Does Apple Cider Vinegar Help with Weight Loss?

Does Apple Cider Vinegar Help with Weight Loss?
4.47 (89.47%) 19 votes

CT scans confirm daily vinegar consumption can lead to a significant loss of abdominal fat.

Discuss
Republish

Vinegar has evidently been used as a weight-loss aid for nearly 200 years, but does it work? Well, like hot sauce, it can be a nearly calorie-free way to flavor foods, and there’s all sorts of tasty exotic vinegars out there now, like fig, peach, and pomegranate, to choose from, but the question is: is there something special about vinegar that helps with weight loss? Vinegar is simply a dilute solution of acetic acid, which takes energy for our body to metabolize, activating an enzyme called AMPK, which is like our body’s fuel gauge. If it senses that we’re low, it amps up energy production, and tells the body to stop storing fat and start burning fat. And so, given our obesity epidemic, it is crucial that oral compounds with high bioavailability are developed to safely induce chronic AMPK enzyme activation, which would be potentially beneficial for long-term weight loss. No need to develop such a compound, though, if you can buy it in any grocery store. We know vinegar can activate AMPK in human cells, but is the dose one might get sprinkling it on a salad enough?

If you take endothelial cells—blood-vessel-lining cells—from umbilical cords after babies are born and expose them to various levels of acetate, which is what the acetic acid in vinegar turns into in our stomach, it appears to take a concentration of at least 100 to really get a significant boost in AMPK. So, how much acetate do you get in your bloodstream sprinkling about a tablespoon of vinegar on your salad? You do hit 100, but only for about 15 minutes. And even at that concentration, 10 or 20 minutes exposure doesn’t seem to do much. Now granted, this is in a petri dish, but we didn’t have any clinical studies until…we did!

A double blind trial investigating the effects of vinegar intake on the reduction of body fat in overweight men and women. They call them obese, but they were actually slimmer than your average American. In Japan, they call anything over a BMI of 25 obese, whereas the average American adult is about 28.6. But anyway, they took about 150 overweight individuals, and randomly split them up into one of three groups, a high dose vinegar group, where they drank a beverage containing two tablespoons of apple cider vinegar a day, a low dose group, where they drank a beverage containing only one tablespoon of apple cider vinegar a day, and a placebo control group where they had them drink an acidic beverage they developed to taste the same as the vinegar drink but using a different kind of acid; so, there was no acetic acid.

No other changes in their diet or exercise—in fact, they monitored their diets and gave them all pedometers so they could make sure that the only significant difference between the three groups was the amount of vinegar they were getting every day. This is where they started out, and within just one month, statistically significant drops in weight in both vinegar groups compared to placebo, with high dose doing better than low dose, which just got better month after month. In fact, by month three, the do-nothing placebo group actually gained weight, as overweight people tend to do, whereas the vinegar groups significantly dropped their weight. Was the weight loss actually significant or just statistically significant? Well, that’s for you to decide. This is in kilograms; so, compared to placebo, the two tablespoons of vinegar a day group dropped five pounds by the end of the 12 weeks. That may not sound like a lot, but they got that for just pennies a day without removing anything from their diet.

And they got slimmer, up to nearly an inch off their waist, suggesting they were losing abdominal fat, but the researchers went the extra mile and put it to the test. They put the research subjects through abdominal CT scans to actually directly measure the amount of fat before and after in their bodies. They measured the amount of superficial fat, visceral fat, and total body fat. Superficial fat is the fat under your skin that makes for flabby arms and contributes to cellulite, but visceral fat is the killer—that’s the fat, shown here in white, building up around your internal organs that bulges out the belly. And that’s the kind of fat the placebo group was putting on when they were gaining weight. Not good. But both the low dose and high dose vinegar groups were able to remove about a square inch of visceral fat off that CT scan slice.

Now, like any weight loss strategy, it only works if you do it. A month after they stopped the vinegar, the weight crept right back, but that’s just additional evidence that the vinegar was working, but how?

A group of researchers in the UK suggested an explanation: vinegar beverages are gross.  They made a so-called palatable beverage by mixing a fruity syrup and vinegar in water and then went out of their way to make a really nasty, unpalatable vinegar beverage.  White wine vinegar was used in both the palatable and the nasty beverage. The nasty beverage was so unpleasant that the study subjects actually felt nauseous after drinking it; so, they ate less of the meal the researchers gave them with the beverage.  So, there you go—vinegar helps with both appetite control and food intake, though these effects are largely due to the fruity vinegar concoctions invoking feelings of nausea. So, is that what was going on here? Were the vinegar groups just eating less? No, the vinegar groups were eating about the same compared to placebo. Same diet, more weight loss, thanks, perhaps, to the acetic acid’s impact on AMPK.

Now, the CT scans make this a very expensive study; so, I was not surprised it was funded by a company that sells vinegars, which is good, since otherwise we wouldn’t have these amazing data, but is also bad because it always leaves you wondering if the funding source somehow manipulated the results. But the nice thing about companies funding studies about healthy foods, whether it’s some kiwifruit company, or the National Watermelon Promotion Board—watermelon.org, check it out—is that what’s the worst that can happen? Here, for example, even if the findings turned out to be bogus, worst comes to worst, your salad would just be tastier.

To see any graphs, charts, graphics, images, and quotes to which Dr. Greger may be referring, watch the above video. This is just an approximation of the audio contributed by Katie Schloer.

Please consider volunteering to help out on the site.

Images thanks to raymondclarkeimages via Flickr.

Vinegar has evidently been used as a weight-loss aid for nearly 200 years, but does it work? Well, like hot sauce, it can be a nearly calorie-free way to flavor foods, and there’s all sorts of tasty exotic vinegars out there now, like fig, peach, and pomegranate, to choose from, but the question is: is there something special about vinegar that helps with weight loss? Vinegar is simply a dilute solution of acetic acid, which takes energy for our body to metabolize, activating an enzyme called AMPK, which is like our body’s fuel gauge. If it senses that we’re low, it amps up energy production, and tells the body to stop storing fat and start burning fat. And so, given our obesity epidemic, it is crucial that oral compounds with high bioavailability are developed to safely induce chronic AMPK enzyme activation, which would be potentially beneficial for long-term weight loss. No need to develop such a compound, though, if you can buy it in any grocery store. We know vinegar can activate AMPK in human cells, but is the dose one might get sprinkling it on a salad enough?

If you take endothelial cells—blood-vessel-lining cells—from umbilical cords after babies are born and expose them to various levels of acetate, which is what the acetic acid in vinegar turns into in our stomach, it appears to take a concentration of at least 100 to really get a significant boost in AMPK. So, how much acetate do you get in your bloodstream sprinkling about a tablespoon of vinegar on your salad? You do hit 100, but only for about 15 minutes. And even at that concentration, 10 or 20 minutes exposure doesn’t seem to do much. Now granted, this is in a petri dish, but we didn’t have any clinical studies until…we did!

A double blind trial investigating the effects of vinegar intake on the reduction of body fat in overweight men and women. They call them obese, but they were actually slimmer than your average American. In Japan, they call anything over a BMI of 25 obese, whereas the average American adult is about 28.6. But anyway, they took about 150 overweight individuals, and randomly split them up into one of three groups, a high dose vinegar group, where they drank a beverage containing two tablespoons of apple cider vinegar a day, a low dose group, where they drank a beverage containing only one tablespoon of apple cider vinegar a day, and a placebo control group where they had them drink an acidic beverage they developed to taste the same as the vinegar drink but using a different kind of acid; so, there was no acetic acid.

No other changes in their diet or exercise—in fact, they monitored their diets and gave them all pedometers so they could make sure that the only significant difference between the three groups was the amount of vinegar they were getting every day. This is where they started out, and within just one month, statistically significant drops in weight in both vinegar groups compared to placebo, with high dose doing better than low dose, which just got better month after month. In fact, by month three, the do-nothing placebo group actually gained weight, as overweight people tend to do, whereas the vinegar groups significantly dropped their weight. Was the weight loss actually significant or just statistically significant? Well, that’s for you to decide. This is in kilograms; so, compared to placebo, the two tablespoons of vinegar a day group dropped five pounds by the end of the 12 weeks. That may not sound like a lot, but they got that for just pennies a day without removing anything from their diet.

And they got slimmer, up to nearly an inch off their waist, suggesting they were losing abdominal fat, but the researchers went the extra mile and put it to the test. They put the research subjects through abdominal CT scans to actually directly measure the amount of fat before and after in their bodies. They measured the amount of superficial fat, visceral fat, and total body fat. Superficial fat is the fat under your skin that makes for flabby arms and contributes to cellulite, but visceral fat is the killer—that’s the fat, shown here in white, building up around your internal organs that bulges out the belly. And that’s the kind of fat the placebo group was putting on when they were gaining weight. Not good. But both the low dose and high dose vinegar groups were able to remove about a square inch of visceral fat off that CT scan slice.

Now, like any weight loss strategy, it only works if you do it. A month after they stopped the vinegar, the weight crept right back, but that’s just additional evidence that the vinegar was working, but how?

A group of researchers in the UK suggested an explanation: vinegar beverages are gross.  They made a so-called palatable beverage by mixing a fruity syrup and vinegar in water and then went out of their way to make a really nasty, unpalatable vinegar beverage.  White wine vinegar was used in both the palatable and the nasty beverage. The nasty beverage was so unpleasant that the study subjects actually felt nauseous after drinking it; so, they ate less of the meal the researchers gave them with the beverage.  So, there you go—vinegar helps with both appetite control and food intake, though these effects are largely due to the fruity vinegar concoctions invoking feelings of nausea. So, is that what was going on here? Were the vinegar groups just eating less? No, the vinegar groups were eating about the same compared to placebo. Same diet, more weight loss, thanks, perhaps, to the acetic acid’s impact on AMPK.

