Benefits of Blueberries for Mood & Mobility

Benefits of Blueberries for Mood & Mobility
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Randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trials of… blueberries!

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Below is an approximation of this video’s audio content. To see any graphs, charts, graphics, images, and quotes to which Dr. Greger may be referring, watch the above video.

The consumption of berries can enhance “beneficial signaling in the brain.” “Plant foods…are our primary source of…antioxidant and anti-inflammatory compounds,” but some plant foods may be better than others. As I’ve explored before, one cup of blueberries a day can improve cognition among older adults, as shown in this randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial. And the same thing in kids after just a single meal of blueberries; though two cups may work better than one.

That single hit of berries may also improve mood. A “double-blind, placebo-controlled, crossover study” in which kids are asked a series of questions. Are you very slightly, or not at all, a little, moderately, quite a bit, or extremely interested, excited, strong, etc. Before and after drinking the placebo, no significant change, but two hours after consuming about two cups of blueberries, their positive mood scores significantly improved. They felt more enthusiastic, alert, inspired, attentive—that kind of thing. That was in the young adults, ages 18 through 21; same thing in seven- to 10-year-old children. Some new dangerous mood-enhancing drug or Ritalin? No, blueberries—and just after a single meal.

Now blueberries can’t do everything. Although a cup of berries certainly appears to improve brain function… “[n]o improvement in [walking] or balance was observed.” Maybe if you tried two cups of blueberries a day? Let’s do it!

Would “6 weeks of…two cups of frozen blueberries a day affect…[the] functional mobility in…adults” over age 60? Let’s find out. How awesome is it that this study was ever done in the first place? Randomized to blueberries or carrot juice as a control, measuring things like walking a plank, seeing if you can maintain your balance along a narrow path.

“Two bright yellow ropes on the floor outlined the narrow path, and participants were instructed to walk [down] within the roped path.” And the blueberries beat out the carrot juice; “significant improvements,” suggesting “blueberry supplementation may provide an effective countermeasure to age-related declines in functional mobility.” And looking back, they were thinking maybe they should have used something like cucumber as a control, since the carrots may have offered some benefit as well, making the blueberry results even more impressive. “Overall, this study demonstrates the need for greater exploration of blueberry supplementation as a nonpharmacologic countermeasure to the public health issue of age-related declines in…[independence].” Or to use the pun version: “Dietary interventions with [phytonutrient]-rich foods, such as blueberries, present a potentially fruitful strategy for combating some of the deleterious effects of age-related neurodegeneration.”

Please consider volunteering to help out on the site.

Image credit: Jess Watters via Unsplash. Image has been modified.

Motion graphics by Avocado Video.

Below is an approximation of this video’s audio content. To see any graphs, charts, graphics, images, and quotes to which Dr. Greger may be referring, watch the above video.

The consumption of berries can enhance “beneficial signaling in the brain.” “Plant foods…are our primary source of…antioxidant and anti-inflammatory compounds,” but some plant foods may be better than others. As I’ve explored before, one cup of blueberries a day can improve cognition among older adults, as shown in this randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial. And the same thing in kids after just a single meal of blueberries; though two cups may work better than one.

That single hit of berries may also improve mood. A “double-blind, placebo-controlled, crossover study” in which kids are asked a series of questions. Are you very slightly, or not at all, a little, moderately, quite a bit, or extremely interested, excited, strong, etc. Before and after drinking the placebo, no significant change, but two hours after consuming about two cups of blueberries, their positive mood scores significantly improved. They felt more enthusiastic, alert, inspired, attentive—that kind of thing. That was in the young adults, ages 18 through 21; same thing in seven- to 10-year-old children. Some new dangerous mood-enhancing drug or Ritalin? No, blueberries—and just after a single meal.

Now blueberries can’t do everything. Although a cup of berries certainly appears to improve brain function… “[n]o improvement in [walking] or balance was observed.” Maybe if you tried two cups of blueberries a day? Let’s do it!

Would “6 weeks of…two cups of frozen blueberries a day affect…[the] functional mobility in…adults” over age 60? Let’s find out. How awesome is it that this study was ever done in the first place? Randomized to blueberries or carrot juice as a control, measuring things like walking a plank, seeing if you can maintain your balance along a narrow path.

