Dr. Greger in the Kitchen: My New Favorite Dessert

Dr. Greger in the Kitchen: My New Favorite Dessert
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Dr. Greger whips up some matcha ice cream inspired by a recipe in his How Not to Die Cookbook.

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Below is an approximation of this video’s audio content. To see any graphs, charts, graphics, images, and quotes to which Dr. Greger may be referring, watch the above video.

This is: Dr. Greger in the Kitchen, where I take the science, and put it into practice. Today, I’m going to share with you my new favorite dessert: matcha ice cream. 

Matcha is powdered green tea leaves. What’s so great about green tea? Its consumption is associated with lower rates of heart attacks, strokes, and premature death, proven in randomized, controlled trials to prevent precancerous colon polyps from developing, and precancerous prostate lesions from turning into full-blown cancer, and so anti-viral there’s an FDA-approved green tea compound ointment used to reverse warts caused by the HPV virus. That’s why, in my Daily Dozen checklist, it is one of the healthiest beverages, along with water and hibiscus tea.

Matcha is probably the healthiest way to drink green tea, since you’re drinking it as a whole food—whereas normally, you just make a hot water-green tea extract, and throw away the leaves. That’s like boiling some collard greens, and throwing away the greens, and just drinking the cooking water! Think what proportion of nutrition you’d be throwing away. The same thing, with tea leaves. Matcha allows you to drink tea whole.

That way, you’ll get all the nutrition, but also all of the potential contaminants. You know, China was late on the ban on leaded gasoline, resulting in higher-than-average lead levels in the soil on Chinese tea plantations. It gets taken up by the plant, but does not tend to leach out into the water when you just make tea the regular way. But if you eat the tea, like matcha, or if you throw tea leaves in a smoothie or something, I would recommend making sure your tea is sourced from Japan, rather than China. I have a video about the tolerable upper daily dose for kids, pregnant women, and other adults, depending on brewing method and source country.

Alright, now this stuff I have here is from Japan, so that’s not a problem. The problem, however, with any matcha tea is the taste. Matcha has a strong grassy, earthy, mossy flavor. So, I figured, why not put it into ice cream? It could be the spoonful of sugar that helps the medicine go down. Of course, traditional ice cream has way more than a spoonful of sugar—not to mention the saturated butterfat. And, the dairy proteins can actually interfere with some of the beneficial effects of the green tea compounds. So, how about making a healthy matcha ice cream comprised entirely of whole foods—just two whole foods, to be exact.

Take two frozen super-ripe bananas, and put them in a food processor or blender alongside with a half-teaspoon of the matcha tea—now, more if you can stand it, but it’s pretty strong stuff, so why don’t we start there. And, blend it up.

Blended frozen bananas take on this perfect, rich, creamy ice cream texture. Now, the more, the riper, the better. You want lots of little brown spots on there. Look at that beautiful green color here. Alright, I’m going to add a little, maybe a little mint garnish here.

The matcha actually makes the blended bananas taste better somehow. So, we’re talking just two whole plant foods—one a dark green leafy. Makes a gourmet decadent-tasting dessert. The more you eat, the healthier you are. That’s the way desserts should be.

If you want more recipes like this, incorporating some of the healthiest foods on the planet, check out my new cookbook, the How Not to Die Cookbook, now available for pre-order. (I think the ice cream recipe in the book actually uses strawberries, almond butter, and vanilla extract instead of the matcha, but delicious either way).

The cookbook will be out this December, right in time for the holidays; makes a great New Year/new you kind of gift. All the proceeds I receive from the sales of my books, DVDs, speaking engagements all goes to charity. I just want you, to be healthier.

Please consider volunteering to help out on the site.

Below is an approximation of this video’s audio content. To see any graphs, charts, graphics, images, and quotes to which Dr. Greger may be referring, watch the above video.

This is: Dr. Greger in the Kitchen, where I take the science, and put it into practice. Today, I’m going to share with you my new favorite dessert: matcha ice cream. 

Matcha is powdered green tea leaves. What’s so great about green tea? Its consumption is associated with lower rates of heart attacks, strokes, and premature death, proven in randomized, controlled trials to prevent precancerous colon polyps from developing, and precancerous prostate lesions from turning into full-blown cancer, and so anti-viral there’s an FDA-approved green tea compound ointment used to reverse warts caused by the HPV virus. That’s why, in my Daily Dozen checklist, it is one of the healthiest beverages, along with water and hibiscus tea.

Matcha is probably the healthiest way to drink green tea, since you’re drinking it as a whole food—whereas normally, you just make a hot water-green tea extract, and throw away the leaves. That’s like boiling some collard greens, and throwing away the greens, and just drinking the cooking water! Think what proportion of nutrition you’d be throwing away. The same thing, with tea leaves. Matcha allows you to drink tea whole.

That way, you’ll get all the nutrition, but also all of the potential contaminants. You know, China was late on the ban on leaded gasoline, resulting in higher-than-average lead levels in the soil on Chinese tea plantations. It gets taken up by the plant, but does not tend to leach out into the water when you just make tea the regular way. But if you eat the tea, like matcha, or if you throw tea leaves in a smoothie or something, I would recommend making sure your tea is sourced from Japan, rather than China. I have a video about the tolerable upper daily dose for kids, pregnant women, and other adults, depending on brewing method and source country.

