Doctor's Note

Need a reminder about what those protective Ah receptors are? See The Broccoli Receptor: Our First Line of Defense and Counteracting the Effects of Dioxins Through Diet.

What’s the best way to prepare broccoli? See my Second Strategy to Cooking Broccoli video.

Women can overdo it, though, in late pregnancy. See Caution: Anti-inflammatory Foods in the Third Trimester.

What else can we do to lower our risk of upper respiratory tract infections? See:

Stay tuned for my upcoming video Are Happier People Actually Healthier? later this week that compares people’s resistance to having the common cold virus dripped into their nostrils.

If you haven't yet, you can subscribe to my videos for free by clicking here.

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  • HaltheVegan

    Now this is the kind of information I find very useful and informative. An excellent video to pass along to my nutrition deficient family and friends! Many thanks to Dr G and the NutritionFacts team.

    • I agree HaltheVegan! It is amazing how this video can help simplify the benefits of eating fresh fruits and vegetables. For your nutrition deficient family and friends, where would you recommend they start? Any ideas on easy ways to get your “Five or more” a day?

      • HaltheVegan

        Here is the list of foods that I recommend to my family and friends (who will listen ;-) For the fruits/berries: apples, blueberries, strawberries, grapefruit, blackberries, bananas, lemons, acai berry juice, pomegranate juice, and cherries. For the vegetables: broccoli, cauliflower, Brussels sprouts, kale, red cabbage, asparagus, tomatoes, green/red peppers, beets, spinach, Arugula, mushrooms, sweet potatoes, celery, and different forms of onions. For beans & grains: red kidney beans, black beans, garbanzos, red lentils, quinoa, oats, farro, barley, and buckwheat. Nuts & seeds: walnuts, pecans, cashews, almonds, pistachios, pumpkin seeds, and ground flaxseed. Spices: turmeric, cloves, cinnamon, ground mustard seed, cocoa powder, parsley, and cardamom. Drinks: decaf coffee, green tea, and hibiscus tea. I think this just about covers my whole diet. And I have accumulated this list of foods mainly from watching the videos and reading on this website and choosing what the research says are the most nutritious foods. Every time Dr G mentions a new super food, I try to add it to my diet … I’m rapidly running out of room in my stomach :-)

        • WOW they are lucky to have you!!!! Isn’t it great to run out of room in your stomach but still be normal body weight??? Yum yum!!!

        • Rebecca Cody

          You may want to add sunflower seeds – high in B complex vitamins along with other goodies – and, at least here, available more inexpensively than nuts in the bulk food bin at my local co-op.

          • Johanna
          • Robert

            No p nuts!!!! Too much fat.

          • Psych MD

            I suggest you watch the 13 videos Dr. Greger has done on peanuts.

          • Matthew Smith

            Have you ever asked why peanuts do not treat mental illness? Beans and peanuts are usually heated or roosted to destroy cyanide content, at the temperature they are roasted all Nitrogen is lost, returned to the sky. Have you considered why all nuts must be heated before they are sold? Almonds are not poisonous, but the cyanide content of any nut is high. Perhaps cyanide in low doses is a healthy source of Nitrogen for the body. Green beans are rich in Vanadium. Perhaps they could treat depression. A raw nut might truly end mental illness. Some unprocessed food would be beneficial for any one’s mind. If you feel that mental illness is based on an imbalance of neurotransmitters in the brain, are you able to see if it is Serotonin or Dopamine excess? Do you dose medicine based on which one is in excess? It is possible there are too little of both, which are mostly made of Nitrogen. Have you found a source of Nitrogen in the diet? For many people, it is Niacin. There is some Niacin in heated peanuts. Perhaps Vanadium and Chromium are superior neurotransmitters. Dr. Hoffer believed Schizophrenia was based on a excess of an adrenaline by product related to stress. Perhaps you have noticed that your patients are under stress. A major source of stress is a food allergy, which abound in people, especially Milk, Eggs, and Wheat. Sometimes meat allergies are present. Niacin is very stress relieving. Niacin and Zinc are the ultimate way to reduce brain imbalances. Green matcha tea, cartoons, Magnesium, and math seem to cause the Alpha brain wave. Is it the Alpha brain wave that is the ultimate treatment for mental illness? The best nutrition could treat mental illness, if only the foods weren’t processed. Selenium seems to treat anxiety. Perhaps it is similar to the neurotransmitter GABA, instead of Depacote or Paxil.

          • mbglife

            Hi Matthew. Interesting post. Sounds like you research nutrition and supplements quite a bit. I’m just curious how you learned much of this. Was it your own reading or are you certified in something.

            Mark G

          • Matthew Smith

            Thank you.

          • greensmoothieparty

            I recently started eating some daily peanuts (unsalted) and noticed that my resting systolic BP went from a bit below 110 to about 120. Perhaps some form of allergic reaction. After a day of not eating them, it dropped back down to 110. Too bad, I really liked them.

        • lgking

          Where’s the raw GARLIC?

        • Matthew Smith

          What a great list. Dr. Greger recommends tomato juice, garlic, and broccoli highly, as you suggest. I am thrilled, Hal the Vegan, with your list of foods. You must be brilliant to have so complete a knowledge of plants. Sprouted sunflower seeds are reputed to be very good for. Do you really eat pumpkin seeds? They seem to be a complete source of nutrition. I am glad you have so varied a diet, and am pleased to see your writing. Is it close to what our ancestors ate? Perhaps bananas, brazil nuts, oranges, dates and figs are what we ate when we were in the tropics. Is it possible we are missing Selenium, Potassium, Vitamin K, Silicon, Calcium and Vitamin C as we live in hardier climates? Thank you very much.

      • Psych MD

        Download Dr. Greger’s Daily Dozen free app to your phone.

        • EXCELLENT ADVICE!!!!

        • Matthew Smith

          Have you considered adding Halos or another unbaked food to the list? Food seems to be baked, soaked, soured, limed, and chilled.

    • Thea

      HaltheVegan: I agree. This type of info keeps me inspired. Who wants to be sick? Not me!

    • Mike Quinoa

      Hopefully we’ve all bought and read Dr. Greger’s excellent “How Not To Die” book by now. I’ve just finished another superb book exactly on this topic, “Super Immunity” by Joel Fuhrman, MD. Both books are required reading for the health-conscious individual.

  • Isn’t it amazing that the top news story this time of year is about the flu and getting a flu shot? Where is the story about eating five or more servings of fruits and vegetables every day??? What are your favorite vegetables, and what do you eat to ensure you hit ALL the colors: red, yellow, orange, green, and blue purple every day??

  • Here is a great place on nutrition facts to drill down on the benefits from antioxidants found in fruits and vegetables. Let me know what you think!
    http://nutritionfacts.org/topics/antioxidants

    • george

      Lisa: questions from the video: 1) Isn’t spinach a cruciferous? If it is, the reason it didn’t work was because the researchers used powder, not fresh, whole spinach? 2) Are there any theories on why tomatoes are dramatically effective but carrots are not? (I was disappointed because I’m allergic to tomatoes but eat about a pound of carrots a week.) Thank you

      • jj

        “Though this study was repeated looking at other immune markers and the tomato versus carrot appeared more evenly matched,” (excerpt from the transcript)

        • george

          Thanks JJ. Good to hear that carrots aren’t useless when it comes to boosting immunity.

