Which Is a Better Breakfast: Cereal or Oatmeal?

Which Is a Better Breakfast: Cereal or Oatmeal?
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The remarkable impact of the structure of food beyond nutritional content or composition.

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Below is an approximation of this video’s audio content. To see any graphs, charts, graphics, images, and quotes to which Dr. Greger may be referring, watch the above video.

“Food structure,” not just nutrient composition, may be “critical for optimal health.” It should come as no surprise that cornflakes and Rice Krispies cause a much greater spike in blood sugars than rice or corn-on-the-cob; but it’s not just the added sugar. “Even with identical [ingredients], food structure can make a major difference…” For example, if you compare the absorption of fat from peanuts, compared to the exact same number of peanuts ground into peanut butter, you flush more than twice the amount of fat down the toilet when you eat the peanuts themselves, since no matter how well you chew, small bits of peanuts trap some of that oil makes it down to your colon. And, “the physical form of food” not only alters fat absorption, but carbohydrate absorption as well. For example, rolled oats have a significantly lower glycemic index than instant oatmeal, which is just oats, but in thinner flakes. And, oat flakes cause lower blood sugar and insulin spikes than powdered oats. Same single ingredient: oats, but in different forms can have different effects.

Why do we care? Well, the overly “rapid absorption” of carbohydrates after eating a high-glycemic index meal can trigger “a sequence of hormonal and metabolic changes” that may promote excessive eating. They took a dozen obese teen boys and fed them different meals, each with the same number of calories, and just followed them for the next five hours to measure their subsequent food intake. And, those that got the instant oatmeal went on to eat 53 percent more than after eating the same number of calories of steel-cut oatmeal. The instant oatmeal group was snacking within an hour after the meal, and goes on to accumulate significantly more calories throughout the rest of the day. Same food, but different form; different effects.

Instant oatmeal isn’t as bad as some breakfast cereals, though, which can get up into the 80s or 90s—even a cereal with zero sugar like shredded wheat. The “new [industrial] methods” used to create breakfast cereals, such as extrusion cooking and explosive puffing, accelerate starch digestion and absorption, causing an exaggerated blood sugar response, added sugar or not. Shredded wheat has the same ingredients as spaghetti—just wheat—but has twice the glycemic index.

When you eat spaghetti, you get a gentle rise in blood sugars. If you eat the exact same ingredients made into bread form, though, all the little bubbles in bread allow your body to break it down quicker; so, you get a big spike in blood sugars, which causes our body to overreact with an exaggerated insulin spike. And, that actually ends up driving our blood sugars below fasting levels, and that can trigger hunger. Experimentally, if you infuse someone with insulin so their blood sugars dip, you can cause their hunger to spike, and, in particular, hunger cravings for high-calorie foods. In short, lower-glycemic index foods may “help one to feel fuller longer than equivalent [higher-glycemic index] foods.”

Researchers randomized individuals into one of three breakfast conditions: oatmeal made from quick oats, the same number of calories of Frosted Flakes, or just plain water, and then measured how much people ate for lunch three hours later. Not only did those who ate the oatmeal feel significantly fuller and less hungry…they indeed then went on to eat significantly less lunch. Overweight participants ate less than half as many calories at lunch after eating the oatmeal for breakfast—hundreds and hundreds of calories less. In fact, if you notice, the breakfast cereal was so unsatiating that the Corn Flakes group ate as much as the breakfast-skipping, water-only group. It’s as if the cereal group hadn’t eaten breakfast at all!

Feed people Honey Nut Cheerios, and hours later they feel significantly less full, less satisfied, and more hungry than those fed the same number of calories of oatmeal. Though both breakfasts were oat-based, the higher glycemic index, reduced intact starch, and reduced intact fiber in the Cheerios seemed to have all conspired to diminish appetite control. “The trial was funded by the Pepsi Corporation,” makers of the Quaker oatmeal, pitted against the Cheerios from rival General Mills. And an exposé on industry-funded study manipulation later revealed that the study originally included another arm, Quaker Oatmeal Squares. “I am sorry that the oat squares did not perform as well as hoped,” the researcher told Pepsi, which “decided to publish only the results about its oatmeal.”

Please consider volunteering to help out on the site.

Image credit: Dustin Kirkpatrick. Image has been modified.

Motion graphics by Avocado Video

Below is an approximation of this video’s audio content. To see any graphs, charts, graphics, images, and quotes to which Dr. Greger may be referring, watch the above video.

“Food structure,” not just nutrient composition, may be “critical for optimal health.” It should come as no surprise that cornflakes and Rice Krispies cause a much greater spike in blood sugars than rice or corn-on-the-cob; but it’s not just the added sugar. “Even with identical [ingredients], food structure can make a major difference…” For example, if you compare the absorption of fat from peanuts, compared to the exact same number of peanuts ground into peanut butter, you flush more than twice the amount of fat down the toilet when you eat the peanuts themselves, since no matter how well you chew, small bits of peanuts trap some of that oil makes it down to your colon. And, “the physical form of food” not only alters fat absorption, but carbohydrate absorption as well. For example, rolled oats have a significantly lower glycemic index than instant oatmeal, which is just oats, but in thinner flakes. And, oat flakes cause lower blood sugar and insulin spikes than powdered oats. Same single ingredient: oats, but in different forms can have different effects.

Why do we care? Well, the overly “rapid absorption” of carbohydrates after eating a high-glycemic index meal can trigger “a sequence of hormonal and metabolic changes” that may promote excessive eating. They took a dozen obese teen boys and fed them different meals, each with the same number of calories, and just followed them for the next five hours to measure their subsequent food intake. And, those that got the instant oatmeal went on to eat 53 percent more than after eating the same number of calories of steel-cut oatmeal. The instant oatmeal group was snacking within an hour after the meal, and goes on to accumulate significantly more calories throughout the rest of the day. Same food, but different form; different effects.

Instant oatmeal isn’t as bad as some breakfast cereals, though, which can get up into the 80s or 90s—even a cereal with zero sugar like shredded wheat. The “new [industrial] methods” used to create breakfast cereals, such as extrusion cooking and explosive puffing, accelerate starch digestion and absorption, causing an exaggerated blood sugar response, added sugar or not. Shredded wheat has the same ingredients as spaghetti—just wheat—but has twice the glycemic index.

When you eat spaghetti, you get a gentle rise in blood sugars. If you eat the exact same ingredients made into bread form, though, all the little bubbles in bread allow your body to break it down quicker; so, you get a big spike in blood sugars, which causes our body to overreact with an exaggerated insulin spike. And, that actually ends up driving our blood sugars below fasting levels, and that can trigger hunger. Experimentally, if you infuse someone with insulin so their blood sugars dip, you can cause their hunger to spike, and, in particular, hunger cravings for high-calorie foods. In short, lower-glycemic index foods may “help one to feel fuller longer than equivalent [higher-glycemic index] foods.”

Researchers randomized individuals into one of three breakfast conditions: oatmeal made from quick oats, the same number of calories of Frosted Flakes, or just plain water, and then measured how much people ate for lunch three hours later. Not only did those who ate the oatmeal feel significantly fuller and less hungry…they indeed then went on to eat significantly less lunch. Overweight participants ate less than half as many calories at lunch after eating the oatmeal for breakfast—hundreds and hundreds of calories less. In fact, if you notice, the breakfast cereal was so unsatiating that the Corn Flakes group ate as much as the breakfast-skipping, water-only group. It’s as if the cereal group hadn’t eaten breakfast at all!

Feed people Honey Nut Cheerios, and hours later they feel significantly less full, less satisfied, and more hungry than those fed the same number of calories of oatmeal. Though both breakfasts were oat-based, the higher glycemic index, reduced intact starch, and reduced intact fiber in the Cheerios seemed to have all conspired to diminish appetite control. “The trial was funded by the Pepsi Corporation,” makers of the Quaker oatmeal, pitted against the Cheerios from rival General Mills. And an exposé on industry-funded study manipulation later revealed that the study originally included another arm, Quaker Oatmeal Squares. “I am sorry that the oat squares did not perform as well as hoped,” the researcher told Pepsi, which “decided to publish only the results about its oatmeal.”

Please consider volunteering to help out on the site.

Image credit: Dustin Kirkpatrick. Image has been modified.

Motion graphics by Avocado Video

Doctor's Note

In case you missed my previous cereal video, check out The Worst Food for Tooth Decay. It’s crazy how the same product can have such different effects on the body, based on its processing. Beyond just focusing on whole rather than refined grains, the wholiest of all is intact grains. Instant oats are better than powdered oats; rolled oats are better than instant; steel-cut oats better than rolled; and intact oat groats are the best!

Check out this great cooking video of my Morning Grain Bowls from the How Not to Die Cookbook.

More on the benefits of whole grains can be found in:

If you haven’t yet, you can subscribe to my videos for free by clicking here and to my audio podcast here (subscribe by clicking on your mobile device’s icon). 

188 responses to “Which Is a Better Breakfast: Cereal or Oatmeal?

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        1. Words are confusing: we all interpret them differently. But regarding this article, aren’t we talking about the DEGREE that the food is refined? Whole oat kernels or berries (which can be called ‘cereal’) is NOT the same as the more refined oat flakes or the highly refined “crunchy oat cereal” from a box.

          1. Exactly Eve. Brenda Davis has explained that the best to worst are sprouted intact whole grains, then intact whole grains, then rolled, then meal, then flour.

            In terms of “cereal”, you’re also right on. In England, apparently, all grains are called “corn”, while in the USA, it refers to the indigenous maize plant.
            John S

            1. Yes, in the UK maize is sweetcorn but in the US it is just corn. Oats are (or at least used to be) called corn in Scotland, while in England corn was usually wheat or barley. ‘Corn’ just referred to the main food grain in a particular country or region. Nowadays though, with US influence via tv and cinema, I suspect that a lot of people in the UK use ‘corn’ in the American sense.

              Corn can also mean any small particle hence corned beef.(beef processed using small corns of salt).

            2. We not do call all grains corn here in England. Here in England, corn is corn/maize. We call the other grains by proper names.

    1. Would this not be an appropriate time to mention the ubiquitous presence of glyphosate in all of these oat products as a result of Monsanto designed harvest techniques? Can we please bring on the ORGANIC OATS? Thank you Dr G

      1. There’s proven evidence that some of the organic oats from a VERY popular brand are sprayed with glyphosate right after harvesting. That helps the oats dry faster. But they are non GMO so people think that they’re safe to eat. I’m not going to eat any oats until I see evidence that they’re not being sprayed.
        (It’s a scary world out there!)

        1. AFAIK, all conventionally grown grains and legumes in the US are sprayed with roundup before harvest. (Not after.) For the combine to work, the plants have to be dead and dry. Most farmers rent the combine so want to harvest the whole crop at one time, so need it to all be dry at the same time. Again, AFAIK, the same goes for herbs. No organic products should be sprayed with roundup.

        1. Availability does vary. I live in the Philippines and it’s extremely difficult to find traditional porridge oats (ie rolled oats) and nobody has even heard of oat kernels or steel cut oats. Instant and quick cooking oats are the only ones found on supermarket shelves (rolled oats only appear a few times a year). Even in Australia, steel-cut oats were difficult to find and hugely overpriced and I’d never seen oat kernels.