Alright, now this stuff I have here is from Japan, so that’s not a problem. The problem, however, with any matcha tea is the taste. Matcha has a strong grassy, earthy, mossy flavor. So, I figured, why not put it into ice cream? It could be the spoonful of sugar that helps the medicine go down. Of course, traditional ice cream has way more than a spoonful of sugar—not to mention the saturated butterfat. And, the dairy proteins can actually interfere with some of the beneficial effects of the green tea compounds. So, how about making a healthy matcha ice cream comprised entirely of whole foods—just two whole foods, to be exact.

Take two frozen super-ripe bananas, and put them in a food processor or blender alongside with a half-teaspoon of the matcha tea—now, more if you can stand it, but it’s pretty strong stuff, so why don’t we start there. And, blend it up.

Blended frozen bananas take on this perfect, rich, creamy ice cream texture. Now, the more, the riper, the better. You want lots of little brown spots on there. Look at that beautiful green color here. Alright, I’m going to add a little, maybe a little mint garnish here.

The matcha actually makes the blended bananas taste better somehow. So, we’re talking just two whole plant foods—one a dark green leafy. Makes a gourmet decadent-tasting dessert. The more you eat, the healthier you are. That’s the way desserts should be.

If you want more recipes like this, incorporating some of the healthiest foods on the planet, check out my new cookbook, the How Not to Die Cookbook, now available for pre-order. (I think the ice cream recipe in the book actually uses strawberries, almond butter, and vanilla extract instead of the matcha, but delicious either way).

The cookbook will be out this December, right in time for the holidays; makes a great New Year/new you kind of gift. All the proceeds I receive from the sales of my books, DVDs, speaking engagements all goes to charity. I just want you, to be healthier.

Please consider volunteering to help out on the site.

Videography by Grant Peacock

Doctor's Note

I’m so excited about my new all-whole-foods How Not to Die Cookbook and, evidently, so many of you are too! Not only did the New York Times Book Review call it their favorite cookbook of the season, this week it rocketed to #3 on the New York Times Bestsellers list —all thanks to you!

You can order it here (and as with all my books, DVDs, and speaking engagements, all proceeds I receive go to charity).

If you liked that beautiful water color of the Daily Dozen, you can now order it as a poster so your doctor can put it up in her exam room :)

This is the second cooking video I’ve done. If you missed the first, you can catch it at Dr. Greger in the Kitchen: My New Favorite Beverage. Let me know if you want me to continue to do these, or if I should go back and just stick to the science. Thanks to Grant Peacock for the videography!

By the way, we of course added this recipe to the site so you could whip up a healthy green-light dessert today. See it here.

Here’s my video about the tolerable upper daily tea dose for kids, pregnant women, and other adults: Is There Too Much Aluminum in Tea?

If you haven’t yet, you can subscribe to my videos for free by clicking here.

184 responses to “Dr. Greger in the Kitchen: My New Favorite Dessert

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  1. Sounds like a tasty recipe. When I buy a drink while out, I usually have been ordering a chai latte made with almond or soy milk. But recently, I discovered that most coffee bars now carry green tea Matcha lattes! So I switched a few weeks ago, so this video is very timely for me.

    BTW, I gave my donation to this fine organization yesterday … such a worthy cause! Thanks to Dr Greger and the team.

  2. In response to Dr Greger’s note, I might also add that I think the occasional “cooking” video does add some liveliness to the serious subject of nutrition, so I don’t mind an occasional one. But the science based nutrition videos are really what makes this website so unique and so great!

    1. Dr. Greger, you are the kid I wanted to grow up to be. Seriously, I love the enthusiasm, zeal and enjoyment effusing in this presentation and smiled all the way thru! I must be the mother who loves you for helping all the people snookered into poor eating, becoming self determinant and healthy humans. Think of the benefits to Americans if Congress passed watching your daily videos as a law!
      Having said that, thanks and now I must go to eat my broccoli.
      Cheers and hugs from your other mother!

  3. I don’t cook collard greens in water. Instead, I rinse them, chop them up (I believe Dr. Greger said that chopping cruciferous in advance of serving or cooking it increases the content of sufurophanes), put them in a pan and cook the over medium heat on the stove top for about 6 min, stirring once every 2 min. (I add a bit of water — about 1 T at a time — if necessary to keep the chopped collards from burning to the pot.) I also add 1/8 t baking soda and about 1/4 t brown sugar per 2 large leaves (which is about 1 serving) but I’ve never checked to see if they are necessary. We got the recipe from a co-worker of my husband — except that we don’t add the ham hocks! The resulting collards are delicious! Velvety, smooth, dark green and with body. I can’t imagine boiling it in water for 20 min, as is recommended in at least one recipe in Dr. Greger’s “How Not to Die” cookbook.

    1. LOL! I am an African American and boiling them in water is what my mom and grandmother use to do. I now prepare them similar to the way you describe.

      1. I don’t know if it’s proper or not, but I think I found a cheap and effective way. I boil organic green tea either in loose form or in bags (I open the bags and empty the contents…..then boil it with previously powdered hibiscus and whip it in a Vitamix it which makes it what I hope is a descent approximation of Matcha.

        1. Bob, green and white tea should never be exposed to water temperatures above 175 degrees (F). Above that temperature the nutrients are destroyed.

    2. Not a good idea to add baking soda. This is a very old French haute cuisine trick to keep green vegetables green when they are being blanched for more than a few minutes, but it destroys some vitamins–principally the B-complex if I remember correctly.