      • Matthew Smith

        Spinach is in the Amaranthaceae, not the mustard family.

  • About Creativity

    Very Good.

  • Rebecca Cody

    When that scratchy throat comes calling despite my best efforts, this little trick I learned from my ND years ago has usually prevented the actual catching of the threatened cold or flu: At the earliest possible symptom, take a dose of enzymes and either open the capsule and dump the contents as far back in my mouth/throat as possible every 15 minutes four times, I now buy chewable enzymes, which makes this process simpler. Just be sure the enzymes contain protease, which chews up the protein coating on the virus and kills it. In winter I usually carry enough enzyme pills with me for four doses in case I notice that first symptom when I’m away from home.

    There is another thing you do for bacterial infections, but I can’t remember at the moment what it is. Most colds and flus, however, are viral.

    • Gumbootgoddess

      I’m not quite sure what I should be looking for in the health food store. Can you give me a name or more info please. Thank you for helping.

      • Rebecca Cody

        I usually buy Super Papaya Enzymes Plus from American Health. They are even in some of our grocery stores and every health food store in town. A dose is three chewable pills. They have a mild peppermint flavor.

      • jj

        American Health Original Papaya Enzyme Chewable. If it makes a difference to you this is the Vegetarian Formula. The Plus formula has some animal derived enzymes.

  • June Ribaldi

    Great post. Your always wonderful to listen to~Keep up the Great Work.:) .

  • Mary

    Can you aggravate an autoimmune condition by eating too many immune boosting foods such as garlic, onions, mushrooms, broccoli, etc.?

    • baggman744

      Generally no, but that would depend on the immune condition. Is it an undiagnosed allergy or sensitivity? Off the top of my head, UC or chrons may be two where’d you have to experiment and watch closely.

      • guest

        Actually, John Hopkins Lupus center (arguably number one in the world, by the way), highly suggest that those with LUPUS, an autoimmune disease) should avoid garlic, certain sprouts, and some of immune boosting plants. They are emphatic about this. I’d be mindful of this if I had any sort of autoimmune issue. Chlorella has been warned against in some people with autoimmune issues, thinking that the stimulation can create problems. I could go on and on.

        • baggman744

          I removed my comment in light of your more accurate info.

        • Mary

          Thanks for the reply. Does Dr. Greger ever respond to questions and comments?

          • Thea

            Mary: I’ve seen Dr. Greger respond to the occasional post. However, it is very rare because the volume of posts is so high. I have no doubt that Dr. Greger would respond to each and every post if he could. Time just does not allow.

    • avoid garlic as well as…..

      See the note i left for Baggman744 below. I’d avoid garlic if I were you, and all nightshades. 100 percent of nightshades! No matter how healthy people say tomatoes are, and potatoes, goji berries, peppers, eggplant….avoid!

    • VegEater

      I’ve been eating tons of garlic, broccoli, and onions all my life with no apparent effects on my auto-immune disease. Also, tomatoes. However, I have avoided mushrooms because they have serious immune boosting effects.

      • Matthew Smith

        Do you supplement with D3 as Dr. Greger recommends?

        • VegEater

          Yes

    • migo

      I have had a heart transplant, and have started a vegan diet (for the

      most part) and am wondering about immune supporting foods. how would
      they affect my drug suppressed immune system? thanks for any
      information.

      • Joan E- NF Volunteer

        That is a great question!! The only issue that I have ever come across is the use of probiotics in immune suppression as probiotics are essentially “good” bacteria. All the diet recommendations that I have come across for organ transplant/immune suppression encourages all of the principles of a WFPB diet. The warning are all regarding meat consumption, as most of the pathogens that are dangerous for the immune suppressed are found in animal foods. However, there is risk of plant foods being contaminated (growing conditions, cross contamination) it is good practice to wash all produce.

        • migo

          Thank you so much for responding to my question. Probiotics as a function of whole foods? or as a concentrated form in a capsule? if i am understanding you correctly, all of the nutritive value of immune system boosting foods in a WFPB diet are not in conflict with the required drug regime one must use for survival in a transplant situation.

          • Joan E- NF Volunteer

            Probiotics as a concentrated form in capsule. They are essentially bacteria in pill form. The WFPD just feeds the good bacteria that is already present. The only issue with WFPB diet for transplant, I would suspect, is making sure produce is washed. I know initially after transplant raw foods are avoided, but as immunosuppression decreases, these foods can be added back in. There is always a risk of pathogen contamination with produce, but the risk is much higher with animal foods. I have a colleague whose daughter has had a heart transplant at a very young age. Food safety is her top priority.

          • migo

            thank you again.
            my cardiologist is a great doctor, but i have never been counseled about nutrition except for the standard low salt, low fat thing. my transplant was 6 1/2 yrs ago, and it was not until six months ago, that i ran into Dr Gregor’s nutritionfacts.org. i understand food safety, but really my question revolved around strengthening the immune system with the food we eat. is there such a thing as too much strengthening of the immune system for transplant patients? in all other senses , the WFPB diet seems to be the really ideal one for a person in my situation.

    • Darryl

      Perhaps not with food, but complementary medicine is another world. There are reports of least five cancer patients taking Agaricus blazei mushroom extracts to stimulate immune function who developed what appears to be autoimmune hepatitis (1, 2), and another study found 23 patients with liver biopsies that looked like autoimmune hepatitis were much more likely to have injured their liver with complementary or Chinese medicine (3).

  • Lynda

    Tomatoes are fruits!

    • Wade Patton

      Grown in the vegetable garden. Mushrooms are fruits too if you like technicalities.

      • Rhombopterix

        my cat is a fruit-cake

        • Vege-tater

          Funny, just as I read that, my cat ran by on his hind legs making weird noises, with a sock (with berries printed on it) between his paws! A psychic (psycho?) fruitcake!

      • Matthew Smith

        Mushrooms are not in the plant family and therefore are not fruits, in the way you describe they are flowers, which they are not. Eggplant and peppers are also fruits.

    • Vege-tater

      Technically so are eggplants, peppers, cukes, pumpkins, olives, squash, okra, etc., (Fruit…The ripened ovary or ovaries of a seed-bearing plant, together with accessory parts, containing the seeds and occurring in a wide variety of forms) but I don’t generally use them as such, do you?

    • Tom Goff

      And fruits are vegetables ….
      http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/vegetable

  • Gumbootgoddess

    Just last week I was complementing myself on what a wonderful healthy winter I had had. Enter stage right, four year old granddaughter with stinking cold who wants to give me a big hug and a kiss!!!!! So here I am sniffing and snorting and eating my fruit and veggies – some battles you can’t win!

