Does Tea Tree Oil Have Hormonal Side Effects?

Does Tea Tree Oil Have Hormonal Side Effects?
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Do the estrogenic effects of tea tree oil get absorbed through the skin?

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Below is an approximation of this video’s audio content. To see any graphs, charts, graphics, images, and quotes to which Dr. Greger may be referring, watch the above video.

Concern has been raised about a “possible link between gynecomastia, topical lavender, and tea tree oil.” Gynecomastia is the abnormal development of breast tissue. I talked about lavender before, but what about tea tree oil? It all started with a case series published in the New England Journal of Medicine.

They describe three young boys in whom breast growth coincided with the topical application of products that contained lavender and tea tree oils. How do we know the products were to blame? Well, the problem resolved in each patient shortly after the use of products containing these oils was stopped. Furthermore, studies in human cell lines indicated that the two oils had pro-female hormone and anti-male hormone activities. So, they “conclude that repeated topical exposure to lavender and tea tree oils probably” was the cause.

But, as a tea tree oil company representative pointed out, only one of the three boys was exposed to any amount of tea tree oil, and they were also exposed to lavender oil; so, lavender oil may have been to blame in all three cases. The researchers responded that this may be a valid argument; however, the tea tree oil had activity similar to that of lavender oil with respect to the in vitro effects. Let me walk you through those.

This is measuring the growth of human breast cancer cells in a petri dish. You drip a tiny amount of estrogen on them, and you can spike their growth, more than a dozen-fold. But, if you add an estrogen blocker along with the estrogen, it abolishes the effect. Okay.

Now, let’s add increasing amounts of tea tree oil to the breast cancer cells. Their growth goes up, and the reason we know it’s an estrogenic effect is that when you add the estrogen blocker too, the growth comes down. Pretty convincing, but “in vitro testing alone is not adequate grounds for indicting traditionally used products,” argued some herbal proponents—including Paula Gardiner, I was excited to see: one of my medical school classmates and friends—hi Paula!

Specifically, argued the Tea Tree Oil Industry Association, only a few tea tree oil compounds actually make it through the skin. So, what they should have done is just measure the hormonal effects of those three compounds. But, that had never been done…until later that year.

Yes, drip increasing concentrations of whole tea tree oil on breast cancer cells in a petri dish, and you can increase their growth, compared to an oil with no estrogenic effect, like eucalyptus oil. But, if you just look at the three components of tea tree oil that actually make it into your bloodstream when you apply them on your skin, none appears to have any estrogenic effects; so, none of the components that penetrate the skin appears to act as an estrogen—alone or in combination. So, you can’t extrapolate the petri dish effects of the whole oil to what one might see when applied on the skin. Thus, what you see in a petri dish may not be identical to what you see in a person.

These new data led European consumer safety officials to conclude that the purported link between gynecomastia and the topical use of tea tree oil is, therefore, considered implausible. In fact, if the anti-male hormone components of tea tree oil remain on the skin, well, how about using it to treat women who feel they are affected by excessive hairiness? Such women were instructed to spray themselves with a dilute lavender/tea tree oil spray versus placebo twice a day on “problem” areas (morning and evening) for three months. “[H]airs were taken “before and after” from four different body areas: chin, chest, thigh, and upper arms.” After three months, no change in the hair diameter in the placebo group, as expected. But, in the lavender/tea tree oil group, all the hairs ended up thinner.

This showed that at least the combination of “lavender and tea tree oils applied locally on skin could be effective in reducing mild [excessive hairiness],” potentially representing “a safe, economic, and practical instrument in the cure of this [quote unquote] disease.”

Please consider volunteering to help out on the site.

Image credit: Monika Stawowy via PublicDomainPictures. Image has been modified.

Motion graphics by Avocado Video.

Below is an approximation of this video’s audio content. To see any graphs, charts, graphics, images, and quotes to which Dr. Greger may be referring, watch the above video.