          1. Fumblefingers. Things may have changed since you lived here in Australia. It’s quite easy to buy both of those now. In fact Woolies has steel cut and the local bulk shop has groats

            1. Yes, it’s been a while but I was in my local Woolies (in Noosa) this time last year and don’t recall seeing steel-cut oats. The local organic bulk foods shop didn’t have groats either but it was probably 18 months since I was last in there. Of course, Queensland is sometimes a little behind the times …….

              1. Ok. I live in northern NSW. We have a very good bulk shop although one thing I would like to buy is unfortified nooch. Don’t know if it’s available in Australia at all.

        2. Bob Red Mills has a good selection of oats, too. Steel cut, old fashioned rolled, and quick oats. I prefer steel cut. They have organic and non, but at least it’s all non-gmo as they have a non-gmo pledge. And also gluten-free certified options.

      2. Sometimes I wonder about studies on antioxidant effects as well… Considering there are significantly more antioxidants in organic plant foods than non-organic, I would imagine that would make as much of a significant difference in studies. I wish they would mention in studies, if the produce used was organic, conventional, or genetically modified. Maybe we’d notice some patterns a long the way if it were pointed out study to study.

      3. Steve,

        I think you’d be pleased to know that there are organic oat products available, worldwide with a high degree of integrity, from Red Bob’s Mill……https://www.bobsredmill.com/

        A group of us just toured his facility and came away very impressed with both the company and products. You will also notice the various options for getting different organic oat cuts, speaking of whole grains. (https://www.bobsredmill.com/bobs-way-whole-grains)

        Dr. Alan Kadish moderator for Dr. Greger http://www.Centerofhealth.com

        1. Dr Kadish,

          I need to discuss a different topic: sinuses. I have a long version and a short version, I’ll give you the short version and you can ask questions if you need more info. I’ve had headaches for many years, I’ve just recently discovered that these ‘headaches’ are my sinuses. I’m getting allergy shots. When I lay down at night, on 2 or 3 pillows (I cannot lay flat or my sinuses will hurt the worst), sometimes my sinuses will hurt. When I wake up they hurt and when I stand up they hurt the worst! Why? They’ve gotten better since I’ve cut out dairy, meat, fat, eggs, wheat and processed foods. I know I’m on the right track, but how long will it take to heal, or recover, or stop hurting. Is there something else I need to do?

          1. Midge,

            Nice work on isolating out some of the top allergens. I’d highly suggest that you’re not finished finding all of the offending agent/s. You might explore the use of an exclusion/provocation approach to your foods, (https://d1vo8zfysxy97v.cloudfront.net/files/wellness-guides/MediClear-Program-Guide_V01_08.30.18.pdf) for a good overview. It’s not necessary to purchase their products for this procedure.

            Also please do a deep dive into your environment….. ie. change the pillows to an organic sourced product….. and yes there is a lot to consider. Don’t miss the less than obvious….vacuum cleaners to air filtration and of course the source of the particulates and chemicals. Please reference the EWG.org site for a bit more info on some of the common items to consider.

            Look forward to hearing that you’ve found your solution !

            Dr. Alan Kadish moderator for Dr. Greger http://www.Centerofhealth.com

    2. @Mr Fumblefingers a rhetorical post right? My perspective based on various scenarios where the term “cereals” are used while technically oats are a “cereals” class of food many people use “cereals” to refer to refined “cereals” class food served up in a box along with some other additives. Would you agree that’s is what is happening?

      On a similar vein i find it very frustrating when nutrition and fad diet folks refer to “carbs” instead of being more specific and call out whether they are referring to “simple carbs” [ == refined food sources ] versus “complex carbs” [ == whole food plant based sources ] given the significantly different results these two different classes of carbs have on ones health.

      1. Carbohydrates are confusing in and of themselves! For instance, fruit can be referred to as simple carbs — and sweet potatoes can be referred to complex carbs, only because most fruit is absorbed A LITTLE faster than sweet potatoes. But I agree that we need to explain what type of carbs we are referring to — are they the highly refined carbs, changed by humans? Or are we talking about the whole food, unrefined and unchanged carbs? When my kids were little, I’d ask them to ask themselves, “COULD a caveman have eaten this?” If they can’t say “Yes” it’s likely NOT the kind of “carbs” they should be eating lots of!

      2. Yes,you are right. I have same frustration when people use ‘vegetables’ to refer only to green leafy vegetables and root vegetables instead of all vegetables. And for that matter ‘vegetarians’ to refer to people who don’t eat meat instead of people who eat an all-vegetable diet. Best though not to get me started ………….

    3. My “cereal” is rolled oats with nuts and dried fruit, no added sugar or fat. Quite confusing terminology &Dr Greger spoke too quickly without varying the speed in this one.

      How much better are steel cut oats than rolled oats I wonder as they need much more cooking time to make porridge

      1. Less processing of any given cereal type results in a “cereal” that produces a lower glycemic response resulting in an attenuation of hunger throughout the day and an increased satiety….resulting in a subsequent lower caloric intake. Rolling, puffing, exploding, pulverizing, all theses “processes” change the digestive ambiance of the cereal consumed….really fascinating.

      2. I keep my various dried fruits in a jar with water in the fridge and spoon it onto my steel cut oatmeal. The dried fruit plumps and the water gets sweet, makes a great topping. I make a big batch of steel cut oatmeal about once a week and keep that in my fridge too. Making the steel cut is very easy if you have a heavy pot like a Creuset. Just let it cook for a few minutes (top on), turn off the heat and let it sit for few hours.

        1. A perfect brekkie!! Also a healthy snack through the day.. Also it could be possible to make small scones with the mixture, at the very least a crumble topping for natural stewed green apples…

        2. I do boil then let sit but still end up stirring a lot to get it creamy. But rolled oats with fresh fruit, beans, nuts and I should add some date, surely would be no or hardly any blood spike afterwards? I don’t get hungry for hours

          1. Do any of you use a pressure cooker or rice cooker to cook your steel cut oats? This way you don’t have to stir them but I’m not sure if they lose nutrients in this process. Any thoughts? Thanks!

    4. Why is a sugar spike a bad thing? Say I eat lots of instant oatmeal and I get a sugar spike, but I get all the nutrients from the instant oatmeal, and then I go eat lots of other food high in nutrients because I’m hungry, why is that a bad thing? As long as I don’t eat more then I need in a day, what does it matter if I’m hungry later? I don’t get this?

      After research it is said this could lead to type 2 diabetes, but actually the main reason type 2 diabetes happens is too much fat on the body and the body being bunged up and then having too much sugar in the blood. So what is the issue with a sugar spike and drop if you’re not over weight?

      1. I suspect that you are right about sugar spikes but I am ignorant of the evidence on this matter. Does anybody have any knowledge of this?

        The reason why I think you may be right is that exercise ‘spikes’ blood pressure too and high blood pressure is a bad thing. But the long term effects of exercise are positive. Perhaps the long term effects of eating whole grains in any form are also positive? Certainly we know that compared to many alternative meals, eating oatmeal produces reduced glucose and insulin responses
        https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4690088/
        https://www.hsph.harvard.edu/nutritionsource/food-features/oats/

        Of course, argument by analogy is a dangerous thing but it does make me wonder.

        That said, you will I think be better served by eating oat groats, steel-cut, rolled or even quick-cooking oats than instant. I say this because they generally provoke lower glycaemic responses and because of a general principle/observation that by and large the less processed the food, the healthier for us it is. However, I am not aware of any actual evidence that people eating instant oats have higher mortality or greater chronic disease rates than people eating less processed forms of oats.

        1. Basically I’m asking what is wrong with a slim or person of average weight getting a blood sugar spike? And or a Blood Sugar drop below resting level?

          I know when someone is overweight their body has too much fat which bungs them up and means that they have too much sugar in the blood which leads to type two diabetes. But for a slim person this isn’t an issue their body would deal with this issue just fine as far as I am aware.

          So I’m asking what is the issue with a person that is in a healthy weight range for their body getting a blood sugar spike? And or a blood sugar drop below resting levels? What is the issue with this? Surely the body would have no problem with dealing with this issue, and you would just eat more sooner? Like eat an apple sooner? What is the issue?

          I haven’t seen any evidence to support that people in a healthy weight range get type 2 diabetes? Can you show a study or explain why biologically getting a sugar spike and or drop below resting levels would lead to type 2 diabetes in some one with a healthy weight range? Or any other issues that could happen as a result of blood sugar spikes and or drops below resting levels in a person that is a healthy weight?

          Thanks

    1. The grain expert put shredded grains ahead of flour ? Flour can be different coarseness not just finely ground . In Dr Gregers video the shredded grains came out worse than for example a pasta made with flour .
      Shredded is a term to refer to finely milled grains that are cooked and extruded under extremely high pressures , like the cold cereals . Not something one can do at home .
      Want your bowl of rolled oats to last you longer before you get hungry again ? Add a quarter cup cooked navy beans to your to your oatmeal . Almost everything goes good with oats either groats,cut or rolled.

    2. Thank you. Those are excellent videos!! I had their books…I used for consultation…
      I bought them after Dr. Greger recommended in “How not to die”.
      Thanks a lot again,

      Cordobes sudamericano (in CA)

  1. So groats are better than processed oats and whole nuts are better than processed butter, even though there is nothing wrong with more fat absorption?
    Guess sprouted grains are still best of all

      1. Deb

        I thought he was justb comparing peanut butter with whole peanuts? All peanut butter contains oils from the fats naturally found in peanuts. However, some peanut butter contains added (hydrogenated) oil (it makes the butter easier to spread and probably extends the shelf life). Is that what you mean – no added oil peanut butter?

    1. MarcoR,

      I stopped consuming smoothies a while ago, though I never made them often. I drank them too fast, and then my stomach hurt. So I decided to eat the ingredients less pulverized, as whole fruit, cooked greens or as salad greens, etc. Plus, Dr. Greger did have at least one earlier video, in which he concluded that whole seeds, chewed up by the eater, fed your gut bacteria better than pulverized seeds. That confirmed my decision to skip smoothies.

      I do make sourdough bread at home, though I grind my own grains. It’s so good!! But we limit the amount we eat, and always eat it with something else, such as hummus and with a salad or other vegetable, etc. Hummus? Well, all things in moderation; some pulverized foods (nut butters, hummus), most not, I guess.

      1. I’ve always disputed the support of “Smoothies” for all the reasons stated in this article. Smoothies are nothing more than highly refined (changed) food. They should be an occasional treat (like ice cream) and not the main part of a healthy diet.