    • baggman744

      Eat raw garlic! That may fight what you have, also, no offense, but it’ll probably keep your grand daughter away as well ;-)

  • Alan

    Good info!! I eat lots of fruits and veggies and lots of carbs. I had a flu shot at age 19 and have not had one since. I am now 60 and have not had a cold or flu for several yrs or any other sickness. Praise the Lord !!!

  • nodelord

    One day might you look in to the Hyaluronic Acid (HA) story. see this…

    https://youtu.be/FgJ-bW6txuw

  • Lynda Klau PHD

    I’ve been keeping my fruit intake low because of all the sugar in it. I usually keep it down to 1 serving of blueberries a day. Can you addresss sugar and fruits.

    • baggman744

      The doc already addressed this: http://nutritionfacts.org/video/how-much-fruit-is-too-much/
      In short, as long as its whole fruit, and there’s no other health conditions preventing it, eat as much as want. Although I did read the one exception may be grapes, as they’re highest in sugar. Remember fructose, unlike other other sugars with the exception of alcohol, needs to be processed through the liver, so its a whole different biological digestion. Remember, whole fruit only, not HFCS, or even plain corn syrup.

      • mbglife

        The reason that Dr Lustig is against grapes is because it’s the one fruit that has no fiber, and as such, the sugar rushes the liver. Fiber, he points out, allows the sugars fructose in the fruit to slowly enter the liver where it can be processed at a healthy flow.

        • SeedyCharacter

          Grapes are low in fiber but do have some: http://healthyeating.sfgate.com/red-grapes-fiber-8097.html

          • baggman744

            Here’s what he says about grapes, “They don’t have enough fiber for the amount of sugar that’s in them.” http://nutritiondata.self.com/facts/fruits-and-fruit-juices/1920/2

          • guest

            With a lot more sugar per unit weight, raisins should be worse then. Bummer; I put a handful of raisins to my morning hot cereal everyday. Is there a list somewhere that shows the ratio of the amount of sugar to the amount of fiber in fruits?

          • Tom Goff

            That’s what I thought too but on reflection, depending on the cereal, we should be getting a lot of fibre to accompany that sugar in the raisins (or grapes in my case).

            There’s a list of fruits and typical fibre and sugar contents (but no ratio) here:
            http://www.thefruitpages.com/contents.shtml
            I also don’t know how reliable it is since the figure for fibre in grapes is higher than that I’ve seen elsewhere (but those were for seedless grapes so both figures may well be correct).

            There’s also a ranking by fibre to sugar content here
            https://www.healthaliciousness.com/nutritionfacts/nutrient-ranking-tool.php?nt=FIBTG&r=SUGAR&tt=Fruits%20and%20Fruit%20Juices&aa=200&i=two

          • baggman744

            Don’t know about a list, but if you’re using a few raisins to sweeten your oatmeal, you could do a lot worse. In the context of a full day of eating, I wouldn’t sweat it. Even the doc uses date sugar. My daily sweeter for oatmeal: a ripe banana. Although I eat my oatmeal raw, a ripe banana mixed into hot oatmeal… yum!

        • Tom Goff

          That’s interesting. I must admit that I’ve always had a low opinion of Lustig but he’s correct that fibre is less than 1% by weight of grapes.
          On the other hand, I only eat grapes with my morning oatmeal and there is plenty of fibre there. Additionally, there is a lot more to grapes than just fibre and sugar.
          http://nutritiondata.self.com/facts/fruits-and-fruit-juices/1920/2

    • Wade Patton

      The issue has been addressed in other comments, but I’ll add that avoiding fruit for sugar or calorie content is usually JUST as misguided as the rest of the notions of Western diet.

      Diabetes, for instance–a disease of FAT toxicity, that affects our handling of sugars, but Sugar isn’t the cause. It will take many years for the general public to understand this–if ever. Please learn more, it’s all free!

  • Linda

    My mom had essential tremor and I have been told that my head will shake sometimes. One day while I was preparing lunch I felt weak and shaky. My friend was there and I asked him if I was shaking. He looked at me and then looked some more and said “It looks like your whole body is vibrating.” The feeling passed after a few minutes. In May 2015 I did a Whole 30. The W30 is an elimination diet, no grains, no legumes, no sugar, no dairy, no alcohol. At the end of the 30 days you systematically add these items back in with 2 days of W30 type eating in between each add back. When I added back the beans, I noticed some shaking which I hadn’t noticed in a while. I decided to avoid them. Shortly after that I went on vacation and my friend made chili (sigh) I decided not to make a fuss and ate it. I didn’t notice any problems and thought, maybe it was just a coincidence? I’ve been using Dr. Greger’s Daily Dozen and eating lots of beans and (yes, I’m seeing weight loss at the rate of a pound a week) I’m shaking. My friend was visiting the other day and she asked me if I was shaking. I said “My head?” and she replied “It looks like your whole body”. I didn’t feel the shaking at all. What’s going on? Has anyone else had or heard of anyone having this type of reaction to legumes? Are they safe for me to eat?

    • Julie

      Any food, no matter how nutritious, that causes an unhealthy symptom should be avoided. It’s your body’s way of telling you that there is something about that food that is NOT good for you. Also there’s a possibility that by continuing to eat a food that causes unpleasant symptoms, the symptoms could get worse &/or develop into a more serious condition.

      • Linda

        Yeah, that’s what I’m thinking, but weight loss.

        • Wade Patton

          As I lost the 30 pounds when starting WFPB, I noticed that I’d stop losing or gain EVERY time I ate animal products and/or oils/fats/sugar.

          I don’t know how I’d do without beans, BUT I suspect your weight loss will continue so long as you keep animals/fats/oils/sugar to absolute minimums.

          I suppose I’d eat a lot more corn, potatoes, grains and rice if I had to avoid beans.

    • SeedyCharacter

      Have you had a neurologist evaluate you for benign essential tremor, Parkinson’s, etc? I would recommend it. I was diagnosed with essential tremor a few years back. I definitely have to avoid caffeine, which worsens it. I’ve not observed any foods to impact the tremor.

      • Linda

        I did see a neurologist. I was there for another matter, but mentioned it to him and he observed it.

        • SeedyCharacter

          Oh, good. So he did a work up and diagnosed you with essential tremor, sounds like. I guess I wasn’t sure if you knew what you had.

          • Linda

            I don’t think the full body vibration is essential tremor or at least nothing like my mom experienced. Now my concern is how does one get protein if they are eating plant based and can’t eat beans? Btw, there is nothing they can do to diagnose essential tremor other than clinical observation. Mine goes from left to right and he says we call that no tremor.

          • Thea

            Linda: re: “Now my concern is how does one get protein if they are eating plant based and can’t eat beans?” The following page will answer your question as it shows how much protein people need and how much you can get from various food groups: http://michaelbluejay.com/veg/protein.html

            Take a look and let me know what you think.

          • Linda

            I thought it was an awesome article, Thea. Thank you!

      • Matthew Smith

        Have you tried supplementing with B12, B1, B6, and Vitamin E?

  • baggman744

    Remarkable that the tomato was superior to the carrot juice. Too bad they didn’t test the whole food and not just the juice. Anyway, so much for the beta carotene craze.

