Almonds for Osteoporosis

Almonds for Osteoporosis
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What happens when you take blood from people before and then again four hours after almond consumption, and drip that blood on bone cells?

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Currently, an estimated ten million Americans suffer from osteoporosis, causing more than a million fractures, including hundreds of thousands of hip fractures, a common reason people end up in nursing homes. Many older women say they’d rather be dead than break their hip and end up in a home.

Bone is a dynamic, living organ that is constantly renewed through a process of remodeling and modeling involving bone breakdown by cells that eat bone, called osteoclasts, and bone formation by cells that build bone, called osteoblasts. Osteoporosis is caused by an imbalance between bone loss and bone gain, most often related to hormonal changes that occur during menopause. Is there anything we can do to help tip the balance back in bone’s favor? There are a number of specific compounds in plant foods that look promising, but that’s based on in vitro studies like this, where they basically just drip some plant compound on bone cells in a petri dish and see a boost in bone builder cells, or a drop in bone eater cells. But no matter how much people like cranberry sauce, they’re not injecting it into their veins. For phytonutrients to reach the bone, they first have to get absorbed from the digestive tract into our bloodstream and make it past the liver before they can circulate to our skeleton. So, what we would need is a so-called ex vivo study, where you take people, feed them a food—or not—and then draw their blood a few hours later and then drip their blood onto bone cells and see if there’s any difference. But nothing like that had ever been attempted…  until this study.

Normally, I’m not impressed with studies funded by marketing boards, which pay for studies like this, that found that eating almonds improved cycling distance and athletic performance… compared to cookies. But this study was brilliant, not surprisingly, given it was performed in the world-famous lab of Dr. David Jenkins.  There was a population study that suggested that eating almonds could protect against osteoporosis; so, they could have just dripped some almond extract on bone cells, but that’s not testing the whole food. Instead you could treat bone cells with the blood obtained from donors fed the whole food to directly test the effects of these foods at the cellular level.

So, they exposed human osteoclasts, the bone eaters, to blood obtained before and four hours after eating a handful of almonds. But wait a second, before I get to the results, if you ate a handful of almonds every day, wouldn’t you gain weight—that’s almost 200 calories? Let’s find out. If you add a handful or a handful and a half—like 35 almonds in addition to women’s regular diet as a mid-morning snack, and tell them to eat as much as they want for lunch and supper that day, people eat less; in fact so much less, they cancel out the nut calories. In this study, they all had the same breakfast, then zero, 173 or 259 calories worth of almonds as a snack, then ate as much lunch as they wanted, but the nuts appeared to be so satiating that they ate less for lunch or dinner such that, at the end of the day, there was no significant difference in total caloric intake between any of the three groups. Part of the reason we don’t tend to gain weight adding nuts to our diet may be because we end up flushing nearly a third of the calories down the toilet, because we just don’t chew well enough. This is why we think there’s so much less fat in our bloodstream after eating whole almonds compared to the same amount of almond oil taken out of the nuts.

So anyway, they wanted to see if they could suppress the activity of the cells that eat away our bones. And they found that blood serum obtained following the consumption of an almond meal inhibits human osteoclast formation, function, and gene expression, providing direct evidence to support the association between regular almond consumption and a reduced risk of developing osteoporosis. They also tried before and after eating other meals, rice or potatoes, to make sure there wasn’t just some effect of eating in general and no, the protective effect did appear specific to the almonds.

To see any graphs, charts, graphics, images, and quotes to which Dr. Greger may be referring, watch the above video. This is just an approximation of the audio contributed by Katie Schloer.

Please consider volunteering to help out on the site.

Images thanks to Earl via Flickr.

Currently, an estimated ten million Americans suffer from osteoporosis, causing more than a million fractures, including hundreds of thousands of hip fractures, a common reason people end up in nursing homes. Many older women say they’d rather be dead than break their hip and end up in a home.

Bone is a dynamic, living organ that is constantly renewed through a process of remodeling and modeling involving bone breakdown by cells that eat bone, called osteoclasts, and bone formation by cells that build bone, called osteoblasts. Osteoporosis is caused by an imbalance between bone loss and bone gain, most often related to hormonal changes that occur during menopause. Is there anything we can do to help tip the balance back in bone’s favor? There are a number of specific compounds in plant foods that look promising, but that’s based on in vitro studies like this, where they basically just drip some plant compound on bone cells in a petri dish and see a boost in bone builder cells, or a drop in bone eater cells. But no matter how much people like cranberry sauce, they’re not injecting it into their veins. For phytonutrients to reach the bone, they first have to get absorbed from the digestive tract into our bloodstream and make it past the liver before they can circulate to our skeleton. So, what we would need is a so-called ex vivo study, where you take people, feed them a food—or not—and then draw their blood a few hours later and then drip their blood onto bone cells and see if there’s any difference. But nothing like that had ever been attempted…  until this study.

Normally, I’m not impressed with studies funded by marketing boards, which pay for studies like this, that found that eating almonds improved cycling distance and athletic performance… compared to cookies. But this study was brilliant, not surprisingly, given it was performed in the world-famous lab of Dr. David Jenkins.  There was a population study that suggested that eating almonds could protect against osteoporosis; so, they could have just dripped some almond extract on bone cells, but that’s not testing the whole food. Instead you could treat bone cells with the blood obtained from donors fed the whole food to directly test the effects of these foods at the cellular level.

So, they exposed human osteoclasts, the bone eaters, to blood obtained before and four hours after eating a handful of almonds. But wait a second, before I get to the results, if you ate a handful of almonds every day, wouldn’t you gain weight—that’s almost 200 calories? Let’s find out. If you add a handful or a handful and a half—like 35 almonds in addition to women’s regular diet as a mid-morning snack, and tell them to eat as much as they want for lunch and supper that day, people eat less; in fact so much less, they cancel out the nut calories. In this study, they all had the same breakfast, then zero, 173 or 259 calories worth of almonds as a snack, then ate as much lunch as they wanted, but the nuts appeared to be so satiating that they ate less for lunch or dinner such that, at the end of the day, there was no significant difference in total caloric intake between any of the three groups. Part of the reason we don’t tend to gain weight adding nuts to our diet may be because we end up flushing nearly a third of the calories down the toilet, because we just don’t chew well enough. This is why we think there’s so much less fat in our bloodstream after eating whole almonds compared to the same amount of almond oil taken out of the nuts.

So anyway, they wanted to see if they could suppress the activity of the cells that eat away our bones. And they found that blood serum obtained following the consumption of an almond meal inhibits human osteoclast formation, function, and gene expression, providing direct evidence to support the association between regular almond consumption and a reduced risk of developing osteoporosis. They also tried before and after eating other meals, rice or potatoes, to make sure there wasn’t just some effect of eating in general and no, the protective effect did appear specific to the almonds.

To see any graphs, charts, graphics, images, and quotes to which Dr. Greger may be referring, watch the above video. This is just an approximation of the audio contributed by Katie Schloer.

Please consider volunteering to help out on the site.

Images thanks to Earl via Flickr.