Now, the CT scans make this a very expensive study; so, I was not surprised it was funded by a company that sells vinegars, which is good, since otherwise we wouldn’t have these amazing data, but is also bad because it always leaves you wondering if the funding source somehow manipulated the results. But the nice thing about companies funding studies about healthy foods, whether it’s some kiwifruit company, or the National Watermelon Promotion Board—watermelon.org, check it out—is that what’s the worst that can happen? Here, for example, even if the findings turned out to be bogus, worst comes to worst, your salad would just be tastier.

To see any graphs, charts, graphics, images, and quotes to which Dr. Greger may be referring, watch the above video. This is just an approximation of the audio contributed by Katie Schloer.

Please consider volunteering to help out on the site.

Images thanks to raymondclarkeimages via Flickr.

Doctor's Note

I’m so excited to be finally getting to this topic. Type in “vinegar” into pubmed, and 40,000 studies pop up! It took me awhile to take it all in, but I’m so glad I did, as it’s something that caused a shift in my own diet. I now try to add various vinegars to my daily diet.

This is the first of a 5-part video series. Get ready for:

For more wholistic approaches to weight loss, see:

The Esselstyn clan plugs a company called Olive Tap, but they seem really expensive. Anyone find any other really yummy brands?

If you haven’t yet, you can subscribe to my videos for free by clicking here.

194 responses to “Does Apple Cider Vinegar Help with Weight Loss?

Commenting Etiquette

The intention of the comment section under each video and blog post is to allow all members to share their stories, questions, and feedback with others in a welcoming, engaging, and respectful environment. Off-topic comments are permitted, in hopes more experienced users may be able to point them to more relevant videos that may answer their questions. Vigorous debate of science is welcome so long as participants can disagree respectfully. Advertising products or services is not permitted.

To make NutritionFacts.org a place where people feel comfortable posting without feeling attacked, we have no tolerance for ad hominem attacks or comments that are racist, misogynist, homophobic, vulgar, or otherwise inappropriate. Please help us to foster a community of mutual respect. Enforcement of these rules is done to the best of our ability on a case-by-case basis.

  1. Which type of vinegar is best? These studies seemed to just mention “vinegar” – but which type is most effective for weight loss?




    2



    0
    1. In the Japanese study, the subjects were given apple vinegar. Animal studies have found similar antiobesity effects with pomegranite, tomato, hawthorn berry, and distilled vinegar, so it seems likely that the active compound is the one they have in common, the acetic acid. Any vinegar will do.

      Straight vinegar can cause chemical burns when applied topically, so it seems a good idea to dilute into a beverage if taking medicinally. Vinegar tablets (with the water evaporated out) have caused esophagheal burns, and I’d avoid them.




      0



      0
      1. Yes indeed! I remember an Organic Gardening magazine popular when I was a youth recommending a quarter cup a day of apple cider vinegar as a tonic. I drank a quarter cup of the stuff straight and had the most painful two days I have ever experienced. That is a large dose to be sure but I would echo your sentiment: Dilute the stuff!




        0



        1
        1. The recipe I remember was half cup apple cider vinegar, half a cup sweet cider and about third cup honey.Drink that down and it would cure sore joints and heart problems and everything else lol .
          I tried it only once, if I was to try that now at my age, I would not bother asking my doctor about it, simply notify the undertaker




          1



          0
    2. Didn’t read the study, but Dr. G did mention the name of the company sponsoring/funding it, Mizkan. The main product it sells is rice vinegar. In the context of Japan, it would make more sense. I keep a bottle of rice vinegar alongside my soy sauce and my stir-fry’s get a tablespoon of each mixed in after they’re done frying. Not sure if adding it to hot food has the same effect, but it tastes great. My stir-fry’s are massive (and often consumed along with a kilo of cooked rice) so it’s quite diluted.




      0



      0
    3. the image on the video is Braggs Organic Apple Cider Vinegar. it’s the one I use. you will have to shake the bottle because the solids settle on the bottom




      1



      0
    4. I don’t know what’s the best, but there’s usually a bottle of organic apple cider vinegar on my table, usually Bragg, but it could be other brands as well as long as it’s organic and has mother. I don’t use it for weight loss though as I don’t have weight issues. I use it for food, dog food, dandruff control, and more. All the brands I’ve tried pretty much do the trick, which includes clearing out my dog’s ears when she gets discharge. Also, to treat dandruff I did an experiment: I tried the regular ACV you can get at the large super markets, and then tried Bragg ACV. Bragg was about five times more effective.




      0



      0
  2. Best way to take Apple Cider Vinegar ? I have heard somewhere that it can harm tooth enamel even with in whole glass of water ? Also I tried a week (after your teaser email on new nutrition dvd), but I feel sore throat. I use to take only 1 teaspoon dilluted in whole glass of water, first thing in the morning.




    1



    1
      1. I drink with a straw also. Anyone not being able to drink 8 glasses of water per day, try a straw it works wonders. I have everyone at work drinking guru straws!




        1



        0
    1. On this site, Dr. Greger has mentioned to rinse your mouth out if you eat something sour right before brushing your teeth, or wait awhile. Sour then immediate brushing is the problem, not the sour in itself.




      0



      0
    2. Just add it to stuff. For breakfast I have a big bowl of beans and greens. Top with raw salsa, sprinkle with vinegar (balsamic with black beans is awesome) and eat. Include some green onion and cilantro for a ridiculously good bowl of breakfast that will keep you full till long past lunch. Oh, and for lunch, have a salad with vinegar-based dressing. Food is food, not medicine. Eat good food.




      1



      0
  3. I too have heard that vinegar hurts tooth enamel. So, is there some way to convert acetic acid to acetate (the final product in the stomach) and is acetate harmless to enamel?

    Maybe baking soda would render vinegar non-acidic (gross tasting though). I’m all for chugging down 2 tablespoons of vinegar a day, but I’d like to not damage my teeth.




    0



    0
      1. Glass straws are a much better option. Reusable, sturdy, usable with both hot and cold liquids,and easily cleaned, they are far more environmentally friendly.




        0



        0
        1. J M: I learned about glass straws from another poster on NutrtionFacts a few years ago. The poster and her family were very happy with them. I think it is an awesome idea. Thanks for bringing it up.




          1



          0
    1. I did a search because I was curious too and baking soda does indeed convert acetic acid into sodium acetate. I didn’t look for the answer to the 2nd part but I would think that since one is acid and the other alkaline the resulting acetate would be neutral. I use potassium bicarbonate instead of the sodium because I’m often low in potassium and it doesn’t add any taste in the amount I use it (1/8 tsp. for 1 Tbs. ACV in 8 oz. of water), but not all the acid is neutralized with that amount, I just prefer the taste, after adding some stevia powder it tastes ‘almost’ like apple juice.




      0



      0
      1. so do you drink that twice a day? (I think the video said the high dose is 2 T per day)
        and where do you buy potassium bicarb?




        0



        0
        1. I’m presently not taking it but I have for b/p and it worked. I used to take it 2x/day.

          My ex-b/f swears it helped his belly go down 3 yrs. ago but when I was taking it steadily I didn’t get so lucky, but I believe it’s because I have Hashimoto’s Thyroiditis and unless I take a lot of iodine (Lugol’s) I can’t shed any weight/fat. Before anybody screams, I’ve done the high iodine 2x before and felt really great after a while, but each time reduced the amount much too soon and too low afraid to be taking too much. I finally learned my lesson and got back on a high dose 2 weeks ago when I realized I’d lost (or was losing) all the benefits I’d gained from ditching meat and eggs and later dairy which I did between mid Dec. and the end of Jan. I lost 16 lbs. without even trying and was so excited, but then near the end of Feb. I got a sinus infection and stalled even while doing Intermittent Fasting so I knew something was wrong again. When I checked my body temperature it had gone again below 98.6 so I got back on the higher dose about 2 weeks ago, still haven’t lost any weight and I’m still dealing with fatigue but my body temperature is still not stable so I’m watching it like a hawk.

          Sorry to have gone off-topic and given all those details but I thought there might be somebody else unable to lose weight who may want to do some research about iodine to save themselves all the frustration (and depression!) that I’ve gone through for years due to my gradually increasing weight. I now finally have hope and it’s a real relief for me.




          3



          0
          1. Thanks, Iluv Merengue, for sharing this story. I may be in same situation, and reduced the amount of Lugol’s too soon. What do you consider a “high dose?” I also have low body temp, so thanks for this tip that it can correlate with thyroiditis and one can use body temp to monitor effectiveness of taking the idodine.




            0



            0
            1. Presently I’m taking 8 drops which are equivalent to 51.68 mg. (the dropper that comes with the brand I’m using deliver 6.46 mg/ea. I’d raised to 10 drops for a week and then tried to go to 12 (after reading about other people on higher amounts) but that didn’t work for me so I scaled back and decided to stay at 8 drops because my temperature has been good most of the day. It usually doesn’t rise until I’ve eaten besides taking the Lugol’s. Yesterday, for example, I began feeling cold out of proportion to the drop in temperature (compared to the day before) so I took my temperature and it was below 97. I was alarmed because I’d already taken the iodine but then I realized I had not eaten yet, after I ate all was well again.




              0



              0
              1. Thanks so much, Iluv Merengue. From your description, I can calculate the percentage solution you are using. Your info on how this affected you is very helpful. Wishing you very good health!




                0



                0
    2. Dentist here! I would not worry about vinegar harming your enamel if you drink it down in one sitting. The real worry is with repeated exposure (sipping throughout the day). If you are not prone to decay, your saliva should be adequate to buffer the short term acid exposure, but a rinse with water afterward isn’t a bad idea. If you are prone to decay, then you may want to rinse with a super saturated baking soda solution to raise the pH (keep adding baking soda to a glass of water until it can’t dissolve any more and you see undissolved particles settle at the bottom of the glass). It is important to note that there are two different types of saliva: stimulated (excreted in response to eating or drinking) and unstimulated (keeping the mouth moist). The stimulated saliva has the best buffering capacity to raise pH in response to acid , but it needs time to recharge in between exposures. If you chew gum for 20 minutes before eating or drinking something acidic, the buffering capacity of the saliva is diminished. So, it’s better to drink it before a meal rather than immediately after eating or chewing gum, and I’d avoid brushing right before or right afterward .