    • jj

      Depends on what markers are looked at.
      “Though this study was repeated looking at other immune markers and the tomato versus carrot appeared more evenly matched,” (excerpt from the transcript)

  • rumicat

    My husband and I have been plant centered for 5 years. We both get sick less, and when we do the symptoms are less severe. Neither of us has needed prescription meds for a cold since changing our diets. Before the trip to the doc for decongestants or antibiotics was an annual one. Not missing this at all.

  • mbglife

    Following Dr Greger’s research and advice for the past several years I’ve been consuming lots of broccoli, kale and, more recently, purple cabbage. But Dr McDougall, whom I also have a lot of respect for, and who has been researching, advising and treating his patients on a vegan diet for over 40 years, recommends having only a side dish amount of cruciferous veggies because of their natural toxins and the heavy metals that even organically grown green take up (see link). He holds similar beliefs about high oxidant foods like blueberries. I find this distressing, as I want to eat what’s optimal, not extreme. But Dr Greger’s long standing advice to have a huge salad daily seems ad odds with Dr McDougall. They respect each other and Dr Greger is even going to present a lecture in a few months at Dr McDougall’s health clinic. But I’d like to see Dr Greger clarify what he thinks a proper amount of greens and cruciferous veggies is.

    https://www.drmcdougall.com/2015/08/31/broccoli-and-kale-taste-bitter/
    Mark G.

    • Tom Goff

      I don’t personally really see a big discrepancy. Even if you eat a huge salad daily, I can’t see that lettuce, spinach, cucumber etc etc are going to provide the bulk of your calories or nutrients, still less the broccoli, kale and purple cabbage components. And that’s only one meal per day – most of us eat 3 meals a day. I’ve always assumed that Dr G means that we should include these things in our diet rather than make them the focal point.
      The only video I recall where Dr G has talked approvingly about a particular detailed diet breakdown is the Kaiser Permanente approach but perhaps someone else has more information? The Kaiser Permanente approach doesn’t seem unbalanced to me but you do raise an interesting point.
      http://nutritionfacts.org/video/what-diet-should-physicians-recommend/

      • mbglife

        Hi Tom. Is hoping you’d weigh in. Party of the problem is that neither talked about it in measured volumes. But with Greger I do recall a few times that he said e should be eating a big green salad daily and at least once he discussed that he means something bigger than the little side plates we use more. McDougall is saying est just a side plate. But the he gives examples of the problem is sizes that probable only raw foodies who don’t eat much fat probably consume. I’ve eaten lots of broccoli almost nightly for years. And really bumped up make too. I just wonder how much is too much if it really uptakes lots of toxins and bad metals.

        McDougall also warns about too much protein, so I’m trying to reduce that some too. And he’s anti oil if any kind, which isn’t a big deal for me. But I wonder sometimes if in trying to do things right I’m not doing too much. McDougall is big in potatoes, but I thought Greger reported on a study that they might cause cancer. It’s crazy trying to keep it all straight. And I’m not even going to try to figure out lectins. Thanks for the link. I’m sure I’ve seen it but I’ll check it again.

        • Tom Goff

          Thanks Mark. I confess that I do not stress about these things too much. All food is a package deal and it’s possible to find a downside to any food. However, McDougall does have a point and Dr G has previously said that it’s possible to eat too much broccoli.
          http://nutritionfacts.org/video/how-much-broccoli-is-too-much/

          However, unless you are also juicing massive amounts, I can’t imagine that a a normal salad containing handful of kale leaves and some broccoli florets along with a selection of other salad vegetables is going to be a problem even if you eat it every day.
          http://www.medicaldaily.com/dark-side-broccoli-and-kale-could-cruciferous-vegetables-be-bad-you-267892
          http://www.thinkingnutrition.com.au/broccoli-is-bad-for-you/
          http://www.today.com/health/kale-safe-eat-look-toxic-fears-facts-t33671
          http://www.today.com/health/kale-safe-eat-look-toxic-fears-facts-t33671

          • mbglife

            Thanks, Tom. I try not to worry to much about them either, but having a lot of neuropathy, and hearing nerve loss, which the doctors think is due to random viruses, but don’t really know, I just try to not subject my body to anymore heavy metals than is necessary. If not for this I’d probably worry about it less. Too bad we’ve trashed out our planet so much that this is even a concern. But that’s a different community board. ;-)

          • Tom Goff

            Interesting. I think then that this argues that you should eat a wide variety of vegetables from safe(r) sources rather than concentrate heavily on a few “superfood” vegetables
            http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1764924/
            (By safer I mean, probably nothing from China, India or Eastern Europe for starters, and eat organic if that’s possible and/or affordable).

          • mbglife

            What was shocking was that something by McDougall that I recently read heard on one of his videos, is that some of the states in the US have really high toxic mineral levels because of the over reliance on chemical fertilizers. I don’t recall the states, but it was really unnerving. And when it comes to say rice and arsenic, California brands aren’t car behind those from China and India.

          • Tom Goff

            Yes, that’s why I suggest organic. It’s the same with animals in that there are many reports of commercial animal feed being laced with heavy metal contaminants. And of course there is also the question of dioxins/pcb in animal foods.
            My problem is that I eat a lot of cereals – oats, wholemeal bread and pasta primarily – and the risk there is of excess cadmium. So, I think I need to get more variety into my diet. You might find this old article a worthwhile read since you have a real interest in this area (I’ve not found a more recent equivalent article although I suspect the FDA will have the information somewhere).
            http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1475014/pdf/envhper00496-0066.pdf

          • mbglife

            I’ve eaten almost exclusively organic for decades now. I know even Greger says to try and buy organic, but says that if he can’t that doesn’t stop him and his family from stuffing their faces with as many fruits and veggies as they can. But unless it’s on the clean 15 list, I won’t touch conventional. And even then, if I rarely buy a clean 15 that’s not organic. Many friends tease me. I’m unphased and feel bad for their kids.

            Thanks for the link, I’ll check it out. My favorite foods have always been grains. I eat about two cups or more (measured dry) of oats daily. I’m sorry to hear about the cadmium. I’ve cut way back on bread because of the proteins formed in dry cooking that are implicated in dementia (igf1?). I feel like the food list just keeps shrinking.

          • Tom Goff

            Yes, my favourite foods have always been grains too – especially cereals. But I am going to have to cut back on the bread – they just add so much junk to wholemeal bread where I live that it’s not even vegetarian (whey, milk and egg would you believe).
            Going back to cruciferous vegetables, I found this 2010 video by Dr G which is relevant.
            http://nutritionfacts.org/video/overdosing-on-greens/

          • mbglife

            I used to eat Ezekiel bread, which I loved because it was so hearty with it’s sprouted grains and course meal. But I had to stop because it always gave me indigestion. The other one that I love is Manna Bread ( mannaorganicbakery.com ). They sprout their grains and then form them into small loaves which are baked, unleavened, at low temperatures that don’t kill the live enzymes. My favorites are their Rye bread and Carrot-Raisin bread. But I’ve decided to reduce even these because it says on the package that the sprouting process converts the complex starches into more simple sugars, like in fruit. But in trying to follow some of Dr McDougall’s advice, we want the starch, not the simpler sugars. :/ I also read that unleavened bread has more lectins. Although, I don’t know the credibility of this statement. And if you try to eliminate lectins you’re going to be left with water.

