Doctor's Note

The math thing is so cool! How else might one use natural means to improve cognitive performance? Check out my video Does a Drink Of Water Make Children Smarter? More mind-body brain hacking tips in Dietary Brain Wave Alteration

More on dietary interventions for anxiety in:

In fact the saffron may be aromatherapeutic too. See the follow-up to the PMS study, Wake Up and Smell the Saffron. And speaking of brain effects, there's Saffron vs. Prozac, Saffron for the Treatment of Alzheimer’s, and Saffron Versus Aricept,

For more flower power see my blog and videos on hibiscus tea (Better Than Green Tea) and chamomile tea (Red Tea, Honeybush, & Chamomile and Chamomile Tea May Not Be Safe During Pregnancy). And hey, broccoli florets are just clusters of flower buds. See The Best DetoxBroccoli Versus Breast Cancer Stem Cells, and dozens of other broccoli videos.

How else might diet affect with the hormonal balance of young boys? Check out Dairy & Sexual Precocity.

More on lavender in my next video Lavender for Migraine Headaches.

If you haven't yet, you can subscribe to my videos for free by clicking here.

  • HemoDynamic, M.D.

    I still don’t know what to do with this information even though it is erudite.
    Maybe only treat women with GAD with Lavender (Gynecomastia in women is a welcome side effect for men) but the decrease in Testosterone in women may also mean a decrease in libido since testosterone is the hormone associated with increased sex drive.
    What’s a person with GAD to do?
    Well I guess when the GAD is so life altering, the side effects may not outweigh the benefits.

    Thanks for your hard work!

    • Thea

      HemoDynamic: Do you think the data suggests that breathing?/eating?/lotions? lavender by a woman who has too much testosterone would be a safe way to lower her way too high testosterone levels? I had looked at licorice as a way to do this, but Dr. Greger’s warnings on licorice show that licorice is not a safe way to do it. Just wondering if you have any conjecture on this idea based on your experience/gut and this video. I’m not expecting medical advice. And of course, if you are too busy to respond, I would understand that too. :-)

  • elsie blanche

    By the time the video was finished I decided that it would be prudent
    to avoid lavender. Even with the positive GAD attributes, the last section of the video makes it pretty clear, to me at least, that lavender might not be such a good idea! Anyone else out there have this reaction? Was this your intention, Dr. G?

    • Plantstrongdoc

      Agree. Interesting, but the side effects – especially long term – is a concern. This is a very fine example – because the “drug” is from the nature, that does not necessarily mean that it is safe.

  • Steve Mayer

    I had the same reaction as Elsie. My daughter takes a med for GAD but she is also in a family with risk for breast cancer. If I understand this video correctly, Lavender oil is a PLUS for GAD but a NEGATIVE for breast cancer. For now, I think I take a pass on this therapy.

  • Robert Llamas

    What’s a person with “GAD” to do? Gosh, how about utilizing a behavioral approach? Like good ole short term behavior therapy. What’s with the knee jerk we’ve-got-to-go-with-a-pill approach? For example, there’s a number of studies out there that show therapy to be superior to meds when dealing with depression.

  • Darryl

    According to “Herbs Demystified” by medicinal chemist Holly Phaneuf (highly recommended, browse at: http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/tg/detail/-/1569244081/qid=1118163253/ ), linalool (~30% of lavender oil, with another ~50% as its ester for extended release) appears to act through competitively blocking the exitatory neurotransmitter glutamate at NMDA receptors, indirectly potentiating the inhibitory neurotransmitter GABA, and reducing acetylcholine release. Other NMDA antagonists are commonly used as dissociative anesthetics, so its unsurprising lavender oil might be calming – its herbal ketamine.

    There’s a line about all medicines being toxins applied at low doses. While lavender oil appears safe in moderation, that observation may apply here. In addition to the estrogenic effects noted in the video, its anticholinergic effect can be an issue.

    Acikalin, Ayca, et al. “Anticholinergic Syndrome and Supraventricular Tachycardia Caused by Lavender Tea Toxicity.” http://www.kjm.keio.ac.jp/past/61/2/66.pdf

    Long-term use of other NMDA antagonists like ketamine is associated with brain damage, at least in lab animals in kept in a perpetual k-hole. ( http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Olney%27s_lesions ). As linalool also has that anticholinergic effect, it might itself neutralize that potential side effect ( http://www.lycaeum.org/drugs/Cyclohexamines/nmda-toxicity.html ).

    There’s nothing magical about herbal medications. Their active components differ from other drugs in being nonpatentable, and accompanied by hundreds of other chemicals of use to the plants. Fortunately herbal preparations with acute toxicity at therapeutic doses have been “off the market” for hundreds of years, but information on long-term effects after their chronic use is sparse, if available at all.

    By the way, linalool and its ester are not unique to lavender – its common to many plants that attract moth pollinators at night. Basil, hops, many thymes and mints, indian bay leaf; over 200 species.