      3



      0
      1. Hi Kim. As a doctor I am always in awe of dentists since we learn even less in medical school about the mouth and teeth than we do about food! Never knew there were different qualities of saliva, that is fascinating! I would however be concerned about habitual use of baking soda–sodium bicarbonate–because of the sodium content which could raise blood pressure, cause edema etc. thoughts?




        0



        0
        1. Interesting question. I’m not sure about that one. If one is only rinsing with it and not swallowing, I don’t know how much sodium one would actually ingest. I’ll have to do a little homework on that :-)




          0



          0
        2. Hi! I studied Holistic Nutrition and am of the opinion that sodium has been maligned too much because of the excessive use of refined salt (refined products in general are not good for us). More often than not if sodium raises blood pressure it’s due to 1) insufficient consumption of potassium containing foods, as they both balance each other, and/or 2) insufficient water intake to “escort” the excess sodium out. Our urine should be clear or nearly clear when we’re adequately hydrate. It usually takes about 3 days for our bodies to rehydrate so drinking a lot all at once can do more harm than good (and I learned that 13 years ago from a DOCTOR who had “crossed over” to Complimentary medicine!). But since Kim suggested the s.b. for rinsing, in that case it’s not a problem at all.

          Personally I take potassium bicarbonate because I have Hashimoto’s which often causes potassium to be excereted, I can get so very fatigued when I’m low I’m never without it, and it also helps me keep my b/p in check, along with magnesium and calcium.

          I think it’s great that there are doctors and dentists here, tickles me to no end! :-D




          1



          0
          1. HI Kim. I think the link of salt with blood pressure is very well established. The INTERSALT trial which was a huge classic study established that blood pressure tends to rise gradually with age in societies that consume added salt (almost all civilized places) whereas in the few societies where salt was not added to the food blood pressure remained stable over the lifetime. Due to the insidious rise of blood pressure (even 1 or 2 points per year), very commonly hypertension appears in large segments of the population in their 60’s, 50’s or even younger. Hypertension is a major risk factor for ischaemic heart disease and stroke, at huge cost in suffering and also financial costs to our society. Hypertension is also big big business for the drug companies. It seems all of these can be greatly reduced if salt/sodium consumption is reduced.




            0



            0
            1. With all due respect, I must tell you that I really don’t have a lot of respect for certain studies that only seek to confirm a bias and leave out a ton of other factors. Who’s to say that the only decisive factor for not having high blood pressure in those societies has to be the lack of salt? Was anything else in their lifestyles studied also? Can you explain to me how exactly salt is guilty of causing high blood pressure? I’d always heard that too much salt would cause water retention but the TRUTH is that that only happens when the person is not drinking sufficient water. I know first hand that salt acts as a natural diuretic when BOTH salt and water are consumed together. Potassium also plays a significant role in hypertension, too much of one will cause the excretion of the other and in the S.A.D. people consume much more sodium than potassium containing foods, so I think it’s ridiculous to blame salt when it has so many other benefits. It’s also well-known that some mammals will walk many many miles to get to a “salt lick” because the excess potassium in their plant diets will make them crave sodium. People actually crave and need salt during certain stages of the stress cycle and that is totally normal, the key is to make sure to drink enough water and consume suffiicient potassium as well.

              But when I speak of “salt” I do not mean sodium chloride, that is a refined product from rock/sea salt which is what we should all be using. Please read what this page says, I think everyone deserves to know ALL there is to know about “salt” instead of going by studies that leave out important facts. http://www.ener-chi.com/eating-unrefined-salt-benefits-our-health/




              0



              0
              1. Thanks Iluv, I notice first of all that the site you are referring me to is a commercial one. The INTERSALT trial was academic without commercial interests. The DASH diet limiting salt similarly came from academic, peer reviewed studies. The life saving clinical results achieved by Dr Walter Kempner (of rice diet fame) were also achieved with severe salt restriction. Standard medical guidelines for blood pressure reduction or prevention of hypertension also recommend the reduction of salt consumption. All studies “leave out” important facts, since it is not possible to compare everything all at once, there are too many variables. As a clinician, with the existing evidence, it would be unethical for me to tell people that excessive salt consumption is not harmful. It is true that much of the salt in the SAD diet comes from junk foods, processed foods, cheese, etc so by cleaning up the general diet one eliminates a great deal of the problem. Salt–sodium chloride–is exactly the salt that is present in rock salt, sea salt etc. The processing removes some trace elements.




                0



                0
                1. Ok, that’s a valid point about that website, I should’ve taken more time to find a better one. So this time the link I’m giving is from the New England Journal of Medicine, complete with references, citing articles, etc. http://www.nejm.org/doi/full/10.1056/NEJMe1407695 It discusses 3 studies published in 2004 that cast doubt on the need to drastically reduce or eliminate salt intake. I really cannot say who funded these studies though, I’m just sort of trusting the reputation of the NEJM.

                  Please note that one of the studies explored the association of sodium and potassium; potassium can simply not be discounted when considering the intake of “salt”. Here’s another page from the National Institute of Health that refers to a large number of studies, 12 of which included potassium in them (the INTERSALT and DASH diet are mentioned there, btw): http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3833247/ I believe this relationship has been known for many decades, I read about it many years ago in a very old nutrition book that had all the appropriate references to the studies on which it based it’s information.

                  I’m aware that for some people in some situations table salt restriction may be necessary, but not so for the general public without good cause, and I haven’t known one single person, myself included, to whom a doctor recommended increasing the consumption of foods high in potassium when their blood pressure was found a little high; the immediate response was to prescribe a drug. I refused to take it after doing a search online for any possible warnings and finding that people with liver problems should not take it as one of the risks was death. I was being re-tested (for the 2nd time in 2 years) to find the cause of my elevated liver enzymes so I thought it was irresponsible for that doctor to have prescribed that without really taking a good look at my records.

                  In any case, we now know that adopting a “whole foods plant-based diet” will reduce blood pressure (eventually) as well as the risk for heart disease (or even reverse it). And since those of us who have adopted it very rarely – if at all – consume junk or fast foods, I just don’t believe it’s necessary to cut out the salt entirely as Dr. Esselstyn and others recommend (but Dr. McDougall doesn’t).

                  By saying that sodium chloride is exactly what is present in rock salt it seems as if you were discounting the importance of the trace elements in it that might even contribute to better use of the “salt”. IMHO, that is like saying that eating sugar cane is just as bad as ingesting refined sugar. I grew up in a sugar cane producing country and eating the cane is considered very healthy over there. And there’s the point that due to the other minerals present in whole salt there is less sodium chloride in it than in table salt, and most of us don’t get enough of the less common minerals as it is.

                  We are all different so the “one-size-fits-all” approach cannot be applied. However, I did notice that you mentioned “reduction” and not elimination of salt, so I guess we’re pretty much on the same page after all. :-)




                  0



                  0
                  1. Thanks Iluv. Sorry you had that experience with bp drug recommendation. Of course the WFPB diet, which I recommend pretty much universally contains alot of potassium as plants are rich in potassium. My comment about the sodium chloride content of sea salt or other salts stands, studying the physiology of the renal tubules which control sodium excretion/reabsorbtion gives evidence for the key role of sodium (in solution the sodium and chloride ions separate). Dr McDougall recommends the use of salt as a CONDIMENT, at the table, as I do. If we are talking about standard recommendations of about a half tsp of salt per day, one would hardly exceed that by sprinkling a little on food, However it is very easy to consume large quantities of salt if it is used in the preparation of food, even good food, and for example bakery bread, even very good quality whole grain bread, does not carry an ingredients label and can contain untold quantities of salt. Or restaurant food, sauces etc. Hypertension is a leading cause of death in our society and by the way, also in the third world, and sodium consumption is very important in regulating blood pressure. There is natural sodium in plant foods (vegetables) enough for the body’s needs unless perhaps in very hot climate, or with a vomiting or diarrheal illness. Dr Esselstyn, please remember, is mainly dealing with patients with advanced heart disease, diseased blood vessels and his regime is aimed at reversing and not just preventing heart disease: his studies were done with a very particular regime and the results of following that exact regime were very impressive. Whether following it 99% or 95% or 80% or 50% would be the same, we can’t know because those studies have not been done. Sodium or sodium chloride though, is not a diuretic as you said in an earlier post, and particularly in someone with heart failure or oedema (peripheral or pulmonary, due to heart failure) excess sodium can really push someone over the edge, into the hospital or worse. The first line diuretics are based on increasing sodium excretion—the kidney excretes sodium and water follows. As you are clearly aware, medications can have serious side effects and personally I would much rather use or advise sodium restriction before going on to the use of a diuretic. Hope that is helpful!




                    0



                    0
                    1. Thank you for again taking the time to reply in such detail.

                      I guess I didn’t express myself properly regarding sodium chloride acting as a “diuretic”, but taken together with sufficient water it will certainly act as such rather than make a person retain water (as long as their kidneys are reasonably healthy). I experienced this myself many years ago when doing the “salt loading” to deal with bromine detox symptoms the first time I took high doses of iodine. The salt loading consists of taking 1/2 tsp. of an unrefined salt, such as Celtic salt, dissolved in 1/2 C. water and followed by 12-16 oz. of filtered water. This is to be repeated 30-45 min. until copious urination begins. I believe I had to do it a 2nd time (=1 tsp. salt) and I was amazed at how much urine came out of me because, frankly, I was very skeptical and even a little afraid to get bloated due to what I myself had learned and my tendency to retain water, but it worked and I had no swollen ankles or puffy upper eyelids, I just felt better after that.

                      The late Dr. F. Batmanghelidj wrote in his book “Your Body’s Many Cries For Water” that essential hypertension “is the result of an adaptive process to a gross body water deficiency” (and he went on to explain why). Perhaps that’s really how it all starts, perhaps it’s the increase in b/p due to slight but chronic dehydration what causes the injuries to our arteries where plaque forms. I’ve only been a vegan for less than 3 mo. so what has really helped me so far is making sure I drink enough water, taking magnesium daily (and calcium a few times a week) and potassium bicarbonate when I feel I need it. I used to have irregular heartbeats and/or tachycardia very often but that is now pretty much a thing of the past.