          • Tom Goff

            Yes. I like sprouted grain bread, wholemeal (unleavened) wraps and European style rye and pumpernickel breads also. Not available where I am now alas.
            Also, the simple sugars aren’t necessarily bad – and McDougall himself is a big fan of the Kempner rice diet which is simple sugars heavy. I also understand that simple sugars including those found in non-starchy vegetables block dietary lectins. Well, that’s always been my excuse for eating salad sandwiches and wraps. And in any case lectins have a number of health benefits.
            Being a cynic at heart, I’ve always regarded the flap about lectins as primarily motivated by the desire of the saturated fat and paleo crowds to distract attention away from the undoubted mortality and other health benefits delivered by grains and legumes. Much like their focus on the weight loss benefits of low carb diets and resolute refusal to mention the fact that these diets increase mortality.
            That’s not to say that I don’t accept that some people are adversely affected by lectins but the observed facts clearly show that people eating diets high in whole grains and legumes are healthier and live longer than people not eating such diets.
            Oh, and re McDougalls advocacy of starch versus other people’s advocacy of greens, you might ind this blog report interesting;
            http://www.theplanteater.com/2012/02/22/day-2-of-the-mcdougall-advanced-study-weekend-part-2/

          • mbglife

            Right, and Weston Price and other meat pushers also talk about how grains carry an acid load. Funny though how in their world meat doesn’t seem to carry one, as it never gets mentioned.

            McDougall mentions that fruit should be limited to 1-6 servings a day because they are simple sugars. He buttons this up when explaining why we are “obligate starch eaters” and goes through why we’re not meat, greens, fat or fruit eaters for the bulk of our energy.

            If you’re interested in trying the manna bread. They ship their bread frozen. You might check it out. They’re in the eastern states. Can’t remember which one. BTW, if you ever want, you can get me directly at mbglife@gmail.com.

          • Thea

            Tom Goff: Great find on that link. At first I wasn’t sure why you linked to that page. It was worth scrolling down to get to the point.

            Just to chat: I was interested in this statement: “As far as DHA, some vegans might not be able to make enough, but [Fuhrman]’s about to conduct a study on this to find out for sure (more on this in another post).” I wasn’t able to find another post or that study on Fuhrman’s site. I could have missed it. But here’s what concerns me greatly about Fuhrman: He makes a lot of money off of selling supplements like DHA. He’s selling one now for $55 for a 60 day supply. His recommendations and products may be perfectly legitimate, but his focus on money making taints his recommendations in my eyes.

          • Tom Goff

            Yes, I know what you mean. I have similar reservations about McDougall who makes money from his study weekends and used to have his own branded foods. The personality cult is what concerns me most though – it’s McDougall this and McDougall that. And people who follow his dietary recommendations are apparently “McDougallers”. Having said that, I think both are sincere but clearly are also not averse to making a buck or ten.
            Despite my reservations about McDougall, I personally eat a starch-based diet. On the other hand I also accept that it’s not for everybody. This blog post is an interesting read …
            http://sitn.hms.harvard.edu/uncategorized/2014/starchy-dangers-in-human-evolution/

          • Thea

            Tom: I’m not exactly sure why, but Fuhrman rubs me wrong way more than McDougall. Fuhrman’s *all* about the money from what I can see. And based on my personal experience, I think he over sells the value his products. McDougall is also supporting himself with his information sharing, but you can find most of that information for free without much trouble. For example, McDougall posts the recipes from the Advanced Weekend for anyone who wants to live that culinary experience for themselves. And many (most/some???) of the talks end up for free on YouTube–as near as I can tell. I believe (though I could be wrong) that McDougall’s forum is free, but Fuhrman’s is not…

            It’s not just the money, but the way Dr. Fuhrman sells his products that rubs me the wrong way. I did a search on Fuhrman DHA and here’s what the browser showed: “Dr. Fuhrman’s DHA Purity is a healthy essential fatty acid. This nutritious supplement improves your child’s intelligence, aids depression and Attention Deficit …” That sounds like way over promising/snake oil to me. But I have some issues with McDougall’s message too. Sometimes his arguments sound to me just like the paleo people’s arguments. It’s not persuasive or as science-based as I would like. And I think that Fuhrman’s extra soft pedaling when it comes to animal products makes him a very good “gateway person” for many people.

            But I agree with you that both are sincere and believe in what they are saying. And I think they both have good things to share with the world. I have learned from both of them. And I’m grateful for McDougall’s starch message as I think it is framed in a way that is productive and will help many people.

          • mbglife

            Hi Tom- I did just a little bit of looking into this today and came across this pubmed summary and it’s completely over my head. Could you please translate? Also, since you mentioned that you have a concern about over consuming grains too, do you have any short points on how to minimize exposure to heavy metals, either by type of grain or region grown?

            As always, thanks!
            Mark
            http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/6492213

          • Tom Goff

            Hi Mark

            I am not a biochemist and this is only an abstract so my interpretation may be way off-base.
            However, it seems to be saying that – using a mice model – both directly ingested cadmium and ingesting the same amount of cadmium in grain seem to have the same effects on cadmium deposition in the liver and kidney (ie both the amounts and forms of cadmium deposited are approx the same). At the low doses typically found in grains, more cadmium is deposited in the kidneys compared to the liver. The last sentence appears to say that the main form of cadmium found in grains is not expressed or created (inducible) by directly ingesting cadmium.

            My main concern with grains is that I eat too much wheat in the form of flour. That’s because I love my bread and wholemeal pasta. Highly processed foods like flours make it easier to absorb calories, minerals etc. and they cost less energy to consume. Also, they are high GI. Healthy breads like wholegrain and sourdough breads additionally seem to increase mineral uptake compared to eg fortified white bread (at least in rats!). On the whole, I think this is a good thing and this is born out by data showing that higher consumption of wholegrains is associated with lower rates of mortality, obesity, CVD, T2D etc.

            Interestingly, for some reason, cadmium uptake from wholewheat flour is less than from white flour even though mineral uptake generally is better. Also, there is some reason to think that organically grown grains have a lower uptake of heavy metals like cadmium. So I prefer to eat organically grown grains that are as coarse (ie least processed as possible). I

            Actually, I eat a fair bit of rice too and that is probably even more problematic for cadmium than wheat. I avoid rice (and other foods) from China – rice from Southern China id heavily contaminated by cadmium. In fact, if you are in the US, American rice may be your safest option with Asian specialty rices from eg Bangladesh, Sri Lanka, Japan etc the worst.

            I also like potatoes but they are a source of cadmium too. In fact, it is pretty hard to avoid if you eat and breathe.