Doctor's Note

What about dairy products? See my Is Milk Good for Our Bones? video.

And what about calcium supplements? Check out Are Calcium Supplements Safe? and Are Calcium Supplements Effective?.

Surprised by the lack of weight gain from eating all those nuts? You won’t be after watching Nuts and Obesity: The Weight of Evidence. And if you think that’s surprising, Pistachio Nut for Erectile Dysfunction will really shock you.

Want to learn more about ingenious ex vivo studies? See:

One possible mechanism for why nuts may be so healthy for our bones can be found in my video Phytates for the Prevention of Osteoporosis. What about the power of prunes? See Prunes for Osteoporosis.

If you haven’t yet, you can subscribe to my videos for free by clicking here.

179 responses to “Almonds for Osteoporosis

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    1. I wouldn’t drink almond milk *for* bone protection in place a of weight bearing exercise and a healthy diet. And I love whole almonds, happily eating them for a variety of reasons/situations. But I wanted to point out that: there are times when milk is called for – certain recipes, on my oatmeal, etc. So, in that case, almond milk might be a good non-dairy milk to use. I’m just saying: It’s really not an either-or thing. It’s what the occasion calls for in my opinion.
      .
      I liked your post/point, especially it’s link to milk. I’m just making another point off of yours. :-)




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      1. Thea: A while ago, you told me that when making almond milk, it was not essential to strain. Since I didn’t drink almond milk anyway but added it to to my morning hot cereal, I tried it, found it excellent, and have been doing that ever since. I save money, have a product without any added junk and more nutritious because it contains the fiber. (In two minutes I make enough milk for a week at const of pennies.) I just want to thank you for the tip. (I learn a lot by watching Dr. Greger’s videos, reading the blogposts is an equally rewarding experience.)




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            1. Psych MD: I hope George will jump in and answer that question. I don’t really have a recipe. I just eye ball it. I would say that you can take any almond milk recipe out there and simply choose not to strain it. This works especially well if a) you have a high powered blender and b) you aren’t too picky about grit. Grit may be less of an issue if you are just pouring it over oatmeal. But for some recipes or for drinking plain, having some grit may not work or may not appeal.

              I’m a ‘it must be perfectly smooth’ type of picky person myself if I’m going to just drink it plain. So, there are times I just use commercial brands as I don’t want to work too hard (no straining for me), and I’m guaranteed not to have grit with the grocery store versions. But for someone like George, making the milk simply and skipping the straining works great, and I’m very glad he found that out for himself.




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              1. A tip if you want your homemade almond milk super smooth: buy raw almond butter (only ingred is almonds) and blend about 2 Tbsp with 3 C water until smooth. May add some vanilla extract. No need to strain anything. I find raw, creamy almond butter at Trader Joe’s, but I’m sure you can find it at other places too.




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                1. Thanks Stephanie! I’ve used that trick in the past also. :-) Thanks for the reminder and for sharing your nut butter to water ratio. Chef AJ buys almond butter in individual packets, which may work well for those people who do not want to buy a whole jar.




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            2. 1 cup almonds, 3 cups water. Blend and then strain. You can add a bit of Erythritol and/or vanilla. I use the almond meal in recipes to replace some of the flour. Store it in the freezer until you need it.




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            3. I use 1/4 cup whole, raw almonds to 3 cups water. Or you can use 1/8 cup almond butter instead. If you don’t have a high speed blender (Vitamix or Blendtec, etc.), you’ll want to soak the almonds overnight, or at least 4 hours.




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              1. I use Soyabella blender to make all sort of vegetable milk (and more, like soups, rice paste, and so on). After soaking whole almonds overnight, it takes 2-3 minutes to make almond milk. You get the almond okara as byproduct. At this point you may decide to mix the okara back into the milk or keep it in the refrigerator for other uses (cookies, soups, patties). Hope this helps :-)




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            4. I make it every morning for my oatmeal. 1/4 cup almonds & 1 c milk. Blend for 2 minutes, then dump into my pan with the oatmeal. I do not strain out the little pieces.




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        1. George – what a great idea. So simple yet practical and functional. You’re my kinda guy! Thanks for sharing with all of us.




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        2. Cool, I do the same since I never actually drink it but use it in recipes and such. Since I live on a tight budget I opt to stretch the almonds a bit with oats, maybe 1/2 of each. It works for me but some aren’t fond of the oaty taste, so add vanilla or cinnamon etc., or else toast the oats a bit first, or just blend and heat the brew after, which kind of thickens it a bit as oats do. I have yet to find an affordable workaround for the disgusting powdered non dairy coffee creamers though!




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          1. I’ve been slipping into Trader Joe’s and buying their soy creamer for when I’m at work. I never thought of stretching my almond milk by using oats. That’s a great idea, I’m going to try it!




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          2. Try some organic coconut milk-like Native Forest, and use the full fat
            one- a teaspoon to a tablespoon. it tastes amazing in coffee. You can
            drop in a tiny bit of vanilla extract for a different taste




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            1. Oh trust me, I LOVE coconut milk, but I really have to watch the fats for health reasons, so looking for something less lethal for me.




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        1. Just got osteoporosis diagnosis – i’m Mostly vegan, a runner, very active, post menopausal. I, too, would like to know how many almonds, prunes, whatever food there is that can rebuild some of the bone loss. Guessing it happens to most older women, but not a pleasant diagnosis to hear.




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          1. Margie,

            I’m sorry to hear that. Please don’t let being labeled with the diagnoses affect your self-perception or healthy lifestyle in a negative way. We live in a world full of over-diagnosis that unfortunately leads to many people taking unnecessary and sometimes dangerous medications when they never even had symptoms in the first place. Have you experienced symptoms of OP (fracture, becoming shorter)?

            Fortunately, osteoporosis can be stopped in it’s tracks with the right interventions. Weight-bearing activity is the #1 best way to combat OP, and it sounds like you’re already doing that. You’re on the right track with the almonds and prunes. Also consider adding in some whole grains, beans, and nuts. Whatever you do, don’t start eating dairy! https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cwKUvlypQOM

            Best,

            Julia




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    2. For practical purposes, almond milk is the same as water; or, if you prefer, flavored water. For some brands, it’s flavored sugar water and/or flavored “fortified” (with supplements) water.




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      1. I make my own by either grinding almonds in my spice grinder then in a blender with clod water, or, now that I have a better blender, just throwing them in with water. Almonds + water is fine with me.




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  1. This is actually exciting news given I am one of those “women of a certain age” group :) I have been focusing my nut consumption on walnuts in my cereal or salad but will now make way for more almonds. My mother suffered from severe osteoporosis so I’ve tried to be conscientious about daily weight bearing exercise and healthy eating. It’s good to know all of the healthy strategies we can employ — As I weave my way through all the conflicting advice, I know I can count on Dr. G, this site, and the wise regular contributors for solid guidance. Thanks to you all!




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    1. Hi Pam! Thanks for your comment and for being a loyal follower of NF and Dr. Greger. Sounds like you’re on the right track – keep up the good work!