  • Paul

    So, why take the risk when both theanine and kava have excellent safety profiles and work well on generalized anxiety disorder. In 2002 and 2003, there were reports, mostly in Europe, of hepatoxic effects of Kava (liver). However, many of these cases were actually attributed to prescription drugs. In addition, many of the supplement manufacturers in an effort to get more profit included stems and leaves from kava instead of just the root. Stems and leaves contain alkaloids that are hepatoxic not found in the root. When prepared with just the root in the South Pacific, there has not been this effect of hepatoxicity. And kava has been shown clinically to be very effective against GAD vs. drugs. As with all substances, it’s not for every day but rather when you are going into an anxious situation. I like Gaia herbs though they are expensive. They have an excellent QA program and very high quality kava.

    Other herbs with some success (though less than kava) that are anoxylitic include: lemon balm, relora (magnolia bark), passionflower, skullcap

    • Darryl

      A reference for the curious regarding the hepatotoxin pipermethystine present in the aerial portion (but not roots) of the kava plant.

      Nerurkar, Pratibha V., et al. “In vitro toxicity of kava alkaloid, pipermethystine, in HepG2 cells compared to kavalactones.” Toxicological Sciences 79.1 (2004): 106-111.
      http://toxsci.oxfordjournals.org/content/79/1/106.short

      I’ve only taken kava on vacation in Fiji. Its an acquired taste.

  • shiftpolitics

    Hi Dr. Greger, good stuff! a question:

    Assuming I want to consume lavender through dried lavender herbs as in tea with hot water, what would be the amount to match the same as the people in the study took? one cup a day?

  • Lizzie

    Hi Dr. Greger : )) Can you do more videos on essential oils?

    • http://nutritionfacts.org/ Michael Greger M.D.

      I’m so glad you appreciated it! I try to stick to food, but sometimes I stumble across something too interesting to pass up!

      • Thea

        To be fair, there is lavender in food items too. For example, I once bought a chocolate bar flavored with lavender. Also, I think there are teas with lavender in them. So, this video is not that far off your normal scope. :-)

  • jonithomas
  • Roy Ferreira

    mention was made about side effects in young boys using lavender oil , are the effects the same with senior citizens 60+

  • Maria

    How much lavender oil would a a 30 year old male who weighs about 150 take for pretty bad general anxiety?

  • Marcus

    Question – I’m male, just about 30, and have some gynecomastia from what I would call my teens/puberty. I’ve been eating a 99% plant based diet for 2.5 years now and my health has tremendously improved. Unfortunately, I seem to have tissue under each of my nipples. Have you ever come across anything that indicates that a plant-based diet can reverse this? Any specific foods? I worry about the increase in male breast cancer risk from having gynecomastia.

  • TMR

    Hmm. I am now conflicted as to what to do. I occasionally sniff lavender oil for anxiety and I find it helpful but reading about the other side effects like breast cancer is not appealing ;-) How often can one sniff lavender oil and it be safe?

  • Darryl

    I’m more of a rosemary person:

    Analysis of performance revealed that lavender produced a significant decrement in performance of working memory, and impaired reaction times for both memory and attention based tasks compared to controls. In contrast, rosemary produced a significant enhancement of performance for overall quality of memory and secondary memory factors, but also produced an impairment of speed of memory compared to controls. With regard to mood, comparisons of the change in ratings from baseline to post-test revealed that following the completion of the cognitive assessment battery, both the control and lavender groups were significantly less alert than the rosemary condition; however, the control group was significantly less content than both rosemary and lavender conditions.

    From:

    Moss, Mark, et al. “Aromas of rosemary and lavender essential oils differentially affect cognition and mood in healthy adults.” International Journal of Neuroscience 113.1 (2003): 15-38.

  • kristina

    Hello Dr Gregor.I hope you can give me some insight on this issue…About a month ago,a friend gave me some culinary lavender,dried lavender flowers.Well,I almost immediately became completely addicted.I am eating about a cup{sometimes more} of cleaned,screened,organic lavender flowers every day! Previous to this,for 10 years,I was addicted to fresh Rosemary,eating as much as I could get my hands on,often buying the plant in a greenhouse and stripping it to eat on the way home.I craved Rosemary,and now Lavender like many folks crave chocolate or maybe even cigarettes.None of the local health practicioners know what to make of it.Can you give me some insight as to whether it is bad for me,or if I should be wary of anything about this bizarre compulsion? Why do you think my body would crave Fresh Rosemary,and now dried Lavender? I would dearly appreciate ANY ideas or recommendations that you might have,as no one in my area knows what to make of it..Thank you so much for your precious time!Sincerely,Kristina

    • bobluhrs

      I’m not a doctor, my interest is more general. It’s unlikely to be a nutritional need, more like the brain finds it chemically useful. The other explanation is you just like it a lot. Human variability of taste and desire may be wider than we give it credit, may not mean anything pathological. So maybe the craving is yours and not your body’s? Did you enjoy or not? You may have just discovered something you really like, that’s lucky.