            My only real advice then would be to eat organic, minmally processed foods grown in the US or some other country that you have researched for environmental safety issues. If the food comes from the US, and you know the source of the grain/potato etc, consult the ATSDR searchable map below for cadmium contamination hotspots. And of course Dr G has an excellent article on how to avoid dietary cadmium absorption.

            http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/10655952
            http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2FBF02140666
            https://www.researchgate.net/publication/236738391_Variation_in_Rice_Cadmium_Related_to_Human_Exposure
            http://toxtown.nlm.nih.gov/text_version/chemicals.php?id=63
            http://nutritionfacts.org/2015/10/15/how-to-reduce-your-dietary-cadmium-absorption/
            http://www.atsdr.cdc.gov/phs/phs.asp?id=46&tid=15

          • mbglife

            Thanks, Tom. Ya, as you know I’m with you on the organic. I almost never eat conventional. One of the few times I do is a weekly lunch with my aunt at a Chinese restaurant that has a blend of three kinds of rice: brown, red and black, mixed together. Really good but I worry that it’s likely all from Asian countries. I’ll need to ask, but I’m afraid.

            I see what your saying more clearly on wheat flour. It took me s long time to cut back on for products. I often enjoy Bob’s Red Mill brand farro. Cooks up like rice in about 20 mins and really good. Had a nice nutty flavor to it.

            On the abstract, what you explained is mostly what I was inferring, but mostly I was guessing at it. Man I’d hate to be a lab animal.

            Thanks for your help. Now I’m off to order a couple old compilation books of MAD magazine, one of the fifties and one of the sixties. Should be fun and interesting. ;)

          • Tom Goff

            Thanks Mark. I can get farro at home in Australia (with a bit of effort) but I’m in the Philippines now. The bigger supermarkets here stock local organic black, red and brown rice. Other organic foods are very difficult to find Ordinary wholemeal bread is also available but wholemeal pasta is only imported from Australia and finding that is hit or miss. Still, the evidence does seem to suggest that eating organic when you can is worth it
            http://journals.cambridge.org/action/displayAbstract?fromPage=online&aid=9325471&fileId=S0007114514001366.

          • mbglife

            I’ll check out that link, but I’m curious, can you get Amazon items for a reasonable shipping price there? Amazon sells so many foods that if you can order from there you could be covered.

          • Tom Goff

            Thanks Mark but Amazon shipping costs are pretty high at the best of times and delivery here isn’t always reliable.

            I found iherb.com much better value for imported US items when I was in Australia However, in the Philippines, there tend to be added import charges/duties/fees slapped on to imported overseas items. Plus I tend to eat these things in bulk – oats etc – so they are very expensive to personally import since postage depends on weight and volume. I very occasionally see the odd Bob’s Red Mill items on the shelves here but the prices make my eyes water. So I count myself lucky to have wholemeal bread/pasta and rolled oats here (and I have to travel to get everything except the wholemeal bread).

          • mbglife

            Wow! Well I figured it was a long shot, but I was just curious. Even trying to get decent fresh fruits and veggies in France, not to mention Spain is challenging. So I’m sure it’s a challenge in the islands. Where’s home when you’re not trotting the globe?

          • Tom Goff

            I have a flat/unit/condo in Noosa Heads in Queensland. It’s a resort town so it doesn’t have big city facilities but it’s very pleasant and Ebay Australia works well for things like organic amla and cacao that I can’t get in bulk locally.

          • mbglife

            Really?! From the troll doll avatar I figured you for a mid-century yank. Never guessed you for a kiwi. Well just goes to show you never to make assumptions. I’m in California, a couple miles from Berkeley, across the bay from San Francisco. A California boy through and through. And spoiled because we grow so much great food here and can get the rest (like grains) cheap from other states. Some states are for desserts.

            I went to Manila for a week in the 90s, but I’ve never been to Australia. Several friends have gone multiple times. They all love it. I hate to travel so I’ll likely never go.

            Although it isn’t perfect, it sounds you can get what you need to get by wherever you’re at.

          • Tom Goff

            I’m a Brit originally and now carry 2 passports (UK and AUS). Kiwis are actually New Zealanders not Aussies, though.
            The UK is much better for food choice but Aus isn’t too bad since a lot of different foods are grown locally. Yeah, I make do here in the Philippines – and eat a lot of red apples (imported from Washington. I should eat the local fruits, they’re much cheaper, but I can’t resist apples and oranges.

          • mbglife

            Ya, after I posted the reply I remembered that kiwis are New Zealanders. Never been to England, just Heathrow. I actually can’t eat apples because they give me reflux. But I have one from time to time because I do love them. I love oranges too but now worry about the findings that citrus increases skin cancer risks. That seems odd to me. But, that’s send to be what’s suggested.

          • mbglife

            Tom, I just rewatched the broccoli video, which I hadn’t seen in years. Although it focused on too much sulforahpane, and not Dr McDougall’s concern “Cruciferous vegetables accumulate particularly high concentrations of the toxic bluish element thallium, atomic No. 81” and heavy metals present in the soil, the anecdote in the end alone was worth the viewing. Dr Greger’s almost as much about the humor as the nutrition.

          • mbglife

            I just read the Today article. I had read that one before but forgotten about it. I trust and respect Dr McDougall. I just wish that he’d also cite sources as much as Dr. Greger. It would make some of this sleuthing easier. :/

    • Thea

      I think it is possible that neither is right or wrong but that both approaches can work. I think Dr. Greger’s recommendations have more fruits and veggies compared to Dr. McDougall’s, but I’m not sure the difference is worth worrying about. I don’t know.
      .
      re: “But I’d like to see Dr Greger clarify what he thinks a proper amount of greens and cruciferous veggies is.” I do think we know what Dr. Greger’s current recommendations are since he just published his book and Part 2 includes the Daily Dozen, which includes exactly how much greens Dr. Greger recommends a day… Are you thinking of something else? A different question?

      • mbglife

        Thanks, Thea, I’d forgotten about that chapter. Maybe nervosa I don’t find measurements in cups very helpful for greens. I can make s cup of greens be a lot or a little depending on how I pack it. Anyway, this does give me a helpful order of magnitude: twice a day eat one cup of greens raw and one-half cup cooked. If still like to hear Dr Greger’s thoughts on the metals and toxins.

        Mark G

    • geos

      I think your misunderstanding what your reading. Dr Greger in his app recommends 1 serving of cruciferous veggies and 2 servings of “greens” during the day. These easily fall within the guidelines of the McDougall program. In this regard there is no real difference between them. What you mis-read was when Dr McDougall was talking about people trying to get all/most of their micronutrients by eating a purely vegetable diet. And gave examples of trying to eat 1500 calories worth a day of any one of these vegetables. It does mean taking in more heavy metals and such if you were to do so along with dozens of servings of any one of these vegetables every day to get your needed calories. And if you were to do so you would need to eat all day long AND end up getting far more nutrients than you need such as proteins AND probably still be hungry everyday. Thats not recommended by Dr McDougall or Dr Greger.

      geo

      • mbglife

        Thanks, Geo, I see that from the info that Thea and Tom provided. One of the things that was also tripping me up was past general comments from Dr Greger talking about having a large bowls of salad daily. And there were lots of other general statements that Greger and McDougall also made that I didn’t mention. Still, McDougall recommends much less of greens than Greger (he says eat a side salad) and he also recommends no more than a cup of beans a day because of the protein load. (I’m trying to follow that advice now). Conversely, Greger recommends not adding salt (or just a little). But McDougall says some for flavor is ok. If you look at McDougall “lower sodium” soups at Whole Foods Market and elsewhere, a small carton that is about 16 oz size, is two servings and each serving is about 450mg of sodium. His regular sodium soups are of course much higher. I think that’s way too much. I respect both Doctors and have followed their advice for years (greger) and decades (mcdougall). Thanks again for the note.