        1. I thought that if you grind flaxseed before eating them you get better benefits, since otherwise many of the whole seeds pass right through your G.I. system.
          Another exception may be frozen broccoli sprouts in a smoothie. By freezing broccoli sprouts you increase the sulphurophane content dramatically. It is hard to eat frozen broccoli sprouts unless you put them in a blender…

          1. We humans make our diets sooooooo complicated and confusing, don’t we? I’d rather trust Mother Nature when it comes to our food supply. I’ve stopped questioning her. Nature gives us what we need to survive. Humans are the only species on this planet that changes its food supply. Birds and squirrels don’t question what nature provided them to eat: They don’t make nut burgers or worm shakes. And they never get sick or overweight (unless they eat human-changed foods!). Humans sure get sick and fat, however, because we are trying to change what nature provided — trying to make it better when we DO NOT fully understand our foods and our bodies in the first place. Do we really need to consume ground flax seeds? Humans say we do. But nature didn’t provide ground flaxseeds so maybe we don’t really need it in this form. Perhaps because nature provides those nutrients that are locked inside the seeds in adequate amounts in other foods. Whole flaxseeds provide lots of benefits anyway, especially as the class of fibre that isn’t absorbed. And in any case, if you simply chewed the seeds really really well you’ll get at those nutrients if it makes you feel better — no need for a coffee grinder! Well, that’s why nature gave us teeth. And do we need lots of sulforaphane? Humans think we do. But maybe the small amount we eat from broccoli and other foods is all nature intended us to require. We question nature too often. We should learn to trust nature. Not change it or make it better. I’m not saying never eat ground flax seeds or frozen broccoli sprouts. Enjoy them occasionally. SO instead of following the latest popular diets with all their confusing, unsupported RULES (Keto, Paleo, Low Carb, etc) we should simply follow these common sense “diet rules” . . . Eat what nature has provided us (plant or animal) — choosing from a wide variety of foods although mostly in plant form — and changed as LITTLE as possible.

            1. Eve Lees,

              I don’t think I’ll be foraging in my backyard any time soon, eating raw only what nature provides me. Moreover, I will continue to wash, chop, mix, and cook my food, depending upon the dish I’m making.

              That said, I agree with your general concept: Eating plant based whole food processed in my kitchen. Though I do eat some ground up or puréed foods, such as bread (I make my own sourdough whole grain loaves, grinding my grains at home), hummus, nut butters, etc.

              Eat veggies and fruit, beans and whole grains, and nuts and seeds, in decreasing amounts according to the list, more or less. Don’t sweat the details. And enjoy!

              1. Unfortunately, in keeping these comments brief, we can’t really elaborate. But in no way did I mean that we need to eat RAW. There is absolutely nothing wrong with cooking a food — as long as we don’t OVERCOOK it. In my comment I said “a food should be changed as LITTLE as possible” and that means not to change it TOO much. LIGHT cooking does not alter a food’s chemistry or nutrient content to any great degree. Not even the “enzymes” (they are mostly destroyed in HIGH temperatures) – and in any case, most of the enzymes we need to digest our foods are in our saliva. Cavemen most likely ate plants that were wilted under the sun and to me, that’s cooking it. There were forest fires in prehistoric times and I’m sure our ancestors scavenged these burnt areas for food. It’s all nature’s plan to continue the cycle of life. HOWEVER I personally eat foods raw more OFTEN than cooked, especially vegetables and fruit (and don’t misunderstand — I occasionally may eat them cooked too). However, it is important to cook the foods that can’t be eaten raw — those that NEED to be cooked — but to cook them in a healthful way that retains as many of their nutrients as possible: Foods like whole grains, legumes, root vegetables (although some can be eaten raw too), and most animal-source foods. But like you said, enjoy and don’t sweat the small stuff!

                1. Eve,

                  People probably are looking at things like how much Sulforaphane because studies where people at enough of it had results where too little didn’t have results.

                  People are using it to shrink tumors and clean their lungs from air pollution and to reverse autism and Alzheimer’s, etc.

                  If someone is young enough or ate well enough, long enough, maybe it doesn’t matter or maybe it still does.

                  The flaxseed for women they are 82% less likely to get breast cancer if they do it right.

                  For men it is protective against metabolic syndrome and might be reversing their high blood pressure.

                  I just used broccoli to reverse social anxiety based on the Autism study and it worked wildly well, but to do it, I needed to know a whole lot of information.

                  I used silica water to reverse hallucinations.

                  I say it because THAT is why the detail is so important.

                  People can think they are doing it right and miss the mark entirely.

                  1. I will say that it isn’t that people are necessarily trying to complicate things. They are trying to get healed of complicated health problems and it is so easy to eat 1 cup of broccoli and not know that it took 2 cups to get the study results.

                    It took either 2 tablespoons of broccoli sprouts or 2 cups of broccoli based on certain weights of the young people.

                    If broccoli sprouts are only 2 days old, they have so much more sulforaphane. If they are older, the amount there has already begun to drop, but you can freeze the broccoli sprouts to increase the level 3.5 fold. If the broccoli is frozen, you might not get almost any benefit, unless you know how to prepare it. You can do the chop and hold to get the enzyme. Chop and eat right away might not be so great. Unless you put mustard seed on or was that mustard powder or something else. Well, you can put a few fresh greens and they will reactivate the process.

                    I am doing this process right now because, to people who don’t really need all that much sulforaphane, this whole process sounds ridiculous, but if you are trying to clear pollution from your lungs and have COPD or asthma, suddenly every single complicated detail matters.

                    1. Eve,

                      I am not actually trying to disagree with you.

                      The people around me have so much disease and I spend a lot of time listening to these videos and the very-detailed information is so useful.

                      I wonder if when the water and soil and air are all poisoned if some of you will suddenly look at the details in the studies and feel like I do when I feel so grateful knowing how much wasn’t enough to have an effect.

                      I feel like those sentences are what people said several times recently. Vitamin D was one.

                      The thing is that is fine. Nobody has to supplement at all unless they want to, but 50-something studies showing an improved mortality is sciences answer to “mother nature” and I am someone who believes in God, so I have to put her in quotes.

                  2. And I totally agree with you — food is powerful medicine. You and others have good reasons for using food as medicine. It’s certainly a better choice than using pharmaceuticals! However, we still need to educate those who put an unhealthy and unnecessary focus on their food when all that analytical detail really isn’t necessary. Weight loss is one example. Some sacrifice their good health by limiting their food choices to those foods or food groups that they believe will help them achieve their goals. It is choosing a wide variety of foods, in as whole a form as possible, that ensures we get all the nutrients and other properties we need to sustain life — to be healthy (and to stay at a healthy body weight!). But so many of us do not know this. We put an unhealthy “reductionist” focus on a particular food or a particular food group, only because of certain properties they contain. The majority of us just need to stop getting into such detail, relax and simply trust nature. We can enjoy nature’s bounty without ripping it apart and choosing foods only for their individual attributes or certain nutrients they may contain. I know you agree with me that it is all foods working together as a ‘team’ – that’s our best guarantee for good health and that in itself will hopefully lower our need to end up having to use food as medicine.

                  3. I love Broccoli Rabe, not such a fan of Broccoli. Nevertheless, I am very curious to hear how Broccoli cured your social anxiety. I remember George Bush Senior debating Bill Clinton. Socially, George was a bit awkward compared to Bill. George hated Broccoli.If George had eaten Broccoli perhaps George would have been reelected president. LOL Seriously I would love hear how much broccoli, how often and how you prepared it helped with social anxiety. and if that is true would Broccoli sprouts give an even larger boost in Social comfort?

                2. Eve – one item that I love raw more than cooked is sweet potato. It is glorious to munch on. Peeled of course. Another thing I love to do with sweet potato is make it into hummous. Use your typical hummous recipe and replace the beans with cooked sweet potato that is smashed to desirable consistency. So yummy!

              2. Actually, I do forage in my backyard. Dandelion greens, purslane, violets, nasturtiums, etc.
                Yummy salads, and I don’t need round-up.

            2. Eve Lees, After reading all your posts here today, your thinking and thought processes on nutrition are very similar to mine! It certainly seems reasonable to me to try to think how early humans lived when evaluating the foods we eat. The less processing, the better, as a general rule. Of course, some nutritious foods must be cooked, like grains and beans, unless they are sprouted.

          2. What do you do with your frozen broccoli sprouts?

            I would appreciate any information you could give to me.

            I am eating broccoli sprouts every day for brain health.

            I am thinking about growing my own because I know that the 2nd day is when they had the most sulforaphane, but I haven’t seen “frozen” versus “2 days old” versus “frozen, 2 days old” broccoli sprouts to see which has the biggest bump. Is there a chart someplace?

    2. I’ve been putting my oatmeal in my smoothie, is it very bad to blend the oats? Make them a lot less satiating?? I put in fridge overnight so next morning it’s thickened, would this make my shake more satiating??

  2. Oatmeal, with its hearty dose of fiber, is a great breakfast choice for staying full and energetic. It feeds a crowd for pennies. It also, likely, contains a hearty does of glyphosate, better known as the Monsanto weedkiller Roundup. The Environmental Working Group released a study that tested 61 oat products, including oatmeal, granola and granola bars, for glyphosate. Of the 45 items made with conventionally grown oats, 43 tested positive, with 31 above the EWG’s threshold for safety. Five of the organic products tested positive, as well.

    One of the healthiest foods on the list, Quaker Old Fashioned Oats, were actually found to have the highest levels of glyphosate, at more than 1,000 parts per billion—the EWG’s child-protective benchmark is 160 parts per billion. Cheerios, Lucky Charms, and Barbara’s Multigrain Spoonfuls were also found to contain significant amounts.

    Bob’s Red Mill organic rolled oats averaged 12.5 ppb of glyphosate, Bob’s Red Mill conventional rolled oats averaged more than ten times that much (150 ppb, which is still slightly below EWG’s limit for safety).

    1. Whole GRAINS (like oats, wheat, rye, etc) are hard pellets (called kernel or berries). These retain far more fibre and other nutrients when they are cooked on the stove (as you would cook rice). We lose many nutrients (especially those we haven’t yet discovered yet) when we “change” the whole grain into things like rolled oats, or grind it down to make flour. The added benefit to eating foods that are changed as little as possible (thereby retaining more of its nutrient quality and chemical integrity), is it will protect our bodies much more effectively against things like glyphosate. Yes, we should try to eat foods that are as “safe” as possible, but if, for example, there is glyphosate on both whole grain oats and its ground-up version (oat flakes), I believe we are far better off consuming the whole grain for its added protective benefits. I like to think the “good” in the food is cancelling out the “bad”. I think it’s best to eat LESS “oatmeal” and MORE of the cooked WHOLE oats (those hard little pellets), cooked on the stove (use the same methods as you use cooking rice). I believe that’s a healthier version of “oatmeal”.

      1. Here is what Dr Greger says the science shows re smoothies https://nutritionfacts.org/topics/smoothies/ We may like to think that whole grains are better in all cases, but having the intact oat grains rolled flatter for faster cooking times and better absorption of nutrients means that a whole lot more people will be enjoying them at their breakfast table.

        1. Sad isn’t it? The human species is so bloody lazy. And that endearing quality has greatly contributed to our history of declining health. It comes down to making choices. I choose to take the time to chew my foods that most people put into a blender. And I choose to find convenient ways of making up big batches of Cooked Whole Grains to have ready in the fridge when I need them. Much faster than grabbing that box of refined breakfast cereal to fill my bowl.

