C. difficile Superbugs in Meat

C. difficile Superbugs in Meat
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Why does the United States appear to have the highest level of C. diff contamination of the meat supply?

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Clostridium difficile is one of our most urgent bacterial threats, sickening a quarter million Americans every year, and killing thousands to the cost of a billion dollars a year, and it’s on the rise.

Although uncomplicated cases have been traditionally managed with powerful antibiotics, recent reports suggest that hypervirulent strains are increasingly resistant to medical management. So surgeons may need to come in and remove our colon entirely to save our lives, although the surgery itself is so risky, the operation alone may kill us half the time. And there’s been a rise in the percentage of cases that end up under the knife, which could be a marker of the emergence of these hypervirulent strains.

Historically, most cases appeared in hospitals, but a landmark study recently published in the New England Journal of Medicine found that only about a third of cases could be linked to contact with an infected patient. Another potential source is our food supply. In the U.S., the frequency of contamination of retail chicken with C. diff has been documented to be up to one in six packages off store shelves, and it didn’t seem to matter which kind. Pig-derived C. diff, however, has garnered the greatest attention from public health personnel, because the same human strain that’s increasingly emerging in the community outside of hospitals is the major strain among pigs.

Since the turn of the century, C. diff is increasingly being reported as a major cause of intestinal infections in piglets. C. diff is now one of the most common causes of intestinal infections in baby piglets in the U.S.

Particular attention has been paid to pigs because of high rates of C. diff shedding into their waste, which can lead to contamination of retail pork, and the U.S. has the highest levels of C. diff meat contamination so far tested anywhere in the world.

Carcass contamination by gut contents at slaughter probably contributes most to the presence of C. diff in meat and meat products. But why is the situation so much worse in the United States? Well, slaughter techniques differ from country to country, with those in the U.S. being what they call more of the “quick and dirty” variety.

Colonization or contamination of pigs by superbugs such as C. difficile and MRSA at the farm production level may be more important, though, than at the slaughterhouse level. One of the reasons sows and their piglets may have such high rates of C. diff is because of cross-contamination of feces in the farrowing crate, which are these kind of metal cages that mother pigs are kept in.

But can’t you just follow food safety guidelines and cook the meat through? Unfortunately, current food safety guidelines are ineffective against C. difficile because it forms these spores that are resistant to heat. To date, most food safety guidelines say cook to an internal temperature as low as 63 degrees Celsius, which is the official USDA recommendation for pork, but recent studies show that these C. diff spores can survive extended heating at 71 degrees Celsius. Therefore, the guidelines should be raised to take this potentially killer infection into account.

See, the problem is that sources of C. diff food contamination might include not only fecal contamination on the meat, but transfer of spores from the gut into the actual muscles of the animal, inside the meat. Clostridia bacteria like C. diff comprise one of the main groups of bacteria involved in natural carcass degradation, and so by colonizing muscle tissue before death, C. diff can not only transmit to new hosts that eat the muscles, like us, but give them a head start on carcass breakdown.

To see any graphs, charts, graphics, images, and quotes to which Dr. Greger may be referring, watch the above video. This is just an approximation of the audio contributed by Katie Schloer.

Please consider volunteering to help out on the site.

Clostridium difficile is one of our most urgent bacterial threats, sickening a quarter million Americans every year, and killing thousands to the cost of a billion dollars a year, and it’s on the rise.

Although uncomplicated cases have been traditionally managed with powerful antibiotics, recent reports suggest that hypervirulent strains are increasingly resistant to medical management. So surgeons may need to come in and remove our colon entirely to save our lives, although the surgery itself is so risky, the operation alone may kill us half the time. And there’s been a rise in the percentage of cases that end up under the knife, which could be a marker of the emergence of these hypervirulent strains.

Historically, most cases appeared in hospitals, but a landmark study recently published in the New England Journal of Medicine found that only about a third of cases could be linked to contact with an infected patient. Another potential source is our food supply. In the U.S., the frequency of contamination of retail chicken with C. diff has been documented to be up to one in six packages off store shelves, and it didn’t seem to matter which kind. Pig-derived C. diff, however, has garnered the greatest attention from public health personnel, because the same human strain that’s increasingly emerging in the community outside of hospitals is the major strain among pigs.