        Mark G

  • mbglife

    Has anyone else tried Dr Greger’s advice to sprinkle a little ground mustard seed on broccoli to create the sulforaphane, which might help our brains and eyes, and help reduce rates of cancer. I tried it for the first time the other day and the smell and the taste were so horrible that immediately washed it off the broccoli. I am now using his suggestion to eat a little of the broccoli or kale raw, which should help the cooked broccoli. But I don’t what the ratio needs to be of raw:cooked in order to get the benefits. Any thoughts?
    Mark G

    • george

      mbglife: I can’t stand raw broccoli so I eat gently steamed broccoli with raw broccoli sprouts whose taste, which is mild, I have no problem with. Broccoli sprouts are expensive though. This summer I’m planning to experiment with growing it myself.

      • TheHulk

        Growing Broccoli sprouts is very easy. Just get a sprouter and water it 2-3 times a day. In 4-5 days crop is ready. It’s so easy that I think it’s a sin to buy it from stores.

        • george

          Thank you TheHulk. My concern has been bacteria and fungus growth, given that sprouts are famous for causing food poisoning.

          • TheHulk

            hi George, you just have to soak the seeds in 20 mins in warm salt water, before soaking it overnight in clean water. Just imagine what might be going on with store brought sprouts.

          • Thea

            george: I don’t think all sprouts are equally famous for causing food poisoning. The main problem is alfalfa sprouts. Other sprouts, especially broccoli, appear to be pretty safe, at least according this page: http://nutritionfacts.org/questions/are-homegrown-alfalfa-sprouts-safe/

    • Vege-tater

      First I heard about the mustard seed, but since I grew a lot of mustard, yesterday I steamed up a big pot of greens and seasoned it with a bit of vinegar with mustard powder in it. I thought it would be overkill, but not bad. I’m wondering now about the nutritional benefits of mustard sprouts, something I love in my sprout mixes, and why I had all those seeds in the first place!

  • Matthew Smith

    I would suggest pumpkin seeds or another source of phosphorus.

  • Matthew Smith

    Tomatoes are so healthy!

  • Linda

    I have been in a really cranky mood lately and was doing research on legumes contributing to shaking and found this article: http://journals.cambridge.org/action/displayAbstract?fromPage=online&aid=7825322&fileId=S1368980009992059

    • guest

      This is just more Paleo propaganda to diss beans. The study in the link was a questioner survey done in the 70s asking how many times a week you eat legumes. There is no end to the low-carbers coming here to post this type of junk science about vegan staples like beans and potatoes. Beans are not bad and certainly don’t cause depression. Oh look, time for some morning bacon grease coffee. yummha. not!

      • Linda

        Thanks for your reply, but I’m really trying to figure this out. Lol, bacon grease coffee is not appealing. When I did a W30 (Paleo type diet) my cholesterol went down 20 points. Now, eating WFPB, it is back up to 247. My doc wants me to get my LDL cholesterol under 130 through diet. I thought the vegetarian/vegan thing would work, but it appears to be going the wrong way. Any suggestions?

        • Tom Goff

          W30 sounds a little extreme
          https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/W30

        • guest

          Sorry, but I don’t believe you. That’s impossible. Your cholesterol did not go down 20 points eating a fat based diet and it did not go up to 247 eating plants. You are not telling the truth. You are being disingenuous probably because you are a low carb troll. If you REALLY ate a plant based diet correctly your cholesterol would plummet in weeks. Mine dropped 150 points the first month. Don’t you have better things to do than come here and post negative things about beans and plants? Please stop, your agenda is transparent.

          • Thea

            guest: Name calling is not allowed on this site. There is no reason to pull out the “t” word here. Linda is sharing her story. If you don’t like it, don’t read her posts. For the full rules for posting on this site, please review the FAQ page linked to at the bottom of this page.

            Note: I am speaking as a moderator for this site.

          • Linda

            Um, yes, it did. Perhaps I’m not eating a plant based diet correctly, but I’m not sure what I could do differently. I’ve been using Dr. Greger’s Daily Dozen app and I’d really like it to work for me because I like animals and the thought of what they go through saddens me. I don’t believe I posted anything negative about plants. I plan to eat lots of fruits and vegetables and whole grains. Beans do not agree with me and I am going to leave them off my plate.

          • HeidiH

            Linda, have you looked at Dr. Esselstyn’s work? He even has his cardiac patients avoiding nuts, seeds, fatty vegetables like avocado and olives as well as and all oils. My son did a repeat of this experiment for his science project one year. He had 6 people follow the diet and it did cut their cholesterol by 20 points in 6 weeks. Impressive. I do know that my own cholesterol jumped 30 points in 2 years when I was not strictly eating a WFPBD. I was eating some chocolate here, a cookie there and putting soy based butter-like product on toast. I was shocked how much it made my lipid numbers jump..

    • Tom Goff

      Well, this research only found an association between legume consumption and SDM in pre-menopausal women. There was no association seen in post-menopausal women or men. And it seems to be an association not found in other studies which suggests there may be a third variable at work here (if it’s not just a chance finding in the first place). It’s also anomalous in that legumes and other high fibre whole plant foods are widely (and popularly) regarded as protective against depression
      https://bmcmedicine.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/1741-7015-11-200
      http://thefoodevolution.com/top-4-good-mood-foods/

      On the other hand “Women are at higher risk throughout their reproductive lives than are men for major depression.”
      http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16292022
      so there may just possibly be a relationship since legumes can effect estrogen
      https://bmcmedicine.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/1741-7015-11-200
      http://mentalhealthdaily.com/2015/04/08/20-foods-high-in-estrogen-phytoestrogens/

      Perhaps eating foods high in phytoestrogens overstimulates estrogen production in premenopausal women, or premenopausal women with low estrogen “crave” high phytoestrogen foods such as beans. Which is “cause” and which is “effect” … or perhaps it is just a chance association? I don’t know. What i do know is that eating legumes is the most important dietary predictor survival in older people ..
      http://apjcn.nhri.org.tw/server/APJCN/13/2/217.pdf

  • Devin Wiesner

    Robert, my standard smoothie recipe consists of the following organic ingredients: flax seed, fenugreek seed, amla powder, raw turmeric, raw ginger, red cabbage leaves, milk thistle seed, cherries, blueberries, raspberries, blackberries, mango, strawberries and a smidgen of white or green tea leaves and hibiscus leaves. As Dr. Greger mentioned in a previous video, this type of drink can be a bit rough on the teeth, so I rinse right after with water of tea.