          1. You absorb more nutrients from smoothies. Lazy chewing is best for gut bacteria. So variety is best. .
            You can make a smoothie breakfast bowl by pouring smoothie on your oats and top with beans nuts seeds

            1. It’s just SPECULATED we absorb more nutrients from smoothies. There really is no proof of it – or that EVERYONE will absorb the nutrients from smoothies. Most studies (and they are in vitro NOT in vivo) show there might technically be nutrients sitting in your blender smoothie — but we don’t really know if those nutrients are actually being absorbed. The studies are not consistent and that’s likely due to all of us differing genetically and in our microbiota make-up. It is a FACT, however, that changing the chemical structure of a food (like smashing it in a blender) immediately causes the loss of many nutrients to oxidation (exposure to air, heat and light). And we know this is a FACT because of our typical Westernized diet: Changing our foods is the reason our Western diet is so unhealthfully nutrient-poor. So you need to keep that in mind. When you refine a food, you lose nutrients (that’s why an apple goes brown when you cut it in half). Nutrients work as a TEAM not individually — so, if you lose some nutrients by refining or changing the chemical structure of a food, you risk being unable to absorb those remaining nutrients because the nutrients to help absorb them are MISSING. In addition, CHEWING is the first and more important step in the digestive process, which you are NOT doing when you drink a smoothie. Coating each mouthful of food with our saliva’s enzymes, as we chew, ensures more effective absorption of nutrients — especially the nutrients from carbohydrates (those fruits and veggies that we put in our smoothies). And if you studied nutrition at all (UNLIKE those who market smoothies and blenders) you also learn that the act of chewing PREPARES all the stages in our digestive process for the arrival of the food. That instant “hit” from you smoothie or any other highly refined (changed) food is actually disrupting the slow, methodical and synchronized chain of events that our digestive systems are designed for. And that can be a real problem for those who already have digestive problems. There is SO much marketing hype and misinformation about smoothies and nutrition in general (mostly because of self-proclaimed nutrition experts on the internet who never even studied the science of nutrition — yeah, including the people who teach us about “lazy chewing.” I’m still laughing about that one). And there are many (debatable) studies that you can cherry-pick to support drinking smoothies. But drinking or eating highly changed foods is NOT better than chewing them. That’s just common sense. HUMANS created smoothies: Nature didn’t. And going against nature is what caused most of our health problems in the first place. If nature wanted humans to drink their food energy, our food supply on this planet would look very different — there would be pools of liquid everywhere. Chew your food MORE OFTEN (that’s not to say you can’t have a smoothie occasionally). But more often, use the built-in BLENDER that nature designed in your face — your mouth!

              1. Eve Dr Greger previously said blended food increases nutrient absorption and he follows best science,not speculation. I didn’t read much past your 1st sentence as too much opinion and yelling (ALL CAPS). If you want to become a primitivist living in the wild with no modern tools at all, do, but they had short lifespans

                1. First of all, studies are not definitive proof – even Greger admits that. No matter how credible the researchers are, they only have the evidence that’s been collected to date about nutrition, to base their arguments on. And that evidence changes all the time as we learn more and more about the relatively new science of nutrition. Not to mention that no matter how carefully a study is conducted, it will always have flaws. I am not criticizing Dr. Greger — he is giving us the best information possible (the key word here is ‘possible’ and I’m having a really, really hard time not putting that word in caps! :). But we still need to question every study, not take them as gospel. I ask that you please set aside your biases and read my entire message. It’s not fair for you to judge when you don’t know the whole story. Just disregard all the CAPS. Pretend they are the italics they are meant to be.

                  1. And I forgot to mention . . . it might be a myth that early humans dropped dead early because there is conflicting info on this (therefore it’s mostly opinion based on the evidence collected to date). Most archaeologists and anthropologist say there aren’t enough samples collected yet to prove the short lifespan theory — and its difficult to accurately determine age for most. There have been a few samples found that seemed to have lived well into old age. And if they DID (oops, cap slip there!) have short lives, I really doubt it was just the diet factor that caused it. There was no “medical” knowledge and living among giant carnivorous dinosaurs . . . I’d say just those two factors (among many others) could trump diet. Yes, I agree with you, much of what I said in my recent post is opinion but it’s opinion based on the experts opinions — because we really don’t have enough evidence yet to prove anything. therefore we each interpret the evidence we do have with our own educational backgrounds, experiences, and beliefs. Just as every “expert” does.

                    1. Eve Lees,

                      WHO was “living among giant carnivorous dinosaurs?” Do you mean humans? Because they didn’t. Dinosaurs were extinct long before humans came onto this world. Humans were prey for predator animals (and we still are), but these were large mammals, and maybe some reptiles, but definitely not dinosaurs.

                    2. I stand corrected using the word “dinosaur,” Dr. J. I was being flippant. But it really doesn’t matter regarding the point I was trying to make. Early man still had to live under conditions we seldom need to face today.

          2. Eve Lees, why do you call people who drink smoothies “so bloody lazy” because they chose to blend their food? I’m a full time medical clinical doctorate student, I have two young children with special needs, i cook almost every meal from scratch, and you think I’m bloody lazy because most of my breakfasts are green smoothies? I get 5 oz of greens, 1.5 c of fruit, 2 Tbs of seeds, and a chunk of ginger easy peasy while I ride the one hour long bus to school each morning. I’d much rather roll out of bed and hit up Starbucks drive through, but at least I can do this green smoothie.

            I’m glad porridge works for you. But smoothies work for me and they offer me great nutrition. They take time for me to prepare, but are easier than a sit down meal when I’ve barely got time to shower.

            Why is this movement so critical of others who are also eating a healthy diet? Whole Foods plant based doctors do promote smoothies and juices even (Dr. Fuhrman has current juice fasts going on) and these are great ways to pack huge nutritional punch into our day. If you don’t like them, don’t eat them. I don’t like oatmeal. I feel like a truck ran over me, even after eating steel cut. I do better with just a piece of fruit. Counter intuitive, maybe, but true.

            But to call me lazy? Why don’t you try full time medical doctorate school while being the mother to two kids with special needs and tell me how you do? My home is always open if you’d like to come over and cook for me.

            1. WOW! My sincere apologies! I did not mean to insult you or anyone. I was merely making an observation of the human race as a whole. And you have to admit, there are many people who just won’t even try to improve their health. It’s sad, but it is what it is. Again my sincere apologies that you took my message as a personal slight. I’ll be sure to censor every word and wording that I use from now on in these message feeds.

    2. The organic ones testing positive is frustrating.

      Bob’s Red Mills is a brand they sell even at overstock stores.

      Do they list other brands?

      At work, I have packs of the Carrington Mills flax packs and McDougall Oatmeal near the water cooler now.

      Not sure what “thick cut” means, but I wanted something there because I am almost never ready to eat when I wake up.

      I mentally am not someone who thinks overnight oats sounds good at all.

      Before I came here, I hated oatmeal, though “camp” is where I had it and it was a ridiculously gloppy version. I had an “I hate oatmeal” internal thought, so my eating any at all is already pretty good.

  3. This video was helpful in terms of orienting in the big picture of food and why
    processed food tends to have all these bad effects. I was a kid in the 60’s and
    I grew up with all of these processed food, in the heyday of processed foods,
    I guess you could say. I never knew anything else. I suffered with attention
    problems in school, as well as poor dental health. It was only later in life that
    I began to pay attention to all of this. I started reading and also watching these
    kinds of videos, but so many of them are so minuscule in focus or seem to be
    pandering to get viewers to tell them anything they want to hear. Like being
    vegan will solve all your health problems in month, or even a couple weeks.

    A lot of it is unbelievable and some just plain wrong, but a lot of Dr. Greger’s
    videos like this are often useful. Thank you.

    1. We can only hope that was the heyday of processed foods.

      Looking at the obesity epidemic now might be the real heyday.

      Either way, I remember saying to my mother that cereal was worse than having nothing. I wouldn’t even be full at the end of eating a bowl of it.

      We would end up doing sugar products other than cereal breakfasts because cereal was so unsatisfying.

      Yes, a SuzieQ or Crumb cakes or a Hostess Apple pie or Eclair or Pop Tart or Ding Dong or Ring Ding or Devil Dog or Donut might not have been healthier, but at least those weren’t pretending to be healthy.

      1. I didn’t even give half of the list of breakfast junk food.

        The coffee cake with the icing and Cinnabon and other cinnamon rolls with the icing and pastry and danishes and pound cake and mega-big muffins…

        I will say that the times when we were trying to be “good” and ate things like shredded wheat and hated it is what comes immediately to mind.

        Laughing. Shredded Wheat wasn’t better than Rice Crispies?

        Yes, I am not eating any of those things anymore, but we genuinely had a very large selection of breakfast junk food.

        I figure that someone has to represent how America is really living on this site.

    2. If you want the big picture, you’re watching the wrong videos. Here’s the big picture. https://nutritionfacts.org/video/how-not-to-die/

      I agree that the website is set up poorly. If a new person comes to the site they should be directed to some video giving an overview of the big picture. Instead they click “start watching” and are directed to the latest video which probably isn’t of interest to someone new to the WFPB lifestyle. And might be something as unrelated as “oil pulling” or “cannabis”.

  4. So… Sounds like adding organic rolled oats to my breakfast smoothie (one of many ingredients) will cause a greater spike in blood sugar than eating the rolled oats in the form of oatmeal or adding them uncooked to breakfast cereal.
    What about the kale, strawberries and/or blueberries, dates, amla, walnuts, apple, banana, homemade almond milk, and ground flax seeds? Aside from the speed of consumption, are there issues with making them into a smoothie, too? What should I know for optimal health?

    1. Looks like you got some good advice from commenters, including checking out the NFO video on smoothies. Generally you don’t want to be always having smoothies for breakfast and yes whole foods that you have to chew are the healthier form, but kale and strawberries, etc ARE healthy do you don’t need to deprive yourself of a smoothie occasionally.
      Hope that puts it into perspective.

  5. What about the 100% brans cereals like Allbran or FiberOne? They have no sugar and presumably not much of the starch that would cause a blood sugar spike. I really learned a lot from this video and will now need to change my breakfast recipes. I have been regularly eating shredded wheat and instant oatmeal (the kind that you put into the microwave for 2 minutes) but I will not purchase those items any more.

      1. I would like to hear if anybody has taken their blood sugar after any cereal and not had it spike.

        Grapenuts?

        Ezekiel Cereal?

        Yes, when I was trying to be really, really, really good, I would eat Grapenuts.

          1. YR, yeah, you need a thingamajig.

            I just mentioned it because that researcher took people’s blood sugar constantly and people who weren’t even considered pre-diabetic had spikes.

            I am not worried about mine because all of the symptoms have been going away and, plus, I am eating beans and lentils and nuts and those keep it down even the next meal, so I feel like I am covered, but it might be that none of us are covered well enough to eat cereal.

        1. Deb, all cereals, including steel cut oats spike mine. Not diabetic, but was curious and tried it. Ezekiel muffins, and Dave’s killer bread do not. Bananas raise blood sugar in everyone in the studies, people vary in response to other fruits.
          Reason I’ve switched to salads, cooked greens, beans, maybe adding 1/2 Ezekiel muffin, or 1 slice of bread for breakfast.
          I used to get hypoglycemia all the time as I ate my ‘healthy’ oatmeal. Found, for me, healthy it isn’t.

          1. Thanks, Marilyn!

            Ezekiel muffins don’t spike it?

            That is good because I like them.

            I like Ezekiel cereal, too, but alas it is in cereal form.

            I saw Mic the Vegan tested his blood after 5 bananas and his blood sugar spiked more than when he ate vegan pizza.