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  2. Dr. G. mentions that the study included other NON-nut foods to look for the same effect and found none. Of course, I don’t expect the almond board to finance the study of walnuts, pecans or pistachio nuts, but I would not be surprised to discover they have a similar benefit. Would love to see this done.




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    1. I’d go so far as to suggest the study would specifically exclude other nuts to avoid the risk of finding another nut is the same or better. Yeah, I can be a cynic.




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      1. If you want to be a cynic just read the whole paper ;)
        I thought it strange that they would compare almonds (a fatty food) to rice and potatoes (very low fat foods) so I looked at the study.
        The comparison meals were not rice and potatoes, they were predominantly cheese and butter. (Purportedly added to make the comparison meal have the same fat and protein content as almonds)
        So it could be said this study was to establish if butter and cheese cause bone destruction compared to a control meal of almonds.
        Also, they did not test for osteoblast functioning. If that were reduced proportionately with osteoclast function there would be no net effect.
        I still like almonds, but I wont rename them ‘miracle almonds’ ;)




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        1. Thanks! I don’t have access to the full text. Based on your report, I think this is really just junk science and probably should not have been reported here at all.




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          1. I wouldnt go so far as to say junk science. The data itself is most likely valid.
            Sure, the reporting of the findings was engineered so journalists would walk away with a story that profits the people who funded the work, but studies do need funding.
            This study does add to the volume of evidence that shows plant foods to be more protective of bone health than animal foods.




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            1. For the benefit of those who cant read the full text, these are the recipes for the three meals they used:
              Almond meal: 60 g raw almonds, 97 g white bread
              Rice meal: 68 g cheddar cheese, 14 g butter, 60 g parboiled white rice
              Potato meal: 62 g cheddar cheese, 16 g butter, 68 g instant mashed potatoes
              All meals had essentially the same amounts of calories, carbohydrate, protein, and fatK




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              1. Kal: Thank you. Very helpful! And I appreciate your perspective on the study itself regarding its value. That makes a lot of sense to me.




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          2. I like McDougall’s take on nuts, it makes sense to me since we evolved in place without access to grocery stores, and we thrived on what was local. (Obviously, look at all of us!) Nuts are concentrated, seasonal, reproductive organs for trees and always come in a hard shell. Not really a food you’d rely on, but would enjoy when available and in the small portions you had “squirreled” away. Our numbers attest to our success on a (formerly) local diet of whatever was available, and I try to use that for perspective. I would love to be able to buy out the produce section, but that ain’t happening, so the variety in nature and my garden has “grounded” me to help make the best out of both science, and common sense. The farther we get from nature, the more we lose. I love technology too, but love my “roots” more! ;)




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        2. You are right. Most disappointing of all these studies is they always compare healthy food with unhealthy ones and test groups are among non WFPB eaters. We need more information comparing Whole-food Plan-based diets. This is my only complaint of Dr. greger approach. It may help SAD but it is of small help for WFPB-diet.




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  3. Cool vid ;-) Dried prunes work even better! Both (along with poppy seeds in muffins once a week) are definitely better than dairy!




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    1. Almond has protein, fat, fiber, vitamin E, calcium, Magnesium, phenolic compounds and flavonoids to name a few nutrients from top of my head. However for more accurate breakdown of nutrients I refer you to this article below.
      As far as having the nuts raw or roasted question, since almond has polyunsaturated fatty acids and process of heat treatment could cause lipid oxidation so I would recommend raw. However, if one has occasional roasted almonds that is fine too.

      Natural variability in the nutrient composition of California-grown almonds




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      1. Thanks but I’m specifically asking what accounts for the bone building effect of almonds per se – as opposed to any other nut.
        The general nutrition profile of almonds I know.




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        1. Hi, I noticed your question today and it is a good question. I wanted to mention that in the study that Dr G. looked at they used almond and it did not indicate that almond in comparison to other nuts in relation to Osteoporosis. In the study abstract , it indicates that consumption of almonds has been associated with increased bone minerals density. It also mentions that the direct effect of almonds on bone cells are not known. i am not sure which nutrient compnent has the most effect I would think it is the high calcium and phosphorus contect and the phenolic compounds and how it is absorbed and digested. I am going to do more search on that and hopefully learn more about this too.




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        1. Hi Robert,
          If you and others are interested, I have located a source of whole, raw, organic California almonds! I have no affiliation with this farm or ranch, but the almonds are wonderful and are grown in a sustainable manner. The reason they can ship raw almonds is that they come direct from the farm and not from a wholesaler. Here’s their website: http://massaorganics.com/
          P.S. Their almond butter is fabulous, as well as their nutty-flavored organic brown rice.




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            1. Yes, but most Americans and people in the world live in places where almonds arent’ grown. Here’s another source:http://www.organicalmondsraw.com/
              Bremner Farms. They can have truly organic almonds because they have a roadside stand. No fumigants. Thanks Big Ag for destroying our healthy food supply.




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        2. It’s the same thing with raw peanuts. It’s amazing how much regulators HATE raw plant foods. All it takes is one individual out of millions to allege illness and the regulators jump on writing laws completely disregarding the benefits for millions of other individuals. But same regulators don’t give a crap about the ill effects of non-plant foods. It’s food discrimination.




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  4. Are not those bone eating osteo something or anothers supposed to eat the spent and worn out bone cells? Isn’t that why women are prescri bed Boniva and other drugs that prevent the body from disposing of old bone and building new bone cells? And isn’t that why the drug takers get broken hips anyway because the bone that stays too long isn’t strong and cannot hold up to the stress of movement?




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    1. Yes,. . .you’re right. The makers of Boniva thought they’d solved the osteoporosis problem by keeping the osteoclasts from breaking down what the body would normally discard. What has been found, however, is that this treated bone is very brittle and fragile. Treated women were finding their jaw bones and femur bones shattering when doing things like stepping on a curb or chewing dinner.




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      1. Wow, yet again, they can’t mimic what plants do so well. Eat the REAL foods instead of an artificial extract of the targeted effect they are hoping for. It amazes me that when I go visit my friends they have scads of supplements and vitamins in view, with no apparent benefits, yet will not make the connection that the food source is superior! Easier to pop a pill and not change anything you like eh?




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  5. If someone is diagnosed with osteoporosis of the spine, can they ever get that bone back if they change their diet and do weight bearing exercises?
    I have heard conflicting reports.




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  6. Almonds should be soaked in a light salted water, and dried/toasted at low heat to wash the phytic acid out of the seed….what we should do with all nuts as per Dr. Weston A Price and NOURISHING TRADITIONS. They call them Crispy Nuts. Phytic acid disturbs our digestive enzymes.




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  7. Almonds to help prevent osteoporosis….As a 60 year old woman with already confirmed osteoporosis who does not take boniva, etc, I would like to know from one of the doctors/team if eating almonds will help me retain what bone mass I have, or is it too late?