Concern has been raised about a “possible link between gynecomastia, topical lavender, and tea tree oil.” Gynecomastia is the abnormal development of breast tissue. I talked about lavender before, but what about tea tree oil? It all started with a case series published in the New England Journal of Medicine.

They describe three young boys in whom breast growth coincided with the topical application of products that contained lavender and tea tree oils. How do we know the products were to blame? Well, the problem resolved in each patient shortly after the use of products containing these oils was stopped. Furthermore, studies in human cell lines indicated that the two oils had pro-female hormone and anti-male hormone activities. So, they “conclude that repeated topical exposure to lavender and tea tree oils probably” was the cause.

But, as a tea tree oil company representative pointed out, only one of the three boys was exposed to any amount of tea tree oil, and they were also exposed to lavender oil; so, lavender oil may have been to blame in all three cases. The researchers responded that this may be a valid argument; however, the tea tree oil had activity similar to that of lavender oil with respect to the in vitro effects. Let me walk you through those.

This is measuring the growth of human breast cancer cells in a petri dish. You drip a tiny amount of estrogen on them, and you can spike their growth, more than a dozen-fold. But, if you add an estrogen blocker along with the estrogen, it abolishes the effect. Okay.

Now, let’s add increasing amounts of tea tree oil to the breast cancer cells. Their growth goes up, and the reason we know it’s an estrogenic effect is that when you add the estrogen blocker too, the growth comes down. Pretty convincing, but “in vitro testing alone is not adequate grounds for indicting traditionally used products,” argued some herbal proponents—including Paula Gardiner, I was excited to see: one of my medical school classmates and friends—hi Paula!

Specifically, argued the Tea Tree Oil Industry Association, only a few tea tree oil compounds actually make it through the skin. So, what they should have done is just measure the hormonal effects of those three compounds. But, that had never been done…until later that year.

Yes, drip increasing concentrations of whole tea tree oil on breast cancer cells in a petri dish, and you can increase their growth, compared to an oil with no estrogenic effect, like eucalyptus oil. But, if you just look at the three components of tea tree oil that actually make it into your bloodstream when you apply them on your skin, none appears to have any estrogenic effects; so, none of the components that penetrate the skin appears to act as an estrogen—alone or in combination. So, you can’t extrapolate the petri dish effects of the whole oil to what one might see when applied on the skin. Thus, what you see in a petri dish may not be identical to what you see in a person.

These new data led European consumer safety officials to conclude that the purported link between gynecomastia and the topical use of tea tree oil is, therefore, considered implausible. In fact, if the anti-male hormone components of tea tree oil remain on the skin, well, how about using it to treat women who feel they are affected by excessive hairiness? Such women were instructed to spray themselves with a dilute lavender/tea tree oil spray versus placebo twice a day on “problem” areas (morning and evening) for three months. “[H]airs were taken “before and after” from four different body areas: chin, chest, thigh, and upper arms.” After three months, no change in the hair diameter in the placebo group, as expected. But, in the lavender/tea tree oil group, all the hairs ended up thinner.

This showed that at least the combination of “lavender and tea tree oils applied locally on skin could be effective in reducing mild [excessive hairiness],” potentially representing “a safe, economic, and practical instrument in the cure of this [quote unquote] disease.”

Please consider volunteering to help out on the site.

Image credit: Monika Stawowy via PublicDomainPictures. Image has been modified.

Motion graphics by Avocado Video.

Doctor's Note

Besides any hormonal effects, Is Tea Tree Oil Safe? That was the topic of my last video, if you missed it.

Here’s the link to the video I referred to about lavender: Lavender for Generalized Anxiety Disorder.

Abnormal hairiness (hirsutism) may also be a sign of PCOS—polycystic ovary syndrome. I touched peripherally on the benefits of marjoram in Benefits of Marjoram for Polycystic Ovary Syndrome (PCOS), and on spearmint tea for PCOS in Enhancing Athletic Performance with Peppermint, but the deepest dive I’ve done so far is Best Foods for Polycystic Ovary Syndrome (PCOS), if you’re interested.

If you haven’t yet, you can subscribe to my videos for free by clicking here.