            He was talking about it recently. It interested me because High Carb Hannah had gained 30 pounds on a raw mostly fruit diet and lost that, plus got to her ideal weight on The Starch Solution. She was eating way too many bananas. I think she had watched someone like Ryan from Happy Healthy Vegan who ate smoothies with something like 10 or 15 bananas in them, but he is so athletic that he didn’t gain weight. He lost weight. But he lost more weight on The Starch Solution and he switched to that during a camping trip because of how hard it was to haul enough fruit for the weekend. Plus, his teeth were doing poorly. I am not advertising for The Starch Solution. I am just mentioning it because most fruit doesn’t seem to spike insulin if eaten as fruit, but banana smoothies caused High Carb Hannah to gain 30 pounds and 5 caused Mic the Vegan’s blood sugar to spike. He spoke about it in his interview with Dr. Greger, but there is another video where he did the test.

          2. I agree with what you say. While we do have steel cut oats each morning we also have a salad with beans on top. I think that lowers the glycemic reaction. Joel Fuhrman says if one has diabetes, one should eat beans and greens. Brenda Davis says hulled barley ( not pearled barley) has the lowest glycemic index of any grain (by far). I usually purchase my grains in bulk in Fairway or Whole Foods. Whole foods puts nutrient labels on their bulk items. I think it is best if the grams of fiber divided into the carbs is 5 or less. Hulled Barley 135 g of carbohydrate 31.8 g of dietary fiber (ratio of 4.24)

    1. Ranss12, I like to read the labels of what I’m buying. Not sure if these are the processed food products to which you are referring, but here goes.

      Allbran: INGREDIENTS
      Wheat Bran, Sugar, High Fructose Corn Syrup, Malt Flavoring, Calcium Phosphate, Calcium Carbonate, Salt, Sodium Ascorbate and Ascorbic Acid (Vitamin C), Reduced Iron, Niacinamide, Pyridoxine Hydrochloride (Vitamin B6), Riboflavin (Vitamin B2), Folic Acid, Thiamin Hydrochloride (Vitamin B1), Vitamin A Palmitate, Vitamin B12 and Vitamin D. https://www.fooducate.com/product/Kellogg%20s%20All%20Bran%20Original%20Cereal/8C2CABAC-E109-11DF-A102-FEFD45A4D471

      Fiber One Original Bran: INGREDIENTS
      whole grain wheat, corn bran, modified wheat starch, guar gum, color (caramel color and annatto extract), cellulose gum, salt, baking soda, sucralose, natural flavor. Vitamins and Minerals: Calcium Carbonate, Zinc and Iron (Mineral Nutrients), Vitamin C (Sodium Ascorbate), a B Vitamin (Niacinamide), Vitamin B6 (Pyridoxine Hydrochloride), Vitamin B2 (Riboflavin), Vitamin B1 (Thiamin Mononitrate), a B Vitamin (Folic Acid), Vitamin B12. https://www.fooducate.com/product/Fiber%20One%20Original%20Bran/1E1E6D9C-E106-11DF-A102-FEFD45A4D471

      All wheat and oat kernels have starch; that’s the major component in the grain. It’s a compact way of storing high energy food (sugars, linked together to form starch in the endosperm) to feed the germinating seedling.

      By the way, I cooked regular rolled oats in the microwave, with water, 2 volumes to 1 volume of rolled oats: heat 1 min, stir, 55 seconds, stir; 50 seconds, stir; let sit about 2 min. You could modify this any way you like to get the texture that you like. It’s also possible to eat the rolled oats uncooked; that’s what muesli is, rolled oats, dried fruits, nuts, seeds, etc. The oats are actually steamed before they are rolled flat, then lightly toasted afterward. https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rolled_oats

      1. Then there is shredded wheat and bran, ingredients: Whole Grain Wheat and Wheat Bran

        I eat that when the weather is too hot to cook. Most of the year I eat oatmeal with oat bran and sometimes add some other cooked cereal just for variety.

  6. Evolving breakfast. Here’s my current gluten free, processed sugar free, animal fat free option: buckwheat, amaranth and quinoa (soaked and/or sprouted) with spice, cacao powder, fresh fruit (cooked in), citrus (added after it’s cooked and cooled a bit), nuts, desiccated coconut, chia seed – did I forget anything? Oh! and it’s cooked in plain old filtered water, no sugar laden almond milk, no soy, no milk. Sometimes I add coconut water from an actual coconut (or the milk from a tin – no, this just doesn’t sound romantic).

    1. Sounds good except for the addition of citrus fruit. Methinks that should be eaten alone, not mixed with other stuff.

        1. I dunno, Marilyn. Yes, we know food-combining “rules” are considered controversial. I should have said “in my opinion.” I’ve always had my grapefruit or orange juice when I first get up (mixed with lemon juice). And then quite a bit later, the gruel, etc.

          Yes, I’m baaaaaad. :-( We’re told to eat the fruit rather than drink the (high in sugar) juice, but it works for me. No health issues so far.

          For what it’s worth:

          https://www.mindbodygreen.com/0-3615/10-Common-Food-Combinations-That-Wreak-Havoc-on-Your-Health.html

          1. YR, thanks for answering, interesting article.
            For you, the juice in the morning may be fine, we are all different.
            Looking at that article, I see I break some of those rules, as do many traditional diets.
            I do like fruit for desert, or with nuts as a snack. From testing, I found my blood sugar more stable than if I eat fruit alone.

          2. YR

            Mr Grumpy here. See, that’s the problem. Some internet blogger quoting ‘natural hygenists’ instead of actual scientific evidence.

            As for their opinions about fruit, did it ever occur to them that fruit contains a lot of fibre/pulp and this will ‘stay’ a long time too? The fibre etc will feed the ‘good’ bacteria which may compensate for the ‘bad’ bacteria fed by the fructose. Juice is another matter though.

            I’d always thought that highconsumption of fruit juices was linked to higher mortality? And diabetes? eg

            ‘CONCLUSIONS—Consumption of green leafy vegetables and fruit was associated with a lower hazard of diabetes, whereas consumption of fruit juices may be associated with an increased hazard among women.’
            https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2453647/

            1. Grumpy Fumbles,

              Well, I don’t put all kinds of sweet crap in smoothies like you vegan types do. It sounds like that’s where most of you get your sugar! Listen (video) to what they put in those things….piles of bananas, dates, etc. Yuck, it is to gag!

              I don’t consider the little half cup of fruit juice that gets me started in the a.m. as over consumption.

              1. YR
                .
                I’m not a vegan nor do I drink smoothies or juices. They are not whole foods. However,it wasn’t clear from your earlier posts just how much juice you do drink,

                Plus I think that the natural hygiene crowd promote ludicrous quackery.

                1. So sorry, Fumbles. I should have said “you no-animal food types.” I know you don’t eat animal foods for so-called ethical reasons, but am pretty sure you wear leather shoes. True, the vegan label is bandied about way too often these days, even when it doesn’t apply, technically speaking. Notice all the ex-vegan videos out there now. We can be sure they weren’t “real” vegans, they just didn’t eat/drink animal foods.

                  Have to go out of town, which is why I got up early and had my breakfast already. I tried the bananas and blueberries by themselves before diving into the gruel, and I liked it, I liked it! I did notice, however, that my hot cereal seemed to need more honey or molasses, because the fruit used to add sweetening. Didn’t add any honey, though.

                  Just an experiment, but am thinking this might be a good thing.

                  And then we have this way of eating: https://foodandnutrition.org/may-2013/ayurveda-indias-5000-year-old-diet-wellness-plan/

                  Your AlmightyGod Science came on the scene many moons later. And “reputable” science is always changing its mind, isn’t it?

                  1. YR,

                    I was an ovo-lacto vegetarian — meaning that I didn’t eat meat, but I did eat eggs and dairy products — for over 40 years, for sustainability reasons. In the past few years, I have stopped consuming eggs and dairy products, and greatly decreased my consumption of processed food. This was primarily for health reasons.

                    So, reasons for eating plant based whole food include greater sustainability (it uses far fewer resources — land, water, fossil fuel inputs — and releases far fewer greenhouse gasses), less environmental degradation, less animal cruelty (see? There’s the ethics part) and worker cruelty (it is cruel to outsource the slaughter and processing of animals to products, not to mention the care for them under cruel and punishing conditions), and decreased development of antibiotic resistance (about 75% of antibiotics in the US are used in livestock production). Oh, and I am relieved to learn, probably improved health. Which I did not know almost 50 years ago.

                    I’m sure there are other reasons; perhaps you can add some? But I am not vegan, and never claimed to be. Even though I do share some of their ethical concerns.

                    1. “I was an ovo-lacto vegetarian — meaning that I didn’t eat meat, but I did eat eggs and dairy products — for over 40 years, for sustainability reasons.”
                      – – – – –

                      Dr. J., if you kept your portions of dairy and eggs down to just a few times a week, I can see where that might be a doable diet — especially if the dairy was organic and the eggs pasture raised.. (A lot of people are allergic to the white of the egg, not the yolk.)

                      Am glad you finally found the right diet.

                      “Ah, but a man’s reach should exceed his grasp,
                      Or what’s a heaven for?”

                      ― Robert Browning

                  2. I eat ice cream occasionally too.

                    Science isn’t a god – it’s just a methodology. It’s not perfect. What is? You appear to think though that it’s an approach that is no better than your own faith-based beliefs in the claims of medical mediums and alleged channelled supernatural entities. Calling it a god is just a way of trying to equate science with your faith-based systems.

                    Also, it’s not always changing its mind although it does correct and build on what has gone before . That said, researchers do often put their own spin on things and draw conclusions that are consistent with the study data but not actually shown by it, especially when that spin is consistent with their funder’s financial interests or their own opinions. Assuming causality from a simple association is one way, and ignoring or under/overadjusting for confounding factors are other. Then there are industry funded studies which apper deliberately designed to create doubt eg
                    https://nutritionfacts.org/video/sprinkling-doubt-taking-sodium-skeptics-with-a-pinch-of-salt/

                    Not to mention the media which are always looking for shock horror headlines and controv)ersies and will happily publish such stories (or even manufacture them).

                    As for Ayurveda, I didn’t see anything there in that article other than beliefs and assertions. I also understand that this 5,000 year old wisdom encompasses this:

                    ‘These medicines, also known as bhasmas, come out of an Ayurvedic tradition practiced for thousands of years in India where highly toxic heavy metals like lead, arsenic, mercury and cadmium mix with herbs or spices.’
                    https://www.npr.org/sections/health-shots/2015/07/31/428016419/toxic-lead-contaminates-some-traditional-ayurvedic-medicines

                    Kinda makes me think this whole ayurvedic thing might be a tad overhyped but if you are happy with that approach, good for you.

                    1. I want to point to the case studies in the new International Journal of Disease Reversal and Prevention raw versus cooked WFPB for lupus nephritis.

                      I think it adds to the raw versus cooked and smoothie debates.

                      The thing is, they were people who needed kidney transplants and most of you never will.

                      I point to it because people will come here with serious diseases and those of us who don’t have health problems won’t understand that sometimes the logic changes.

                2. YR

                  You seem to eat a very healthy diet and have a healthy lifrstyle despite having what seems to me to be a very strange attitude towards ferreting out the facts about healthy eating.

                  I am not American but I have heard of Pollan and his dictum “Eat food, not too much, mostly plants.” That seems to sum up most international and national dietary guidelines, and the WFPB approach, very well. However, I personally prefer to read (discussions of) the evidence rather listen to the opinions of gurus no matter how much they may resonate with my own beliefs.