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    1. The single best thing one can do for their osteoporitic bones is weight bearing exercise. The bones operate on a feedback system (as does the entire body). If the bones are not being used “much” the body does not waste energy/nutrients keeping the bones in full density. If you want to increase your bone density, jump rope, use weights, lift things, use your body.
      The same thing happens in your brain. New research shows that if you are losing your hearing – and not compensating with a hearing aid – the corresponding neurons in your brain that used to receive that sound atrophy and disappear, adding to dementia.
      The exact same thing happens in babies brains after they are born. The neurons in the brain that get used by the sensory system (eyes, ears, taste, touch, smell) grow strong and the rest of the neurons in the baby brain are culled and discarded via atrophy. Think of it like a trail in the woods; the more its used the more defined the trail. The body is efficient and does not keep clutter around because its expensive (nutrition, etc.) to do so. The body does not save unused parts for a rainy day. (except for fat I’m sorry to say)
      Elderly Japanese women (I’m talking in their 90’s) regularly sit on the floor and get up and down without assistance. That’s because they do it all the time. The body knows to keep muscles and bones strong.
      Almonds may be helpful but they won’t replace what the body needs to keep itself in functional shape. . which is active use both physical and mental. As a neuroscientist and physiologist I’ve seen plenty of bodies and brains that get no use. There’s not much to be done if we don’t do our basic homework.
      And no – it is definitely not too late. Don’t baby your bones, . . use them! and good luck.




      1
      1. Great point about weight bearing excercise to help osteoblast cells makes new bones. I would also add for those people who have difficulty with walking even simple movements while sitting for example using can of beans in hands and do simple movement up and down and side to side would help too.




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        1. I have walking challenges due to being post-polio. I recently realized that using forearm crutches is like walking on my arms/hands and is stimulating my arm bones. For my leg bones, since I can no longer jump rope or do jumping jacks, I hold onto the kitchen counter and stomp! In my chair yoga class, the teacher has us lift our legs under the knee (in a sitting position) and drop them onto the ground with a thud. This also stimulates the bones. Lots of creative ways of keeping osteoporosis at bay. (My osteopenia has reversed as a result of my weight bearing exercises.)




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      2. Thanks GEBrand…It’s helpful to know that your bone density DID improve with lifestyle changes (food and movement!) I will take both to heart…




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        1. We forget that our body knows how to maintain and heal itself…if we would just quit injuring it! We can get away with an awful lot while we are young because nature wants us to pass on our genome, but the older we get, the more careful we have to be. I am thoroughly convinced from my own experience that a Whole Food Plant Based diet high in starch and low in fat is the way to go to reverse even serious health issues, and I am certainly not the only one! You are what you eat, food IS medicine, and all that. Sounds so cliche, but there’s a reason! :) Good luck!




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    2. Bones are made of Phosphorus and Calcium. Perhaps a phosphorus source, like pumpkin seeds, would be of benefit. K2, D3, Magnesium, Zinc, Phosphorus, Boron, and Strontium are atoms that make up bone, and are needed for bone growth. The exact food source rich in these nutrients eludes us. Perhaps it is a seed or coffee, something like the structure of wood, a raw unsoaked plant based food.
      http://www.naturalhealth365.com/0880_pumpkin_seeds.html/




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  8. I use almond milk, made myself, on my oatmeal but make my granola using the almond pulp obtained from making the almond milk and therefore get the whole almond. The almond pulp gives a nice nutty flavour to the granola.




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    1. Avoid the use of refined vegetable oils is the advice in the article. Of course, a whole food, plant-based diet is anti-inflammatory and turns off the cancer genes.




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      1. Thats awesome, thanks for taking the time to tell me where that was, I’ve been looking for the last couple of days. Some of the media here in England were trying to spin it as eating mostly vegetables will cause cancer. Have a great day Julie! Tom.




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        1. Yeah, where’s the profit in veggies, and media always wants a story to grab the public’s attention to sell their product! Big industry rules the world and veggies don’t fit in that model, we have to use our own good sense and think about what we evolved eating. If you’ve ever tried survival in nature, you learn pretty quick plants are everywhere and easy to get, but living things run away, and require an energy expenditure and group effort that would have made it rare. If we truly were meant to eat meat, we would have evolved the enabling characteristics of omnivores like bears, raccoon, opossums, skunks, etc., and also eat it the way they do!
          The argument that we fueled our evolution because we learned to use tools to hunt doesn’t fly…often apes do too. They still spend the majority of their day consuming fibrous plants, low in energy content. The only difference between us and our primate cousins is we learned to use fire and to cook and concentrate calories (energy) and discovered the starchy storage organs of plants, and even developed extra copies of amylase to digest them. Our teeth and jaw’s shrunk in comparison to primates because breaking down the fibers got a lot easier with cooking, more nutrients became available, and with all the new free time and better fueled brain, ta da, humanity! LOL. it just makes a whole lot more sense to me than the silly meat eater theory! If that was the case, lions and tigers and wolves would be smartest of all. Eat your veggies :)




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        2. So true! I thought it was weird that all the articles from the UK had nearly identical headlines. I think since Sarah Knapton published first, the other papers basically copied the byline. Terrible journalism, all around!




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    2. Dr Greger’s response on his facebook page-

      Here’s the actual paper: http://mbe.oxfordjournals.org/…/molbev.msw049.full.pdf… As you can see it says nothing of the sort. They compared a genetic marker in a population in India (most of which ate meat) to a U.S. population and found higher rates of a gene variant that facilitates the elongation of omega 6 fatty acids. They found higher rates in India, which they speculated may have come from natural selection of generations of a population which historically has been about 40% vegetarian. Says nothing about the health of U.S. vegetarians (or Indian vegetarians for that matter). Even if you have this gene variant, you’d just avoid omega 6 rich oils like sunflower, safflower, and cottonseed oil, which is a good idea anyway. Classic man bites dog story media nonsense I’m afraid.




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      1. I really enjoyed the original research, though. The key takeaway for me was that straying from a vegetarian diet is doubly dangerous for people with the ‘vegetarian allele’. It makes total sense when you look at cancer and heart disease rates in traditionally largely vegetarian people switch to a SAD diet. I published a more thorough review on my blog this morning.




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    3. I published a piece in response to the telegraph article on my blog, ModVegan.com, this morning (“Veganism Kills!). I also have a free link to the original research from Dr. Brenna. I was immediately suspicious of the title from the telegraph article – so biased, and all the quotes are cherry picked to make a veg. diet look bad.




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  9. When studying osteoporosis, I never liked the Fosamax effect, which preserves bone by reducing the bone resorption activity of osteoclasts but does not increase (actually reduces) the bone building activity of osteoblasts. Bone remodeling needs both processes working in tandem. It keeps our bones young. I don’t like remedies that down-regulate a natural process (clearing out old bone) rather than restoring the full functioning of the process. It’s a disappointment that the study in the video only looked at the impact on bone eaters, not bone builders. The research doesn’t tell us whether almonds just help retain old bone or helps build young bone. (Still, almonds are a great food in many, many ways. Eat almonds. Better yet, eat a variety of nuts and seeds.)




    1
        1. As mentioned in the article, those with the genes should avoid the use of refined vegetable oils: a whole food, plant-based diet is anti-inflammatory and turns off the cancer genes.




