseases—like uveitis, which blinds tens of thousands of Americans every year. Uveitis is often an autoimmune or infectious inflammation of the central structures in the eye. Steroids, to knock down people’s immune systems, are the standard treatment, but carry a slew of side effects.

So, researchers tried giving uveitis sufferers oral supplements of curcumin, the yellow pigment in turmeric—thought responsible, in part, for the spice’s anti-inflammatory effects. Eighteen patients given curcumin alone, and all 18 improved. Efficacy “comparable to corticosteroid therapy,” but without any side effects.

A larger, follow-up study was similarly encouraging. 106 patients, all of which had a uveitis relapse in the year before starting curcumin. But, in the year after? Only 19 did. Altogether, the 106 patients relapsed 275 times in the year before. So, multiple relapses—but in the year on curcumin, a total of just 36.

Well, if turmeric curcumin works for mild eye inflammation, and serious eye inflammation, what about really serious eye inflammation?

“Idiopathic inflammatory orbital pseudotumors.” Let’s break that down: idiopathic means doctors have no idea what causes it—from the Greek idios, as in idiot. Inflammatory—orbital, referring to the bony cavity that houses our eyeball, and pseudotumor, as in not really a tumor. But, a lot has changed since this was published in 2000. “Inflammatory orbital pseudotumour is now generally attributed to low-grade non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma.” So, it does actually appear to be a form of cancer. Well, what can curcumin do about it?

They decided to look at the spice compounds, because the available treatments are so toxic—steroids, radiation, and chemotherapy. In fact, initially all the patients in the study were put on steroids, but had to stop them because they either didn’t work, or “had to be withdrawn [because of]…complications.” And, they didn’t want to use radiation, because they didn’t want to blind anyone. But, you’ve got to do something. All the patients had such swelling that they couldn’t move their eye as they normally would. If only there were some cheap, simple, safe solution.

Four out of the five patients who completed the study had a full response—defined as complete recovery, with no residual signs or symptoms. Actually, complete regression of the eye dislocation and swelling occurred in all five out of five patients, though one of the patients continued to suffer some residual effects.

Please consider volunteering to help out on the site.

Image credit: Korean Journal of Radiology 8(4), August 2007. Image has been modified.

85 responses to “Benefits of Turmeric Curcumin for Inflammatory Orbital Pseudotumor

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  1. Bummer about the lack of controls with these conditions. I’m pretty convinced on the uveitis story with yumeric, but wondering what the natural history of idiopathic inflammatory pseudotumor is. Does it usually get worse or better?




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    1. According to: http://eyewiki.aao.org/Nonspecific_Orbital_Inflammation_(Idiopathic_orbital_inflammation,_Orbital_inflammatory_syndrome,_Orbital_pseudotumor)#Outcomes

      Outcomes are highly variable and indeed people do get better with time, but think about the disease when it first occurs and how uncomfortable the symptoms are. Even just looking at how it presents causes a sense of urgency.

      According to this article: http://jamanetwork.com/journals/jamaophthalmology/fullarticle/415221
      Steroids are first line therapy and it is not necessarily effective in everyone.




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  2. This brings up a question raised in another comment in a previous video about curcumin. The research paper below seems to imply that curcumin extracts are essentially useless because they are not absorbed well and are metabolized into other compounds rapidly in vivo. Could Dr Greger or other knowledgeable people comment on this paper:

    http://pubs.acs.org/doi/abs/10.1021/acs.jmedchem.6b00975

    The studies referenced in the video today seem to indicate that curcumin is very useful. Can someone explain the contradiction here? Thanks.




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      1. Great … looking forward to it.

        It just seems that there are many research studies that do show a benefit of curcumin extract, I was surprised to see this recent (Jan 2017) research paper, which was an overview of past studies, implying a lack of benefit. Of course, the whole turmeric plant food is probably the best method of ingestion, but the curcumin content is so low, it may be OK for disease prevention, but might not be enough to fight a present disease, so a curcumin extract may be required for that.




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        1. There’s a few people here who like to take a supplement called “Curqfen”. It’s supposed to absorb about 20 times better then the standard curcumin supplement. But they have some more expensive curcumin supplements that are supposed to absorb even better. I think it’s some of these more expensive supplements that are used in these clinical trials showing benefits.