                  Interestingly, there was something out of Germany quite recently on the ‘not too much’ point which suggests that overfeeding (irrespective of weight gain) may actually promote poor health

                  ‘The Kiel researchers suggest that an unnatural and particularly comprehensive nutrient supply decouples bacteria from their host organisms, and thus destroys the delicate balance of the microbiome. The, to some extent, over-fed bacteria in the gut thus promote disease development. The Kiel scientists published this fundamental new approach towards a more complete explanation of environmental diseases yesterday in the journal mBio.’
                  https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2019/05/190515110343.htm

            2. Fascinatingly, Dr. Fuhrman gave his “origin” story on Chris Beat Cancer and he said that he thinks his original interest in becoming a doctor came from his father reading books by ‘natural hygenists’ as a teenager.

              Laughing.

    2. tonym – like you I have been eating amaranth since about 2004, like you I use filtered water only, topped by fresh berries and yogurt – best brekkie!

  7. I was having steel-cut oats for breakfast with cranberries, walnuts, ground flax seed, and unsweetened soy milk. Then I tried some whole oat groats, and they really add another delicious dimension to the flavour—so now I only eat oat groats. I buy 25 lb. bags of organic oat groats from a company in Toronto (Scarborough) called Grain Process Enterprises at a very reasonable price. The whole oat groats take a bit longer to cook, but the flavour is out of this world.

    1. Wow Mike! Good to know. I’m from Toronto but live in Massachusetts now. Not sure how I would get a 25 pound bag of oat groats over the border though. How long are they good for? That’s a huge quantity!

      1. Fawn, they are good for about a year. They also sell a 50 pound bag. I use 6 oz (dry) at a time. Google your area. You might find a supplier in your neighbourhood.

  8. As a kid, when Mom would supply me with any breakfast cereal I wanted, I quickly got bored with them because they just made me hungry-this rang out in my memory seeing today’s video.

    So, quite naturally thereafter, being in the South of the US, I ate fried eggs with bacon or sausage, or oatmeal, or jelly on toast pretty much every morning for many years. Oh and a old favorite was “Cinnamon Toast” made with oven with white bread topped with sugar, cinnamon, and margarine to glue it all together. HOW did we survive all that! Also washed it all down with a glass or two of the white poison extracted from bovine mammary glands (which gave me chronic sinus/headache issues for years).

    Funny that, all those items are much more “home made” that most folks eat these days, according to what I read.

    Now, fully 4 years into WFPB, I make grits or oatmeal or potatoes/rice each morning, unless I fast. Fasting past a meal or two is so easy now that my body is chocked full of phytonutrients and isn’t clamoring for more at every opportunity. I’ve quit coffee/caffeine and drink water 90% of the time.

    Just last week a fellow let me know that he and his wife had adopted my way of eating and that they were feeling better, losing weight and excited about it. Sharing here because I know how excited we get to share and help others and how absolutely steadfast most folks are despite their declining health. Keep telling folks, sooner or later someone will benefit-they may even thank you. It is a joy when they do. WP

    1. Wade – a good comment, could you please give some info on WFPB, and if you found it difficult to adjust to it? Thanks.

      1. Krystin,

        He might come back. Not sure.

        Are you new to WFPB?

        I am a year and a half into it. Did I find it difficult to adjust?

        Conceptually, it was difficult for me, because I hadn’t eaten any fruit for 30 years and had never eaten even one bite of kale or most greens and hated broccoli and blueberries and couldn’t tolerate garlic or onions or beans and hadn’t ever eaten steel cut oatmeal and hadn’t eaten the type of oatmeal I hated as a child since I had been a child and hadn’t had beets in about 30 years either and only had ever had sweet potatoes with mini marshmallows and mashed potato with milk and butter and I could keep going on. I had to learn so many things, like how to cook without oil and what people eat at all.

        Buying cookbooks or going on Whole Food Plant Based cooking sites was seriously helpful.

        But if I hadn’t been here, I doubt I would have succeeded. Watching 10 videos on blueberries and turmeric as superfoods which do everything from doubling my Natural Killer Cells to fixing my brain equaled something called nonstop motivation and focus. The more you learn practical things and the more you focus on this process, the easier it is to transition.

        If it weren’t for this site, I would have probably ended up Vegan junk food and then, maybe backed up to Vegetarian junk food.

        Watch a few videos every single day if you are new. Then, go and look at recipes.

        I just got a free trial of a site called the Culinary Gym and today, I learned how to make Buddha Bowls and they have more of a blueprint than recipes. I already had encountered them as something called grain bowls and glory bowls and it seems like there were other names, but I already do a similar process for wraps and bowls might be neater to eat.

      2. Thanks Deb, yes I was quite active here 3-4 years ago, but now am “hit or miss” as the commentariate has changed so much and the format went down a little. Long time folks remember when Thea was on here too. Things change.

        Krystin: Here’s what I did to make the change, being single helped a lot: Made up my mind to eat no meat for one day–then figured out -what- to eat. Once I started conceiving of meals with no AP, then I could do more than one day. Stocking the fridge and pantry to eat this way is the next step. Then, in order to get transitioned and make a plan I -knew- I could stick to for at least a few months as a trial, I allowed myself “no rules” for the weekends. I started with a 5/2 plan, which made it really easy to be social or celebratory on the weekend. I figured that “MOST of the time” is what counts. I still advocate that approach for mid-life transitioners like myself, but I eat much more like 6/1 or 7/0 these days because I’ve learned so many more great easy fast convenient plant foods to eat and keep myself stocked up with them. There’s yet more to try. But a small portion of greasy/gamey/cheesy food now and then simply won’t kill me. Matter o’ Fact, it will do me less harm now that my gut bacteria are shifted to plant consumption.

        I made the change while I had a lot of little complications (reflux, migraines, chubby, achy, not sleeping so great, etc) but no biggies had taken hold yet. And now I’m quite satisfied that I’ve put them off forever or for a very long time. All those little problems went away, and everything tastes better now, I know so many more foods and variations on preparation (always been a home cook). Everyone’s mileage varies. My testosterone improved (didn’t see that coming).

        Being quite familiar with food preparation and making 95% of all my meals made it somewhat easier than I suppose it is for those bound to boxes and bags from the grocery. But fruit is easy for anyone, I eat tons of fruit now, but the starchy vegetables are what anchors plant eating. I had potatoes and black beans and blueberries just now for breakfast.

        Make up your mind first, don’t tell others (the SAD eaters) until you get a grip on it, they will NOT be supportive or helpful at all if talk about it in your planning or early stages. But when you start to feel better and lose weight without effort (if you’re heavy) then you’ll have the confidence to share with the overly skeptical rest of the world. Eat healthy, be healthy, feel better look better BE better!

        ps:

        I have a whole pile of YT videos in a playlist. Peruse that list if you have any specific questions or would like to see many different doctors/expert opinions on eating for Health above all else. Look up “Wade Patton” on youtube, playlists: view full list-about 100 in there, some have do to with food addiction and some of the folks are “real food” folks who don’t fully eschew AP. But the overarching unity is that Whole Plants Rule a healthy diet. But no matter how excited you get, remember that most of the rest of Western society is aligned against you. Be gentle with them-only a few will get it and get it slowly. Billions are spent brainwashing them annually.

        1. Thanks, Wade!

          I love reading how people approached things.

          I do feel like beans, lentils, sweet potatoes, rice, steel cut oats and other whole grains are the less expensive on top of being more filling anchors.

          Krystin, Wade is right about starting with the pantry. Dry goods stock well and the bulk aisle makes things cheaper.

          Lots of people buy Ball glass jars and fill them with the dry bulk goods as main staples. Have some canned or boxed or pouched beans for when you don’t have time to soak them. The culinary gym woman makes templates instead of recipes. That can help for nights when you don’t have any time at all. For me, I stock the dry goods. Then, I go a few times a week just for small amounts of organic produce.

          Frozen fruits have almost the same nutrition as fresh fruits and often have sales.

          I save money there and then, add money by buying pre-chopped organic vegetables. (When I don’t buy pre-chopped vegetables, I often come back and find out that I never ate the things I bought and have to throw them out. That is knowing me well enough to know that sometimes cheaper isn’t the way to go.)

          I feel like having a wide variety of organic produce gives a wide variety of options between salads, wraps, grain bowls, and veggies dipped in hummus, etc. To me, I alternate between raw vegetables in those forms and starch recipe dishes. Lots and lots of bean dishes because they are so filling.

          For that, I would say find a few dishes like chili, lentil loaf, vegan lasagna, curry vegetables with rice or beans and rice, potato dishes, shirataki noodles or lentil pasta and then have those lined up as your hot meals. Most people seem to use Instapots. Walmart sells the Pioneer Woman’s Instapot, which still has a manual setting. Most of the newer models don’t have that setting and most of the free recipes online tell people to use it.

          I could give you way too much information. My favorite advice is just to watch the videos by the doctors every single day and choose some recipes and stock your pantry and fridge.

          Cheese replacements still have a lot of fat, but they are helpful for getting off of cheese. Been there, done that. Veganaise still has a lot of fat, but it helped until I learned enough oil-free sauces. I use no-oil hummus often. They sell it at Whole Foods.

          Learning the dressings and less fattening cheese replacements take time, but it makes things like weight loss easier.

          Watch out for oil in plant milks and oil in everything. Watch videos on making your own milk and vegan cheeze and hummus and oil-free salad dressings.

          For bread, Ezekiel bread and Dave’s Killer bread are the ones people speak about. Ezekiel has no flour, but it is in the freezer section because there aren’t preservatives.

          1. One biggie I forgot about: soda pop cola soft drinks (choose your local term). I was drinking 2 or 3 cans per day and thinking that was “moderation”. At that time I was also drinking coffee (straight) and beer on a daily basis. I kept at my coffee and beer but found some herbal teas (some caffeinated, some not) to replace my sugary-fizz-drinks. I also love fizzy water (when I can find them). The trick here is to realize that COLD-steeping most teas works just as well as using hot water–such that I’ll open a bottle of water, drop in a tea bag, enjoy the color change, and drink it as/after it makes tea. Also the lower temp steeping prevents over-extraction/bitterness as is common in black teas-and why we add sugar (to hide the bitter, and then lemon to offset the sweet). But tea, gently made is easy (like “sun tea” but no sun necessary) , and goes down easier, with no additional stuff. Also, when I quit beer (over a year ago), I had to replace a lot of fluid consumption and found that lime-water worked for me. Squeeze a lime into a liter or so of water and sip right on. Eventually my tastes changed too. I quickly lost the yen for sugary drinks. On my first “weekend pass” I had a normal soda–it was terribly sweet, but I managed to drink it (or most of it). Then the next weekend pass–I got another one and just couldn’t drink it. Since then, in four years, I think I had one taste of an iced-down fountain drink on an 8-hour road trip. And that was enough-simply not interested in sugary junk drinks anymore, ever, at all. I don’t even put a lime in my water much now. Water, fizzy water, teas (no caffeine), and sometimes a beer (but I have to be careful to avoid hangover, so two is my limit now). Coffee is special occasions or road-tripping only as I got off all caffeine most recently. Now my sleep is much better and my bladder tells me if caffeine is in my system-and is not happy until all has passed through. TMI, but hey-water is good stuff.