          0
        2. Dr Greger’s response on his facebook page-

          Here’s the actual paper: http://mbe.oxfordjournals.org/…/molbev.msw049.full.pdf… As you can see it says nothing of the sort. They compared a genetic marker in a population in India (most of which ate meat) to a U.S. population and found higher rates of a gene variant that facilitates the elongation of omega 6 fatty acids. They found higher rates in India, which they speculated may have come from natural selection of generations of a population which historically has been about 40% vegetarian. Says nothing about the health of U.S. vegetarians (or Indian vegetarians for that matter). Even if you have this gene variant, you’d just avoid omega 6 rich oils like sunflower, safflower, and cottonseed oil, which is a good idea anyway. Classic man bites dog story media nonsense I’m afraid.




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  10. I know that Dr. G does not favour vitamin K2 (menaquinone-7, or MK-7) supplementation, holding that our bodies can synthesize this. It is worth mentioning this stuff when discussing calcium metabolism, as its role is pivotal (I have been so impressed with its importance that I now go to the trouble of making my own natto (by far, the best dietary source) and consume about 3 Tbl per day in my green smoothie. Search this site on “vitamin K2” to hear Dr. G’s take on the subject.




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    1. I am surprised too. K2 has remarkable longevity and risk prevention results. I believe he said much of the nutrition we need is not found in vitamins, but lost from the large colon. If only there were such an end product plant based food. You will probably gain much health benefits from your natto.




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    2. My partner and I split a 3oz package of mailorder Megumi natto daily. That’s a pricey habit, but we acquired a taste for it years ago when we were macrobiotic– and we value its potential health benefits. Would you be willing to share your technique for homemade natto?




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      1. I would love to. I get so much satisfaction from the whole process. Since it is slightly off topic, I will give you a rough sketch for everyone’s benefit, and then provide an email address, in case you or anyone else wants to follow up for detailed instructions.

        Basically, I use an InstantPot electric pressure cooker to cook the pre-soaked soybeans for 4 hours, using a special technique that steams the beans instead of immersing them in liquid. Then I culture the beans with starter (commercial starter spores initially, then my own starter from the previous batch), and ferment it for 24 hours using the InstantPot’s ‘Yoghurt’ setting.

        It is a more time-consuming process than making yoghurt. (I also make enough soy yoghurt to consume a cup or more per day. I am a huge fan of live cultured foods.) It took me a lot of research to find what I consider to be the best technique. My results are better than anything I have seen elsewhere, commercial or otherwise.

        My email is dfbarbour@gmail.com.




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  11. I am leary about eating almonds because they have a huge imbalance of omega 3 and omega 6 fatty acids. Almonds have a high omega 6 content. Omega 6 fatty acids can cause inflammation and add to the plaque build up in arteries. Maybe 2 or 3 almonds a day might be OK. But, not a handful.

    You can reduce bone loss by stop eating meat. Meat makes your blood PH more acid. The body has to borrow calcium from the bones to buffer the PH in the blood in order to bring it back to normal. Stop eating meat, stop eating sugar, work out at the gym, do some walking.




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      1. Hi, Robert. I think that link only relates to pH changes relative to animal protein consumption. But what happens when, say, someone’s diet is mainly sugar (or doesn’t provide much calcium – or their system doesn’t process it well)?




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      2. Interesting video. I was aware that eating meat can also add to the problem of muscle atrophy, but I didn’t know that some studies may show that eating meat does not cause bone loss. Of course, there are other biochemical aspects to how calcium moves in the body such as our level of magnesium and vitamin K2, and vitamin D. It is a very complex system. But, I would just GUESS that if meat can contribute to muscle loss, it probably also contributes to some SMALL degree to bone loss. We just have not figured it entirely out yet. I say this because bone loss happens as we age. There should be a study to compare bone loss to meat eaters versus vegans.




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    1. It seems to be a general rule that our bodies seem to take what we need from plant sources, but we can “OD” on the calcium, iron, fatty acids, etc. stored in animal sources, among the slew of other negatives. Considering animals get those stored nutrients from the plants they eat, makes a whole lot more sense for us to do the same! Simplistic, but works for me!




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  12. We get osteoporosis from a bad diet of food and a bad diet of movement, according to Katy Bowden in MOVE YOUR DNA. We have to move more! Give our bones something to adapt from. We sit too much, we concentrate our movement to once a day. We are really on duty having a body. No way around it, the more you move and expect action from your body….the stronger all the different components of our bodies are! She calls it NUTRITIONAL MOVEMENT.




    0
    1. Mary, I definitely agree. The “piezoelectric response” of bone is based on pressure, if I recall my A&P studies correctly … which would implicate a sedentary lifestyle. As well, the bone’s function as a calcium source for other aspects (pH balancing, muscles, etc.) comes into play, as should the effectiveness of the digestive system (and, no doubt, hormone balances). While I enjoy the site and visit it often, I always remember there’s a relatively narrow context – but I also see a lot that can be used in trying to build a more comprehensive system based on the current data. In the end I think there are often too many variables, so lots of views will change over the years.




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    1. I believe it depends on which component of the almond is causing the effect. If it is simply the level of phytonutrients in the blood stream, the effect should be similar between the butter and the whole nut. Processing may even make the almond more absorbable. The difference between whole nuts and nut butters seems only in relation to gut bacterial food/microbiome as discussed here- Are green smoothies bad for you?

      If the component is heat or chemically sensitive then there will be a difference between raw Vs roasted (although truely ‘raw’ almonds are rare- legally need steam treatment or fumigation first in many countries).

      Hard to really say without knowing the mechanism of action!




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  13. Ha, didn’t fall for the “Snoopavision” prank you guys! LOL
    I was wondering if the fat sparing effect of eating almonds would apply if they were blended. I should probably read the comments first, but by then I always forget what I wanted to ask…and I wish that was an April Fools day incident, but it’s daily! I’d blame it on age, but THAT issue is word recall…knowing exactly what I want to say, but the word is buried! Drives me nuts, I am gonna wear out the online thesaurus! lol




    0
    1. I would have thought that blending would have decreased the fat sparing effect, but at least with regard to calories consumed/compensated for, processes like blending don’t seem to affect the nuts, for example-

      The dietary compensation theory

      AND

      Testing the pistachio principle

      This article highlights a study showing a benefit for weight for both nuts and nut butters-
      http://nutritionfacts.org/2013/09/19/choosing-the-best-nutrition-bar/

      “In general, the 5-10% of Americans that average a tablespoon or more of dried fruit a day tend to be less overweight, less obese, and have a slimmer waist with less abdominal obesity. They tended to eat more, but weighed less. Similar findings were found for those that eat nuts and nut butters, lower body mass index, slimmer waist, and significantly less excess weight and obesity.”

      The only potential negative (if you are focusing on just one food- nut butter Vs nuts- rather than the context of the whole diet) would be the bacteria food/microbiome health, as mentioned here-

      Are green smoothies bad for you?




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  14. Too bad they didn’t compare almonds to steak or cheese. Would be interested to see the results of the latter, and if they actually contribute more to osteoclasts




    0
      1. Ah interesting. I haven’t had time to actually engage the paper yet, but he never mentioned exact food other than mainly almonds. Will have to take a look at the paper asap.