  • vegank

    Last month I had a week when my(and family’s) fruit & vegetable consumption went down quite a bit due to schedules, and was relying on refined carbs, rice etc. After 4 years of no sickness we were sick with a cold for about 2 weeks for the first time.
    Seeing the graph in this video therefore did not surprise me but was more of a confirmation of how quickly things can turn if you’re not
    careful. I always appreciate the visual aid provided in the videos, makes it much easier to digest all the information .

    • HeidiH

      We have had a similar experience. Coughs abounded in our house after a 2 week trip (we were coming from abroad) Christmas trip to my parents who follow the SAD. We were lucky to get a few servings of fruits and veggies a day. We did not do enough meal planning before our trip and with the family coming and going visiting family and friends, I was not in control of the diets of the family. I now realized that an ounce of prevention really does beat out a pound of cure. The cough in our teenage son is still not completely better. I can no longer boast that we have only had 10 sick days in 6 years. Will have to start the meter over and do better on our WFPBD.

      • vegank

        This year I am trialing an analogue system to ensure the same mistake isn’t made this year, it may not be for everyone but it forces you to review your /family’s habit daily. In this link it is about the 18th post (october habit tracker).
        It seems that for us the temporary poor nutrition and the “sick season” coincided …a short and sharp lesson.
        http://www.bohoberry.com/bullet-journal-hacks/

    • JS Baker

      Thanks for the cautionary tale. It is a reminder to stick with the ‘daily dozen’ every day. During the last 12 months I have had no colds (or any illness) while the people around me at work, social groups, and my wife have all had the “usual” number of colds. I am celebrating 3 years eating WFPB diet (thanks to Dr. Greger, the NF volunteers, and all the generous commentators). In the years prior to WFPB eating I usually caught 2-3 colds per year, each one lasting the typical 7-10 days. During my first and second year WFPB I had only one cold each year and each one lasting only 4 days. I thought that was pretty good, until this past year with ZERO colds. I’m inspired to keep this streak going. NF videos and comments really help to reinforce my healthy eating intentions.

    • Sam

      Same here. During winter, here in the northern US, raw greens don’t settle with my stomach (slightly cooked, a bit better. but still, so more carbs. As a consequence, no energy. I recently had changes in my schedule too and no veggies for a couple of months, very limited, yes, caught a cold.

  • luaV_19

    Hi Dr.Greger, i was wondering if could answer this question. A lot of videos on your website shows that plant based eaters have a much stronger immune system, i myself dont get sick like, never! i know some vegans that have strong immune function as well, but some of this vegans also have a low white blood cell count on their blood test (most are on the normal range, but some are below it). I did some research and i appears that vegans have less inflammation on their body, so their white blood cells dont have to fight all the time.Smokers have high white blood cell on their blood test as well, i assumed it was inflammation. SO, is this true? could you explain this?: http://jacknorrisrd.com/white-blood-cells-in-vegans/

    • luaV_19

      what do i need to do to have a question answered by one of the doctors here? REALLY???? everybody ignores all of my questions

      • Thea

        luaV_19: It is not a matter of ignoring your questions. The comments area is run by volunteers and there literally is not enough volunteer hours to answer every question. Many questions go unanswered. You are not being singled out. Another reason a question may go unanswered is that the answer isn’t known. Or there may be some other reason such as someone asking a medical question which can not properly be answered over the internet. As I said, many questions go unanswered. There is no understanding that people are owed answers here. If you discover the answer at some point, let us know. There’s a chance that someone else will be interested too. Good luck.

  • Darryl

    Curious about how much glucobrassicin (precursor to AHR ligands I3C & DIM) your favorite cruciferous vegetable has? Try my new Google spreadsheet of known glucosinolate contents for cruciferous vegetables. Watercress remains a glaring omission, but I haven’t encountered a good source after much effort.

    • Thea

      So cool! How generous of you to share!

    • The watercress data is in this EPIC study. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19295191 Unfortunately, it’s not available for free (or to be precise, it wasn’t the last time I checked). Feel free to email me for a copy. hsugarmill@sympatico.ca

      • Darryl

        Would you believe that despite this being my main data source, I had no idea that table continued on to the next page? Currently editing.

        • Yes, I would believe. You consume a wealth of information and do a wonderful job of teaching me–and others–how to digest it. Thanks for all you do.

  • Really appreciate your work and videos. It would be nice though if the citations for the studies mentioned are available someplace. Thanks again.

    • Thea

      Mark Kaylor: To the right of each video-of-the-day is a button which say “sources cited”. After you click that button, look in the area under the video. The citations will have replaced the doctor’s note. You wish and you shall receive. :-)

  • Healthnut Okie

    Can a healthy person consume to many brussel sprouts on a daily bases? I eat about 20 brussel sprouts for lunch, cooked in the skillet on low/med in a tablespoon of oil. No bloating or gas, just curious, as I have heard of “overdosing on veggies” which sounds like total nonsense to me.

  • Sam

    Doctor, I find nightshade family of vegetables is questionable by and for some people.

    Calcify soft tissue.
    An Apparent Relation of Nightshades (Solanaceae) to Arthritis
    http://noarthritis.com/research.htm

    “Nightshades, in those with this sensitivity, have been associated with symptoms like stomach discomfort, digestive difficulties, joint pain, and muscle tremors.”
    http://www.marksdailyapple.com/nightshades/

    “Potato glycoalkaloids adversely affect intestinal permeability and aggravate inflammatory bowel disease.”http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12479649

    Kinetics and retention of solanidine in man.
    “These data show that solanidine is absorbed from the diet and stored in
    the body for prolonged periods of time. We suggest that at times of
    increased metabolic stress (pregnancy, starvation, debilitating
    illness), stored solanidine might be mobilized from innocuous loci with
    deleterious effects.”
    http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.3109/00498258209052469

    The effects of capsaicin on reflux, gastric emptying and dyspepsia.
    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/10632656

    Garrett L. Smith, N.M.D, The Inflammatory Effect of Nightshades; Well Being Journal, May/June 2011 p. 26-33.

  • Pavla Doe

    Dr. Greger, could you please also do a video on thyroid and cruciferous vegetables? I have Hashimoto’s thyroiditis and have been told not to eat cruciferous vegetables. Could you please help to find out if eating those would worsen my condition or is it still beneficial. I love cruciferous vegetables, so i still eat it, but I am not sure if I am doing any good to myself. I would very much appreciate either your answer or a video on hypothyroidism problem. Many thanks for all this great information. I love your channel and website.

  • Heather Kaszuba

    Thank you Dr. Greger (and your whole team) for your wonderful videos. My husband and I love them. They’re very helpful. In all your mounds of research, if you see anything specific about the immunity benefits of Echinacea, I’d really appreciate knowing what the balance of evidence says about it. Thanks.