Since the turn of the century, C. diff is increasingly being reported as a major cause of intestinal infections in piglets. C. diff is now one of the most common causes of intestinal infections in baby piglets in the U.S.

Particular attention has been paid to pigs because of high rates of C. diff shedding into their waste, which can lead to contamination of retail pork, and the U.S. has the highest levels of C. diff meat contamination so far tested anywhere in the world.

Carcass contamination by gut contents at slaughter probably contributes most to the presence of C. diff in meat and meat products. But why is the situation so much worse in the United States? Well, slaughter techniques differ from country to country, with those in the U.S. being what they call more of the “quick and dirty” variety.

Colonization or contamination of pigs by superbugs such as C. difficile and MRSA at the farm production level may be more important, though, than at the slaughterhouse level. One of the reasons sows and their piglets may have such high rates of C. diff is because of cross-contamination of feces in the farrowing crate, which are these kind of metal cages that mother pigs are kept in.

But can’t you just follow food safety guidelines and cook the meat through? Unfortunately, current food safety guidelines are ineffective against C. difficile because it forms these spores that are resistant to heat. To date, most food safety guidelines say cook to an internal temperature as low as 63 degrees Celsius, which is the official USDA recommendation for pork, but recent studies show that these C. diff spores can survive extended heating at 71 degrees Celsius. Therefore, the guidelines should be raised to take this potentially killer infection into account.

See, the problem is that sources of C. diff food contamination might include not only fecal contamination on the meat, but transfer of spores from the gut into the actual muscles of the animal, inside the meat. Clostridia bacteria like C. diff comprise one of the main groups of bacteria involved in natural carcass degradation, and so by colonizing muscle tissue before death, C. diff can not only transmit to new hosts that eat the muscles, like us, but give them a head start on carcass breakdown.

To see any graphs, charts, graphics, images, and quotes to which Dr. Greger may be referring, watch the above video. This is just an approximation of the audio contributed by Katie Schloer.

Please consider volunteering to help out on the site.

Images thanks to Animals Australia.

Doctor's Note

Never heard of C. diff? That’s the Toxic Megacolon Superbug I’ve talked about before.

Another foodborne illness tied to pork industry practices is yersiniosis. See: Yersinia in Pork

MRSA (Methicillin-resistant Staph aureus) is another so-called superbug in the meat supply:

More on the scourge of antibiotic resistance and what can be done about it:

How is it even legal to sell foods with such pathogens? See Salmonella in Chicken & Turkey: Deadly But Not Illegal and Chicken Salmonella Thanks to Meat Industry Lawsuit.

If you haven’t yet, you can subscribe to my videos for free by clicking here.

64 responses to “C. difficile Superbugs in Meat

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  1. I understand that handling meat in the industry safely is a concern as addressed by the references and that adopting a plant-based diet will improve your own health and safety, but I have a feeling that these studies are trying to instill fear in others over something that is not a huge deal. No omnivorous person around me is dead or terminally ill because of these infections so other than trying to prevent chronic health conditions, why should I care about this superbug?




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    1. Because containment and control make all the difference between a preventable infection and an epidemic. Half a million people infected and over 29,000 related deaths per year are absolutely high enough numbers to justify warning people. In 2011 there was an E. coli outbreak in Germany, and all of Europe was on alert in an attempt to find the source and control the spread. In all, 3,950 people were affected and 53 died.




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        1. A 1999 NY Times article states “Although the United States has one of the safest food supplies in the world, about 76 million Americans suffer food poisoning each year and about 5,000 die from it, the Federal Government said today.”




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    2. My grandmother died of C. Dif. Usually these bacteria are more harmful to people who have weaker immune systems, like the elderly and young children. Not that you should care about THOSE people….