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        1. I think cheese in 2 groups and not in the almond group really confuses the whole study. How can almonds vs cheese for osteoclast function be well controlled research?




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          1. Well, board-funded research will always have its liabilities in my opinion. They didn’t test against other nuts, out of personal interest most likely, which is understandable. Yet, still regrettable. I agree cheese is an odd choice for comparison, but I guess they figured if they match up against an unhealthy food, they may see better results? I read the comment you mentioned from Kal, and I agree not measuring osteoblast concentration/activity is also regrettable.




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            1. I think a cheese comparison is actually a good idea considering the hype of dairy foods and bone health! I’d like to see more head-to-head controlled studies of dairy Vs plant foods with specific bone health outcome objectives!




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  15. Plants are greater than the some of their parts. Phytonutrients are a research topic as healing of osteoporosis. Supplementation with K2, Magnesium, and Phosphorus (like pumpkin seeds and almonds) has been helpful. Perhaps nuts and whole plants are superior. I love supplementing my diet with plants, and would like to learn about how to create a balanced diet from plants just for me.




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    1. Just eat whole unprocessed plants as possible in as much variety as possible. Avoid refined sugars, refined grains and extracted oils to the greatest extent possible. And that is pretty much a balanced plant based diet in two sentences.




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  16. I getcha, Thea. I looked at some recipes a while ago and they all involved more steps than I cared to go through so I thought maybe you had some unique twist in mind. I love almonds. I eat a variety of nuts every day. For milk I use Trader Joe’s unsweetened soy milk. Judging by the nutrition label it seems to retain more of the original food value than the typical store-bought almond milk.




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  17. I just want everyone to be clear on this almond adventure, (not sure if this is in the video, these videos get very long) Thru my research, all almonds bought in North America are all pasturized which means no benefits because the skin and outer layer has been compromised. I buy mine from Spain in bulk
    .




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    1. Can you quantify “compromised” for me. In what way does pasteurization degrade the nutritional content of the almonds? Are there studies that quantify the reduction in specific phytonutrients as a result of being pasteurized?

      These are honest questions. Almonds have to be pasteurized because of recent salmonella outbreaks that were traced to raw almonds and so almonds for sale in the US must be either steamed until the surface temperature of the almonds reaches 200 F (93 C) or fumigated with propylene oxide which is a known carcinogen. If the nutrient degradation from steam pasteurization is small, I could live with continuing with that path to dealing with potentially dangerous bacterial contamination. But if it can be shown that one of the more nutritious foods is seriously degraded by steam pasteurization for a bacteria that comes from contamination of the nuts by animal wastes, then the focus needs to be mandating ways that almonds are grown, handled and tested to avoid the contamination problem in the first place. Hey I know, maybe if we didn’t try raising so many millions of animals crammed into small pens standing knee deep in their own wastes, then maybe their clouds of dried feces wafting down wind from these places wouldn’t contaminate all the plant foods this “dust” falls on. Nah, that would be far too radical a solution.




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  18. I would think other whole foods would also aid such as sesame seeds, beans, green leafy vegetables as turnip greens as here almonds.




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  19. DR. my question is a little off the topic. I´d like to hear your opinion, because this topic is very important and controversial. I’d to know which is the best
    sources or supplements of omega-3 oil?
    Triglyceride fish oil supplements or ethyl ester fish oil supplements? Which works optimally against Alzheimer’s disease?
    I´m looking forward to receiving good news.




    0
    1. BRUCEWAYNE: Dr. Greger does not recommend any fish oil. He has several videos showing both how ineffective fish oil has been shown to be plus how contaminated, even brands that are supposedly “pure”. However, Dr. Greger does recommend taking pure omega 3 oil as derived from the source: algae. You can see his recommendation here: http://nutritionfacts.org/2011/09/12/dr-gregers-2011-optimum-nutrition-recommendations/
      .
      When it comes to protection against Alzehimer’s there are some foods which have been shown to be helpful. You may want to check out this page: http://nutritionfacts.org/topics/alzheimers-disease/ This page is very good news as it shows that there are some things we have control over when it comes to alzehimers. It’s not a guarantee, but anything to lower the risk is good news in my book. Don’t you think?
      .
      For more about fish oil check out: http://nutritionfacts.org/topics/fish-oil/




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  20. Points to ponder….

    http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/11/141105140708.htm

    “We think it’s important to reinforce the fact that osteoporosis is not just a woman’s disease,” said Rozental. Studies have shown that men have twice the mortality rate of women both during initial hospitalization and in the year following a hip fracture. Survival rates following a wrist fracture, the number-one upper extremity fracture in older adults, also are lower among men.

    “Treating men for bone fractures, but not the underlying cause, places them at a greater risk for future bone breaks and related complications,” said Rozental. “The results of this study lead us to suggest that men over the age of 50 with fractures of the distal radius should undergo further clinical assessment and bone density testing to better identify those at high risk for future fracture as well as those who would benefit from further treatment.”

    http://drhoffman.com/article/strontium-for-bone-health-2/

    Further, scientists are looking into the benefits of strontium for osteoarthritis because researchers hypothesize that strontium might also improve cartilage metabolism; additionally there may be protection against dental caries since 10 percent of subjects that had no dental carries in a 10-year study sponsored by the U.S. Navy resided in a small town that had unusually high levels of strontium in the municipal water supply.

    It is my clinical opinion that strontium citrate is absorbed better than the other forms of this mineral.

    Remember that strontium is very closely related to calcium. They both utilize the same carrier protein for transport. Calcium will win this tug of war effortlessly. The take home message is to take strontium 4 hours away from calcium (preferably other minerals as well) before bed. Currently, I dose strontium at 681mg in one dose prior to bed (each strontium citrate capsule contains 227mg of pure strontium citrate = 3 capsules) on an empty stomach (defined as 2 hours after a meal).

    -no link-

    There are considerable variations in the quality of drinking water in Norway. The researchers studied variations in magnesium and calcium levels in drinking water between different areas, as these are assumed to have a role in the development of bone strength. They wanted to examine whether there was a correlation between magnesium and calcium concentrations in drinking water and the incidence of hip fracture.

    The study results show that magnesium protects against hip fracture for both men and women. The researchers found no independent protective effect of calcium.

    It’s well known that cardiovascular deaths, including sudden cardiac deaths, occur far less frequently in areas that have hard water, which contains lots of minerals, compared to areas with soft water, which is relatively mineral free. British researchers took a close look at this data and narrowed the protective effects to one specific mineral: magnesium.

    ** the local geniuses decided to soften ALL water at the plant and charge extra for it…they’ve found a way to reduce people’s health…and charge extra for it….**




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  21. Nice video, as usual. However, at 3:27, I was confused. 0, 28 and 42 g? Either 0-21-42 or 0-14-28-42. (To get a linear independent variable)? What did I miss?

    I often make fresh almond milk in a small blender of Magic Bullet type. Quick and easy, easy to clean. Just love it.
    Maximum volume of the blender is 350 ml (cup = 1.5 US). 10 almonds (~ 12 g) + 1 teaspoon cinnamon / 350 ml of water.