“Two bright yellow ropes on the floor outlined the narrow path, and participants were instructed to walk [down] within the roped path.” And the blueberries beat out the carrot juice; “significant improvements,” suggesting “blueberry supplementation may provide an effective countermeasure to age-related declines in functional mobility.” And looking back, they were thinking maybe they should have used something like cucumber as a control, since the carrots may have offered some benefit as well, making the blueberry results even more impressive. “Overall, this study demonstrates the need for greater exploration of blueberry supplementation as a nonpharmacologic countermeasure to the public health issue of age-related declines in…[independence].” Or to use the pun version: “Dietary interventions with [phytonutrient]-rich foods, such as blueberries, present a potentially fruitful strategy for combating some of the deleterious effects of age-related neurodegeneration.”

Please consider volunteering to help out on the site.

Image credit: Jess Watters via Unsplash. Image has been modified.

Motion graphics by Avocado Video.

112 responses to “Benefits of Blueberries for Mood & Mobility

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    1. Thanks for your question. The anthocyanin in blueberry polyphenol content is not affected by the process of drying. In this study it indicates that the frozen samples did not show any significant decrease in anthocyanin level during three months of storage. Measurement of the antioxidant activity of anthocyanin extracts from blueberries showed there was no significant difference between fresh, dried, and frozen blueberries.

      The Change of Total Anthocyanins in Blueberries and Their Antioxidant Effect After Drying and Freezing

      1. Spring03, so why in the video Joe posted, does it show such a drastic decrease in antioxidants in the dried blueberries? Is that accounting for loss of other antioxidants while the anthocyanin levels remain the same?

    2. I go a step further and mix twelve spices, five berries, two medicinal mushrooms, and four herbs together. I consume it twice a day.

      How? I buy all in powder form. I swirl them into green tea / hibiscus kombucha along with a healthy squirt of hemp seed oil.

      Yum Yum Yum! No free radicals make it out alive.

    3. I add water to a 3 or 4 day jar of oatmeal and eat each daily serving with frozen wild blueberries. Today I was feeling adventurous and added a couple of scoops of coffee mocha ice cream and a dash of blueberry juice. That was my lunch and I must say I enjoyed it more than without the ice cream. ‘-)

    1. Well the study was in vitro not on humans….so there is that.
      My personal observation is however, few comparatively are drinking soy milk anymore. It is still there on the shelf, but there are probably five or more variants of almonds milk with this or that added to them for one or two types of soy. And now flax milk seems to be making a charge. Even my local Walmart in a rural area has that.

      I assume soy is more for the more traditional, just lactose intolerant person, who may use that opposed to regular milk. The healthy eating crowd I think are going for the other things nowadays. As we don’t want, most of us to overdose I soy, I think probably that is a good thing.
      Keep in mind that video is like 2010. A lot has changed in 8 years. Flax milk was really not even around, not to mention almond and coconut blends, and other things. Sweetened nonsweetened, the market has much variance now.

      1. Is something as overconsumption of soy products a real thing? Wouldn’t this fall into the catergory of the Okinawans eating like 80% of calories from sweet potatoes? Even if there are limits, soymilk only has about 6 to 8% soybeans per portion and the rest is just plain water. Seems pretty safe. I do eat other soy products, edamame beans for that crazy tastefull buckwheat pasta recipe from how not to die and tofy, tempeh. Sometimes some soy protein powder when doing resistance training. (sorry T Collin Campbell, it’s really not much powder though).

        1. Sure I agree. But if one is already eating a lot of soy, why would you add some more?
          It is just there is so many varieties now of the milks. I eat plenty of soy myself and am not worried about any high limit. I think it is way overdone.
          Now if I did not eat any soy I probably would drink soy milk for benefit however slight.

        2. Netgogate

          Pretty sure it was 15 servings which undid all the benefit from consuming soy and turned on the IGF-1.

          Also, Soy protein powder might be one to watch out for.

          Though soy seems to be getting an internet makeover or Google decided that I am pro-soy and gave me all the pro-soy articles. Seems like last time I looked it up, the processed soy and Soy Isolates had negative articles versus this time, none of the articles put down the TVP and vegetarian patties or the salted soy.