                      0



                      0
                    2. Well Iluv I am glad you feel better better on vegan diet, but I we will have to agree to disagree on th subject of salt! BTW the diuretic in the treatment you took is actually the water! Good luck, Dr Miriam Maisel




                      0



                      0
                    3. If salt is the bad guy that causes water retention, thus increasing blood pressure, how come I didn’t hold on to any after consuming 1 tsp. in a rather short time? And let’s say that salt is not a diuretic per se, however, it seem obvious to me that when enough water is consumed it is not a threat then anyway, at least not in a person with normal kidney function. But I’m with you about agreeing to disagree. Good luck to you as well. :-)




                      0



                      0
                    4. Iluv, If you are interested in the subject of diuresis you can learn about it in any good physiology textbook where it goes into the function of the various parts of the nephron and the feedback mechanisms in the body which include baroreceptors and osmo-receptors, central and peripheral mechanisms and so on…Then you will be able to answer your own question!




                      0



                      0
                    5. I really wasn’t looking for an answer to that question, it was really more of a rhetorical one. If I were an active health practitioner maybe I’d follow your advice but what I know serves my personal purposes just fine, thanks.




                      0



                      0
              2. I think telling people to eat salt, whatever the source, is pretty dangerous advice. The evidence that there’s a serious connection is pretty well established. Absence any counter studies disproving this you are just grasping at straws. It reminds me of the paleo crowd who claim that all of the bad news about meat consumption doesn’t apply to the perfect meat they eat from organic happy animals. The trouble with this dodge is that it can be used against any argument. eg Smoking doesn’t really cause illness because the studies they did it on didn’t use organic tobacco, you know the stuff I smoke. This is just obfuscation and needs to be called out as the bunk that it is.




                0



                0
                1. You obviously have the right to think whatever you want but what I view as really dangerous is to put blind faith on a connection that has been “pretty well established” only on a PARTIAL truth. To only consider what a diet high in sodium does to some people without considering the other very important factors that I mentioned, such as water and potassium intake (and other electrolytes) or the rest of their diet, is only proof of “black & white” thinking, very nearsighted really. But allopathic medicine has been famous for its tunnel vision, only concentrating on one thing and constructing a whole dogma around it and then sticking to its guns even after there’s plenty of proof that their “dogmas” are flawed.

                  The relationship between salt and potassium is not a theory like you might think, nor is it a “new” concept either. It was already studied back in the late ’50s, one example is someone identified by “G.R. Meneely” and published in the American Journal of Medicine in 1957 and 1958. I tried to access the study but because it’s old it may have to be requested by other means. There are also other references but I do not wish to invest any more of my time in trying to convince anyone, anyone knows that if a person has their mind made up it’s of little use to try to change their minds; they will shut down any “argument” in order to protect what they already believe. As for the undecided and/or open-minded, they will do an impartial research that considers ALL sides of a matter so there’s no need to try to convince them either.

                  I’m going to play devil’s advocate here for a moment regarding your mention of eating meat: I’m sure you’re aware that the studies mentioned in Dr. Campbell’s book “The China Study” have never been taken seriously by the medical community in general. In fact they love to emphasize that it’s all been “debunked several times”. His views and similar ones are still considered quackery, so why do you believe it’s the truth? Why would studies that have been given little attention be any less important than Dr. Campbell’s findings? After all, the “many benefits” of eating of animal products have been “pretty well established”. There’s been more recent studies that “seem” to prove that additional cholesterol is beneficial and many embrace them to justify their choice, but that wouldn’t change your mind, now would it? I have learned in my 63 years of life that no matter what we believe nor how convinced we are of something there’s always plenty of people who believe the opposite with equal conviction. “Science”, which is by far not perfect, will also always attempt to prove things opposite to what many of us believe, but some embrace science as if it were an infallible god. Therefore, it’s really not very wise to consider science perfect nor rely on it blindly.

                  Your comparison of smoking regular tobacco vs. organic is pretty absurd because the human body has no need for tobacco, period, whereas unrefined salt not only contributes 2 needed electrolytes plus many trace minerals that we can definitely benefit from.

                  Lastly, in view of the fact that your opinion is only just that, I hope in the future you will think before you type and be a little more civil and less condescending. I hope you will avoid telling people you don’t know that their opposite view is “just obfuscation” and “bunk”, that is offensive and uncalled for and has no place in a “forum” like this where everyone has shown respect for everyone else… until now.




                  0



                  0
      2. I certainly appreciate your insight. Sure helps me. Seems logical that there would be the very short term impact that could be lessened by the rinse. So now I gotta drink vinegar!




        0



        0
      3. If you chew gum make sure its aspertame (cancer) free as nearly all gum has it. I’ve read a lots of throat cancer amongst big gum chewers.




        0



        0
      1. Salt is not very alkaline, baking soda (sodium bicarbonate) is much better IMO. I think I still have pH test strips, I’ll try to remember to test a bit of my Real Salt in water tomorrow and maybe I can tell you for sure.




        0



        0
    3. After I have my morning ACV (1oz) I follow it by doing my gargling( from the other video,) and hopefully they salt water takes care of the ACV.




      0



      0
  4. If it is capable of harming tooth enamel, maybe it is ALSO capable of harming the gut tissue, skin of the GI tract.

    It does seem logical and possible to me that this sort of substance “is not an ideal substance to put in human body/not meant
    for human body”. Man-made creation with consequences?




    0



    0
      1. Interesting since I was recently told by a friend that her GERD was from too much acid and aggravated by trying to eat more veggies and fruits, and I was under the impression it was aggravated by fats/oils? Any insight?




        0



        0
        1. Foods/drinks that are most likely to contribute to GERD are alcohol, garlic, raw onion, tomatoes (due to the acid), anything really spicy, chocolate (sigh), citrus fruits, peppermint, and coffee. Of course everyone has different sensitivities. On a quick pubmed search I couldn’t find anything about acetic acid/vinegar for GERD, but a google search shows that lots of people find it helpful. Interesting given acidic foods usually make reflux worse.




          0



          0
          1. I found anything with citric acid to be a big trigger. For some strange reason acetic acid (from vinegar or kombucha) provides almost immediate relief. One thing interesting thing is that vinegar and kombucha tend to contain histamines. Histamines actually increase stomach acid production and some alternative health practitioners say the problem is under-production of stomach acid, maybe they are on to something (shrug).
            As for the underlying reasons for GERD, I had none of the risk factors. I remember my mother suffering from it starting around the same age as I am – approaching menopause. I seem to be much better now and I don’t know what fixed it – kombucha, kefir, exercise (improves vagal nerve tone). I’m just happy I’m not on the PPIs anymore. The longer I was on them the worse I got.




            0



            0
    1. No, no it’s not going to harm the GI tract. Apples will ferment as soon as they have the right circumstances. Johnny Apple Seed was not planting those apples to make pies, he was doing it for cider. It is a old and consequential process that humanity has taken advantage of for many thousands of years (at a minimum). An entire population saw this as a sacred process and created a mythology around it. (Ever heard of the Druids, or Celts?)

      Just rinse your mouth out after you drink an acidic beverage.




      0



      0
      1. Yeah, but it is causing the harm on the enamel of teeth. And your mouth is, actually, considered part of the digestive tract. I do not see how one can conclude that it is not capable (longterm?) of degrading internal gut tissue, the vinegar solution, that is. Maybe I am still missing something.




        0



        0
        1. I edited that comment because I was thinking about diluted in a beverage. Rinsing your mouth or using a straw should help with the enamel issue.




          0



          0
          1. Hey, great discussion, thought I would “weight in” and link to all Dr Greger’s great videos on dental health especially those on tooth enamel. Also, plant based or vegan populations in North America are the only people who on average have a normal body weight. This is an excellent video on the science, but I raise the question of whether it is necessary on a regular basis if people follow a plant based eating pattern and are an optimal body weight. Or can it just be added to all the great food tricks in the videos under weight loss which I have also linked to below.

            dental health

            weight loss




            0



            0
            1. As I understand it, AMPK activation does other interesting things besides promoting weight loss. Maybe the upcoming videos will cover more.




              0



              0
            2. I guess the answer to the question would in part depend on the content of upcoming videos on this topic, e.g., Vinegar and Artery Function. My current BMI is 21 and I am a strict (now, finally) WFPB eater. But since I suffer from significant coronary artery disease, I’ll be interested to see if vinegar can improve endothelial function. If so, weight-loss schmeight-loss: I’m in it for my arteries! ;-)




              0



              0
        2. Ethanol in alcoholic beverages is converted to acetic acid in the body, and ethanol doesn’t hurt teeth, so how about getting drunk as a way to get acetic acid without its harmful effect on teeth?




          0



          0
          1. Alcohol is damaging to your heart, liver, pancreas, and brain, not to mention that it is carcinogenic. Getting drunk to bring acetic acid into your system obviously causes more damage than health benefits.




            0



            0
          2. That’s a nice idea, however I believe the toxic effects of alcohol on the liver would be more detrimental.




            0



            0
        3. What you’re missing is that your own stomach acid has a pH between about 1.5 and 3.5–and doesn’t harm the rest of your body because it’s buffered by a thick layer of mucus and secretions of bicarbonate solution. Apple cider vinegar has a comparable pH of about 2.8-3–well within the capacity of our stomachs to neutralize.

          As we age, most of us have to start worrying about not getting enough stomach acid, rather than having too much.