    3. Chef AJ cooks her greens in lots of water, mostly so she can drink the water – called pot liquor in the South. But your method sounds good to me.

    1. Even people doing public service need to eat and pay their rent, oh and utilities and insurance and medial journal subscriptions, keep all the computers running. I don’t know the number, but there are quite a few people working for/with Dr Greger on all this and everyone of them has a life that needs to be supported.

      1. And let’s remember the costs of putting up a website, doing videos, maintaining it all, traveling to speaking engagements for the purpose of spreading the word… the cost list goes on and on.

      2. Uh oh, it looks like Jerry Lewis is back with two different names now, “Jerry” and “Jack Frost” … so childish. One would think he could find better things to do with his time :-(

      1. Liesbeth you are helping to create a misconception here , while book sales and speaking engagements fees all go to charity , the charity is NFO . Then NFO pays Dr. Greger for his efforts , it’s the same as a church , it is not for profit but there are people who make a living and get paid , for example at our church we have a part time janitor , book keeper and various other trades from time to time who all get paid . Then the pastor himself gets paid , this is always a difficult negotiation to do , as I have never meet a pastor who did not feel he was being underpaid .
        I’m surprised a moderator would not correct this error which I have seen repeated in the comment section several times .

    2. hi Joe, NutritionFacts.org IS a non-profit charitable organization dependent upon donations to provide the service that it does for the public. You can read about it here https://nutritionfacts.org/about/
      I believe the goal for the current fund drive is 250,000 (quarter million dollars)

      Thank you Dr Greger and NF team for all that you!

        1. Buster

          Why do you say matcha is a dubious product? i don’t consume it myself but i am curious. It is possible that heavy metal contaminants in tea might be more bioavailable from matcha than other types of tea but you have any evidence of this or other evidence of harm?

          Also how can you get paid for endorsing a type of tea? Matcha is not a brand or a company. And I am pretty sure that there is no such thing as a matcha marketing board. It is a ridiculous accusation to make – that Dr G is receiving payments for promoting matcha tea and failing to disclose a financial interest. And an unpleasant on at that.

          Since you are so negative about Dr G and NFO, why do you even bother coming here? Is it solely for the purpose of making character-blackening insinuations like this? You have been honest enough to disclose that you work for the dairy industry but does this mean that you have to attack people like Dr G and NFO who refer to the evidence that dairy foods have some adverse health effects?

          1. Dr. Greger gave a caution about the use of matcha , make sure it is from Japan and not China , if your pregnant you want to take more cautions etc.
            When you take a fairly common ingredient like green tea which costs about a 5 cents per serving and change a few things like grow in the shade and change the way you process it and now suddenly you have a product selling for up too $2 per serving . You have a situation that brings out greed in the sellers of product . Look at the other commenters here , at least one person thought that Costco was selling Japanese Matcha at a discount only to find out it was Chinese . I have seen bogus certificates before also. (Organic Certification) . It would be something to guard against , look what happened to the olive oil industry , good luck if you need to be certain it is extra virgin oil .
            Several people commented that DR G does not take any compensation for what he does , that can’t be true . He does a lot of work obviously , and needs to be paid . Being negative is not my forte , I would need to take lessons from some of the commentators on here .

            1. Well, NFO pays Dr G a salary. The website tells us this.
              https://nutritionfacts.org/faq/

              However, I don’t know what his salary package is although I have no reason to think that it is exorbitant (or that he receives money to promote products).. If you have evidence to the contrary, please present it.

              As for matcha bring dubious, I don’t know. It may well be overpriced as you suggest but that doesn’t make the product itself dubious. Personally, though, I am a bit concerned about heavy metal and fluoride consumption from ingesting (powdered) tea leaves. Nonetheless, i don’t think this makes Dr G guilty of promoting “dubious products”. Anything in excess including the water we drink and oxygen we breathe is harmful.

              To be honest, I thought it was a bit ironic that somebody whose job is to promote dairy products would accuse Dr G of promoting dubious products.

        2. Matcha “dubious?” lol – those silly, long lived Japanese with 1000 years of history! (I oft wonder if some don’t proofread their comments before publishing!)

  4. Any guidance on green tea sourced from India? I’m worried about Japan because of nuclear contamination from Fukushima and lots of other nuke power plants on the tiny island.

    1. To me India is pretty scary as a source as well. Any 3rd world country where there is a lot of poverty, you have many farmers who are desperately trying to earn enough to feed their children and keep a roof over their heads. In that case, safety concerns, legalities, regulations, etc will take a back set to expedience. Because of that I don’t even trust “organic” from those countries.

    2. We have many Indian grad students and one who is from Sri Lanka, where a principal ag product has always been tea (think the British Raj, among other things). They both say that Indian mass-produced tea produced for export is often kept in less than hygienic conditions. You are better off with high-end stuff produced elsewhere such as Taiwan or various southeast Asian countries. The Sri Lankans always bring me back very nice tea that they say is produced, stored, and transported in clean and safe conditions.

      A Japanese colleague tells me there should be no significant concerns about Japanese tea because they are very meticulous about their tea. It is subject to rigorous oversight and testing. I haven’t checked this out but will take his word for it.