          I need to photograph the articles because this is how I get confused. I swear there were ones against salted soy and processed soy and soy protein shakes and now I went from page to page and it was all positive. Examining my head. Nope, pretty sure I really did read those things.

          1. ” Google decide you are ” … Good one. LMAO. Run the extension from andnauseam.io to block you from seeing ads while clicking on them in the background and discarding the results. Fill their databases with garbage. You can be the “GI” in GIGO!

            It is a resistance method so threatening to Google’s business model that they banned it from the Chrome store. You have to get it from the developer’s site directly.

            It is funny once in a while to look at the ads that were clicked on my behalf and laugh. I started using it 2 years ago and I guess I’m very interested in Fords and VWs. LOL.

        3. I use soy as a post-workout drink too on occasion, I just open up a can of my black soy beans, blend them in some water and drink them lol. It’s actually really refreshing, plain to taste but good and satiating .

        4. Netogate, I make my own soy milk at home, and I don’t filter it, so we consume the whole soybean. (I call it unfiltered soy milk, or cooked ground soybean sludge.) We put it on cereal or use it for baking (e.g., sourdough whole grain waffles). I calculated that we eat about 0.4 oz per serving, more than 6-8% soybeans per portion, I think (i’ll check this out). I stopped filtering it when I got tired of trying to use the filtrate — and I hate to throw it out, and not consume the whole soybean.

          However, to make soy yogurt (all the commercial soy yogurt is inedible, with lots of additives), I use a commercial soy milk with 2 ingredients: water and organic soybeans. My home made unfiltered soy milk doesn’t work for yogurt.

      2. Ron,

        You are right that it is “hip” to be anti-soy and people drink other things to avoid having lectures by the “soy police” but I am not sure whether almond milk and coconut milk and flax milk have been tested to not mess up the antioxidant value of green tea, too.

        I do suspect that the blueberry drink in used in one of the studies covered probably had something like a milk or faux milk type of product. Doubt they just used water. So, the milk type product didn’t sap all of the strength out of the blueberry.

        So probably I could add the blueberries to my soy green tea latte and maybe it would be like the Magic E restoring the power to the vowels so they can stand up for themselves and say their own names. Yes, I have been hanging out with a young person.

        https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=c3oA4wfUBak

      3. I think a lot of health conscious people still drink soy milk. I only use soy milk in savory recipes like soup. I don’t worry about overdoing soy as it’s pointed out that to get the IGF1 spikes you’d have to consume ridiculous amounts each day, but soy has unique benefits so I purposefully try to incorporate it into my diet on a weekly basis. But I am desperate for Barb’s question to be answered! As ron pointed out, it was in vitro so that is something to think about as a petri dish is a far cry from the intricate process of digestion. But I’m still separating my soy from berries and I’d prefer not to or not to worry about it, same with tea and cacao. If it turns out it does interfere, fine, but I don’t want to worry about it unnecessarily especially since I would love to mix berries with my soy smoothies! And I’ve seen a lot of people here say they use soy milk and berries together.
        Isn’t Dr. Greger going to be coming out with a video on that? I thought that was stated, but when?

    2. Soy milk can be an integral part of a plant based diet designed to lower cholesterol as in the portfolio diet which was featured in a few of Dr G’s videos.

      https://andytherd.com/2015/12/29/made-in-canada-revisiting-dr-jenkins-and-his-portfolio-diet-for-lowering-cholesterol/

      And no, this study was with people ingesting milk or soy protein, and both blocked the antioxidants in green tea. I would think the same is true for blueberries on our cereal or oatmeal.

      https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22366739

      This forum is in desperate need of moderation on a full time basis imo.

      1. Well from the transcript on Dr Gregers video you linked…”Now this was in vitro, in a Petri dish. We don’t know if this translates into actual people, but until we do know more, I encourage folks to drink their tea straight. And, as I’ve noted in previous volumes, green tea is healthier than black.”

        So in vitro may not translate. Tannic acid in teas are bound by dairy milk and I would assume soy as well. But that is a good thing as it tends us to stomach cancers.

        1. Oh I see your point. In the second link you reference another study on galloylated catechins with three different substances affected assimilation.
          So I don’t know…………… can we assume galloylated catechins and polyphenols have the same assimilation characteristics?