          0



          0
          1. The human body is amazing! different pH is found in different compartments. The mouth, or at least saliva, seems to be about 7 in healthy people (see article Salivary pH, a diagnostic biomarker, in J Indian soc Periodontol–I just googled it.) That is basically neutral. (like water) The stomach is very acidic. The small intestine is alkaline. Remember that pH has to do with concentration of hydrogen ions, so if you have something with a pH of 3 and dilute it into 10 times its volume (like, 1 tsp vinegar into 10 tsp water, or neutral food, then the result will be less, acidic—in this case the resulting pH would be 4. The stomach doesn’t need to neutralize the vinegar as such….There is a negative feedback mechanism in the stomach, which detects the pH and regulates its own acid secretion, so if there is enough acid there already, secretion would stop—works kind of like a thermostat. But dentists do suggest rinsing the mouth after consuming vinegar, to protect tooth enamel. Hope this is helpful.




            0



            0
            1. However, Phyllis, if you scroll down there is a comment from a dentist who says rinsing not definitely necessary, so I bow to the greater wisdom. Worth reading the comment in its entirety.




              0



              0
    2. That’s not how it works inside the body, we produce our own bicarbonates to neutralize acids before they enter the small intestine, otherwise the hydrochloric acid from our own stomachs would do way more harm since most of us eat at least 3x/day.




      0



      0
    3. Apple cider vinegar, which is 0.04% acidic solution in the bottle, is reduced in concentration even further when you dilute it with water or add it to food. The hydrochloric acid that your body produces is many, many times stronger than vinegar undiluted in the bottle. There is no way that vinegar can hurt the lining of the gut. And I am, of course, talking about a healthy gut lining. Ulcers, stomach cancer, etc. are of course a completely different topic.
      Another way to consume vinegar is to pour it on a grain salad. It absorbs into the grain and adds to the flavor of the dish. For 2 cups of dry grain, then cooked, (rice, quinoa, wild rice, barley), I will pour 1/4-1/2 C vinegar and add another splash for lemon juice. The vinegar fools your taste buds into thinking you’ve consumed salt.
      Vinegar on new potatoes, boiled, with spices, salt, parsley, other veg, etc. is a wonderful lite dressing.
      For a real treat find malt vinegar – we used to pour malt vinegar on french fries at the amusement park as kids. Great flavor!




      0



      0
      1. GEBrand: Do you have any opinions/thoughts about a really good, low acidic balsamic vinegar? I don’t generally like the stronger vinegars. But this Napa Valley balsamic vinegar (http://www.napavalleynaturals.com/Grand-Reserve-Balsamic-Vinegar–25-Stars/p/NVN-GRAND&c=NapaValleyNaturals@Vinegars) that I can get from the grocery store is very low acidity, 4% (and is pretty tasty!).

        But then I wonder if I would be getting the benefit discussed in this video when I consume a low acidic vinegar. Is the difference really that much practically? And could I get the benefit if only I consumed __ amount instead of the 2 tablespoons a day? Even 2 tablespoons a day would be tough for me, but I’m just wondering. Any thoughts? Anyone?




        0



        0
          1. Vege-tater: Do you mean diluting a full strength, say apple cider, vinegar? That’s exactly what I think they did in the study with people drinking a concoction where only two tablespoons of the liquid was the actual vinegar. So, I know that’s an option, but I truly do not like the stuff. (Yeah for people who do.)

            I’d rather have my fancy balsamic vinegar. So, I’m just wondering what the trade-off is. Can I get away with the low acidic vinegar if I just ate more of it? How much more would I have to eat? Etc. We probably don’t know the answers to these questions. I was just looking for some informed speculation. :-)

            Thanks for your thoughts. You are absolutely right that the “high” acidic vinegars can be diluted.




            0



            0
            1. Sorry Thea, yep, like I said dorky, I just didn’t read it very well. I was thinking if 4% balsamic was okay than in general maybe less acidic/slightly dilute vinegars might be more suitable for ya, but bzzzzt! :o




              0



              0
            2. Thea – see my post above. All vinegars are essentially 4% by definition. The difference I think you’re getting at is the flavor of the vinegar. And I’m with you – who doesn’t love balsamic vinegar? The asian store that I go to carries a line of vinegars (4% acetic acid by definition) that are flavored with dates and another that is flavored with pineapple. Makes the vinegar really yummy, is still 4% acetic acid, and goes great over a salad. . . or potatoes. . . and, now that I’m thinking about it . . .I’ll bet a pineapple flavored vinegar on greens would be dyn-o-mite.
              So I would not worry about trying to drink it, . just find ways to incorporate it into the diet. I’m going to guess that the reason the people in the video drank the solution is just as an experimental control for the research.




              0



              0
        1. Hello Thea – At about 33 seconds in the video Dr. Greger points out that in order for vinegar to be defined as vinegar it must be 4% acetic acid. So all vinegars are (approximately) 4% acetic acid, including the Braggs that is shown in the video. Balsamic vinegar is made by adding grape must which gives it that really yummy balsamic flavor. Traditionally, balsamic vinegars were made in casks and the must was allowed to develop naturally over time. You can still get naturally fermented balsamic vinegars but they can be pricey. Nowdays balsamics are made simply by the addition of concentrated grape must. The Braggs is apple cider vinegar, no grape must added, and has a much harsher flavor (in my opinion). Your balsamic that you reference should do the trick. Another apple cider vinegar that I find palatable and less harsh than Braggs is good old Heinz apple cider vinegar. Others will point out, of course, that it is not organic, is filtered, pasteurized, etc.
          My brother and I, both vegan, like to make a fat free salad dressing using the juice from a jar of green olives as a base. Just add your vinegar (a tablespoon), spices, stir in some dijon or cracked mustard, a splash of soy sauce and pour over your giant dinner salad. (you’ll have to fine tune for your palate of course) So there is 1 tablespoon of vinegar down the hatch right there in a tasty salad dressing. Pour another spoonful over your potatoes or grains and there you go!




          0



          0
          1. GEBrand: I’m feeling a bit embarrassed that I missed that point at the 33 second mark. But I’m also glad I did, because asking you the question provided me with a whole bunch of really great info. Thank you for taking the time to reply in such detail! (And so kindly.) To be fair to me, I did recently hear a well known speaker talk about how we could get balsamic vinegars that are less acidic. I had that statement in my head when I asked my question.
            .
            Thanks also for sharing your salad dressing idea. I’m going to have to give that a try!




            0



            0
      2. Yes, many scientists have found that sour combined with grain or starch decreases the glycemic load (and improves the flavor in my opinion).




        0



        0
  5. I tried using a tablespoon of vinegar added to water and sweetened with stevia with each meal for a while, to increase stomach acid, since we generally produce less as we get older and I was noticing the effects of that. I wasn’t doing it for weight loss, but that would have been a nice side bennie. However, I quickly started getting one canker sore after another. When I looked up canker sores to try and figure it out, it mentioned vinegar as one cause. Perhaps if I’d used less I wouldn’t have gotten the sores. As soon as I stopped the vinegar they went away and haven’t returned. I still use it in salad dressings without a problem.




    0



    0
    1. hi Rebecca, i don’t drink the vinegar i toss two tablespoons into my last meal of the day. that’s usually some form of lentils. my choice is the one pictured above – Braggs. when i mix it into the lentils i can easily consume it – my mind doesn’t see it as something new cause it;s dealing with the lentils, a known entity. i only do the vinegar with one meal. i imagine three times a day is a lot for your poor mouth to take. good luck, tree




      0



      0
      1. I used the Bragg’s also, but since I was trying to increase stomach acid I needed to do it with each meal. Didn’t work for me. And you’re right about maybe that much every day was too much. Obviously it was! I have found that if I take betaine hydrochloride capsules I have better digestion and much less gas from beans, but I have a hard time swallowing pills and capsules. They stick in my throat or esophagus. That’s why I thought vinegar could possibly be the answer. I’m now using an herbal, Iberogast drops, with meals to see if they help, on my alternative doc’s recommendation. We’ll see.




        0



        0
      2. Great idea! I tried to drink diluted vinegar last night through a straw – yuck! it burned the back of my throat (even diluted) and it tasted awful.
        Today, I mixed a couple spoonfuls of hummus with 2 T of vinegar and used it on my salad as a salad dressing. Much better! I’ll try it mixed with lentils and/or quinoa or brown rice. those all sound do-able.




        0



        0
  6. Dr. Gregor, using the available evidence how do you recommend taking apple cider vinegar and how much per day? If I want to just take it in the morning in a glass of water how much should I measure?




    0



    0
  7. Outside the body, vinegar, like lemon juice, is acidic; however, my information is that as the body metabolizes it, the result is an alkaline state of body tissue. Any information on this? In addition, vinegar is no more acidic than our own digestive juices. Several health care experts claim that a major problem in our culture is the dilution of digestive acids, resulting in poorly digested food traveling through the digestive tract. Consuming vinegar (diluted), allegedly assists the body in maintaining a healthy level of acidity that will digest food more efficiently, thus assisting in nutrient extraction by the gut and contributing to an alkaline state. Thoughts ????




    0



    0
    1. Our pancreas makes sodium bicarbonate which is released once the stomach is done digesting our food, it’s purpose is to neutralize the hydrochloric acid secreted by the stomach. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bicarbonate Perhaps the alkaline result after ingesting lemon juice and vinegar is due to the stimulation of the production of more bicarbonate but I really don’t know, your turn to do a search to find the answer. ;-)




      0



      0
  8. This is wonderful, Dr. Greger! The talk about vinegar for weight loss has been around since before I began high school – decades, lol. I look forward to your 5-Part video series and learning more about vinegar’s relationship to blood sugar control, esp.




    0



    0
  9. I have just started a recipe for a ginger/mint fermented drink on the veggiesutra.com website. It uses 3/4 cup of apple cider vinegar, but as it takes two weeks to make I’m not able to make a recommendation yet. Maybe someone else would be interested in trying it too.




    0



    0
  10. I recommend Bragg Organic Apple Cider Vinegar. It is the highest quality, organic certified, raw (not pasteurized),unfiltered, unrefined, Non-GMO Project Verified. Also great flavor for a vinegar. It is best to use organic apple products because most conventional apples are sprayed with pesticides.

    The Bragg Organic Apple Cider Vinegar has also been studied at Arizona State University with published studies and shown to be beneficial to those at risk for Type 2 Diabetes . See http://www.BraggACV.com.