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      1. Hi Jocelyn

        Goodness sorry to hear about your grandmother. I don’t think Matt doesn’t care it just sounds like he is trying to better understand the research surrounding this superbug like everyone. Seems like a pretty serious issue to me. In dietetic clinical rotations we would always hear about C diff and of course how to treat complications like diarrhea through diet. If I remember correctly it wasn’t always easy to fix and I always assumed it was strictly found in hospitals. Interesting research find by Dr. Greger. Thanks for all the comments.

        Joseph




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      2. My sister too…she was so sick for a long time from C.Dif., a horrible illness! My son had MRSA after he was hospitalized for burns, and never fully recovered and eventually passed away from complications related to it. My husband is still battling MRSA after surgery. These things are no joke, they can kill and they ARE out there! Factory farming is deadly…even the plants aren’t safe from it!




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        1. Sorry to hear that about your family – lost a lot of my family to cancer a few years ago, so i can relate.

          What i personally would recommend is to do everything in your power to boost your immune system. There is a lot of good material on what to eat, more importantly what not to eat and what to add to boost. I dont think we should walk around and be scared of bugs(even super) – focus should be on boosting that immune system.
          A good place to start could be learning about fermenting and adding fermented foods to your diet. Natto, Cambuche, Jun, RawFood yoghurt, “the regulars” like Sauerkraut etc.
          Others could be adding more raw foods(maybe try raw to 4) or adding more superfoods like bluebarries etc.




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          1. You must be a mind reader and you better believe I take measures to boost my immune system, and what a coincidence I should see this right after I had lunch because I just had “probiotic soup!” (Cukes, tomato, celery, romaine, kale, parsley, cilantro, basil, onion, garlic, turmeric, flax and sunflower seeds, a dash of cumin and a big fat scoop of fermented salsa, fermented nopales, a few fermented lime pieces and a heaping spoonful of white miso, about a cup of lukewarm water, and puree in the blender. Once it’s smooth I add a cup of my homemade un-cow yogurt, some nutritional yeast and blend it all together. It makes a full blender batch that I let sit about an hour to increase the probiotics, and just before eating it, I add a bit of crushed ice and blend one more time, and serve it with finely sliced cukes, and a bit more yogurt swirled in… some chopped herbs, toasted sesame seeds or whatever sprinkled on top, and it’s lunch in minutes! A great treat in the heat, [Florida] and plenty to share or save for later. LOL!)
            I do make all kinds of fermented foods, just last night I made a huge batch of soy/almond/oat/ flax yogurt, that I used in my “soup” and will also use some of that, adding in some soaked pureed cashews and nootch to make fermented cheese, using white miso and a bit of rejuvelac to do the job for me. I’ve made natto with all kinds of beans, tempeh also with grains, lacto fermented sauerkraut, salsa…with tomatoes, peppers, grated eggplant lots of cilantro, garlic, onions and our local nopales (cactus pads) I foraged! It came out awesome! I was experimenting with the eggplant, not too traditional but it worked beautifully to make it really thick instead of soupy. (Love it with some fermented beans on toasted tortilla triangles with a bit of my cheese on top!) I have yet to get some Kefir grains…I would love to, but pricey and can’t seem to find any locally. I’ve probably fermented everything you can think of and then some…cactus, seaweed, nuts and seeds, foraged local plants (higher in taste and nutrition than anything you can buy or grow…and for FREE! Eat the weeds!… http://www.eattheweeds.com/about/ … LOL!) I am on a tight fixed income, so every little bit helps! It also gets me outside plenty to get my vit D, exercise, learning, focus, peace, and grounding, all good things! LOVE it, being retired is awesome, I finally have the time to pursue passions and enjoy every minute! I cannot understand how people can ever be bored…though it seems everyone else around me my age (mid 60’s +) has so many health issues they just sit around and watch TV! (I don’t even have one.) I was actually one of them years ago, diabetic, sick and obese, until “Forks Over Knives” pulled me back from the brink! (It’s never too late!) This WPFB lifestyle NEEDS to become gospel, because everyone still thinks I am some weird aberration and they couldn’t possibly give up their SAD because everyone thinks it’s “normal” to eat that way, and the gov. agencies and their doctors approve! SAD indeed!