    0
    1. When you strain the pulp out of the resulting milk save it and add it to a bean burger recipe rather than just throwing it away and losing nutrients and fiber that remain behind.




      0
    1. I just listened, quickly, to the portion of this video tape about the risks of high protein consumption. Dr. McDougall does, indeed, mention two studies which he says showed that consumption of soy protein and seitan (wheat protein) result in bone loss. He does not give those references, so I cannot check them out. I wonder if these studies actually showed that there was increased excretion of calcium in the urine, and Dr. McDougall ASSUMED that this calcium was coming from the bones. I say this because Dr. Greger has shown in these two videos that protein intake causes increased excretion of calcium in urine, but also increased absorption of calcium from the intestines, so there probably isn’t much net loss of calcium:
      1) http://nutritionfacts.org/video/alkaline-diets-animal-protein-and-calcium-loss/ ; also
      2) http://nutritionfacts.org/2014/07/31/does-animal-protein-cause-osteoporosis/

      Excess protein clearly puts increased stress on the kidneys, which is why people with renal failure are always recommended to eat low protein diets. I think it is clear that plant protein is preferable to animal protein for various reasons, as Dr. Greger discusses:
      3) http://nutritionfacts.org/video/plant-protein-preferable/; and
      4) http://nutritionfacts.org/2014/11/20/how-beans-help-our-bones/ — about how beans, and specifically phytates, HELP our bones.




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  22. I thought that beans and legumes are good for bones and prevented arthritis and osteoporosis but after hearing what Dr. McDougall said about them, you can not think, McDougall says over a cup of legumes and beans per day causes osteoporosis and arthritis and bone degeneration. He says in the video of my previous comment.




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    1. Thank you for your question! Dr. Greger recommends 3 servings of beans per day as part of his Daily Dozen. One serving would consist of either ¼ cup hummus/bean dip, ½ cup cooked beans/lentils/split peas, or 1 cup fresh peas/spouted lentils. Here’s another video that you might find helpful: Increased Lifespan From Beans.




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  23. How about Peanuts instead of Almonds ? Almonds are expensive. I eat lots of raw peanuts (~1/4th the price of almonds). Also, since bones are living organs, how about teeth ? My dentist said teeth are the only organ in the body that cannot heal themselves. For example cavities left alone, will never heal themselves & with time get worse. Is that true ? I thought may be an embryonic cell injection into the gum or infected teeth may benefit the teeth and help the teeth heal itself (just an idea).




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    1. Hello Ray! Thanks for your questions – I can definitely help answer one of them. Peanuts do contain some calcium, but not high amounts. There’s about 26 mg of calcium in 1 oz of peanuts vs 75 mg in 1 oz of almonds. You can definitely still enjoy the raw peanuts. Just make sure to include other sources of calcium-rich plant food into your diet as well. A few of my favs are broccoli, kale, and bok choy!




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    2. Hi Ray, Good question about dental health. Dr Greger has great videos on dental health which may help answer some of your questions. I included the link below.

      Dental Health




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  24. I really need this answered by Dr. Greger. Him and Dr. Fuhrman says that beans are very important. However, some vegan doctors say that we should limit them to 1 cup a day. I love beans and I eat 4-6 cups of beans a day. In fact, beans are my main starch. I read how not to die and he does not put an upper limit on beans. Is there an upper limit? Thank you.




    0
    1. There is no upper limit that I have ever heard of for beans and legumes. In my personal experience with myself and my patients the only limiting factor is the amount of flatulence you may create.

      Can you give me the names of the Vegan doctors who say limit beans to 1 cup per day? Or the resource you are reading. I would love to investigate why?




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  25. Osteoclasts eat away old bone. If we reduce the osteosclast activity, we end up with older, less healthy bone staying there longer: osteoclast reducing activity could be a good strategy only in case of octeoclast hyperactivity, Instead, boosting osteoblast would increase the formation of new bone. I wonder if any almond-effect can be seen also on osteoblasts.




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  26. Heat treatment, in its process to destroy whatever it is they are afraid o,f the whole nut is compromised and has no nutritional value it is worthless except for the ruffage part




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  27. According to google 100 gram of almonds has 264 mg of calcium. If the calcium comes from the ground, doesn’t the amount of calcium in the ground have an effect on the amount of calcium in the almond ? Can the farmers increase the calcium in almonds by fortifying the soil with calcium (like they artificially fortify cow’s milk with calcium & other stuff).




    0
    1. Ray: According to the book, Becoming Vegan, 35 grams of almonds has between 79-115 mg calcium. That range suggests to me that, as you also suggest, that the amount of calcium in the ground can affect the amount of calcium in the almonds. (Unless the difference in calcium amounts relates to different type of almonds.) But how much can we change the amount of calcium in an almond by fortifying the soil? I don’t know that we have an answer to that? Presumably an almond plant would have a maximum amount of calcium that it could use and still be a healthy almond plant. But I don’t know.




      0
    2. Farmers commonly put lime made from limestone(calcium carbonate) on the soil every few yrs to restore the soil ph, which acidifies over time so there is no shortage of calcium in the soil. Plants are limited to the amount they can absorb. Also there are all these chemical interactions. Too much of one nutrient can limit the uptake of another. So its all about getting the nutrient balance right which results in optimal health and production/yield of the plant or in this case almond tree. So putting more calcium in the soil won’t lead to more calcium in the finished product beyond a certain point.




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  28. Does this help slow the progression of osteoporosis if one already has it? I have it as a result of the cancer treatment I received years ago, most probably due to prednisone (long term use of steroid). I do weight-bearing exercise and eat healthily so I’m wondering if this will also help to even reverse the osteoporosis? Thanks in advance




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  29. Are there any pro-osteoBLASTOgenic foods supported by ex vivo studies as impressive as almonds are for antiosteoclastogenesis (other than plant based calcium)?




    0
  30. This is really interesting to someone like me, a post-menopausal woman with a family history of osteoporosis, and presumably could also be relevant to people with fractures or having bone surgery. But do we have any sense of whether there is a dose effect and a minimum therapeutic dose? How often and how many almonds would you need to eat to have a beneficial effect?




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  31. I would be very grateful for any advice for post menopausal women suffering from vaginal atrophy and associated UTIs. I eat a vegan diet including the daily foods recommended in “How Not to Die” other than the Hibiscus tea which I thought might be irritating my bladder.




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  32. It may be the boron. We already know that boron is good for the bones,
    as the body requires boron for proper metabolism and utilization of
    various bone-building factors. There are 23 mg/kg of boron per fresh
    weight in almonds, far more than most other foods. Other foods high in boron are peanuts which contain 18 mg/kg, and hazelnuts which contain 16 mg/kg. So these nuts may have benefits similar to almonds.

    In another video, Dr. Greger points out that prunes are also very good for the bones. Prunes contain a whopping 27 mg/kg of boron, the highest of any food. Raisins are also very high at 25 mg/kg, so
    raisins may have benefits similar to prunes.
    Dates contain 9.2 mg/kg.