71 responses to “Does Tea Tree Oil Have Hormonal Side Effects?

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  1. Wondering if fennel, lavender, and tea tree oil are what they were using in those creams, which were supposed to slow hair growth?

    I don’t remember the brand names, but I remember trying them as a young person to try to get out of some shaving/waxing/Nair care but didn’t want to have to do the daily discipline for that either.

    I tried to look it up but found ones with Lemongrass and Green tea and Papaya.

    Most of my leg hair is gone, but I have a few patches left and am wondering if I can figure out which thing to use to get rid of it completely.

    There are some parts of getting older, which I can genuinely celebrate.

    I am at the good part. before incontinence and before the awkward hair color and lubrication problems and after periods, PMS, menopause and hair overgrowth. Hooray for every day of the good part.

  2. Typo error on graphic at 2:34: horiz axis label on the chart. Should be “Concentration.”

    BTW, I like it when the video chart graphics show data series separately (or one at a time), as in this video, instead of displaying all data at once. It helps me to understand what’s being plotted before seeing the relationships between the series. That was a nice touch.

    Did that make sense?

  3. Green tea? Papaya?

    Can people just drink Green tea and eat Papaya? Perhaps add some Lavender to their tea?

    Less sticky and messy than trying to figure out which carrier oil to put the Papaya in.

  4. I assume it probably wouldn’t work for me being post-menopausal.

    I would laugh if I accidentally brought myself back into menopause.

  5. Considering anyone can take any study and run with it especially when there are very few on a topic, I will stick to historical evidence. We have literally over a century of shampoos using lavender and several decades of them using tea tree oil, and lo and behold no mass hair loss in the people who used it.

    1. Jimbo,

      You are absolutely right about the shampoo!

      I have a brand right now with tea tree oil and I am not afraid of losing my hair!

      Good point!

      1. Jimbo and Deb, the research didn’t say anything about *losing* hair. It measured the thickness of the hair and found that they were able to thin the hair. Plus the amount of TTO and lavender in the research solution would be an order of magnitude more than anything you would find in regular shampoos or the solutions of previous generations that didn’t have our refining processes. Your observations and the research aren’t at odds =D

        1. Ryan,

          Jumbo was responding to me pondering if I could get rid of hair and he said that it wouldn’t and you are agreeing with him.

          1. Ryan,

            Jimbo was trying to get me to use common sense and you are trying to get me to use the parameters of the studies and you both made good points.

            I was actually mentally being playful because of the products I have used in the past.

            Genuinely, I believe in using both common sense and re-checking the details.

    2. Jimbo

      I lived in the time before drink driving laws were introduced. Many people used to drive after a night out on the town. In fact I knew quite a few people who insisted that they were better, more careful drivers after half a dozen drinks than they were stone cold sober. If drinking caused deaths on the road, most of the population would have been killed off years ago, they argued. They said the same thing about smoking. Smoking doesn’t kill every smoker and many of the longest lived people in the world were/are smokers, so smoking can’t be responsible for increased risk of illness and death

      That sounds very much like the ‘no mass hair loss in people using those shampoos’ argument. We simply don’t know if there are greater or lower rates of hair loss in people using such shampoos. You seem to be just making an assumption here.

      In any case, the studies discussed in the video looked at the effect of the topical application of oils on hirsutism in women. It noted that hairs became thinner..
      It made no statements about its effects on hair loss, or on scalp hair or on its effects on hair in males.

      In fact, there is some evidence that massaging a mix of certain essential oils into the scalp can improve hair growth in at least one type of hair loss (alopecia areata). Note that to avoid toxicity, researchers used a food grade carrier oil to contain or ‘carry’ the essential oils. They didn’t use full strength, undiluted essential oils.
      https://jamanetwork.com/journals/jamadermatology/fullarticle/189618

      There is also some evidence that lavender oil alone can increase hair growth (at least, in one strain of female lab mice). Whether it is safe or effective in (male) humans is another matter.
      https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4843973/

      1. Thanks Tom,

        Always appreciate your feedback.