    0



    0
    1. In the interest of full disclosure, I believe you are recommending a product made by the company you work for as the Director of the Bragg Health Foundation, yes?




      1



      0
  11. At the advice of an elderly friend, I’ve been using apple cider vinegar for over 35 years for several things like stomach aches, intestinal viruses, sore throats, my skin, my hair, as well as protecting myself and my children from potentially, contracting food poisoning. Anytime, we went out to dinner and/or especially, a potluck dinner, I always gave my children a small teaspoon of apple cider vinegar, along with a huge swallow of water to rinse out the aftertaste. In the event of food poisoning, I believe it helps to eliminate most of the bacteria, which potentially, can be in any meal. With the consumption of vinegar prior to a hazardous meal, you may still get food poisoning; however, the side effects are greatly reduced to a slight stomach ache, versus spending three days in the bathroom. My children, who are all grown are now giving it to their children for stomach aches and also, prior to going to any function, where food will be served. I’m guessing, that years of success of using vinegar has proven itself and now, my children are carrying on the healthy tradition for my grandchildren. Of course, they probably wouldn’t ever admit that I was ever right about “anything!”




    0



    0
  12. The reason I like these videos is because they give me the understanding of WHY things work the way they do. When you fully understand a nutritional concept then you become highly motivated to follow through on doing what is necessary to achieve the benefit. For example, I have read this over and over again for years that vinegar is good for you and it helps you to lose weight, but I never knew why. As a result I would do a little vinegar every once in a while, but was NEVER consistent. Now through the help of this video I am really motivated to be consistent in taking 2 tablespoons full of vinegar every day. Thanks for the video Dr. Greger.




    0



    0
    1. I agree, John. As a family doctor for the past 28 years, I have lost track of the number of times one of my patients mentions various beneficial effects of vinegar — usually apple cider vinegar, and usually recommended by their grandmother. Until recently, I have always just nodded and said something like “If it helps you, keep taking it”. It is, indeed, nice to have some science behind this.




      0



      0
  13. I forgot to mention that when you have an upset stomach, drinking a little vinegar in a glass of water ( dilution ) really helps to cure the indigestion, upset stomach, or even nausea.




    0



    0
  14. In answer to the question doctor posed about other yummy brands, I enjoy Alessi White Balsamic Vinegar for the every day use. My local grocery store carries it and it has a pleasant taste. They have other fun flavors also.




    0



    0
    1. I use coconut vinegar in cooking. It’s better in hot, spicy dishes than apple cider vinegar, which imparts a hint of sweetness to food.




      0



      0
    1. Hi dietplus. If you’re getting a sore throat and abdominal pain/burning after drinking apple cider vinegar (or any vinegar), you probably need to dilute it more. The concentrated acid can cause a burning feeling in your esophagus or back of your throat. Interestingly, gargling diluted AC vinegar can help relieve a sore throat.




      0



      0
  15. The researchers apparently used standard vinegar rather than raw unfiltered vinegar (like Bragg’s, shown on the video). Industrial vinegar (whether cider, wine, rice, &c) is essentially dead, stripped of the enzymes that make fermented foods (including raw vinegar) worth eating. It’s kind of like eating boiled yogurt or kefir—you may still get some protein and calcium, but none of the healthy probiotics that are their chief selling point.

    Hope the upcoming vinegar videos make that important distinction.




    0



    0
  16. Kombucha might be the way to go. I would think it has the acidic properties of vinegar and it tastes great plus provides probiotics. Can Dr. Gregor comment on its properties compared to vinegar? I know he didn’t like it in a previous video due to someone making a bad batch once but that could happen to lots of foods. One has to be careful when brewing: sanitary conditions, make sure no mold is growing on the batch.




    0



    0
      1. Julie: Ooops. I just read your post more carefully/in full and see that you are aware of the previous video. Sorry for my original post. But please note that the problem is not just one case…




        0



        0
    1. The article abstract also stated that the patient was newly diagnosed HIV positive; the patient may have gone a bit overboard on it.




      0



      0
    2. Kombucha gets my vote: 4 oz more or less daily of my own homebrew. I remember thinking when I saw that NF video that Dr G was being unnecessarily alarmist based on the flimsiest of research results–especially since there was no data on amount consumed or other relevant variables.

      I don’t expect scientific confirmation of the health benefits of kombucha from this or any other site that relies on the kind of reductionist double-blind placebo-controlled studies considered the gold standard for research. There’s no single variable to isolate for study, for one thing, but rather a cocktail of dozens of substances that may interact synergistically and may vary significantly from one batch to another. Even if that obstacle could be surmounted, there’s no Big ‘Buch with any financial incentive in touting the benefits of something that can be made at home for less than $2 a gallon.




      0



      0
  17. Okay, since I am big on fermentation, I’m curious how well fermented kombucha, which can be very vinegary, fits into the picture? Same animalcules or no? lol Apparently even cheap processing and distillation can make acetic acid, but I’d still prefer the real deal!




    0



    0
    1. Overlapping populations of “animalcules,” but with many differences.
      Raw vinegars are analyzed here (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26897250) and here (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25828705)
      Kombucha analyzed here (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24290641) and here (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/8559192)

      Note that that last paper says: “The low rate of contamination [in home-brew samples] might be explained by protective mechanisms, such as formation of organic acids and antibiotic substances. Thus, subjects with a healthy metabolism do not need to be advised against cultivating Kombucha. However, those suffering from immunosuppression should preferably consume controlled commercial Kombucha beverages.”

      Brewing & drinking my own kombucha presumably will keep my immune system strong enough so I won’t have to resort to the commercial stuff.




      0



      0
  18. In the last 2 weeks I have started a daily consumption of 2 tablespoon of white distilled vinegar added to vegetables, rice or beans that is made out of corn, sold at Costco( 2 gallons for under $4) and have noticed in addition to losing 1-2 lbs., a drop of diastolic and Systolic blood pressure of 16 and 8 points!




    0



    0
  19. I guess another good reason to keep drinking my home made kombucha….lots of acetic acid! Had to laugh with others that tried to down straight apple cider vinegar like I did
    ….thought I burned a hole in my esophagus! :)




    0



    0
  20. I use a vinegar dressing that you can find on Dr John McDougal’s website in the recipe section. It uses four different vinegars: balsamic, rice, apple cider, and red wine vinegar, plus other stuff (garlic, mustard, etc. No oil). I put it on everything, almost. It made my transition away from olive oil and other oils easy.




    0



    0
    1. Lemons (and other citrus fruits) contain citric acid, rather than acetic acid, so we can’t assume citrus fruits would have the same effect on weight loss. That said, there are lots of other great reasons to consume fruits as part of a WFPB diet. Here are just a few from Dr. G’s videos: citrus fruit




      0



      0
      1. I didn’t see your response and just answered Mary’s question with the exact same response. Great minds think alike :-)




        0



        0
    2. Hi Mary,
      The acid in lemons is citric acid where as the acid in vinegar is ascetic acid so I don’t think lemons will upregulate the AMPK enzyme. (I did a quick search of the literature and didn’t find any articles looking at effects of citric acid on AMPK activity). You can still eat lemons for their other wonderful benefits like vitamin C.




      0



      0
        1. The phytonutrients in lemons although health promoting are not the same as the ones in grapes. As the video you cited states the anthocyanins in grapes seem to increase NO production resulting in relaxation of endothelial walls. The phytonutrients in lemons, particularly limonene and lycopene are protective against certain cancers.




          0



          0
  21. I do not know reliable this website below is but the information there seems legit even though there are no citations. It is worth reading before embarking on a vinegar regime, especially if you are on medications. The WebMD section on apple cider vinegar is also worth reading.
    http://www.med-health.net/Apple-Cider-Vinegar-Side-Effects.html
    http://www.webmd.com/vitamins-supplements/ingredientmono-816-apple%20cider%20vinegar.aspx?activeingredientid=816&activeingredientname=apple%20cider%20vinegar

    And there was a case in the UK of a woman who died after drinking a mugful of vinegar so limiting the dose will be important
    http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/health/10680470/Coroner-warns-of-dangers-of-internet-myths-after-woman-dies-from-drinking-vinegar-in-abortion-attempt.html




    0



    0
    1. Tom Goff: Holly molly! What great finds you come up with! And most sobering. Here I am, all proud of myself for making up a vinegar drink, and while I’m sipping, I see your post…
      .
      As you say, the first link has no citations. And I found it interesting that the first two sites give opposite reported effects for osteoporosis. But as you say, they are worth reading and thinking about. Once again, awesome post.




      0



      0
      1. Thanks, Thea, you are making me blush.

        I think the WebMD site also mentions that large doses of vinegar can exacerbate osteoporosis. So I do not think the two sites completely contradict each other. The dose is probably the big problem – some people think you can never get too much of a good thing. However, like aspirin and paracetamol, too much vinegar over an extended period is risky. I think exceeding the 2 tblspn per day figure mught not be wise.
        http://www.karger.com/Article/Abstract/45180

        I also vaguely recall reading somewhere that vinegar is protective vis-s-vis osteoporosis in normal weight people but increases risk in the obese. However, I can’t find the citation now so my memory might be playing me false.




        0



        0
  22. I suspect that the best vinegar would be Apple Cider unfiltered and unpasteurized: That is with the ‘mother’ present. Most of the good stuff is removed if you filter and then pasteurize.




    0



    0
    1. Tickled Pink: OK, you inspired me. I took a look at the link and thought, “Maybe you could make your own good drinking vinegar.” So, I took 2 tablespoons apple cider vinegar, about 1.5 cups water, some erythritol (sp?), and 1-2 tablspoons of berries and whipped it all up in my blender. End result? Needs much work. But not nearly as gross as I thought it might be. It is good enough to drink it all down at least this time. And I’m not one to suffer for my health… ;-)
      .
      We’ve gotten some good tips already from other others who have been putting vinegar in their food. I’d be interested in some drinking vinegar tips (I know we have had a couple already of those too). How do you do it? Do you have a good recipe for the rest of us?