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        2. For any surface infection where antibiotics will not control it, try putting honey on it, Honey has several modes of action against microorganisms.




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    3. My niece just got the infection. That family eats a standard American diet and she is very young. This was a big scare for the family. It seems to be happening all over the place. Im just glad me and my wife adopted a whole food vegan diet when we did. (we eat low fat high carb McDougall style)




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    4. Wow. It’s all about fear. It’s not a “huge deal” because of course it’s not “around me.” Enjoy your pulled pork sandwich.




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    5. What I see is absent from your comment, is a recognition of the rapidly growing nature of this trend. Perhaps the following images will provide you with some context:

      https://lh6.googleusercontent.com/OwOaBSSxuZlp2qtPl6lP6lVc3fzk5Yx2pkD43k9D_7N2xFEFd7Mp7vwWTHt_8CwciwcbnLYFnBOF36J04m3ZrJjvfRUPNOT6j3T6vkf-Ks5VedVP11PetmLszA
      http://www.nature.com/nature/journal/v431/n7011/images/431892a-i3.0.jpg
      http://uncmain.sites.unc.edu/files/2012/06/ccm3_025801.jpg
      http://www.bloomberg.com/quicktake/content/uploads/sites/2/2014/03/Antibiotics2.png
      http://www.bloomberg.com/quicktake/content/uploads/sites/2/2014/03/Antibiotics-1.png

      These trends are the reason we hear the predictions of a “post-antibiotic era” in the not too distant future. You genuinely think a future in which previously easily treated and potentially fatal bacterial infections are untreatable is “not a huge deal”?

      I hear vegans often take comfort in not being at risk for many foodborne or fecal oral transmissible infections. Obviously vegans are taking themselves out of the direct line of fire but not bringing infected carcasses into their kitchens. However, we still interact with the non-vegan world. We can take comfort in not majorly contributing to such a massive public health problem, but that doesn’t make us invulnerable to the threat ourselves. Do you ever eat at non-vegan restaurants? Use public bathrooms? Put your food on the conveyor at the grocery store that someone before you put their nasty package of chicken on? Travel or hope to travel other areas of the world with less than first world level hygiene?

      I hope you never have to go to the hospital for any major procedures, but if you should, you should absolutely have a healthy awareness of the possibility of contracting an antibiotic resistant infection (to this end you can look up rates of healthcare associated infections and shop around the hospitals in your area). Should you ever have kids, and your partner gives birth in a hospital, or your kids or elderly parents are hospitalized, you should absolutely be concerned. Should you have grandkids someday, what do you think the percentages of infections that are antibiotic resistant will be at that time? What will happen to healthcare as we know it if we can’t perform the simple act of confidently protecting patients from bacterial infection in the course of so many procedures where this is necessary?

      A rapidly growing trend that threatens to largely dismantle many of our modern medical practices doesn’t warrant an undertone of fear? Really?




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    6. Once you know about something like this I think you’re ethically bound to react reasonably, and with empathy. It’s not you or anyone you know today, but it may be tomorrow. Irony tends to accompany tragedy, and being the victim of it is generally something worth avoiding. I would suggest approaching things like this soberly, and with an open mind.




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      1. “250,000 illnesses and 14,000 deaths costing a billion dollars annually” And this is only C. difficile. From the CDC, there are over 2,000,000 antibiotic resistant infections and 23,000 deaths per year from other organisms in addition to that.




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    7. My mother got food poisoning from campylobacter in chicken. Antibiotics wiped it out, but they also provided a perfect breeding ground for C.diff. Long story short, the doctors told her she will have to deal with C.diff for the rest of her life. She will always be at a high risk for another C.diff incident that requires her to take at least a week of work. She now spends $100 per month on probiotics, Saccharomyces boulardii supplements, and extra antibiotics whenever she has the flu or cold. The experience also gave her diverticulitis.