        And, you are right, we don’t know, because it hasn’t been studied, but Jimbo is right that if people were losing their hair, there would be a clamor and tea tree oil and lavender would be used as aftershave maybe instead of shampoo unless men were trying to look as handsome as Dr Greger.

        1. And yes, I did not like the filmmakers having Dr Greger on camera in the Don Johnson look, but he looks quite handsome clean cut and with facial hair and he stole my heart in his winter hat interview look.

      2. Tom,

        You are right about smoking and drunk driving. Human beings are good at lying to ourselves and to others if there is a pleasure trap involved.

        I don’t think thinning hair is immune to that force called denial.

        But so many people are using essential oils that I still do expect the anecdotal evidence to be on the public scene before the studies.

        1. Mainly, I was the one who started the unfortunate thread, not Jimbo, and Jimbo responded in a neutral comment and I was happy with that and didn’t want him to become a target because of my thinking about products I have used in my youth.

          Also, I am not picking on Dr. Greger for his hair and I am not coming on to Dr. Greger.

          I am being sincere that I think he has kind eyes and a nice smile and a pleasant countenance and his winter hat reminds me of college very much.

          Okay, my dog has officially been alive 14 weeks since the diagnosis and somehow my sense of humor doesn’t translate well on-line.

        2. Deb

          There may no be mass hair loss as Jimbo claims. However, what about say a 5 or 10% increased rate of hairloss in people using such shampoos? Wouldn’t that be important to know? Or a 5 or 10% decreased rate of hairloss for that matter? We just don’t know what happens with long-term regular use despite Jimbo’s claim about centuries of historical evidence.

  6. Of course, yes, Happy New Year, Dr. Greger. But cats??

    I don’t know how Deb 13 weeks feels about this outrageous revelation, but I am sorely disappointed. This news caused me to do some on-line research, and I was shocked to learn of the history of dogs and the Old Testament. I pointed out this link to my German Shepherd and what she said, I can’t repeat: https://www.myjewishlearning.com/article/judaism-dogs/

    First you went after us pot smokers, then the dogs. Tell me I’m dreaming. Please.

    1. LOL!

      Yeah, but my dog is such a good boy.

      The dogs must have heard those Old Testament verses and had a Jabez moment and said, “Something is backwards.”

      1. Get it? Backwards? LOL!

        I am not going to disagree with the Holy Spirit.

        However, God did use some things symbolically as ways to teach mankind in terms mankind could understand. Parables.

        1. Anyway the Christian perspective is that the curse from the fall is what set the bad dog in motion and God is reconciling all things into Himself and the dog will lay down with the cat is my very very loose translation.

    2. ‘Fraid not. However, your post did remind me of this media release from three weeks ago

      ‘COSTA MESA, CA, August 21, 2018 – In the largest known brain imaging study, scientists from Amen Clinics (Costa Mesa, CA), Google, John’s Hopkins University, University of California, Los Angeles and the University of California, San Francisco evaluated 62,454 brain SPECT (single photon emission computed tomography) scans of more than 30,000 individuals from 9 months old to 105 years of age to investigate factors that accelerate brain aging. SPECT tomography) evaluates regional cerebral blood flow in the brain that is reduced in various disorders.

      Lead author, psychiatrist Daniel G. Amen, MD, founder of Amen Clinics, commented, “Based on one of the largest brain imaging studies ever done, we can now track common disorders and behaviors that prematurely age the brain. Better treatment of these disorders can slow or even halt the process of brain aging. The cannabis abuse finding was especially important, as our culture is starting to see marijuana as an innocuous substance. This study should give us pause about it.”
      https://www.j-alz.com/content/largest-brain-study-62454-scans-identifies-drivers-brain-aging

      1. Gee Whiz, that information is life changing! How could I have been so blind to the truth as revealed by the good Dr. Amen? Where can I send money so that he can carry on with his crusade?