            Herbal teas were instrumental in getting me off soft-drinks, and they pack all sorts of phytonutrients. Compare the price of a box of tea to a case of your favorite soda.

    2. Yes, cereal makes kids hungry might be enough parental motivation to change.

      I remember that, too.

      I remember looking at the milk at the bottom of my cereal bowl and thinking, “I am already hungry and I haven’t even brought my bowl to the sink yet.”

  9. Your article said nothing about cooked unsweetened cereals. I use a mix of oatmeal, buckwheat and some ground brown rice; could add other things if I wanted – perhaps some dried fruit or nuts. It seems pretty healthy and tasty to me. To compare only processed cereals is missing a whole world of options.

    1. caffrey,

      His video had specific studies which were done and the studies used the foods the studies used.

      Hard to get around that.

      It does though talk about oats and the concept is the less processed the better and you are talking things like ground brown rice and that would 100% be better than ground white rice. The topic though was that structure matters and my guess is regular brown rice would best ground brown rice and steel cut oats would beat some other types of oatmeal. Structure matters.

      That is how you can look at it and decide is it really refined or does it have texture and fiber?

    2. Caffreyc:

      Studies rarely put “our foods” (the nutritionally astute folks) against each other and only sometimes against the “greater common” because we are the “niche” population and most studies are done to serve the masses and even to promote to them foods that are only marginally better than the garbage they are served most often. That’s why research folks like Dr. Greger have to work so hard to sort out the nuggets that serve us best.

      My cereal this morning: Oats, with banana, strawberries, and blueberries, plus clove, allspice, ginger, and cinnamon. I feel rich in antioxidants and phytonutrients now-and won’t be hungry again for hours.

  10. How to make soured porridge from rice, barley, wheat, quinoa, teff, amaranth, etc? Can you use a portion of the porridge as a starter culture to be able to prepare grains overnight for instance? I figure that, especially for pseudo grains, that if you sour them, then add barley or rye malt extract at the right time, you could reduce or remove the oxalates in them.

      1. I felt like Dr. Fuhrman did a nice job talking about veganism as a topic during his interview with Chris.

        I had no idea what he was going to say, but I ended up liking it very much.

    1. I agree with you PJK. I don’t think it’s a great idea to base our food choices on the Glycemic Index. It may have some of us choosing not-so-healthy foods only because they have low GI’s, and avoid healthier choices because they have high GI’s. And I’ve also noticed that there is never consistency in how a food is rated: One chart will say a food is high, yet another chart will give it a lower rating. I don’t take studies at face value — I question them all, but here is one study that is worth considering . . . https://now.tufts.edu/news-releases/high-variability-suggests-glycemic-index-unreliable-indicator-blood-sugar-response

  11. Why is a sugar spike a bad thing? Say I eat lots of instant oatmeal and I get a sugar spike, but I get all the nutrients from the instant oatmeal, and then I go eat lots of other food high in nutrients because I’m hungry, why is that a bad thing? As long as I don’t eat more then I need in a day, what does it matter if I’m hungry later? I don’t get this?

    After research it is said this could lead to type 2 diabetes, but actually the main reason type 2 diabetes happens is too much fat on the body and the body being bunged up and then having too much sugar in the blood. So what is the issue with a sugar spike and drop if you’re not over weight?

    1. One small counterpoint to your question, in the video around timestamp 1:30, is that those who eat higher-glycemic foods will be hungry sooner. That is due to the rise and quicker fall of blood sugar. When the blood sugar falls, you’ll feel hungry again, and if you are eating high-glycemic foods that will happen sooner than later.

      So basically, how do you know if you are not overeating? Maybe your body is hungry sooner because of the instant oats? Do you hit a energy drop mid-morning? Do you mitigate that energy drop with caffeine or unnecessary calories? Type 2 diabetes may be linked to being overweight, but you do not need to be overweight! Regular spikes in insulin may result in other fluctuations to your homeostasis…

      I don’t understand people who eat instant oats. they taste like crap, generally have more additives, etc. I eat Bobs Red Mill’s Organic Steel Cut Oats every day. I’ll cook them the night before, boil for like 10 min, let sit in fridge overnight. All done. No need for instant oats, just toss them in the microwave.

      1. Basically I’m asking what is wrong with a slim or person of average weight getting a blood sugar spike? And or a Blood Sugar drop below resting level?

        I know when someone is overweight their body has too much fat which bungs them up and means that they have too much sugar in the blood which leads to type two diabetes. But for a slim person this isn’t an issue their body would deal with this issue just fine as far as I am aware.

        So I’m asking what is the issue with a person that is in a healthy weight range for their body getting a blood sugar spike spike? And or a blood sugar drop below resting levels? What is the issue with this? Surely the body would have no problem with dealing with this issue, and you would just eat more sooner? Like eat an apple sooner? What is the issue?

        I haven’t seen any evidence to support that people in a healthy weight range get type 2 diabetes? Can you show a study or explain why biologically getting a sugar spike and or drop below resting levels would lead to type 2 diabetes in some one with a healthy weight range? Or any other issues that could happen as a result of blood sugar spikes and or drops below resting levels in a person that is a healthy weight?

        Thanks

        1. A physician tells me it’s normal for blood glucose level to rise a small amount after a meal, even in people who don’t have diabetes. For everyone, blood sugar begins to rise about 10 or 15 minutes after eating and reaches its peak in about an hour. But these are just approximates, because it depends on many factors, such as the type and amount of food you eat. So yes, it is normal to have a “spike” after you eat something that is more quickly absorbed by your body (such as highly refined foods or foods with a high glycemic index). Fluctuating blood sugar levels are one of many ways the body maintains homeostasis (balance).

          However, there are several factors that can disrupt how well your body metabolizes and stores sugars (glucose). This can be caused by many factors including long-term poor eating habits (a diet very rich in high fat and/or high sugar foods), long-term stress (the stress hormone cortisol can affect how well your body metabolizes glucose), lack of physical activity, and several other medical and/or lifestyle factors. Any of these factors can increase the risk of developing Type 2 Diabetes — a condition where your body’s cells either resist the effects of insulin (insulin resistance) or your body doesn’t produce enough insulin to maintain normal glucose levels (insulin is the hormone that regulates the movement of glucose into the cells).

          80 percent of those with type 2 diabetes are overweight or obese. However, thin people can still develop diabetes. There are those who have lots of ‘visceral’ fat (fat stored deep in the abdominal area and surrounding the vital organs) but little ‘subcutaneous’ fat (stored just under the skin). These people may not look overweight, but can still have as much fat as someone who does look overweight. The medical term for this is “Medically Obese, Normal Weight” or MONW (it’s also been called ‘skinny-fat’). Those who are MONW may look healthy and may look normal weight, but they actually have a higher ratio of fat to muscle — and this makes them just as much at risk for conditions like diabetes and heart disease as those who ‘look’ overweight.

          1. Thanks, good response.

            How does someone know if they have a lot of ‘visceral’ fat?

            Second, is there any other negative health effects from this? If say someone had very little to no ‘visceral’ fat? Any other conditions that might happen as a result of a blood sugar spike and drop?

            My instincts say one would need to replace nutrients used, but that doesn’t really cause health problems.

            1. First of all . . . all the information I offered in my last message was from a medical doctor. If you have other concerns or questions, I suggest you go to a credible, knowledgeable source (like your doctor or a Registered Dietitian). A “comments area” like this is not the proper place to ask questions of this nature – unless there is a physician ready to reply to your comments (any takers out there? Is there a Doctor in the house for Stephen’s questions?)

              As to your question of how to determine visceral fat on a person who is NOT overweight or obese, they will probably have a wide mid-body — but they may or may not have lots of fat to ‘pinch’ around their waist (pinching lots of fat indicates the subcutaneous fat only). A CT Scan or MRI is the most accurate way to measure the fat hidden deep in your body. Or you can have a Body Fat Test (ask at your local Fitness Center or Gym if they have any Fitness Instructors who are trained to do this).

              IDEA Health & Fitness Association suggests this easier way, although it is not entirely accurate: Measure your Waist to Hip Ratio (WHR). Divide your waist measurement (in inches) by your hip measurement. If the result is higher than 1.0 for a man, or higher 0.85 for a woman, this may indicate you have “hidden fat” or visceral body fat issues.

              You can also just measure your waist only (but this is also not very accurate, especially if you have a large build or bone structure): If you are a man with a waist measurement over 40 inches, you likely have excess visceral fat (for women, it’s over 35 inches).

              The rest of your questions . . . you really need a credible source to answer those. Ask your doctor. We are all different and there is usually no “one-size-fits-all” answer to most health issues. If your questions are a personal concern for you, your doctor will know your particular health history and will be able to advise you based on your individual needs.

              1. I get what you’re saying about not being a medical doctor.

                If someone has very little visceral fat and isn’t over weight in general, then I assume a blood sugar spike and drop wouldn’t be a health issue? At least when it comes to diabetes.

                I just meant is there any known medical conditions that could be the result of blood sugar spikes and then blood sugar dropping below resting blood sugar levels, other then diabetes?

                Obviously if you don’t know. Then maybe someone else will? So I will still ask the question.
                Hopefully someone will know and show supporting evidence or point me where to go to get supporting evidence.

                I will look in to the information you gave me and do more research on Visceral Fat. Thanks for the reply.

                1. I still think you should go directly to a credible source, one that you can talk to personally. It’s difficult to verify the credibility of those who reply on this site unless it’s Dr. Greger himself (I could be calling myself Dr. Eve, yet I may not be a medical doctor – or maybe I’m a veterinarian). Therefore you may be getting information that could potentially harm you or not give you any help at all.

                  But until you do find a credible source to consult with, here is some information about Hypoglycemia — which is the only condition I can think of that you might be referring to. Other than diabetes, hypoglycemia is probably the most commonly-know blood sugar problem there is (that we know of, so far). Here is a credible link for more information:
                  https://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/hypoglycemia/symptoms-causes/syc-20373685
                  and if you think you have hypoglycemia — again, go see your doctor!

                  Here is some more information about visceral fat, and the other types of fat we store in our bodies:
                  https://www.ideafit.com/fitness-library/how-to-help-clients-beat-belly-fat
                  I think you should be able to open this link. I’m a member of IDEA, so I had no problems accessing it — but I’m not sure if the general public can. If you can’t open it — surf the internet for “IDEA Fitness (and) visceral fat” or “ACE Fitness (and) visceral fat” (these are two very credible health/fitness organizations). You can trust the information from these associations.

                  And by the way, it’s important to keep in mind that it is entirely NORMAL to have your blood sugar levels rise and fall (sometimes drastically, depending on what & how much you eat) after every meal.

                  1. It’s hard to know where to begin looking sometimes, a google search just floods with a lot of nonsense, and looking on pubmed when I’m not sure what terminology to use isn’t useful. I will look in to what is said from multiple sources, and look for evidence. :)

                    I’m trying to work out whether or not healthy people need to worry about foods being low on the Glycemic Index, if they eat healthy most of the time, and exercise, and have very little fat on their body.

                    Obviously people should get regular check ups.