      My brother ate the same tainted chicken, threw up for two hours, and is fine and healthy. Everyone is affected by food poisoning differently. But that superbug can completely alter the course of some people’s lives and control them.

      Incidentally, my mother’s story is one reason I adopted a WFPB diet. I refuse to have my life changed because of tainted meat and dairy products.




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    1. Fecal transplantation? Eeeeeeeewwwww, think I’ll just stick to the WFPB diet and hope that keeps my good bacteria in check ;) – but thanks for the info!




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  2. To produce as much and as cheaply as possible of the food that gives us the chronic diseases that eventually kill us, we produce superbugs that can give us fatal infections – the human being is not a wise mammal….




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    1. Shhhhh! Don’t say that out loud…they are very proud of their technology. Cars and airplanes are just over 100 years old…they are SO ADVANCED.




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  3. Hopefully, buying chicken raised without antibiotics at least doesn’t
    contribute to the problem of antibiotic resistance–and rewards more
    responsible growers.

    Curious, I checked and was disappointed to
    read that even wild game may be contaminated with these bugs, although
    at relatively low prevalence in this pilot study (2.6% of 114 animals of
    37 central Iowa species were MRSA-positive):

    Shylo E. Wardyn
    et al. 2012. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in Central Iowa
    Wildlife. Journal of Wildlife Diseases, 48(4), 2012, pp. 1069–1073.
    Wildlife Disease Association.
    http://www.jwildlifedis.org/doi/pdf/10.7589/2011-10-295 :

    “…We
    conducted a pilot study to determine the prevalence of
    methicillin-sensitive S. aureus (MSSA) and methicillin-resistant S.
    aureus (MRSA) in 37 species of wild animals rehabilitated at a
    university clinic. Nasal, wing, wound, and cloacal swabs were
    collected. Of 114 animals, seven (6.1%) were MSSA-positive
    and three (2.6%) were MRSA-positive. The MRSA isolates were
    obtained from two eastern cottontail rabbits (Sylvilagus floridanus) and
    a Lesser Yellowlegs (Tringa flavipes), a migratory shorebird.
    Antibiotic resistance testing of the MRSA isolates revealed that
    two were additionally resistant to tetracycline and erythromycin, and
    the third isolate was also resistant to erythromycin,
    clindamycin, and levofloxacin. All three isolates were positive for
    the Panton Valentine leukocidin (PVL) gene. Sequence typing of the
    staphylococcal protein A (spa) region revealed one MRSA isolate to
    be t002 [i.e., the bird’s was likely hospital-derived], whereas the
    other two MRSA isolates were found to be t008 [i.e., the rabbits’
    were likely farm-derived]. Our results suggest that S. aureus,
    including MRSA, is being carried by wild animals, although at a low
    prevalence…”

    My uncle died of MRSA at 80. An avid hunter and
    fisherman when younger, he picked up MRSA in hospital or while
    recovering at home from his minor (elective) surgery. Once in his
    shoulder joint, the bug could not be dislodged, although his MDs tried
    antibiotics, suction, and surgery (twice) that summer. My uncle, who had
    survived WWII (tailgunner) and numerous heart attacks, found it ironic
    that an apparently minor infection would finally take him.




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  4. I buy my meat from small family owned farms – grass fed/finished. I eat the grass fed/finished ground beef raw – no problems so far and I’m 61.




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    1. Thanks to factory farming, nothing and no one is immune…even wildlife. Obviously a great number of people can avoid it since there are still plenty of us, but it’s just a matter of time and the state of your immune system…Russian roulette with a sick twist.




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        1. From veggies? LOL! Oh those vile, vicious, virulent, veggies huh? It’s called living on planet earth and animals are great at storing and passing on the bacterium, so don’t be too pleased with yourself. Here’s a quote from the CDC that describes the reservoir of infection…
          “Listeria monocytogenes is commonly found in soil and water. Animals can carry the bacterium without appearing ill and can
          contaminate foods of animal origin, such as meats and dairy products.”
          http://www.cdc.gov/listeria/sources.html




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    2. You have been lucky thus far. If you have to have that chunk of roasted meat on a regular basis, fine.
      Sugar coating it with “grass fed”,”small farm raised” and “organic” is however misleading. It always has the same components that are not doing your body any favors except satisfying your cavings for savory, juicy saturated fat that is nudging you toward arteriosclerosis, heart disease, cancer, and other health maladies.