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          1. nc54: Thanks for the tip.
            Yes, I noticed in the research paper referenced in this video where they used “Norflo tablets (curcumin-phosphatidylcholine complex; Meriva)”. This study was published in 2010, so there may be even better sources now. This is certainly a fascinating field of study. But I’m leaning more now to just continuing to use whole turmeric with a little pepper as per the video here:

            http://nutritionfacts.org/video/turmeric-curcumin-plants-vs-pills/




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          2. Maybe nature’s design for turmeric is low bio-availability and that’s why the whole spice often works better that the single curcumin extract which does not include a few dozen other active ingredients. Bio-availability is used too often as a buzz word to sell supplements. The gut regulates bio-availability for many phyto-nutrients, minerals and vitamins.




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            1. Turmeric as opposed to curcumin probably has an effect on the gut biome? It is effective BECAUSE it stays mostly in the gut? Just a guess….

              LEF has a magnesium supplement that has a time release mag oxide part that stays in the colon…helps with colon polyps?




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        2. WFPB-Hal: Re: “It just seems that there are many research studies that do show a benefit of curcumin extract…” That’s the part I keep going back to also.




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          1. Could it be that studies tend to isolate components for testing because it’s easier to take a measured and known quality and quantity, than eat a food with so many variables, so curcumin gets the focus more often than turmeric? Seems we always hear so much about the properties of Vitamin C, or E, magnesium, or whatever, but not so much about oranges, nuts or pumpkin seeds…except here of course! Isolating and concentrating an ingredient may seem a more potent solution and may even confer quicker or more noticeable results, but often removing the other naturally occurring components, besides the loss of complementary benefits, moves it into the realm of pharmaceuticals, with undesirable and unexpected side effects or toxicity. Not saying this IS the case here, but it does give me pause. (I originally wrote “paws”, I think I’ve been hanging around with cats too long.)




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            1. Vege-tater: re: “Could it be that studies tend to isolate components for testing because it’s easier to take a measured and known quality and quantity, than eat a food with so many variables, so curcumin gets the focus more often than turmeric?” That’s what I think too!




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      2. Thea: (Follow-up reply to my earlier posts): I just re-watched a previous video here on NutritionFacts at:

        http://nutritionfacts.org/video/turmeric-curcumin-plants-vs-pills/

        This video sheds a lot of light on the difference between the extract curcumin and the whole food turmeric. Looks like the whole-food approach wins again against the reductionist approach. And with the synergistic effect of peperine from pepper making the ingredients more bioavailable, maybe the whole turmeric approach is the better and more cost-effective way to go. It would be nice to see more studies done with the whole turmeric rather than the extract, but as we have seen before, these studies would be hard to get funding for, since turneric is much less expensive than the extract!




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          1. hi Thea, I love the video that WFPB Hal posted – just another demo that nature got it right! Spices are a joy to use, and I frequently use them in indian cooking for the wonderful taste and health benefits. But you know, I think curcumin has marketing forces behind it similar to coconut oil .. there are people who will always go for the pill or container etc, instead of reaching for ‘simple and effective’




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            1. susan: I appreciate your general sentiment and I’ve seen the video you are talking about. However, I’m also under the general impression that there are also good studies showing that the extract works in some situations. I could be wrong about that. It will be interesting to see how Dr. Greger addresses this study that everyone keeps asking about. Thanks for your thoughts!




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          1. No problem, Vege-tater. I’ve done that same thing many times. And sometimes Disqus re-orders the comments so it’s sometimes hard to see which ones came first.




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          2. Hi VegeTater – I wanted to respond to a different comment of yours but the “reply” icon was not enabled for some reason. Anyway, your comment was about bioavailability re: curcurmin and what you called “complimentary functioning” (I’m paraphrasing your comment). Given your interest, I thought you might be interested in this very interesting Ted Talk titled “Eat to Starve Cancer” by a world renown cancer researcher. Take a look (20 mins):
            https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=C_5Z31mUmtc In one part of the talk he shows that putting two teas together, with their own antioxidant capability, more than doubles its effective value (called potentiation . . .one potentiates the other). Take a look.




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  3. Is it better to consume the spice or an unprocessed root? Is the spice more concentrated and what would the equivalent amount of root to spice ratio be?




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    1. Hi utbyker — great question!

      My thought is that the best way to consume tumeric is the way that you will do so on a daily basis.
      I use the root and put it in my smoothies with pepper (improves bioavailablility).
      I also add the powder to dishes that I cook because I find the powder easier to handle while cooking.