                    It’s hard because there isn’t really a doctor that makes people a diet based on their current health. Like there isn’t anywhere you can go that says, right you have this so you need to eat these sort of foods more. You know it’s a bit like it’s hard to eat healthy, if one person could be healthy eating Shredded Wheat or Oatmeal, while another could get Diabetes. You end up not being able to recommend any food, and people might as well eat whatever they want because no solution exists which doesn’t lead to problems, just go to a doctor if you’re ill. So that is the problem. Since I think this is false and if someone is healthy, exercises has healthy fat levels, there should be a diet which maintains this position, and it’s not just about having a low blood sugar spikes, it’s about eating food is about getting the calories you need, it’s about absorbing the right nutrition’s as well, and so the issue comes as to working out which foods offer the least risks, with the most nutrition, when someone is healthy. Since Shredded Wheat or Oatmeal has a lot of nutrients, then recommending something low on the GI might lead to worse issues for someone that is healthy, this food should be perfectly fine. So basically I’m trying to work out what is going to be healthy for people with no current medical problems.

                    1. We shouldn’t concern ourselves with the Glycemic Index. It was originally designed for use by diabetics, but it isn’t even significantly effective for them. It shows only a “small but clinically useful effect”: http://care.diabetesjournals.org/content/26/8/2261
                      The Glycemic Index diets actually create a “good food – bad food” problem because people are choosing “not-so-healthy” foods with low GI’s over more “healthier” foods because they have high GI’s. There is also much inconsistency in how a food is rated: One chart will show a food is high, yet another chart will give it a lower rating. In addition, we are all different so the rate you would absorb a food will be entirely different than the rate I may absorb that same food, despite how the GI charts rate it. Here is information from Tufts University, showing we need to be cautious using this method of rating foods: https://now.tufts.edu/news-releases/high-variability-suggests-glycemic-index-unreliable-indicator-blood-sugar-response

                      This is just my opinion – but I believe the “Glycemic Index Diet” is not applicable to the general public. It is best used therapeutically (for diabetics) – just as the Ketogenic diet is meant to be a therapeutic diet (for those with epilepsy and other neurological disorders) and not for use by the average person.

                      And another thought – it’s far more accurate to say that a highly refined (changed) food will be absorbed quicker than the whole food source it was refined from. This is probably more accurate than using the GI rating, because, as I commented above, each GI chart can vary widely and no two people absorb foods the same way (we are all so uniquely different!). So instead of worrying about the GI rating of a food, think of how much that food was changed (refined) from its original source. For example, table sugar is quickly absorbed. However, it takes far longer to absorb and digest the whole food the table sugar was refined or extracted from (sugar beets or sugar cane).

                      Also important to keep in mind . . . the more refined a food is, the fewer nutrients it will retain. In the sugar example, the table sugar will have far fewer nutrients than the sugar beets it was extracted from. This is mostly due to the process of oxidation (exposing nutrients to air, heat and light). When you tamper with or change (called refining) any whole food, some nutrients can be lost to the process of oxidation. And the more drastically we refine a food, the more nutrients we lose. So, to get more “bang for your buck” of nutrients, more often choose foods that have been changed as little as possible. That’s not to say you can’t have refined foods, especially if they are only ‘lightly’ refined because there won’t be a significant nutrient loss. But if you want as many nutrients as possible, it’s smart to make sure refined foods aren’t a huge part of your diet.

                2. Stephen,

                  In regards to your question, there are significant issues with hyperglycemia, specifically one of them is the formation of excessive AGE’s (Advanced Glycation End Products). They have an intense impact on multiple areas of our body, most specifically our vasculature. This is obviously referring more chronic stages of hyperglycemia, but even the consistent excessive levels can trigger their production.

                  For a more in depth look at AGE’s see, https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6015964/ and https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3951818/

                  On the other side of the coin, hypoglycemia can result in excessive cortisol production and result in a cascade of endocrine disruption. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2991551/.

                  Hope this helps to clarify the rational of keeping ones blood sugar in check and not “testing ” the system with load of sugar from any form.

                  Dr. Alan Kadish moderator for Dr. Greger http://www.Centerofhealth.com

    2. Stephen,

      I don’t know if there is a study which can explain it to you.

      I can use white rice as an example. In Asia, where they generally aren’t obese, people who eat white rice 4 days per week are more likely to develop Diabetes.

      If you are not Diabetic, it might not seem to be a big deal, but there are times, for instance, when you are sick or elderly when suddenly it matters.

      That becomes a logic of how often are you feeling comfortable allowing your blood sugar to spike?

      If you get sick or get older, you might be like the frog in the pot and not know that you crossed over into a dangerous place.

      You keep letting your blood sugar rise and your body starts causing you to urinate more frequently because your body, which is sometimes smarter than you are wants to get rid of the glucose. Then, you start getting dehydrated and that starts off seeming like not a big deal, but that can become one.

      I “got away” with eating Standard American Junk Food Diet for decades, but my brothers suddenly both needed surgery and my younger brother also needed high blood pressure medicine and they started talking Diabetes and he has gout even when his uric acid is low.

      He is still “getting away” with things but it is like a credit card where he can still afford the payments even if it suddenly is a little bit more painful.

      Once you are there, you can either do something about it or bury your head in the sand and I think I am saying it because you can probably get away wtih eating instant oatmeal for a very long time, but you have a mindset of “getting away with” and if it is one thing, that may be okay for the rest of your life. If it becomes a whole list of things, you might get in trouble when you get older.

      1. I haven’t seen any evidence to support that skinny or slim people have type 2 diabetes? Can you show a study or explain why biologically getting a sugar spike would and or drop below resting levels would lead to type 2 diabetes?

  12. The new book is looking good doctor Greger! Can’t wait for it (actually I am already looking forward to the one after that about aging). I could also use a new cookbook I am rotating like 4 recipes from it each week.

    You have a research group? When are we going to meet the team?

    Would it be crazy to upload the facebook Q&A videos to youtube after they are finished? (While also keeping the youtube ones offcourse).

    I just gifted my mom with a Dutch translation of the first book, it’s really fat! I didn’t know because I have digital English from that Russian book/paper download thing.

    Remember to enable bitcoin donations during the next round! Greetings from Belgium.

  13. WNPR is bashing all of it right now.

    Food Schmooze Bad Food Bible Bad boy doctor making fun of Dr. Ornish and making fun of the studies.

    Spinning all of it.

    He is a teacher educating potential future health professionals that none of it matters.

    1. I used my pseudonym Facebook account, which I still can’t figure out how to take down and posted a comment. I was the only one though.

    2. What a piece of shit. It’s fine if you personally want to be a moron, valuing more your own sense of ideals than actual science, but to actually teach this to others because of your idealism is monstrous.

  14. That’s why desserts or something like pancakes used to make me feel hungry… I even started making sure if I had dessert, to have it before dinner. Now my desserts are pretty much whole plant foods, so that doesn’t happen to me anymore.

  15. Tonight, I paused at the plant-milk aisle and thought about this video and thought about the fact that I had switched to Oat Milk recently and there ain’t that much structure in milk was the thought that went through my mind.

    I switched from a type with oil to coconut milk, which is high in saturated fat, I paused at soy milk, but I am back to drinking coffee and already have my venti soy Matcha tea latte in the morning and sometimes I end up having a second of those and I don’t want to accidentally have too much soy either.

    And now, oat milk will probably spike my blood sugar.

    Hmmmmmm

  16. re: How Not to Diet:
    Congratulations!
    It is finally being finalized!
    It is really being realized!

    You accomplish so much that I think you must have a secret twin! At least we know you are taking care of yourselves!

  17. Recently I read an article regarding the use of Glyphosate on grain crops to aid the crop in its drying before harvest….oats being one of those. Indeed, I have actually seen this being done in Indiana over soybean fields. The article read that the amount of the glyphosate in the cereal was way over the allowable use limits. Quaker Oat Squares Brown Sugar was over 4000 ppm beyond the allowable limit. With this new process in drying grains, just how safe are any grains to consume.

  18. What I would like to know Dr Gregeris how oatmeal compares to a cereal you have mentioned in other videos as a good breakfast item — “Uncle Sam” cereal which has lots of fiber.

  19. Ben,

    It totally depends on which oatmeal…… specifically how it was processed. There are wide variances between as an example a quick cook vs a stone ground whole grain oatmeal. https://andytherd.com/2018/05/14/instant-oatmeal-vs-steel-cut-oatmeal-body-knows-difference/

    As to the Uncle Sam’s cereal: “We cook whole wheat berries with salt, whole flaxseed and a touch of barley malt to enhance the nutty flavor of the whole grains and steam them until soft. Next we roll them into flakes and oven-toast them to deliver the cereal that has been enjoyed for over a century.”

    This is a very processed product that has indeed a fair amount of fiber but would not be substantially different than many cereals effects vs the whole grain unprocessed oats. The key word here is processed……

    Dr. Alan Kadish moderator for Dr. Greger http://www.Centerofhealth.com
    Ben,

    It totally depends on which oatmeal…… specifically how it was processed. There are wide variances between as an example a quick cook vs a stone ground whole grain oatmeal. https://andytherd.com/2018/05/14/instant-oatmeal-vs-steel-cut-oatmeal-body-knows-difference/

    As to the Uncle Sam’s cereal: “We cook whole wheat berries with salt, whole flaxseed and a touch of barley malt to enhance the nutty flavor of the whole grains and steam them until soft. Next we roll them into flakes and oven-toast them to deliver the cereal that has been enjoyed for over a century.”

    This is a very processed product that has indeed a fair amount of fiber but would not be substantially different than many cereals effects vs the whole grain unprocessed oats. The key word here is processed……

    Dr. Alan Kadish moderator for Dr. Greger http://www.Centerofhealth.com

  20. Dear NutrionFacts.org stuff – would it be possible to get the studie “Absorption of whole peanuts, peanut oil, and peanut butter” (link: https://cdf.nejm.org/ppv/ppv_form.aspx?doi=10.1056%2FNEJM198010163031605&promo=ONFGNRP7#ppurchaseArticle) from you? For me would be 20 Dollars for one study create my ruin between days, because I like to read the sources of Dr. Gregers Articel nearly every day…
    It would be great of you, if you can send it as a email to info@heilpraktiker-jurisch.de – I promise I will you include in my next evening prayer.
    Thank you so much in advance Steffen from Germany

  21. I was wondering why the spagetti made with refined flour was having a lower GI impact, because on the face of it it does not make sense. It must be becasue the cooking process produced more resistant starch than the shredded wheat which otherwise would not be the case.

    Usually multiple cooking steps are required to achieve this, which went unmentioned in the video. You don’t want people to have the impression that white pasta is okay without doing this.

  22. Arent rolled oats simply groats/steel-cut oats soaked and cooked because they are too hard to eat?!
    Weird to Imagine steel-cut oats are healthier than groats since they are simply cut groats. That’s like saying cut broccoli is better than uncut broccoli even though we all know cutting before cooking broccoli increases pre-sulforaphane compounds… weird.

  23. This video makes sense, but what about the fact that Bob’s Red Mill Steel Cut Oats has 170 calories per 1/4 cup, while Bob’s Red Mill Oat Flour has 160 calories per 1/3 cup? This seems contradictory to both basic logic and the findings reported by the video — wouldn’t the flour be more calorie-dense than steel cut oats since flour is just oats that have been finely milled into oat flour particles?

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