      2. Barb,

        If you go to Dr. McDougall’s site, they will ban you if you don’t talk about everything from the McDougall perspective and I am not putting them down for that. They have paid staff who dedicate their time to weeding out every little comment on their boards and that is how they maintain order, but not for profit sites don’t tend to have paid staff for that and once you start micromanaging the comments, you lose the free flow of ideas and you lose discussion and debates. I do post to Dr. McDougall’s site, but it is polite and a little bit boring, but it is useful if you are there trying to figure out the McDougall plan and that is why they do it.

        Dr. Greger is trying to write a book and translate another one into every language possible and he has a team of people reading the 100,000 nutrition posts every year and making videos and blog entries and unless people are abusive to each other at too high a level, this site will probably lean toward free flow of ideas and sometimes vigorous debate.

        He has other sites, which are less conversational. You can go to his Facebook, YouTube or Care2 sites and follow him on Twitter or watch his interviews on other channels. Seems like if you don’t like one format, there are others and it might be that people need to do a Goldilocks and the three bears type of process until they find which community is just right for them. I like this one better than the others, but like the YouTube Channel, too. I don’t like Facebook and that has nothing to do with Dr. Greger’s Facebook Account. I did look at Facebook and it felt like I got a lot more videos, but that was less personal. That was like going to a Dr. Greger restaurant chain and this is like going to Dr. Greger’s house for a meal. I can’t believe it isn’t thousands of people flooding this site. It might be that someday.

        1. What I know about moderating things is that people don’t make comments anymore.

          If Dr. Greger got rid of all of his hijackers, he wouldn’t have to read so many comments.

          But there would be days when he probably wouldn’t read many comments at all and he encouraged people to share what they are interested in so that he can figure out how best to serve his community.

          I genuinely appreciate that.

          I read a lottttttttttttttttttttttttttttttttttttttttttttttt of websites on every single topic and most of those websites don’t have any comments at all. More sites have no comments than sites which have 100.

          There are times when sites get results closer to what you probably want. I can go to sites like Plant-Based Science London and see that Dr. Greger’s talk on oatmeal had over two million six hundred views and has two thousand eight hundred comments – and that is a genuine mystery of the internet. Oatmeal is the one which generated deep discussion. But if you read the comments they are all, “I ate oatmeal yesterday” “I eat oatmeal with blueberries” “I was afraid that he was going to say that oatmeal was bad for you” “Oatmeal spikes my blood sugar”

          Not putting that level of conversation down. It just would be me only showing up if he happened to hit on a food which I was passionate about. Oatmeal wouldn’t have been it for me.

          1. Laughing, because I watched the oatmeal video just to see why it had so many views and it is either that people like oatmeal or because they are perplexed that oatmeal was the top video and went to see why like I did.

        2. “If you go to Dr. McDougall’s site, they will ban you if you don’t talk about everything from the McDougall perspective ”

          THAT’S good to know! (Not that I ever hang out there.)

          1. Yes, it would have been better to know it before I got banned the first 5 seconds I was there. They only banned me for a week. Not sure whether they have a “banned for life” policy.

              1. LOL!

                That might do it!

                No, I went there and someone had been trying things for Cancer and they were feeling afraid and I posted probably 20 links to Dr Greger’s videos.

                The whole point was that Dr McDougall has his own videos and his own dietary concepts and the board is solely for examining those.

                I have watched Dr McDougall debate Dr Fuhrman for instance and they disagree on things and Dr McDougall would gladly debate him at a conference, but he doesn’t allow that same debate on his discussion boards.

                That being said, his introductory videos talk about him having opposing viewpoint people come to discuss things at his conferences and that sets people like me up.

                His videos act like he is open to discussion and even debate, which I was looking forward to being part of that, but they don’t allow debate or discussion only McDougall on their boards.

                They set me up!

                  1. “….and I posted probably 20 links to Dr Greger’s videos.”

                    OMG, that would DEFINITELY do it!

                    It’s a “vegan jungle” out there. :-)

      3. Barb, thanks for the link. I would also like to know if other plant milks do the same with tea… I hope and suspect not. I love making almond or hemp matcha milk! Sooo good. Anyways, thanks for posting this question, I’ve been wanting to know this since I saw his first video on green tea and soy milk and I think considering soy, berries, cocoa/cacao, tea, etc. are all such big parts of a WFPB diet for many of us, that this is a subject that deserves some urgency.