      The following doses are recommended for adults:

      Cut root: 1.5 to 3 g per day
      Dried, powdered root: 1 to 3 g per day
      Standardized powder (curcumin): 400 to 600 mg, 3 times per day
      Fluid extract (1:1) 30 to 90 drops a day
      Tincture (1:2): 15 to 30 drops, 4 times per day

      Turmeric | University of Maryland Medical Center

      To health!




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      1. I have macular degeneration but have been shying away from turmeric because I read that too many of the wrong carotenoids will prevent uptake of the ones the retina actually needs, such as lutein and zeaxanthin. (The other carotenoids bind to places where the lutein and zeaxanthin are needed, preventing their uptake, from what I understand.) I had no way of knowing what carotenoids were in turmeric, if they are the ones I need or not. My retinal specialist says my disease is driven by inflammation. Are there any tests that show that turmeric helps with macular degeneration? Or, would it only make things worse?




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        1. I was looking for some clues on pubmed today vmh, and came across this abstract https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/?term=macular+degeneration+alternative+treatment+review+tumeric which I think indirectly alludes to your questions. It makes for interesting reading.. basically, anything that can help lower inflammation and promote health of the endothelium lining the vascular system will help . Curcumin is mentioned in the long list of things having a positive effect though the researchers say more studies are needed. All the best to you vmh




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          1. Thanks! The Hungarian article is very interesting — loads of ideas for places to start with intervention. It’s interesting that the author points to vascular problems (in contradiction to my retinal specialist who said it’s not a vascular problem but an inflammatory issue). It’s not the only place I’ve seen the vascular issue raised, though, so I’ll take it to heart.




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            1. I have more good news vmh! I have talked about the two year study completed last year by loma linda university researchers (the Adventists) on Walnuts and Healthy Aging before in past months.. well, I just found a page of published results. http://journal.frontiersin.org/article/10.3389/fnagi.2016.00333/full Its also on pubmed I believe. One of the things being studied was the eye,retina issues so this might be of interest to you.

              Here’s the thing (i am not a medical professional vmh, just a fellow traveller on a journey to good health ) .. low inflammation in the body has everything to do with vascular health . So that first link we looked at mentioned phatmacological and non-pharmacological ways to lower inflammation in ths body (eye), and promote arterial health. Aspirin, low dose statin, wfpb diet and walking are part of my program for example. NutritionFacts.org has lots of videos on the anti- inflammatory effects of partiicular foods if you want to deep dive this topic. You can start today with getting more greens in your diet. Wishing you every success vmh!




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              1. *sorry, the results of the Walnuts and Healthy Aging study were not published, but the study design was. Its interesting to see the various things they are looking at, including telomere lengths. At the bottom of the page are other links to studies , MD included




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        2. To complicate matters…..

          http://www.lifeextension.com/Magazine/2016/7/Saffron-Improves-Vision-in-Aging-Humans/Page-01

          Saffron’s benefits can be augmented by other proven vision-preserving nutrients, including alpha-carotene, lutein, zeaxanthin, and astaxanthin, as well as cyanidin-3-glucoside, which preserves dim-light vision.

          Together, these nutrients appear applicable to all people 50 years and older, offering protection against age-related macular degeneration at its earliest stages.




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          1. Interesting article with pros and cons. Thanks. At one point I tried to figure out demographically, around the world, which diets and peoples had the most , and least, macular degeneration. As I recall, the turmeric was not stamping out AMD in India, although there could be other factors.




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            1. My guess is that turmeric certainly would not hurt but I don’t think it will help MD specifically that much. Turmeric mainly works on the “outsides or insides” of the body. I mean the skin, mucous membranes, abdominal cavity, inside workings of kidneys, where outsides of bones meet other bones (joints) etc. `I would check out Dr. Edward Kondrot, who is an MD who uses natural methods. He has lots of info on his website. http://healingtheeye.com/macular_degeneration.html He also has programs with his newest thing using stem cells. It is pricey at about $10,000. He also has very good supplements.




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    1. HI Colleen – so glad you weighed in. I, too, bookmarked your site. Great-sounding recipes and I look forward to perusing more.
      Any chance you can provide calorie information? Trying to take off a couple of holiday pounds and trying to watch that part of my life until I get back to where I want to be.
      But thanks for sharing with us!