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  33. Hmm now I ask me, can I eat almond with (primary hyperparathyroidism) or is this bad for the gall bladder, pacreas or kidney, because the hight calcium? Or maby it is better eat 3 almond all 4 hours so that not to much calcium come in the blootstream?




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  34. I have a question regarding eating raw nuts versus roasted and their effect on suppressing bone destruction. I would gladly eat my almonds raw but admit eating them roasted (with tamarin!) makes them that much tastier. Are there any facts out there on this?




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  35. This is great! I’m looking for more ways to improve the health of my teeth and gums. Might diatomaceous earth also be beneficial, either drunk in water, or brushed with? Thank you for the help!




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  36. Dorange,

    The good news with bones is that they are a dynamic system that can change.

    With that said, I would encourage you to look at your blood work carefully and be checking your vitamin K, vitamin D levels, free testosterone and other hormones, along with B-12 and RBC magnesium to start the conversation. Have you had your digestion checked ? Are you using any enzymes with your meals ? And of course weight bearing exercises are a must. Please also note the many articles on Dr. Greger’s site: https://nutritionfacts.org/?fwp_search=osteoporosis&fwp_content_type=video

    I encourage you to see a physician who is using a functional approach, not just some of the standard injectables which are now proving to be less effective and with more adverse events seen now that they have been in the marketplace for an extended period.

    Dr. Alan Kadish moderator for Dr. Greger




    0
    1. Thanks, Dr. Kadish
      All my levels are OK, my digestion is OK, and I eat a lot of probiotic foods with my meals. My only issue is exercise, because I have a neurologic condition besides a high level os osteoorosis despite all that. I have been refusing bisphosphonates, cannot take boro or strontium for other reasons. I am under the care of a good neurologist now, and I guess my way out is through exercise and supplementation.




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  37. Hello. I saw this video and just couldn’t stop thinking about my grandma… She has osteoporosis and she is overweight by 20kgs… Is there any way I could contact with Dr Greger..? I really want to help her but I don’t know exactly how. Thank you in advance




    1
    1. Hello Vasia! Unfortunately, Dr. Greger is unable to answer most of the questions posted here, however, we do have an amazing team
      of volunteer doctors, nurses, and dietitians who answer questions. I have forwarded your message to them.
      Please note that we don’t have enough volunteers to get all questions answered, so an answer is not guaranteed.




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      1. Hello Marie,

        I totally understand. Thank you very much for taking the time to answer to me.I really appreciate it. That’s okay. I hope someone answers though because I am very concerned. Thank you again.




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    2. Hello Vasia,
      I am a family doctor with a private practice in lifestyle medicine, and also a volunteer moderator for this website. There are several things your grandmother could do to treat her osteoporosis, without resorting to medications such as “bisphosphonates” (Fosamax is one type; these can have serious side effects). A good way to discover these is to search the NutritionFacts website using the term “osteoporosis”. You will find, in addition to the above video about the benefits of eating almonds:
      1) About the benefits of eating foods high in phytates, especially beans: https://nutritionfacts.org/video/phytates-for-the-prevention-of-osteoporosis/
      2) About the benefits of eating vegetables, and dried fruits, especially prunes: https://nutritionfacts.org/video/prunes-for-osteoporosis/
      3) About the benefits of exercise:https://nutritionfacts.org/video/longer-life-within-walking-distance/. Note: weight-bearing exercise is especially important for osteoporosis.
      4) About the importance of eating soy: https://nutritionfacts.org/video/who-shouldnt-eat-soy/

      I hope this helps.

      Dr. Jon
      PhysicianAssistedWellness.com




      1
    3. Hi Vasia,

      I know how you feel. My Nan also has osteoporosis. How old is your Grandmother? If she is open minded, I would get her to watch Dr Greger’s videos. And show her the links the team have sent you. Dr Greger’s videos helped me cure Asthma. Plants are our medicine. Would she eat a Plant Based Diet?

      Dr Greger has a cook book coming out end of this year. I would get this for your Grandmother as a Christmas Gift. I am buying it this year so I can get my partner and daughter healthy. https://nutritionfacts.org/2016/06/30/not-die-cookbook/

      Good luck!




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  38. I am concerned that I am not getting enough Vit k2 on a vegan diet. I have osteopenia & have been told Vit. K2 is essential.




    0
    1. Roz,

      You can check your blood levels easily. Please ask your physician for this test in addition to your vitamin D and red blood cell magnesium. This is not a comprehensive list but should be a starting point. Remember that the magnesium blood level needs to be from red blood cells, not serum, to be accurate.

      You might also make a point of evaluating your digestion, as intake without good absorption is not going to address your issue. It’s been my clinical experience that in addition to diet this has been a pivotal aspect causing the osteopenia.

      Dr. Alan Kadish moderator for Dr. Greger
      http://www.Centerofhealth.com




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    1. Hi Cathy. I am a moderator for NutritionFacts.org and I will be delighted to help you.

      I searched the site and the only information listed is Fukushima & Radioactivity in Seafood. A search on PubMed yielded nothing specific on California Almonds but it might be interesting to take a look at these sources Dr Greger cited in the radioactivity in seafood video:
      http://journals.sagepub.com/doi/abs/10.2190/HS.42.3.m
      https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22403909




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  39. BRILLIANT VIDEO AS USUAL! I wonder if there are any studies on homemade Almond Milk with distilled water? And if heat changes it’s nutrition value?
    My poor Nan has Osteoporosis. So I will most certainly try and eat almonds every day. Especially, as my family suffer from bone problems. And many hip operations.

    Out of interest, if anyone could share information on Morphine, I would appreciate it. My Nan said she was in pain, she has Osteoporosis. But I am told this is not possible as she is on Morphine. Any help and advice would be appreciated. Many thanks Sharon x

    P.S. Thanks Dr Greger for sharing all your videos for free. Thanks to you I have managed to get off my Inhalers. I know plants heal.




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  40. Hello Sharon,
    Thank you for your question. I am a family doctor with a private practice in lifestyle medicine, and also a volunteer moderator for this website.

    First, about the morphine. If your Nan is still in significant pain, then she is not being given a high enough dose of pain reliever(s). It’s as simple as that. Anyone who says that a patient cannot be in pain because they are already taking morphine is, frankly, either very ignorant about pain and pain relief, or else is just trying to get you to stop asking for more pain medicine by telling you something that isn’t true.

    Regarding homemade almond milk: If you make this without heating it up, I’m quite sure that ground-up almonds plus water is every bit as good as whole almonds. However, I do not know about the effect of heat on almonds. To be safe, you might try finding a recipe that does not involve heating things up.

    I hope this helps.
    Dr. Jon
    PhysicianAssistedWellness.com
    Volunteer moderator for NutritionFacts.org.




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  41. I make my own almond milk in a COLD PRESS juice extractor and then just add the milk and nut fibre together, which is quite delicious plus get the added fibre.




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  42. I make my own almond milk by using a COLD PRESS extractor, but then add the extracted ground almonds to the milk, which is delicious, plus having the extra fibre.




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