        This isn’t the same Dr. Daniel G. Amen featured in this Quackwatch.com article, is it? https://www.quackwatch.org/06ResearchProjects/amen_response.html/

        And, quite strangely, there’s another Dr. Amen who grossed $20 million last year, and is discussed, along with his product line, here: https://sciencebasedmedicine.org/dr-amens-love-affair-with-spect-scans/. I’ll bet that those brain and memory supplements that he hawks, contain zero marijuana.

        When the Washington Post calls him “the most popular psychiatrist in America, by almost any measure,” one has to sit up and take notice. Jeff Bezos don’t mess around with dope, neither.

        Thanks for the timely information. With this kind of scientific learning telling me that pot is no good for your mind, I am going on the straight and narrow, from here on out. As soon as my stash is gone.

        1. None of that delightful diatribe refutes the results of the study.

          But hey if you want to believe that pot use only has positive effects, then go for it. All those studies showing adverse effects must be the result of scientists ‘having a go at marijuana because, well, they must be part of some conspiracy or are influnced by commercia interests, right? I mean what other explanation could there be?

          1. Ouch! and Touché!

            How could I have ever doubted the “study” conducted by a graduate of what used to be known as the Oral Roberts School of Medicine? Only a few folks are so cynical as to doubt him; here are some: https://observer.com/2016/08/head-case-why-has-pbs-promoted-controversial-shrink-dr-daniel-amen/

            And “all those studies showing adverse effects” are certainly to be trusted, as Marijuana (as I’m sure you know) is identified as a Schedule 1 drug, by Nixon’s DEA, with no accepted medical use, and therefore the use of the substance can put a scientist in jail or a company or school in deep doo-doo with the federal government. Those who believe that marijuana has positive uses, in medicine, are unable to go ahead with their studies. But you probably already knew that.
            https://observer.com/2016/07/being-a-pothead-may-help-prevent-alzheimers-disease/

            Thanks for this helpful exchange, it’s been enlightening. I had only intended to take Dr. Greger to task for his love of cats (my dog was disappointed). I didn’t know that I’d learn so much!

            And if you have any extra cash around, I’ve got a couple of bridges in the San Francisco bay area that I’m looking to unload, for a friend. Lots of people use them daily; the cash flow is awesome! There are some other potential buyers, so you’d better make up your mind soonest!

  7. As I always say, “Anybody who likes cats can’t be ALL bad.”

    I was owned by both cats and dogs over the years, and cats rule! :-)

      1. LOL at the article clearly written by a cat favoring person.

        Some of us like both.

        Cats are harder to train, but easier to leave home alone during long work days.

        Dogs are a direct reflection of their owners whether seriously well-trained or bad dogs.

        My brother bought a puppy this Summer and every member of his family immediately had to become disciplined enough and consistent enough to train a puppy. Best thing that could have happened to them.

        My other brother has cats and those two brothers each have the perfect animals for their lifestyles and personalities.

  8. I sometimes drink lavender chamomile tea, could that interfere with hormones or is the low concentration in the tea compared to an essential oil nothing to worry about?

    What about shampoos containing lavender oil? I don’t use it but I’ve actually read that lavender oil helps to promote hair growth because there is a sea of confidently stated misinformation on interment. But I have seen lavender used in hair care products, could this cause thinning on the scalp?

    Last question… Someone I know uses tea tree in their ears, I know deep inside our ears we have tiny little hairs that are important, could this actually thin those important hairs or is that something entirely different?

    1. come to think of it, I also see a lot of shampoos containing tea tree oil. Personally, I think I’ll stick to not using essential oils topically unless for a burn or something… essential oils are some pretty powerful stuff, people maybe shouldn’t just throw them in commercial products left and right.

    2. S

      I don’t think we know enough to make statements about its effects either way with any confidence. However, that doesn’t stop entrepeneurs and companies selling stuff from making sweeping claims. My response to Jimbo above briefly touched upon some of your points though.

      1. I’d also add that essential oils may be no more risky than the chemical ingredients used in commercial shampoos anyway. They may even be less risky for all we know.