    3. I lived in Japan during the Fukashima meltdown. Contaminated tea was found as far South as Yokohama (South of Tokyo) and beyond. I avoid Japanese tea like the plague. The Japanese economy was hit hard, and contaminated products made it to market by hook or crook. I’d much rather take my chances with Vietnamese or Sri Lanken tea.

  5. Careful on Japanese matcha. If it’s “food grade” matcha FROM Japan (ostensibly), it’s usually FROM CHINA. How do you know? If it’s REALLY REALLY CHEAP, it’s probably Chinese. If it’s quite expensive or if you know the provider, it’s probably Japanese. Japanese companies source their “food grade” teas from China. Chinese teas should be very suspiciously approached. A study showed very high levels of dangerous pesticides. Chinese teas (not green) are often prepared by throwing away the first batch and then brewing the washed leaves with a few more batches. One scientist from China assures me that the initial washing gets rid of the toxins including pestidicides. P.S. Japan-stay with teas grown away from Fukushima-there might be radiation from the disaster there still in the soil.

    1. Absolutely. Be sure the tea is labelled as being produced in Japan and is of higher quality–i.e., more expensive. Often the packaging will specify exactly where it was grown because the Japanese are very fussy about their tea. Obviously you want to avoid anything grown near Fukushima. I don’t think tea cultivation is big there. Not sure, though.

    2. So you can tell what teas from Japan might be coming from China and you can tell what teas have been grown “near” Fukushima? Please, tell us.

  6. My husband and I have been doing the frozen banana ice cream for a while now. Our favorite is banana and frozen organic cherries. OMG!!! Delicious

      1. I have 8 blueberry plants and stock up gallons in the freezer. They make good ice cream on their own. Ripe bananas sweeten them but have such a distinctive taste that I usually skip bananas. Pitted sweet cherries work well for added sweetness, and the color of dark cherries and blueberries is amazing. I add matcha and chocolate sometimes but the resulting color is not as appealing.
        Aqua faba whipped “cream” with erythritol is a great finishing touch. A pinch of citric acid or cream of tartar makes the whip stiffer.

    1. wondering the same thing. I haven’t tried matcha and would love a recommendation (preferably something I can order from Amazon) – thanks!

  7. Tried both green and white tea based on Dr. Greger’s past recommendations but I react in a bad way to the caffeine. Are there any other options using the tea plant Camellia sinensis that do not have caffeine?

    1. There is decaf green tea at my local store (haven’t checked country of origin). When I make a smoothie I cut the teabag open and dump in the contents. You could make matcha by dumping a lot of dry green tea leaves into a blender and buzzing it to powder. That help?

  8. Any latest word on whether almond milk (which often has supplemented Calcium) ALSO blocks the phytonutrients in green tea?
    Soy milk seems to have the same effect as cow’s milk and I’m wondering if it is the calcium content in these drinks which is having this effect.

    1. Thank you for your question. I am afraid I can not find any information on this question and it has not been covered by Dr Greger. I don’t think the studies have been performed to answer this question.

      1. Correct. Eating meat will not kill you and will certainly help you survive in situations where other food options like fruits, vegetables, and nuts are scarce or absent. In the first-world where life expectancy is now higher thanks to modern medicine, what has been found in numerous studies highlighted by Dr. Greger and other doctors and researchers is that meat consumption also increases your risk of chronic illness such as heart disease and cancer. A number of causes are established to explain this correlation such as the nature of animal protein, the heme-iron found in meat, and the harmful chemicals and treatments used on meat in the food industry. This is why the elders of Okinawa, Japan have one of the longest life expectancies in the world and their meat consumption is only 1% of their caloric intake.

      2. Thomas, not all studies are created equal. By that I mean, we need to use critical thinking to find which studies have flaws and which studies are sound. For example, you would be skeptical of study that showed beer consumption to be healthy if it was funded by Coors, correct? It’s not cherry-picking to ignore studies like those. It’s being a critical thinker.

      3. Is that why an expert scientific panel convened by the World Health Organization reviewed all the evidence and concluded that processed meat is carcinogenic and red meat is “probably carcinogenic”?

        if you are genuinely concerned about cherry picking evidence, you might want to examine the claims of the people who tell you that eating meat is harmless or even healthy.

    1. I agree. What’s with the white coat and the stethoscope? Dr. G, can’t you just be a normal person when you go into the kitchen? Oh, wait! You’re like that at home aren’t you.

      1. Robert & Gabriel …

        Are we looking to grow in health on this site or not? YES, we are looking to grow in health. It’s inappropriate (and plain rude and childish) to comment so personally. This is not high schoolboys. BESIDE THAT, Dr. Greger absolutely identifies AS A DOCTOR… because he is, in fact, A DOCTOR … AND everything he is doing and offering here is AS A DOCTOR for our health and well being. Beside that, it’s all in good fun and enjoyment.

        PLEASE…consider some exercise (90 minutes, ideally) to work off some of your aggression, sour moods, lack of humor or negativity, not sure what-all to call it. Happy people live longer.

      2. “What’s with the white coat & stethescope”? Apparently it’s to support his video image, & theatrical hobby (for lack of a better word), same as his mannerisms, voice inflections etc. Why not let him enjoy what he loves doing (helping people live long & healthy lives, & ease the suffering of innocent animals)?
        Many people (including my wife) LOVE those things about him.
        If my wife is in a good mood I can maybe get her to listen to one sentence out of my mouth without interrupting me, but she’ll listen silently to Dr Greger for hours, or go to sleep listening to his videos.
        “Different strokes for different folks”

    2. Gabriel , this is completely overlooked by this crowd , my 4 year old completely freaked out when santa talked to my daughter as he walked by us at the mall . I had to explain to her he was not real , just a guy in a costume , we have always told our kids the truth about santa .
      If Dr. Greger wants to play dress up and pretend he just stepped away from a patient to give you this recipe , I guess that is up to him . It is a obvious visual lie to make you think he is something he is not . He has never seen patients .