      1. Yes, I make porridge with water, then splash some soy milk (or almond milk etc) on top of it when it’s in the bowl. Hijacker, did you see the link Darryl provided? I went to the free text and found Table 1 of the top 100 foods for polyphenols. Very handy.. blueberries are ok, but many foods we eat frequently if not daily, are high on the list. Spices, herbs, olives !, blackberries, all kinds of familiar foods are loaded with polyphenols. So basically, it probably doesnt matter if soy milk cancels out the blueberries or the green tea,.. eating polyphenol rich foods all day means I won’t be missing much over the course of the day.
        Thanks Darryl!

        1. I don’t bother with plant milk at all on my porridge although I do ocasionally use some oatmilk to cut my black tea if it is a particularly strong brew.

          Yes,Barb, Darryl’s is a great link. Blackcurrants seem to be a better option than blueberries when it comes to berries although they are perhaps even harder and more expensive to obtain where I am currently living. As a result, I usually just eat grapes or dried goji and wolfberries instead (picked them up on an overseas trip).with my porridge.

  1. I often wonder…I rarely eat like 2 cups of blueberries at one sitting. Depending on time of year and availability the things can be way expensive. In any event just seems I am overdoing it, if I did. Problem is….how much content can one consume in a morning smoothie?
    Over a day or so, sure.

    But my wondering is…..how much affect are we getting from mixing in things, like a bit of blueberries, maybe some cranberries, kale, amla, and this and that thrown in together. As I assume most of us do in a smoothie.
    Stands to my reason, we would get a potentiated effect, but really I don’t know as science shows that excepting perhaps if one counted up antioxidants.

    I have no choice really, as I am not going to just eat blueberries, and chuck the lot for them, eating only so much at one sitting.
    But I have wondered at that.

      1. Yes you are right, Dr Greger mentions that in his last line in this video. It is apparently the polyphenols. So the blueberry thing may be a bit overdone. I am already mixing in a bunch of those other things. Most as opposed to some perhaps?

      2. Darryl, haven’t read the study so I don’t know if they chose blueberries for the high pterostilbene content rather than simply anti-oxidant properties.

        Pterostilbene is very high in blueberries and works similarly to resveratrol… one of the differences being the pterostilbene has 80% bioavailability where resveratrol is only 20%… more at the link below:

        https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3649683/

    1. Ron,

      I was thinking the same thing about the expense.

      Especially for organic.

      My mind was picturing the little packages of blueberries I get and was wondering if one package is 2 cups.

      I found out with my dog’s cancer that it all costs way too much.

      I had a friend who I haven’t seen in a while contact me and she is going through mirror things to what I am going through. All of her neighbors are fleeing our state because taxes and living expenses are too high. The wealthy people in my family also are fleeing it to get away from taxes. I probably am not going to be seeing my father almost ever starting soon. He has been a short time in Florida snowbird for several years but he bought a place to get away from the taxes up here. Both of us had a very long list of people doing that and we both also had a very long list of people in hardship and sickness.

      I had a politician stop by my house and ask what was on my mind and I told him about the people leaving the State and going homeless and how taxes are already a burden, which he plans to raise and he said that “But you get services like excellent medical care and hospitals” and I laughed that he chose that to try to sell me why the high taxes are worth it. Every relative I have who went to the state hospital over the past two years has sworn to never go back again. Someone my friend knows got a medical alert bracelet and it said, “In case of emergency, don’t take me to this hospital” The problem is that my mother had been in another hospital, which forced morphine on her while she was crying out for them not to give it and my step-mother had a stroke last year and went in with stroke symptoms, but it took a third hospital over a week to check for stroke. They didn’t check for it until after announcing they would be releasing her and then they said, “Oops, we never checked for a stroke.” and my father’s friend ended up with an amputation because a different hospital set his foot wrong and my sister-in-law’s relative had a 4th hospital misdiagnose her and it caused problems and back to the state hospital, my grandmother’s records ended up being written like “the telephone game” where every 5 minutes a new group of people would come in and they would ask the questions to her or whoever happened to be standing near her bed and when she needed a procedure, I spoke with the anesthesiologist and she said, “Unfortunately, half of the things in the chart aren’t real and I already knew that. I think one of the doctors actually had something like dementia and he changed her diagnosis and then later someone else took over and the diagnosis changed for a 3rd time and when I brought my grandmother there trying to learn how they wanted me to manage her congestive heart failure and lung issues, the ER offered to admit her so that I could learn and an intern saw me in the cafeteria and fought to not allow my grandmother to be admitted anymore and that was before they tried to kill her.