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      1. Funny thing is that American tobacco has a ton of additives added compared to British tobacco. American french fries from McDonalds have like 50 more chemical ingredients than British Mcdonalds french fries. American sausages are loaded with extra chemicals that are supposed to be CYA (Cover Your ..). I don’t smoke or eat meat. I am just sharing what seems like an interesting trend in American products when compared to other nations. I would not be surprise to hear that culture is somehow related to disease and that the problems that emerge in the US do not happen in other nations.




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      2. Not roasted Jerry, raw!
        Here is a joke I bet Charles will appreciate…
        A man was having dinner with some new friends at their farm, when into the room comes a huge pig, pulling his back end on a wheeled dolly. “Geez, what happened to the poor pig?” the man asked, concerned.
        The farmer, swelling with pride exclaimed, “That pig, my friend, is a hero! We had a house fire one night, and that pig came squealing into our bedroom at 3 a.m. and woke us out of our sound sleep! He then ran into the nursery and grabbed the baby out of the bassinet by her jammies, ran with her past us, and got her out of the choking smoke to the outside! He ran back inside again to make sure the big kids were awake, chased us all outside, and went back in one more time still, to find his buddy, the dog!”
        “Wow! That IS an amazing pig! You guys were so lucky to have him, he really is a hero! But um, you still didn’t tell me what happened to his hind legs?”
        The farmer stopped chewing, put down his fork and stared dumbly at the man. “Come on pal! No way you can eat a pig like that all at once!”




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        1. I know about the elephant, but I figured for the average “free range”, “antibiotic free”, “organic”, “small, local farm”, meat loving foodie, that was going to be more than they could possibly tolerate




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  5. On the spiritual side man has been taught the vegetarian diet for thousands of years, but of course very few listen. The ill health coming from eating meat is karmic, and it’s only made worse now owing to the horrid treatment of animals. My Dad spent the last twenty years of his life paying this debt, heart disease, diabetic, wheel chairs, amputations, yearly surgeries, weekly visits to the doctor. What
    a horrible way to spend a ¼ of your life! Being an avid hunter and wild game eater his entire life, he had the erroneous
    belief free range would mean good health… it does not.

    The amazing thing is how much better you feel on a plant based diet… every single day of your life! Thanks to sites like this, if nothing else,
    we at least have the truth.




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    1. I’m with you! Adam and Eve were vegans; after the flood God only grudgingly gave permission to eat meat when nothing else was available and all kinds of restrictions were imposed; Daniel went vegan and proved that was healthier than the king’s meat; Jesus was a militant vegan who was crucified for letting the animals out of the temple slaghterhouse . . . Don’t get me started. Whether there is a God or not, there is a bill to pay for mistreating animals and the environment.




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      1. I am Christian, but don’t forget the Hindus and the Jains. A great number are Vegetarian, although it is too bad they eat dairy. Clearly Paleolithic people are wrong to say that Vegetarianism and Veganism are modern fads- they certainly have a basis in the Bible, as well as in Indian religions. Denise Minger claims here, http://rawfoodsos.com/for-vegans/ that “Veganism is a modern experiment—a dietary situation humans have never before faced—and its full repercussions are still unknown,” yet it goes back thousands of years in Israel and India- although maybe Indians don’t qualify as Vegan since they consume dairy. Daniel did eat only Vegetables at times and did get very healthy- contrary to what Minger would expect. She also suggests Vegans eat bivalves, such as oysters, while not considering that these foods are NOT Kosher. Leviticus 11 only allows fish with fins and scales and bivalves do not have these. One point of Kosher laws is to make meat eating more difficult and cumbersome. Perhaps to lead us to Vegetarianism and Veganism. Minger’s attitude is extremely disrespectful to religion. Many people of the “Paleo” bent constantly bad mouth India for its Vegetarianism, claiming that this causes their diabetes. Yet it truly is the dairy they consume that causes it.