      1. Buster

        Don’t be silly. Every MD has seen patients. You don’t qualify as an MD without spending years seeing patients.

        Why do you come here and make false statement like this? You accuse him of never having seen patients and you accuse him of taking kickbacks for promoting products and not disclosing this fact. Oh, yes, you are here to promote the dairy industry. Does this have to involve making unfounded slurs on the character and expertise of people who dare to show the evidence that dairy products are associated with adverse health effects?

        Presumably you are also highly critical of Harvard because it showed that removing dairy fat, and replacing it with whole grains, reduced cardiovascular risk by almost 30%………..

        “When dairy fat was replaced with the same number of calories from vegetable fat or polyunsaturated fat, the risk of cardiovascular disease dropped by 10% and 24%, respectively. Furthermore, replacing the same number of calories from dairy fat with healthful carbohydrates from whole grains was associated with a 28% lower risk of cardiovascular disease.”
        https://www.hsph.harvard.edu/nutritionsource/2016/10/25/dairy-fat-cardiovascular-disease-risk/

        1. Ya gotta live in the real world TG .
          If anyone needs advice on dairy perhaps you should listen to Dr. Catherine Pound , she is a researcher , investigator and head of the Paediatric Society of Canada .
          She states ” there is a bit of a push from the health movement where people think or feel that a more plant based nutrition is better than a meat based nutrition , which may be true in adulthood , where we are recommending to move away from eating meat frequently , but that does not hold true for children who need the protein “.
          she continued ” we see parents that are well intention ed moving to a plant based beverage for their children thinking they are doing a good thing while actually they are with holding important nutrients and proteins.. Kids aged 2 to 8 need 13 to 19 grams of protein per day which can be meet with 2 cups cow milk . Plant based milks including soy are inappropriate .”
          You see TG in the real world the number one vegetable is the potato , problem is we are getting close to 70% of those potatoes consumed as frys or chips , not exactly health food .
          For the time being we need the dairy cows , not only for the nutrition , but cows also help the environment , their pastures are a sink for methane and cows also increase fertility on our farms .

          1. Dear Buster,

            When I read your post above about cows milk being the best to feed young children, I’m thinking of infants ages zero to two. The best milk for them is breast milk. After two years of age, they (like all adults) can ditch the milk (meat or plant-based) and start drinking water. That is the best beverage on the planet. Yes, young children need protein, but dairy milk is harmful. It’s dangerous to adult health. Doesn’t it make sense that it would also be dangerous to children’s health? Plant proteins have been shown to be all that we need. The evidence has been shared again and again, especially if you’re a regular on this site. Why can’t you just watch the videos and review the sources cited yourself and make up your own mind concerning your personal decisions without bringing in the opinions of other experts? Anybody who promotes the consumption of cows milk for children is supporting the poisoning of children. And there is so much evidence to showing this. Why would you choose to support that?

  9. Uh oh, it looks like Jerry Lewis is back with two different names now, “Jerry” and “Jack Frost” … so childish. One would think he could find better things to do with his time :-(

  10. I love the recipe videos. Please keep them up! It would be good if the site included the recipes as depicted in the videos. Thanks for all you do Dr Greger!

  11. LOVE IT!!!
    We love seeing Dr. G. in the Kitchen. Thank you for dedicating your life to help all of us feel better!
    Now that’s optimal wellness, LOL
    Holly

  12. I love this guy! Watching Dr. Greger makes me laugh right out loud! He’s so excited about eating healthy he is almost lifting off the floor! He’s the Mary Poppins of the nutrition world! He always brings a smile to my face.

  13. Thomas which studies have you been reading? Dr. Greger is a most generous and caring person with an excellent reputation. He does not have an agenda. He and the team collate research and present the findings as they are. No one on this site badgers anyone else. Your food choices are up to you. What you will find on nutritionfacts.org is advice based on the latest cutting edge research which, with the greatest respect to you Thomas, indicates the way to great health is a WFPB approach. Personally I am indebted to Dr. Greger and everyone who volunteers their time to prepare and present crucial information on this site. It has helped me sort of the trash from the treasure many times. Thanks dr. Greger! Your efforts are appreciated!

  14. I love your personality and enthusiasm Dr G, you really make make me smile. I came across your wonderful website a month ago and watch a video daily. I ordered your new cookbook from Amazon ages ago but have to wait until the end of December before it is delivered – I can’t wait! I became vegan 6 months ago as part of my healing journey and feel fantastic! Karen, UK.

  15. More videos, more videos, more videos….please!!!!

    You make healthy eating informative AND FUN!!!

    I purchased 9 How Not To Die books last year for Christmas gifts for my family. This year I purchased 9 of your cookbooks. I truly can’t think of a better gift to give to those that I love!

    Thank you for all that you do. I am so fortunate to have you and your fabulous information in my hip pocket! (On my phone, that is)…haha!!!!

    Happy Holidays!