      Yes, my tax money hard at work.

      1. The internist or whatever you call her said about the ER doctor, “ER doctors have limited value. They know some things.” But he was the one who told me that I had to figure out her Lasix every day and adjust the dosage based on what I was seeing. He told me how to figure it out.

        She was like the character from the show House who dated House’s friend.

        All I remember was that my grandmother was holding my hands and looking in my eyes and smiling sweetly and we were having a deeply sweet, intimate moment and she came in like a bull in a china shop and told me in the most threatening ways that she was going to die soon, but it was a graphic threatening way. Not one second of bedside manner and she didn’t even look at my grandmother who never stopped looking at me. All of them were like, “You are going to have to take her home and you won’t be able to have powerful oxygen and you are going to have to put the nasal cannula in her mouth and she is going to gasp for air and you are going to have to put a pick line in her neck and it is going to be painful and you need to let her die. What are your goals? Why would you selfishly allow this woman to live?

        That was the very first time anyone mentioned death about my grandmother and she got the specialists to drop my grandmother and got the ER doctor to say, “I could fight to get her admitted if you want it but they are asking me not to.” and some other nurse came huffing into the room and said, “She is 92 years old and it is terrible that you are keeping her alive” (by using antibiotics when she needed it.)

        When my mother said that she wasn’t in pain and wanted to try to stay alive, the nurses asked my grandmother if we had abused my mother and said it to us and my mother woke up from a coma and talked about how mean-spirited they were. They were not nice is what my nice mother said and so did my grandmother. Though, when she saw one Hallmark Christmas movie, where someone was pronounced dead she cried out, “No, I am not dead yet!”

        Yes, hospitals are traumatizing to me and to my relatives and to my friend who called and I ended up talking to her about WFPB.

        She is trying to save some of her elderly neighbors from being medical expensed out of their houses.

        I am hoping WFPB can help.

        1. Back to John’s site.

          The discussion board is solely for discussing the McDougall program.

          They were polite enough in their blackballing and that is how they moderate to control things so people who need their program won’t get confused.

          Dr. Greger could do that here.

          He could do a “How Not to Die” site and a “How Not to Diet” site and maybe have someone from his staff moderate it, but it is a use of time and money.

          I saw a quote from Dr. Greger yesterday where he said that he felt like there wasn’t enough time to get everything done.

          If I could translate funny technical books into foreign languages, I could be doing that all night long and at least it would be productive insomnia.

          1. Thinking about hospitals is how I ended up thinking about John’s site. He got a tattoo threatening to sue and I am sure there are people who think that he is paranoid, but I am not one of them.

  2. For the FWIW file, here is one healthy senior guy’s 4X weekly blueberry regimen.
    Into a large bowl dump:
    1 unmeasured pour (but lots) of frozen blueberries
    1/2 cup frozen fresh cranberries (for its ursolic acid)
    1 freshly squeezed lime
    1 full teaspoon of black raspberry powder
    1 teaspoon fresh ground cardamom
    1/4 tsp freshly ground black pepper
    1/4 tsp freshly ground cloves
    1/4 tsp Ceylon (aka true) cinnamon powder
    1/2 tsp stevia powder
    POM Pomegranate juice drowning it all.
    Mix well, and don’t forget to lick the bowl clean.

    1. Thank you, I would like to try this but not sure where to buy black raspberry powder. Also wondering what the sugar level is jn POM juice.

      1. Hi Sande – Thanks for your question! The total sugar content of POM juice is about 32 grams per 8 oz serving. To pack in some fiber (not found in the juice) I’d suggest using whole pomegranate arils instead! (1/2 cup arils = about 3.5 grams fiber and 12 grams sugar). Also, a quick search for black raspberry powder shows berrihealth.com may be one place to purchase it.