      0



      0
      1. YES! There has to be a good “recipe”for drinking vinegar! But what is it? It has to be diluted and it has to have something that can mask that awful taste! Does anyone have any ideas????? Thanks!!




        0



        0
  23. Hey I was wondering if Dr. Greger might be interested in doing a video on “is it possible to consume too much plant protein from a whole foods vegan diet?” If not, I would be satisfied with an explanation here. Thanks




    0



    0
    1. Brandon: I am a family doctor, and volunteer moderator for this website. Dr. Greger has done several videos comparing plant protein with animal protein. You can find these by just typing “plant protein” into the “Search” box at the top of the NutritionFacts home page. He doesn’t exactly answer your question about whether it is POSSIBLE, but the conclusion in each of these videos is that animal protein is bad for you, and plant protein is not. I think that unless you are on kidney dialysis, it would be difficult to eat too much plant protein.

      1) Protein Source and dietary acid load — shows that diets high in animal protein have a high acid load and cause protein leakage into urine, but not diets with high plant protein.

      2) Treating Chronic Kidney Disease with food — shows that plant based diets protect against kidney disease, heart dz., diabetes, and hypertension, whereas animal protein is harmful.

      3) Which type protein is better for kidneys — shows that animal protein stresses the kidney due to an inflammatory response causing hyperfiltration, but NOT plant protein.

      4) Preventing Gout Attacks with Diet — shows that purines from animal protein but not plant protein cause gout attacks.

      [i have tried to create hyperlinks to each of these videos; am not sure it worked; if not, will re-do this]




      0



      0
    2. Brandon, . .I have often wondered the same thing. I have noticed that when I switched to a WFPB diet 7 years ago my cholesterol and triglycerides both went up . . .into the lower levels of the danger zones. And they have remained there. Triglycerides can increase due to too many sugars in the diet. So I’ve severely reduced grains and increased my plant proteins – greens, broccoli, cauliflower, asparagus, seeds, etc. Anyway, . . I, too, have wondered about the plant protein issue – am I getting too much?
      So I referred back to T. Colin Campbell’s China Study research. If you go to the section where he discusses what percentage of the diet will cause cancer to grow when animal proteins are fed we see that anything above a certain percentage (was it 5% or 20%?) would cause cancer to grow. And they could start it, stop it, again and again by altering the amount of animal protein allowed in the diet.
      If I recall, . . the research could not get cancer to grow no matter how much plant protein was given. But I’m with you, . .I do wonder if I’m getting too much in an attempt to lower my cholesterol and triglycerides. .. . will this affect the kidney? I have seen a Dr. McDougall video where he referenced a concern about getting too much plant protein in the diet. Like you, I am a little unclear about this topic.
      Good question.




      0



      0
    1. Hi Susan, I see no reason at all how vinegar could be harmful for diverticulosis or diverticulitis. If you’re using unfiltered, unpasteurized apple cider vinegar (as pictured above), it has probiotics which is good for your gut health. If you’re concerned that the acid from the vinegar will “eat” away at your out-pouched large intestine, I don’t think you need to worry. The digestive enzymes from your pancreas neutralize the acetic acid as soon as it leaves your stomach and enters your small intestine.




      0



      0
  24. I’ve lived in Japan for over a decade now and I often find my friends in USA making mistakes when it comes to the metric system – even doctors. I think the people taking the vinegar lost about 1 cm from their waistline, not 1 inch.

    I use Pomegranate vinegar on my salads. Wonderful flavor!




    0



    0
      1. Thanks. I was just glancing at the figures and got it wrong. My bad. 1.9 cm? “3/4 of an inch” sounds about right to me.




        0



        0
    1. The videos haven’t been released yet, so there’s no “there” there on the other end of the link. As the videos are released, they’ll start working.

      It’s as if they published the table of contents and first chapter of a book to let you know what’s coming with a promise to send you the rest of the chapters later.




      0



      0
  25. But vinegar is not a whole food at all, why would it be good for health? there are a bit of alcohol in vinegar and it is very acid.




    0



    0
    1. Julot: Some plant foods which are not whole foods are also good for us. This is what I mean (others may have different definitions) when I talk about a “whole plant food BASED” diet as being healthy. The diet may not be all whole plant foods, just based/largely made up of whole plant foods. And it may also include some non-whole plant foods which are also known to generally be healthy. Other examples of non-whole plant foods generally shown to be healthy on this site are: tofu, green tea, and some cocoa powder.

      So, the question is, what does the science say about vinegar overall? This video starts to answer that question.




      0



      0
  26. Here we go again, with more comments alleging that scientific studies, if funded by industry, must be suspect. That is just not the case. Doctors and scientists who work in industry, be it food, or vinegar or whatever, do NOT routinely distort or fudge the results of scientific studies to favor their funding source. It does not enhance the quality of your column, nor the logic of your argument, to suggest that any study funded by industry must be suspect. Enough with the anti-industry paranoia, please….




    0



    0
  27. In fact, if you look at the global warming studies conducted by East Anglia University in Great Britain, which has been renowned for their work in this field, you will find that these “unbiased” scientists were caught deliberately distorting some climate data that did not happen to support their theories. There are a minority of researchers and scientists working in academia and in industry who falsify data and the great majority of scientists are ethical and don’t falsify data. What we should consider, as advocated by the late author Dr. Michael Crichton (MD, Harvard Medical School), is that research funding should be more widely available and not depend so much on wealthy donors of all sorts whose desired outcomes may influence the results of the research. Strongly suggest you read “State of Fear” by Michael Crichton to get some really great insights on this topic.




    0



    0
    1. Hugo: You yourself admit the crux of the matter right here: “…wealthy donors … desired outcomes may influence the results of the research.” I don’t have a link handy, but I’ve read multiple times that studies of studies show that the results often end up favoring the “desired outcomes” of the people who supply the money compared to studies on the same subject that are more generally funded. That doesn’t mean that (in most cases) the researchers are being accused of falsifying data. It just means that human nature creates bias which can creep into study results. Not always. It’s just a possibility that we have to keep in mind even when it is not obvious how such bias might be in the study.

      Thus, it behooves the public to always pay attention to who funds a study to help us keep extra sharp when analyzing studies. I imagine that responsible researchers would welcome this extra scrutiny. Dr. Greger says that a funding source does not automatically make a study false. That’s why he often does report on studies which were funded by particular industries. But Dr. Greger pays attention to who did the funding and is especially on his toes accordingly. And Dr. Greger often enough points out funding sources to us to allow us to keep potential bias in mind. Your objection to keeping this important data in mind makes no sense to me.




      0



      0
  28. One other thing that ACV is good for is to make “fake booze.” I brew up some strong red hibiscus tea (and keep a big bottle of it in fridge), add about 1-2 T of ACV (depending on amount of tea and personal taste), add some tart cherry extract, add a big dash of pomegranite juice, small shot of lemon juice and of course a good shot of stevia (Trader Joe’s liquid stevia tastes EXACTLY like sugar; it’s amazing…). Then mix it all up and you’ve got a delicious drink with the kick of alcohol provided by the vinegar. Definitely more satisfying and booze-like than, say, pop or juice, which is very bad for you anyway. Cheers!




    0



    0
  29. The loss of 4.2 pounds in 12 weeks and .74″ from the waist (using 2.2 k/lb and .393701 cm/in conversion rations) if one consumes two tablespoons a day is significant.




    0



    0
  30. Is it possible, that they chose people who consumed a diet low in fiber for the study to boost the positive effects of the vinegar intake and to do the same with the negative effects of not taking the vinegar? Fiber is converted to acetate in the colon by bacteria. I don’t think that’s it worth the negative consequences of ingesting vinegar, i.e. dental and esophageal erosion. Instead, this video seems to me to drive home the importance of consuming a fiber rich diet. Thanks as always for the work you do Dr. Greger




    0



    0
  31. There’s usually a bottle of organic apple cider vinegar on my table, usually Bragg, but it could be other brands as well. I don’t use it for weight loss though as I don’t have weight issues. I use it for food, dog food, dandruff control, and more.




    0



    0
  32. Salad would be tastier?! Worst that can happen is indigestion of already unhealthy food of the people that consume such abominable things like vinegar.

    It really seems that behind all this “science” is mere gourmet witchcraft. Optimal plant based diet is not eating rotten products like vinegar, however “organic” it is. Optimal diet is eating fresh and fully ripe plants, not before and not after that. It seems that we are so accustomed with strong tastes and stimuli that noone can help us.

    Eating unnatural products like vinegar and calling it tasty is mere hedonistic quest fro more and more stimuli and conforming to a sick attitude that our food would be tastier with some irritant poisons sprinkled over it.

    This is how lies creep and crawl into our brains.




    0



    0
  33. Thanks Dr G for a great video & for mentioning that ACV is available everywhere. Indeed it is- even Walmart has the Braggs brand shown-so we don’t have to make a special trip to the health food store. I wonder if balsamic is as good; it’s absolutely heavenly with EVOO on dark greens!! THAT I could drink :)




    0



    0
  34. I have started to put my quarter tsp of tumeric in my hot mug of water with 1tbs of ACV in the morning to get it in my system. Should I be concerned that the combination of the tumeric and ACV will lessen any of the benefits of the two? I find it quite tolerable to drink and want to be sure I am not negating the benefits with combining as it is quite convenient to consume this way. Thanks for any thoughts you may have!




    0



    0
  35. I mix a couple of tablespoons of fruit vinegar (mango, elderflower and lime, etc.) into carbonated spring water (no sodium). I love it and it has replaced my wine at night. But have wondered if the soda water is good for me.




    0



    0
  36. I’m curious, has anyone looked at the effects of the large blast of low pH, high acetate concentration on medication efficacy. A lot of people take their medications with meals and I wonder if there is any interaction.