  16. I’m curious about absorption of foods. You talk about eating all these different kinds of wonderful food, but sometimes I just feels like it goes straight through.

    1. Hi Michele,

      All foods are absorbed in differents ways. Unless you have dumping syndrome, the food can’t go straight through. You might want to check with your physician this situation.

      Nutritionist Yared
      Volunteer Moderator

  17. I also enjoy the videos and hope you continue them. Your cookbook not only has recipes that are easy to prepare but delicious. And your witty comments bring a smile to my face
    Keep up the good work! We need more people in the world that do something to help others rather than helping themselves. You are changing lives. Thank you.

  18. I am so grateful to have found Dr. Greger . I can’t begin to imagine the hours of study and sacrifice he has put in to help others live longer and healthier. For those of you who want to find fault most of us no better than to take what you say with a grain of salt. Go write your own book. Leave us to enjoy and appreciate what the good doctor is doing for us. I never thought at age 65 I’d say I am Vegan.
    And I love it. Thank you Dr. Greger you are in the top five people who have made a huge difference for the betterment of my life. And I adore your personality. You are adorable. I love you . Thank you.

    1. Amen to that I just love Dr Greger. I am 66 and I am so glad to have found a better way to help me to stay healthy and live longer. There will always be negative people in this world, I have learn to just keep believing what is true and Do ME!
      Thank you Dr. G

  19. Dr. Gregor you are just fantastic. Please keep doing what you do. Me and my husband (and gradually our kids) are now all WFPB and we feel fantastic. They way you convey information through entertaining anecdotes is amazing and makes me not want to touch animal products again. Thank you for your generosity of spirit and kindness.

  20. Dr. Chef is IN the kitchen! Great outfit (including the chefs hat and stethoscope) :D
    Can’t wait to receive the cookbook!
    Many thanks for all your hard work.

  21. Toward the end of the year I love giving a few hundred bucks to this site. But with the repeal of Net Neutrality, I doubt NutritionFacts will last another year. There’s no way that ISPs like Comcast/NBC will allow a site like this to exist when their major sponsors are McDonald’s and The Beef Council.

    I’m going to wait it out and see what happens. It’s very sad, but I’m not very hopeful that we will continue to be able to see Dr. Greger’s videos for much longer.

    Net Neutrality ends in 58 days. Enjoy this site while you can!

  22. I just picked up your new cookbook at Costco. It’s great! Even better than I thought it was going to be.

    FYI the original book How Not to Die is back in stock at Costco for the holiday season! Get it for those you love.

    It will be great to have a paper copy of these books especially now that the future of the internet is so uncertain. I’ve taken sites like this for granted for many years. As I mentioned above, now that the FCC has repealed Net Neutrality, who knows how much longer sites like this will be around.

  23. I like to see the Doc in action in the kitchen.
    The Cook Book is great ~ I only wish it had the Metric Measurements we use in Australia.

    1. Can’t you buy imperial measuring spoons and cups in Australia? My family in the Netherlands actually prefers cooking with them. I’ve done both metric and imperial over the course of my life and I have to say I prefer what the Americans use.

    2. Raoul – there are only about a million conversion sites on the internet which will convert the measurements when you enter the values. In the time it took to complain about this re: Dr. G’s book you could have found one and made good use of it.
      Do we really need to have everything spoon-fed to us in this life?

  24. Love the cooking videos. Keep up the awesome work. Where did you get a cute little blender like the one in the video that actually chops frozen bananas? Already have your new cookbook and love it already.

      1. Should have looked first … I fished out my box … AND looked online … it said … Kirkland Signature Japanese Green Tea 100-count Item #979855

  25. Woooo-whooo!!! Just found out Kirkland (Costco) green tee IS macha tea AND it’s from Japan, double Yay!!! I love this tea in oatmeal with a frozen banana & cinnamon & walnuts, yum, GREAT way to start the day … AND goes with Dr. Greger’s notion of ‘how can I make this meal healthier”.

  26. There are so many great recipes in your new cookbook! But I am allergic to soy and miso paste is an ingredient in many of the recipes. Can you suggest a substitute for the miso?

    1. Looks like you already have one good suggestion for a substitute, but if you need more I saw there are many suggestions for substitutes if you just Google “substitutes for Miso” While Google is never the site I go to for health information, it can be helpful for cooking suggestions. Some innovative cooks even make their own batches of alternate miso which might appeal to you. Glad you like the cookbook. Mines on its way to me!

  27. Can anyone suggest a quality organic matcha powder (from Japan) to purchase? I will check amazon but would prefer a recommendation from someone posting here. Thank you for your time! (Dr. Greger, keep these “In the Kitchen” videos coming. As others have said, these videos are a refreshing change from your science-based videos. Love your excitement and sense of humor!)

    1. Hey, Deb … I posted this morning ….

      IviDecember 16th, 2017 9:53 am Woooo-whooo!!! Just found out Kirkland (Costco) green tee IS macha tea AND it’s from Japan, double Yay!!! I love this tea in oatmeal with a frozen banana & cinnamon & walnuts, yum, GREAT way to start the day … AND goes with Dr. Greger’s notion of ‘how can I make this meal healthier”.

          1. Sharon, it’s tea bags … I need the convenience of packaging & pre-measured for my life & travels. Also, easy to add it to salad when I’m out.