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      2. I am Christian, but don’t forget the Hindus and the Jains. A great number are Vegetarian, although it is too bad they eat dairy. Clearly Paleolithic people are wrong to say that Vegetarianism and Veganism are modern fads- they certainly have a basis in the Bible, as well as in Indian religions. Denise Minger claims here, http://rawfoodsos.com/for-vegans/ that “Veganism is a modern experiment—a dietary situation humans have never before faced—and its full repercussions are still unknown,” yet it goes back thousands of years in Israel and India- although maybe Indians don’t qualify as Vegan since they consume dairy. Daniel did eat only Vegetables at times and did get very healthy- contrary to what Minger would expect. She also suggests Vegans eat bivalves, such as oysters, while not considering that these foods are NOT Kosher. Leviticus 11 only allows fish with fins and scales and bivalves do not have these. One point of Kosher laws is to make meat eating more difficult and cumbersome. Perhaps to lead us to Vegetarianism and Veganism. Minger’s attitude is extremely disrespectful to religion. Many people of the “Paleo” bent constantly bad mouth India for its Vegetarianism, claiming that this causes their diabetes. Yet it truly is the dairy they consume that causes it.




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      3. For those who just gotta worship somebody worship the scientists who sacrificed their careers to follow the truth. There are many unsung hero’s who deserve your praise. How come whether there is a god or not, whenever anything good happens God shows up at the end of the line with his hand up saying, “That was me, that was I, that was the author of this Book!”

        As my atheist friend put it:
        One of my personal faves is when a krishin or kathlick makes fun of scientology or mor(m)onism– as if eating the flesh of a virgin-born-zombie-carpenter-pseudodemigod on Sunday mornings & worshipping an execution device are perfectly rational acts to engage in. Straitjackets are more appropriate attire than suits and dresses for these delusional christards. I inevitably get an, “Why do you hate god so much?” Idiots. I don’t hate leprechauns either, but I do hate when leprechaunists try futilely to shove leprechaunism down my throat.




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    2. I’m not particularly religious, but had plenty of training, and as I recall, even in the garden of Eden, God told Adam and Eve they were free to eat all the things that grew, except for one. Maybe it wasn’t an “apple” they ate after all, maybe it was an animal? Because later on, disappointed with man’s avarice, God decided to suffer man’s weakness and gave him strict rules about what beasts he could gnash upon, and how they were to be slaughtered. Many Jews still keep kosher and I remember when the Catholics even gave a nod to the no meat precaution by going “meatless” on Fridays and during Lent…(though apparently fish weren’t flesh?!). I didn’t get it as a kid, but even then I was happy to not be forced to eat dead animals at least sometimes! I always abhorred ingesting animal products, especially anything that looked like muscle, and milk…I used to find creative ways to get around having to drink the slimy stuff! I think my body was warning me off at a very young age, but in the 1950’s, it was clean your plate or starve! LOL!




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    3. Belief is a sufficient condition to stop human advancement. Belief in the supernatural, or luck, or one’s inherent inerrant self-styled logic. Sadly, we all carry this holdover from our past to varying degrees.

      Good science, facts based on science and the correct interpretation of them are the only way forward for us. There are no shortcuts. There are no spirits so there is no spiritual side of humanity. No such thing as karma so that whole line of “reasoning” is irrational. You Dad did not pay any debt. He ate a bad diet and suffered the consequences.

      I do, however, agree wholeheartedly with your last sentences.