    1



    0
  37. I love these videos, but at the end of this one it was pointed out that the study was funded by a vinegar company. This was glossed over and dismissed with Dr. Greger saying, “Well, at least your salad will be tastier.” If this was a study involving a meat/dairy/oil, etc. company funding a study it would have been a bigger deal, they would have been condemned for it, and the study would have been seriously pulled into question. Should we believe this vinegar study is legitimate and uncompromised or question its validity?




    0



    0
    1. Jocelyn: Just because a study is funded by a particular industry does not automatically make it invalid. However, it does mean that we need to be extra critical and cautious. Dr. Greger is aware of this need. That’s why he always reads who funded a study and reads the researcher’s reported conflicts of interest *before* reading the study itself. (I heard Dr. Greger explain this in a Q&A after a talk once.) Knowing that the study might be biased helps you to read the study with an open, critical eye.
      .
      With that in mind, consider your question: “Should we believe this vinegar study is legitimate and uncompromised or question its validity?” You should not consider the study legitimate nor illegitimate *just* because the study was funded by big vinegar. The source of the study can help you look for flaws and if you can’t find any flaws, then you might: a) consider whether the study is consistent with the body of evidence, and b) take the results with a grain of salt, and c) make note that similar results may apply to similar foods which were simply not tested because of the funding source (the last two points being why the source of the study is worth mentioning).
      .
      re: “If this was a study involving a meat/dairy/oil, etc. company funding a study it would have been a bigger deal, they would have been condemned for it…” I don’t think this is an accurate representation of what happens on this site. NutritionFacts covers studies done by meat/dairy/eggs and points out how the studies are flawed. The studies are not condemned just because of who funded the studies. The studies are condemned for the flaws. Knowing who funded the studies ads a helpful dimension to the picture. But that’s not why we reject the studies.




      0



      0
    1. eat a base diet of whole organic starches, potatoes oat, barley, rice 70%. vegetables and fruit 20% and 10% nuts and avocados add more nuts/ avocados to your diet if need to add more weight




      0



      0
    2. natlp: A few months ago, you posted a question about gaining weight. This post just came to my attention for some reason. Even though the question is old, I thought I would answer it for you in case you are still interested:
      .
      ———————-
      As explained in the following NutritionFacts video: http://nutritionfacts.org/video/eating-more-to-weigh-less, the key to healthy long term weight *loss* is understanding calorie density and eating low calorie-dense foods. When applied in reverse, the concept of calorie density can be used to *gain* weight. In general, to gain weight, you would want to eat more foods which are more calorie dense. The idea is to add several foods into your diet until the amount of calories you take in exceed your energy needs.
      .
      Examples of higher calorie dense foods appropriate for a whole plant food diet include: nuts, dried fruits, tofu, avocados, olives, and breads/crackers/dry goods. Also, eat more cooked foods compared to raw foods. For nuts, note that in one of the NutritionFacts videos, we learned that if you eat pre-ground ground nuts (nut butters, nut sauces, etc), then you increase your calorie absorption over eating unprocessed nuts.
      .
      While the following article is focused on weight loss, you could use the information in reverse for weight gain (or if your goal is just weight maintenance, follow these ideas): http://www.jeffnovick.com/RD/Articles/Entries/2012/5/20_A_Common_Sense_Approach_To_Sound_Nutrition.html and http://www.forksoverknives.com/the-calorie-density-approach-to-nutrition-and-lifelong-weight-management/
      .
      The idea/point is: don’t just add a snack and junk food like ice cream. Incorporate several of these relatively healthy foods and cooked food in general in each meal and snack. For example, while a person wanting to lose weight would ideally use a vegetable-based sauce, you would use a nut-based sauce. While a person wanting to lose or maintain weight would include a whole lot of raw food, say big salads with some lemon juice as the dressing, you might eat smaller amounts of raw food and far more cooked veggies, beans, and grains proportionately.
      .
      While that’s the answer to your actual question, I would step back and ask, “Why do you want to gain weight?” Are you hoping to gain more fat? If so, why? Gaining fat doesn’t seem healthy to me unless you are severely fat deficient. On the other hand, if you want to gain more weight without gaining (too much) fat, then what you are really talking about is gaining muscle. Gaining muscle is a good goal. (From what I’ve read: All else being equal, having more muscle is healthier.) But gaining muscle is more than just changing your diet. Gaining muscle requires certain types of exercise. That’s beyond the scope of this site. I just bring it up so you can think about what your real goal is and what it would take to accomplish it.
      .
      Dr. McDougall has a great article on the topic of gaining weight. It will provide some additional perspective as well as maybe some additional ideas. http://www.nealhendrickson.com/mcdougall/030700puhowdoIgainweight.htm
      .
      One last resource: While you may not be a teen and/or an athlete, the following page may interest you. Not all of the recommendations on the page are whole foods, but there are some good ideas that may help and it is a site (Vegetarian Resource Group) that I trust.
      http://www.vrg.org/teen/veg_athlete_weight_gain.php
      .
      Hope this helps.




      0



      0
  38. is there a difference as to what vinegar you drink? Does it have to be apple cider vinegar? Does it matter when you drink it? i.e. before or after meals




    0



    0
  39. Do you know if neutralizing the acidity of vinegar drink by adding sodium or potassium carbonate, would compromise the fat-burning functionality of the acetic acid?




    0



    0
    1. Simona,

      It does appear that modifying the vinegar drink will influence it’s function and the studies suggest it would have a negative influence. Stick with the dilute form. Dr. Alan Kadish Moderator for Dr. Greger




      0



      0
  40. is there a difference as to what vinegar you drink? Does it have to be
    apple cider vinegar? Does it matter when you drink it? i.e. before or
    after meals




    0



    0
    1. This video specifically references acetic. Any bottle of vinegar that you pick up with give the percent and type of acid in the bottle. Such as 4% acetic acid. If you don’t see acetic acid I would not purchase it if you are trying to use the information in this video to lose weight.
      Also, do a search on this site for vinegars. He has done another one that shows that vinegar interrupts the blood sugar spike after eating carbs. Put vinegar on your potato, pasta, grains, etc. for a nice slow energy-burn.
      Lastly, go to the Bragg’s website and look at teh information they have on their Braggs Apple Cider Vinegar.




      0



      0
  41. I have a problem with your final point here. It’s OK for the vinegar company to fund and potentially influence the study, but not the egg industry, or meat or dairy? And the reasoning is that if the research regarding “healthy” foods is corrupt, it’s ok, because worst case you eat more “healthy” food. Well, isn’t the point of the research to learn and/or prove what is actually “healthy?”

    I want very much to believe that this site is truly dedicated to the scientific proof, and has no bias or agenda. But comments like that, and the fact that every single study seems to prove that only plant based whole food diet is beneficial, seems to point toward bias and an agenda, even if only “proving” a pre-conceived belief.




    0



    0
    1. Thanks for your commend Brad,

      I have truly thought about this in a number of situations, for example there is also evidence of oats being beneficial for health that are funded by the grain industry and it can be challenging to draw a line about what’s truly healthy or if the benefits have been overstated. But again, Dr Greger makes it clear that just because something is plant based, doesn’t mean it’s healthy, You can see that in his following videos:

      Olive Oil & Artery Function
      Does Coconut Oil Clog Arteries?

      And if I remember correctly in one of Dr Gregers interviews in a podcast, he clearly states that all research should be funded by the government or through the NIH, to reduce bias towards any food and I agree, plant based or not.

      Like you said, while science tries to prove which foods are healthy, in the case of meat, dairy, eggs or fish, the case is that they associated with so many negative health issues, the list is endless and as a RD I can tell you, it’s growing every year. Everyone should have the right to know the negative effects of a food, it shouldn’t be a matter of an agenda.

      Hope this answer helps.




      0



      0
  42. Dr.Greger, vinegar (aside from apple cider vinegar) seems to shut down my digestion for the day, meaning I want to eat, but my stomach seems to say no. Not fun.
    A teaspoon of apple cider vinegar with water and cordial *before a meal* helps reduce my h-pylori reflux.




    0



    0
    1. Hi Vegan Dogs,
      Thanks for your comment. Many people have problems with vinegar. I was surprised to hear this but when I went to Raw vegan culinary school this was accepted as common knowledge and for that reason we never used vinegar in any dish. Imagine my surprise to be making raw vegan dishes everyday with zero vinegar! We routinely used citrus juices as marinades and as part of all our dressings. No stomach troubles for anyone!




      0



      0
  43. The studies show that the more vinegar consumed the higher the weight loss benefit. Does Dr. Greger suggest limiting to 2Tbs? Or is there an added benefit to consuming more? Like 2Tbs twice daily.m for example.
    Thank you.




    0



    0
  44. I’ve been drinking this daily, however like mentioned in the video, the taste makes me nauseous. Are the apple cider vinegar supplement pills just as effective?




    0



    0
  45. Has Dr. Gregor created videos on the most effective weight-loss supplementation? I just saw an add for garcinia cambogia taken with apple cider vinegar.

    Thanks




    0



    0
  46. This post very good.Many people have an interest within the healthy edges of Apple vinegar (ACV).
    ACV is vinegar made up of beverage or apple should.
    The change integrity or organic ACV contains “The Mother” of vinegar, that is what you wish to appear for.
    “The Mother” sediments are strands of proteins, enzymes and friendly microorganism.
    we tend to suggest general Organic ACV with The ‘Mother.’ Here are a number of the key health edges of ACV:
    read more in here: http://www.needinfo24.tk/2017/07/what-are-advantages-of-apple-beverage.html




    0



    0
  47. I drink Bragg Apple Cider Vinegar. 2-3 tbsp in 30 oz of filtered water.

    When I drink this I instantly feel good. I have more energy, stamina and feel like doing something. (Easily fatigued my whole life) (not sure why) so when I started drinking ACV and felt such a positive rise in my body, I can most definitely tell when I haven’t had it for the day. My go to.




    0



    0
    1. Hi Megan,

      I am a volunteer for Dr. Greger. Thanks for your question! You can get apple cider vinegar at almost any grocery store. Just look in the aisle by all the other types of vinegar–they should have several options.

      Hope this helps!




      0



      0

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Pin It on Pinterest

Share This