        Some people use no shampoo. They call it the ‘poo free of clening their hair. Come to think of it, it does sound much nicer than using ‘poo to clean our hair.

        Popular methods include putting a spoonful of baking in a bottle and adding water. Or they use apple cider vvinegar instead.

        I think I will try the baking soda method – fewer chemicals than ‘poo and considerably cheaper.

        1. Funny, in the 1970’s, my closest friend had a mother who was a strong women’s libber with a cat named, “Sojourner Truth” and she was trying things like baking soda for cleaning her hair because she thought the product industry was charging for the labels. She had us trying all sorts of things, some probably not so good.

          Homemade detergent might not work for cleaning clothes though. Look it up for yourself. If the “stripping the clothing clean test” is accurate the tub turns very, very dirty brown after laundering with homemade detergents. I can’t remember the scientific explanation, but I do remember the dirty water.

          1. They used to use urine for cleaning clothes. You can’t get much ‘greener’ than that.

            As for the ‘stripping’ statement, I believe that exactly the same thing happens with commercial detergents.

            Apparently though you don’t get that build-up when using baking soda and white vinegar for laundering clothes. I have always used white vinegar as a fabric conditioner and have never noticed any problems in that department.

            1. TG, Me too! I add vinegar to the fabric softener dispenser, dating from when my daughter was a newborn and I was washing cotton diapers at home — 28 years ago! We also used little flannel squares, dipped into warm water, for “clean-up,” which I washed with the diapers. She never had diaper rash, which seems amazing now, because she has sensitive skin and often has eczema (she’s a nurse and washes her hands frequently).

        2. Thanks Tom, your replies and links were helpful. I avoid chemical laden body care products but I actually started avoiding using essential oils as well for basically the reasons you’ve stated: lack of evidence on safety and what they actually do. For the skin, I’ve found use of essential oils to be too harsh and drying, at least for the one’s I’ve used, but that lavender oil works amazingly for a burn (not referring to sunburn) in my own experience and I find the aromatherapy very soothing.
          The only shampoo and conditioner that I found to be truly pure and natural and chemical free, after searching high and low, is Sunfood brand, my hair has never looked or felt so good either. It’s pricey as all the natural or so-called natural stuff is, but it goes such a long way and can even be successfully diluted with water.

          I hope the baking soda thing works out, could you imagine how much money people could save and what less of an environmental impact!

      1. Thank you Liisa :) I love that the uses of natural products are being looked into more as opposed to the miracle claims we’ve all (or at least form my perspective it seems) been used to in regards to learning about these products along with the assumption that the companies using them know what they’re doing.

  9. This also covers the unpublished 2018 study by J. Tyler Ramse and his collegues at the Endocrine Society, as they basicaly did the same thing as ten years before by using in vitro experiments.

    I once used the Dr. Bronner’s Organic Pure Castile Liquid Soap with tea tree oil and it smells kinda nice.

  10. Okay, we are at Tea Tree Oil and I am down here with my mind trying to unravel something.

    My friend has toenail fungal infections on three or four toes and if I remember properly tea tree oil worked just as well and just as poorly as the medicines people use to try to treat it.

    Your video linked fungal infections in the toes to poor circulation.

    She also has yeast infections and works in a scientific environment with gear which doesn’t help matters.

    Okay, so I am still researching Cancer and some people believe that it is sometimes caused by fungal overgrowth and whether it is or not they say that it is often linked to fungal overgrowth and treating the fungal overgrowth can put the Cancer into remission.

    https://www.beatcancer.org/blog-posts/cancer-candida-and-sugar

    Is there any link between poor circulation and Cancer?

    That sounds like a dumb question, but they both link to fungal infection so I am trying to figure out if it is a linear process or a triangle or immune system breaking down causing some of it.

    Trying to research it, but it is new in my list of things.

    I am going to treat my dog for fungal infection naturally next.

    But I am worried about my friend.