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      1. I don’t track calories, rather try to make every choice a healthy choice, but anyway :) I just added it all up, and for the cocoa, it’s about 300 VERY NUTRITIOUS calories for each of the two cups the recipe makes. The latte is more like 200 kcal per cup (due to fewer dates). Thanks for checking out my recipes! I hope you enjoy! …you could always do less hemp seed, even just one Tbsp works well, which would cut down significantly (decreasing each cup by about 90 kcal). Come to think of it, you could also decrease the dates to 5 for the cocoa, removing another 75 kcal per cup. So that would make the cocoa only 135 kcal per cup, or 270 for both cups! Thanks very much again for checking out my website :)




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        1. Hi – I understand the concept of not tracking calories. . . eat until you’re full on a WFPB diet. But I do have to comment that that idea worked great when I was younger and much more active. In my mid-60’s now, less active and lower metabolism I do see that I need to be aware of how calorie dense my food is. Jeff Novick’s “Calorie Density” chart is extremely helpful for that. But for me, for example, a 300 calorie drink would be “expensive” for me since my BMR calorie level is 1260 calories per day. So that puts your drink at 24% of my daily basic calories. So that’s a lot for my situation and something to be aware of.
          Having said that, I see that there is a whole lot of good stuff in your drink and I intend to make the lower calorie version of it. So thank you for being willing to have this discussion with me – I truly appreciate it. And thanks again for sharing.




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          1. I hear you Rachel! One really can overdo it, even on a whole foods plant based diet, and if you are trying to watch, drinking your calories isn’t the best way to go :) Just cut down on the dates and hemp, and you can enjoy this drink as a very healthy treat!




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            1. Hiya – I looked back at our discucssions. Colleen stated that the calorie count is “300cal for each of the two cups the recipe makes”. That would be 300 calories per cup. I can still make the lower calorie recipe. . . and the point for me is to get the turmeric into my ol body. :-)
              I just mention this here in case someone is following the conversation and getting confused.
              Have a great day:-)




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          2. We have the same issue! Kind of frustrating when everyone touts the whole ad libitum thing with WFPB, but we are all different and it is what it is! I love to eat so I’ll probably never be thin, but I’m not sick anymore either!




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            1. Me three! I rely on soup to give me variety of vegies and herbs/spices at lower calorie ‘cost’. I think in terms of 3 meals around 350 or so, and a few fruits thrown in for snacks.. sigh.




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              1. Kind of a comfort to finally hear I’m not the only one after seeing the hordes of skinny vegans and also hearing from others, when I inquired, how maybe I’m not paying attention and unconsciously “sneaking” in fats or sugars or snacks, when that’s not at all true. Most days I eat 2 meals and rarely snack, so I am always “paying attention”.




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                1. I wonder if the many years of not being WFPB have caused the body to no longer be as “efficient” or “smart” in handling copious amounts of WFPB foods. Maybe there’s only so much damage the body can repair??

                  That’s not me having a go at you, just a thought I had. Very few of us were brought up on a WFPB diet. Thankfully I’m bringing my children up this way though and hopefully they’re be vegan like me when they can understand things better.




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                  1. Since my entire family and myself have always been large, I have “dieted” my entire life, as the “experts” recommended, drastically cutting calories and limiting the wrong foods, which is totally unsustainable and just bogus. I have heard that when the body thinks it’s starving, it gets very efficient at conserving fat, like I needed help, and certainly seems true for me. Whatever the case, I did lose 150 lbs going WFPB and kept most of it off over 5 years, but still have excess I would love to ditch!




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                  2. I guess the ideal would be to go daily dozen a few years before conceiving, making sure to have all the nutrients like DHA covered. Has anyone done this? I’m wondering if they would be more advanced physically and intellectually.




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                  3. I dont know Scott , but I sure wasnt raised in a wfpb household though we were ‘health conscious’ for the times. I did study nutrition, mom suscribed to harrowsmith and we ate our broccoli. But , nonetheless, I have never been able to ‘free feed’ like some say. Maybe being female is part of it. I could maintain being slim, but I am always mindful. I sure do congratulate you though on raising your kids wfpb. What a gift (and education) they are receiving !