    2. Deb……I found a pound of Davidson’s loose decaffeinated organic green tea on Amazon and just powdered it myself in a Vitamix. I have a hard time believing genuine Matcha is much better than that. Mine is a lot cheaper anyway.

  28. Hello I am on the verge of converting my families and my own eating habits. There is so much information out there not to mention its very hard to decipher whats factual and what is misinformation to confuse people. Anyways I am wondering what is the best Western diet? I own land and am in the process of becoming 100% self reliant and am trying to compile a list of foods that I can grow/raise. I am sure Dr. Gregers new cookbook. Is there any other cookbooks that I should know about.

    1. Mike, I’m not quite clear what you are asking for. But if you are searching for additional healthy recipes, go to John McDougall M.D.’s site. His wife, Mary, has been compiling recipes and posting them for decades.All for free. https://www.drmcdougall.com/health/education/recipes/
      If you are interested in another book, a great one for health- promoting meals is: Bravo!: Health Promoting Meals from the TrueNorth Health Kitchen by the Chef of True North Center.
      Have fun!!

      1. Love my copy of Bravo! It’s great for banging out something that looks chef-y for friends, but secretly more cookable than you’d think.

    2. One of my favorite cookbooks for healthy food is the PlantPure Nation cookbook by Kim Campbell, who is T Colin Campbell’s daughter-in-law. There is also one called the China Study Cookbook. Straight-Up Food by Cathy Fisher is good, and uses no sugar, oil, salt, or flour.

      For a wonderful talk on suggestions for getting other people to happily go along with your plan, check out the talk by Timaree Hagenburger: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=U-NE-5rIZVM&feature=youtu.be. She also has a website.

      The most knowledgeable nutritionist or dietitian I’ve ever heard, with many talks on Youtube, is Brenda Davis, RD.

      Good luck with your project.

    3. The WFPB lifestyle is quite simple really. Just eat from the plant with minimal processing. When in doubt, just eat the plant raw as long as it’s edible (i.e. beans should not be eaten raw). I eat broccoli, asparagus, spinach, and all fruit and nuts raw. There is no cooking. I feel great all the time. I think you’re placing an unnecessary restraint on yourself by being completely self reliant, but if you must, then you’ll need to talk to your local farm bureau to get the seeds for plants that grow best in your area, otherwise you’ll have to excessively fertilize or use pesticides on them which is very undesirable.

      Dr. Ben

  29. I’ve never tried matcha & would like to, but am concerned about caffeine content – even 1/2 tsp for the recipe in this video – as i have hypertension. Thoughts? Thanks!

    1. Hello Sophie – my high bP was very stubborn but it’s finally gone. Hang in there with green veggies, try to have them be half your meal, with any kind of sauce. Wish you the best.

    2. You could consider drinking hibiscus tea instead. It lowers blood pressure.
      https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25875025

      I am currently drinking Twinings Mango and Strawberry tea. Despite the name, it is basically hibiscus tea and a very pleasant drop.

      Dr Greger also has a number of videos on hibiscus tea that are worth watching (use the search box to find them).

    3. I tried to find a good scholarly answer on how much caffeine is contained in matcha tea but was only able to find what appears to be a reliable answer from a comprehensive tea site which concluded: “1/2 tsp of Matcha powder is about 30 – 35 mg, caffeine similar to that of other green teas prepared with an infusion of 1 heaping teaspoon of leaves. That’s about half the amount of caffeine you’d get from a cup of coffee.” Are you avoiding all caffeine? If you indulge in a half a cup of coffee without problems or BP spikes, you might try this dessert and see if it affects your BP. However the suggestion below to try Hibiscus tea is probably a safe approach. Hope this helps

  30. A note to the production crew, could the light source be positioned higher or out to the sides? It might mitigate the flashing eyeglasses. Or were y’all looking to maximize the loveable science geek image?

  31. It looks more of a pudding consistency. How do we make it like icecream? What is the best container to store it in? How long do we freeze it for to make it into icecream?

    1. If you noticed the way he broke his bananas, they weren’t frozen rock hard. Just totally freeze & you’ll get firmer ice cream. That’s all there is to it.

    2. Miriam,

      Consistency will be dependent on the freeze of the bananas coupled with time in the food processor and your added favorites for flavoring. You can experiment with some oily foods (nuts and seed butters, coconut, etc.) to change the consistency and of course store it in your freezer to harden the mixture a bit more.

      Also, if your adding additional ingredients, make certain they are cold before adding to the mix…and when storing use a pre-chilled container.

      Dr. Alan Kadish moderator for Dr. Greger http://www.CenterofHealth.com

  32. After discovering a whole food planted based lifestyle 5 years ago my life has been transformed. I have lots of energy and great health. All the declining symptoms of eating the standard american diet have receded. I’m grateful for all of your imaginative recipes and continual support.

  33. Dr. Greger,
    Thank you for these wonderful videos. I appreciate the effort you and your team have put forth in all our behalves. I purchased the cookbook and I am excited to use it. What charity does the proceeds benefit? I think it is wonderful that you would take what you need and pay the rest forward. It speaks highly of you and your work. I see so many doctors writing books, and I often feel that it is a one-sided deal that benefits the doctor. You seem to be very different from many of the others, and you also seem to find great joy in your service. May the world be blessed for the good through you efforts.