  11. “There’s ample reason to believe that in most patients, the most likely organism inciting the immune cascade is Candida albicans. Candida should normally be a symbiont in the GI tract. Given certain biochemical cues, it morphs from being a benign unicellular organism into a pathogenic, predatory, filamentous one. (See September 5, 1997, issue of the journal Cell and a paper from Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory, December 12, 2000, “Biological Program Prevents Development of Pathogenic Form of Fungi,” by Dr. Martin Schroder.)

    Like vultures seeking out dead or dying animals, filamentous Candida seek out cells that have been compromised by low ambient oxygen or low nutrient levels. The immune system will try to prevent this invasion. This is what we see histologically and biochemically in diseases associated with oximation.

    If you really grasp what’s going on beneath a patient’s surface symptoms, you’ll be better able to help the body move toward normal physiology and restore health.

    I’m often able to accomplish this by focusing on restoring the body’s ability to maintain what I call “autonomic homeostasis,” the ability to maintain a healthy environment. This is done with bioidentical hormone replacement (including thyroid hormone and vitamin D3), and replenishment of key vitamins, minerals, essential fats, and amino acids. I also try to bolster levels of natural antifungals such as stomach HCl and iodide/iodine.”

    I was reading this and noted that iodine and stomach HCL were called “natural antifungals:” and both of those are linked to risk of Cancer on their own, so I will mentally wonder about a link at those. Though I think HCL being low was hypothesized about there not being enough trypsin and chymotrypsin enzymes, but it could also be that when it is there, it is also protectively antifungal.

    1. Deb, what was your dog eating before he got sick? Just thinking about whether your dog is hanging in there because you changed his diet after(?) he got sick? and whether eliminating the original food is helping him survive? rather than the introduction of new foods? Just wondering….

      1. WFPBLisa, One little dog I rescued years ago had mammary tumors, which we discovered when she went into false heat (she hadn’t been spayed). We agreed that surgery for the tumors was not appropriate (though I did have her spayed — boy, was that rough on her!!), and the vet estimated her life expectancy as about 2 years — she lived for 5 more years. Since we thought she was about 8 when I got her, she lived till about 13 — not bad for a little dog with a very uncertain past, who was discarded in a city public park in the middle of winter. She received no special treatment, and ate the same commercial dog food as the other little dog rescued with her, who was lame. He is still with us, 13 years later, and is about 14-15 years old. Still lame, but very game: he adores his walks!

  12. Deb

    Sounds like you are quoting someone who sells people a lot of supplements based on one of those alternative cancer cure claims.

    I checked out one of those people mentioned in the article you linked to. Sure enough, he has criminal convictions. One was for fraud and two other convictions were for manslaughter.
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tullio_Simoncini

    You might also find it helpful to read cancer specialist David Gorski’s analysis of this cncer/fungus/sugar claim before you go wandering down tht particular path
    https://respectfulinsolence.com/2017/09/07/a-naturopathic-cancer-quack-tries-to-silence-criticism-with-legal-thuggery/

  13. Deb

    Sounds like you are quoting someone who sells people a lot of supplements based on one of those alternative cancer cure claims.

    I checked out one of those people mentioned in the article you linked to. Sure enough, he has criminal convictions. One was for fraud and two other convictions were for manslaughter.
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tullio_Simoncini

    You might also find it helpful to read cancer specialist David Gorski’s analysis of this cancer/fungus/sugar claim before you go wandering down tht particular path
    https://respectfulinsolence.com/2017/09/07/a-naturopathic-cancer-quack-tries-to-silence-criticism-with-legal-thuggery/

    1. Tom,

      I saw it in a few places and there was a woman whose Cancer went away, but she died from a fungal infection and T Colin Campbell went to China and solved why young people were getting Cancer and it was aflatoxin from peanuts.

      Are you saying that bacterial viral and fungal infections aren’t causing Cancer?

      I guess I have to go back to T Colin Campbell and see why the peanuts caused Cancer.

      The woman had her tumor go away and it could have been something like the turmeric pancreatic Cancer thing maybe or like the aflatoxin, but I have to start someplace to start to understand why it might cause Cancer or whether you are right and he is totally off.