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                    1. HI Susan – I “chatted” with Vege-Tater above. But I also wanted to chime in here with you and Scott. Like you, our family ate healthily growing up, almost no junk food and only after “proper” meals were consumed. I gave up milk in my teens – lactose intolerant big time but not knowing what that was at the time. We all know muscle cells burns calories faster than fat cells and, as I have aged, I am sure I have less muscle. I am less active. And being post-menopausal I know that affects our metabolism. So I don’t think that it’s a case of the body not being efficient or smart enough to handle WFPB eating (because, after all, the body breaks down anything you eat into its amino acid and nutritive components for use). For me, I believe its a case of the energy we consume vs the energy we expend. And sometimes its hard to know when we’ve got that right except when our pants start to feel tighter or looser. Even if I had stayed on a SAD diet I would have had to make these adjustments of aging. Even so, I think that would have been more difficult because the SAD diet is so full of very concentrated calories in the food. I see age-equivalent friends of mine who still eat a SAD diet and are having a much, much harder time with their weight and health numbers than I am.
                      But I do appreciate Scotts perspective on this and, I agree, kudos to him for raising his kids this way.
                      Ok . . enough blabbing. :-)




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                2. HI Vege-tater, Susan, et. al., . . . I first went WFPB about 9 years ago because I had 30 extra pounds on me and all my blood work numbers were going in the wrong direction: cholesterol, LDL, uric acid, blood glucose (prediabetes reading), etc. My weight put me officially in the ‘overweight’ category. After going WFPB I lost the 30 lbs and my numbers got much, much better. But I noticed over time that my weight crept back up from poor eating habits. I recently took off 20lbs and am back, now, to my 21BMI where I am hoping to stay through being more conscious about my eating habits. I am post menopausal and this does make a difference. Like you, I love to eat.
                  What helped me to get back to a better weight (I was not going to buy another larger size pant!!) was to . . . like the Paleo folks say, . .. dump the carbs. For me that meant getting rid of grains, breads (for the most part) and incorporate some regular fasting periods into my day. I read some books on fasting and watched some videos (Valter Longo, Ph.D., Michael Moseley, M.D. “The Fast Diet”). I try to make it a point to build in a 12 fast period every day (and longer if I’m feeling comfortable) and eat in an 8-hr window. Greens with every meal is the goal (not perfect, but that’s the goal). A large salad every night before anything else is eaten is another rule for me. I do have grains now occasionally but not on a regular basis and never at night as I can’t burn them off. For starches I choose winter squash, sweet potatoes and regular potatoes as I think they have a broader and deeper nutrient profile than grains. One of my all time favorite meals is mashed potatoes and mushroom gravy – so satisfying while losing weight. I often eat this for breakfast, yum:-)
                  I found a BMR (basic metabolic rate) calculator so I could keep mental track of rough calories needed for the day.
                  It has all helped and I’ve slowly taken off 20 lbs over the last year. I feel so much better.
                  But I just wanted to share with you and Susan that being WFPB SOS vegan is helpful to my health but it’s still a challenge for some of us. My cholesterol is still at 200 and LDL at 99 although when I was in my 30’s my cholesterol was 150 (I was much more active then). Like you, however, I’m not going back to SAD as I enjoy this diet much more than my meat-eating days. And I feel much better about the animals and the earth.
                  I just wanted to let you and Susan know you’re not alone out there. Hang tight :-)




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                  1. Thanks for sharing Rachel. I have always had the metabolism of a slug, and menopause did not help any! I also always try to have soup and/or salad first, but I guess I also have to lighten up on the complex carbs because I can never seem to get enough. It’s never been sweets with me, but starches! It really is annoying when I get told not to limit what I eat when eating WFPB and to cut the fat and oil, which I avoid like the plague because I was diabetic. More exercise would help, but I have so much damage from RA and spinal issues, it’s not exactly fun! I’m hopefully getting a recumbent trike, so that may help. I tried out a rental and fell in love, and the owner took pity on me and said he could sell me one of their used ones when they order new ones because new is way out of my price range. Can’t wait!




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          1. Delget Noor :) My label says 153 kcal for 1/4c, and I find 1 cup to = 20 dates, so for 10 dates ~ 300 kcal. If one uses Medjool, the recipe would call for only 4-5 dates total, and for someone trying to reduce calories, like YOU :), I would go with 1-2 Medjool dates. Cheers!




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            1. “for someone trying to reduce calories, like YOU :)”

              Personally, I never met a calorie worth counting. Ten Medjool’s seemed like a very sweet concoction and all I have on hand are Medjool dates, which is why I asked.