  34. I love this video and think it is funny Dr. Greger is all dressed up. I’m glad he has a great sense of humor. And I just made the macha ice cream in my blender – where a good portion is stuck to the bottom since I did half a recipe and it was not enough to really blend well. But it was delicious. The container of the macha has been in my cupboard for a few years and all I could read was JP – the rest was in Japanese – but I’m still alive.

    Thank you Dr. Greger. I have already prepared a couple of the other recipes in your book and enjoyed them.

  35. A little late, but I’ve been making frozen banana ice cream for some time, I’m still experimenting though.

    I usually start with
    2 bananas
    ~2 tbsp almond milk, and add more as I blend
    ~1 tsp vanilla extract

    I will variably add in the flavour, never tried the matcha powder
    -2 tbsp cocoa powder or
    raspberries (my favourite)
    blueberries (just ok)
    strawberries (pretty good)
    cherries (great)
    lemon (2nd favourite)

    I’m going to try some type of melon in the future, I keep frozen red/black currants often and I’ll try those, pineapple is a favourite of mine, I’ve made smoothies so this is a must.

    For extra texture I add in
    -dates, this add soft chewy and sweet spots, like a fudge ice cream
    -cacao nibs, small cookie crunch
    -vegan chocolate chips, not a whole food but an ok treat for a chocolate crunch

  36. Thank you for all you do for us…. and please, continue to be in the kitchen from time to time so that we can apply what you teach us. I wish you the best.

  37. The cookbook is terrific! One question: some of the recipes include the use of broiling or high temperatures. Is there truth to the idea that high temperatures cause foods to become toxic?

  38. I love your cooking videos…I request you keep doing both. Thank you for all you do Dr. Greger. You have revolutionized the way we eat and I thought we ate so well! My family, my clients and I love your work.

  39. Love your ‘In the Kitchen’ spots! Keep them up. These recipes have become part of my daily diet. I was looking for something sweet but healthy and easy to make. macha ice cream with banana. Perfect! Thank you.

    1. Jerry, I disagree. I thought it was an excellent idea. Comments such as yours irritate. Why don’t you make a decent contribution to people’s health?

  40. Just tried this recipe and I’m blown away by how delicious it is, and super easy to prepare. Tastes like cheating, but it’s not! I liked it so much that I just bought the HNTD Cookbook… But unless I’m blind I don’t see this recipe in it??? Looking forward to trying the other recipes though! And definitely keep the kitchen vids coming, Dr. Greger! This is exactly what I need for my New Years’ Resolution.

    1. Just go to an Asian store and buy any brand of Japanese matcha. Next choice is Korean. Avoid all matcha or any foods made in China.

  41. Dear Dr. Greger,

    Could you make some recommendations for whole-food plant-based Passover Seder dishes? (In one of your videos, you mentioned that you grew up in a Jewish household; I figured you’d be a good person to ask.) Traditional Ashkenazi seder dishes are a bit horrifying— gefilte fish, chopped liver, hardboiled egg, chicken soup with matzo balls held together with egg, brisket, etc. When not made well (which is exceedingly common), the gefilte fish and chopped liver are reminiscent of cat food. There’s got to be some way to do a plant-based passover. (Asking for a Jewish friend.) Any thoughts?

    1. Hi Laura,

      Are you on our email list? If so, please stay tuned for the September email newsletter (end of Sept) and keep an eye on our social media around then! :)

  42. Hi! I just made the other linked V-12 Veggie Blast smoothie linked in the notes and it was great. Subbed cucumber for bell pepper because that’s what I had on hand but that is the beauty of smoothies, you can easily substitute ingredients.

    My question is that I noticed in the video all the packs of veggies for smoothies were to be put in the fridge. Do you loose any significant value of nutrition if you put these packs in the freezer?

    Thanks and keep up the great work!

    1. Hi kittybitty – Thanks for your question! It is so awesome to hear that you enjoyed the V-12 Veggie Blast smoothie and it is always fun to get creative and try new substitutes in recipes! When freezing produce, minimal nutritional value is lost and the nutrient content remains comparable to fresh produce. In fact, the nutrition value may be better preserved with freezing. So if you are not going to eat the packs of veggies/fruits within a few days to a week or you are bulk prepping, I would recommend freezing them. Hope this helps!

      Janelle, RD CD
      Registered Dietitian and Health Support Volunteer

  43. Sure green tea has some good properties but at what cost? It isn’t without a downside and I am surprised I have not see you mention the really extraordinarily high levels of fluoride in green, white and black tea. I have read it is as high as up to 400 times more fluoride then in fluoridated water.

    Will you please do an article about that. Being someone uber toxic with fluoride, your advise recommending green tea/ macha could be more them harmful.

  44. Just made green tea ice cream , but added some assorted unsalted nuts plus a T spoon
    Of unsweetened coco powder. Haven’t tried any other way , but it was so very delicious couldn’t tell it wasn’t real ice cream , can hardly wait til my next one. Diana
    Thanks for the idea great thinking !

  45. Someone commented that the matcha in the green tea bags from Costco
    Had negative ingredients like lead as they found out the tea was from China not japan the box clearly say a product of Japan. So are these safe or not ? . I don’t want to start adding crazy things to my diet now .” I am trying not to die “ I think it was in the exchange between 2 guys one workedgor a diary?
    Please let me know Diana

    1. Hi Diana, my personal recommendation would be to contact the company directly and ask if they have had their tea tested for lead or other metals. If you find an answer, I’m sure others here would be happy to see it! Thanks!

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