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  6. Okay, I know I never shut up, but I have to say one more thing! I love this site not only because of Dr. Greger’s awesome videos and information, but because it is uplifting to be surrounded by so many intelligent, compassionate and supportive people! It gives me hope that our collective consciousness can some day be raised to a level that can put an end to the sickness and cruelty we’ve foisted on this beautiful planet and it’s denizens, before it’s too late.
    I would love to post this chart in every conceivable location in giant letters, if I could! http://michaelbluejay.com/veg/natural.html




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  7. My Mom’s dentist gave her some pretty strong antibiotics and she got C-Diff. She was sick for a couple of months and never got her strength back and has never been the same. Thank God a friend had also had it and knew how to treat it because her M.D. just kept giving her more antibiotics which was making it worse. It’s nothing to take lightly.




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    1. My gum started swelling and feeling abscessed a month ago. Did not go to the dentist because he would just give me antibiotics which did not work 3 years ago. Chamomile tea poultice took the swelling down part way. Then remembered my Oregano Oil. Can’t stand the stuff but…. Mixed it with Cayenne in a little split peas 3 times a day for 9 days. Took care of the problem.




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      1. I would not bank on homeopathic cures for gum disease. You need to se a periodontist. You are playing with fire. I am not talking about fire in your mouth with your gums,- you could end up losing your teeth in addition to long range debilitating heart problems and other infection issues within your body.




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  8. It may not seem like a huge deal until it’s your 3 year old and his/her grandparent fighting for their life with e-coli or c dificile .




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  9. …so go into hospital for an operation, IV antibiotics following… just don’t touch the hospital SAD-dinner-C.diff and you may live!




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  10. My husband contracted this dreadful super bug while in the hospital after hip surgery. It took us 7 months and a lot of very strategic germ warfare to finally rid him of it. Believe me when I say, you do not ever want to get C-diff – he lost 30 pounds and every bit of strength he had – thought a couple of times I would be a widow before it was over. Thankfully, today thanks to a very wise infectious disease doctor who gave us “the cure” for him – he is healthy and doing well!




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  11. Always better to prevent than cure. And a vegan diets has countless benefits besides avoiding this particular infection.
    This being said, for those who do are infected with Clostridium difficile, there is apparently a simple alternative to antibiotics with a very high curing rate : fecal transplant, wohoo…
    “In 317 patients treated across 27 case series and reports, IMT was highly effective, showing disease resolution in 92% of cases.”
    Source:
    Systematic review of intestinal microbiota transplantation (fecal bacteriotherapy) for recurrent Clostridium difficile infection.
    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22002980




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  12. Very interesting article at http://www.bbc.com/news/health-32551873

    C. diff used to beat C. diff infection

    “The symptoms are caused by toxins released by C. difficile bacteria.
    So the team at Loyola University Health System in Illinois tried giving patients spores of non-toxin-producing C. difficile.
    The trial showed the healthier bacteria took hold in the gut 69% of the time. In those people, just one in fifty faced another infection.”




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  13. I’ve read that a lot of people carry around C. Diff., but do not have problems because their healthy gut flora keeps the population down. When the healthy gut flora is destroyed by antibiotics, these tough bugs can take over the neighborhood and cause problems. So, many people recommend probiotics. What is the difference between vegan probiotics and probiotics from other sources? And if you’re reading this and have used them, which are the best you have found?




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  14. Those who want to keep us controlled and ignorant have hacked this excellent video. Fortunately, I saw it before they wrecked it for the public.
    I wish those that are able to volunteer to help Dr. Greger, could do TRANSCRIPTS so we could read what was said, even whtn the sound and studies themselves are removed.

    Stories like these, make me glad that I’ve only eaten organic since the late 1980’s and I’ve become friendly with local farmers that grow my food. My cat and I only eat organic and are rarely ill.

    I did get the runs when eating unrefrigerated greens and beans while in the hospital, because I refused to eat their herbicide resistant crap. Hospitals are notorious for toxic food. No wonder people become dependent on drugs. Next time, I’ll bring a small ice chest to keep my organic plant based diet cold.




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    1. Susan K Snow: The sound problems are due to technical difficulties. We are working on fixing that for the next volume of videos that will come out in the next few months. In the meantime, all the videos have a ‘Transcript’ button. Click that button and the transcript appears below the video.




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