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              1. I just was mixed up and thought you had commented before about the calories. If you give it a try, I hope you enjoy the drink! :)




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    1. Well, . . I just had to take a look at your link. And I have to say that I agree with Minority of One that leaving the reading of research to Dr. G and his staff is the better thing to do. Although I do have a biological science background of a medical nature, I found this publication challenging to read. So I focused on the “Conclusions” section. It stated that “no form of curcumin appears to possess the properties required for a good DRUG CANDIDATE”. It then listed the certain requirements needed to turn a natural substance into a stable to-be-manufactured drug. The “Conclusions” then went on to state: “Of course we do not rule out the possibility that an extract of crude turmeric might have beneficial effects on human health”. The discussion went on to state – and here I paraphrase – that the complexity of curcurmin is so great that it is almost impossible to isolate a single therapeutic component for isolation into a drug. The discussion continues further in that vein and then states “Development projects with numerous other prominent plant natural products (e.g. “polyphenolics”) have experienced similar drawbacks despite major efforts.” This statement confirms what Dr. G and T. Colin Campbell have been stating for years now. That the complexity of the “goodies” that plants give us is so complicated that it is impossible to isolate one component of the plant into a drug that will act on one or more type of disease. The plant itself is so complex that making it into a drug is virtually impossible to test and then manufacture.
      This piece of research does not state that curcumin or turmeric does not work. It states that it is so complicated that isolating one component of one type of curcurmin from turmeric is virtually impossible because of the complexity of the plant. Big difference.
      Thank you.
      I would invite others to read the Conclusions section in this particular piece of research and see if they see it differently or perhaps similarly.
      Thank you.




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    2. Hi Glenn, I had a look at this study, which has also been mentioned by others. It is looking at isolated curcumin, one of the components of turmeric, and not at an extract of the whole root, which contains many other components. One cannot really generalize about the whole plant from information about a single component. Also, though it does seem that curcumin was effective in the studies cited by Dr Greger in this video, one cannot generalize to other conditions. I hope that is helpful.




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    3. Turmeric is high in salicylic acid so my guess is that is what gives Turmeric it’s anti-inflammatory and cancer fighting properties.




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    4. This study that you are referencing discusses curcumin, one of the many components of turmeric. This study calls into the question the effects of curcumin-into-drug-making not turmeric. The discussion of this paper was not of turmeric at all.




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  4. I was wondering if that last study used topical tumeric (eyedrops) or oral tumeric. I guess this is the correct abstract:

    “Curcumin was administered orally at a dose of 375 mg/3 times/day orally for a period of 6-22 months in eight patients.”




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  5. Dear Mr. Gregor

    This is your Russian fan. I would like to know is your book “How not to die” will be published on russian language?
    I would like to give to my mom, ex smoker as a gift on her birthday.

    With Respect,
    Sotnikov I.S.




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    1. Thank you for your message and support, Ivan! A Russian translation of the book will be released this year, but at this time we do not have a specific date of release. Keep your eyes peeled! I think it will make a wonderful gift. :)

      Thank you!




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      1. I posted once more in a more appropriate thread ;) Thanks for your reply, I’ve checked the discussion from WFPB-Hal and Glenn DeBlasi questions and read more carefully the Conclusion section in the article and I totally agree with you.




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      2. I like being able to pop a pill since I can’t always cook something up. I wish they made a supplement with whole turmeric and black pepper. I know you can make your own but I want to buy them already made to save time.




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        1. Funny, cos I’ve looked at this and it’s still on my to-do list. I even asked the company I use to get my bulk organic spices, but they didn’t seem interested. So I’ve made my own capsules that I give my wife:
          – 3/4 turmeric + 1/4 ginger + black pepper
          – 3/4 ginger + 1/4 turmeric + black pepper (for headaches)
          – amla powder
          All in 1g vegan capsules.

          I don’t need capsules as I take them off the spoon, but they’re handy if travelling.

          I think these would sell well. I’ve just to find the right lab to do it as selling the ones I make is probably not smart.




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  6. Fascinating. I have had idiopathic uveitis since 2010 and have tried steroids and immuno suppressants which didn’t
    work. What has worked is a tiny implant inside my eyeball which
    releases steroid in a much smaller and slower dose. However, the life of
    this implant (approx 3 years) will end later this year. Throughout the
    whole treatment since 2010 I have also been diagnosed with Hashimoto’s hypothyroidism and part of me wonders whether all of my treatments, in trying to cure my uveitis, have affected my thyroid. Is that possible?

    What is the suggested way or me taking turmeric for uveitis? Orally in a paste?




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  7. Hey guys, I’m looking for an olive oil substitute for cooking meatless burgers. Also, a healthy soy sauce substitute. Any suggestions?

    Thanks in advance!




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    1. Hi, Oldfart. I am Christine, a NF volunteer moderator. If you would like to see the studies cited in the video, click the tab to the right of the video window labeled “Sources Cited.” You will find links to the cited scientific literature. I hope that helps!




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