      1. I am not buying products from the man or going for treatment from him.

        I am trying to understand if there is a link between it and people were saying they took cultures and found fungal infection with Cancer regularly.

        Was he lying about that?

        Is that what he was in trouble for?

        I know you throw everything out but I am not interested in the man at all. I am interested in that concept.

        1. Did he fake the lab tests pointing out that there were a lot of fungal infections along with Cancer?

          Other people said the same thing.

          I am not doing studies right now, I am doing Cancer theories. Those may not be studied in my lifetime.

            1. Is it impossible?

              Improbable?

              Highly unlikely?

              I eventually will get to the studies about it part, but I am back out at observations from lab tests and theories.

              Root canals and Cancer was an observational connection from someone who noticed that women kept having Breast cancer on the same side of the body that TE woman had root canals on. Then anecdotally people who couldn’t get rid of their Cancer had it improve after dealing with the root canal.

              There probably never will be hard science on that.

              It is just in a long list of theories, which if a woman gets Breast cancer she will either deal with root canals or not.

        1. E.g., people who ate peanuts with aflatoxin got cancer ONLY if they had high animal food intake, but NOT if they had low animal food intake–based on statistics.

          1. Wow,

            thanks Liisa!

            That is helpful!

            My friend keeps getting yeast infections and toe nail infections.

            I gave her the gallon sized chlorine dioxide dog shampoo I bought when my dog got ringworm.

            My vets dog with Cancer had ringworm, too.

            She used it last night and her toes look so much better. Most of the black is gone.

            1. I have been concerned that when you look up black toenails they say things like “Melanoma” but hers going away with the chlorine dioxide would mean it is a fungus, right? I get confused because they said to be concerned especially if it was on the toes, which is where her black was.

      2. Deb

        Viruses and bacteria are known to cause certain cancers. However the claim that candid albicans is behind all cancers is not supported by any credible evidence.

        Cancers and especially cancer treatments damage the immune system. Cancer patients with suppressed immune systems are vulnerable to infections including candida infections. HIV patients are another group with suppressed immune systems
        ‘ In HIV disease, up to 90% of HIV+ persons will have a symptomatic episode of oropharyngeal candidiasis (OPC) sometime during progression to AIDS, many of which become recurrent.’
        https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12164664

        The fact that a cancer or an AIDS patient died of a fungal infection doesn’t demonstrate that fungal infections cause either cancer or AIDS.

        Campbell’s story about peanuts related to his experiences in the Philippines not China. It related to aflatoxin poisoning resulting from consuming contaminated peanuts. Aflatoxin is a toxin produced by certain molds (which are a type of fungus).

        It is the claim that candida albicans is the cause of all or most cancers that I am suggesting is incorrect.

        1. Okay, and that “cause of all or most cancers” is not something, which made sense anyway.

          So was the aflatoxin not causing cancer?

          I believe they called him in to solve why kids had cancer.

          Was it that the kids had aflatoxin poisoning and were misdiagnosed as having cancer?

          1. *The China Study*, pp27-28 of the new edition, reports that Campbell surmises that aflatoxin caused cancer in the children of the richest people in the Philippines because they ate a lot of meat in addition to their peanut butter that contained high amounts of aflatoxin. Poor people’s children, without access to as much meat, were apparently escaping cancer.
            At the time, Campbell wondered how this could be since he thought high protein diets were the best for health.

    1. A naturopathic place on-line asked the same question as a question for the same reason you did.

      They didn’t give it as an answer.

  14. I had such a fun night tonight on a site called mathgametime.

    They have a game called 40xescape, which is a logic game where they have you figure out the logic to open elevator doors 40 times.

    I am so happy.

    I made it all the way through.

    I still have logic, even if I don’t have the same cognitive abilities that I used to.

    1. I’d like to know this too but I’m thinking that there is a big difference between the actual dried flowers and the essential oil which is extremely concentrated – I’ve read that in 1 lb of lavender essential oil there is 250 lbs of lavender.

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