        Hope this helps!

        Janelle RD – Registered Dietitian & Health Support Volunteer

        1. I use a special wide straw…..Interestingly (perhaps) some Asians do eat with their hands not using implements. Tibetans will do that when amongst only other Tibetans for instance.
          I am strictly a implement person with the exception of corn on the cob and fruits. Habit I guess.

  3. **Off topic : About the daily dozen**

    On closer look at the daily dozen app and by using the metric system option, I saw that when you count up all the grams of different vegetables that you have to eat per day, it comes about 300 grams of vegetables in total.

    You now, that is not that much, many of us are probably getting way more then that?!

    The nutritional recommendations in Belgium, where I live, also has the total daily recommended intake of vegetables at 300 grams. That is regardless wether I’m eating a plant based or an animal based diet. (Is that a correct word, animal based diet? A “carnivorous diet” would sound so odd for something that is unremarkably normal and prevalent in human societies. When one uses the word “carnivorous” I tend to associate this with lions or something).

    So anyways, I thought that that was quite remarkable, a whole food plant based diet that requires as much vegetables every day then any other Belgian diet. (although in practice 99% don’t meet that amount with a total average of 145 grams of vegetables a day).

    Does anybody know what research Dr. Greger looked at to base his DD amounts on? Is there a video for that? I already saw some studies looking at foodgroup benefits (beans, whole grains, fruits, vegetables, nuts) and where the goldilocks point seems to be for maximum benefits. Some foods had benefits that kept increasing with higher intakes (beans was one of them, if I recall correct) and some had a clear amount where additional intake did not result in better health (fruits and vegetables and nuts I think). It would be interesting to know the science behind the daily dozen in this manner.

      1. So here’s that study I was talking about in relation to benefits per food group.

        Schwingshackl, L., Schwedhelm, C., Hoffmann, G., Lampousi, A. M., Knüppel, S., Iqbal, K., … & Boeing, H. (2017). Food groups and risk of all-cause mortality: a systematic review and meta-analysis of prospective studies, 2. The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 105(6), 1462-1473.

        No dose response relation (no further decrease in all cause mortality at greater intake as 100 grams nuts, 300 grams vegetables and 300 grams fruits.
        Decrease in all cause mortality for nuts -17% fruits -10% and vegetables -11%.

        There was a dose response relationship (“the more the better”) for 150 grams beans and 100 grams whole grains.
        With decrease in all cause mortailty at the mentioned dosages : -16% for beans and -25% for whole grains.

        https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28446499

        1. On the question itself I always think of amounts of things like RDA’s, always dependent upon the amount a person is eating. They are all based usually on the bottles and such a 2000/2500 calorie diet. Lumberjacks back in the day used to eat 12000 calories a day by most estimates. So how would such a small comparative amount fit in with that overall caloric consumptive need?
          To meet that requirement they would eat things like lard sandwiches. So how would a specific amount of this or that fit in with a 2000 calorie person a clerk and a 12000 calorie a day lumberjack eating lard sandwiches for lunch….just seems to me there can not be a absolute set in stone number.
          I would guess it has to be a proportion related to specific other content consumed.

          Even today extremely trained athletes like Olympic swimmers eat 12,000 a day. A study may just show in population 95 plus percent with not a read on the 5% who do not meet the norm. Valid science but the limitation is inherent and perhaps not known. Seems to me.

    1. Usually they use the term meat based diet. We are always and ever will remain as humans, omnivores, eating meat and plants if necessary.
      Carnivores, some romantic peoples may think us that, great hunters and such, we are not. It requires a certain criteria of physical attributes to meet the requirements found only in other animals.

      Curiously omnivore is of French introduction and is a real new word 1800’s or so to english. Guess they did not think much of nutrition back in the day.

    2. Netgogate

      We usually call diets that include animal foods, omnivorous diets although meat eating is now often tered ‘carnism’.

      I would imagine that the recomended vegetable intake of 300 grammes daily is the recommended minimum amount. This also seems to be the case in Belgium. For example, the UN Food and Agriculture Organization states that in Belgium, the recommendation is

      “Eat at least 400 g of fruits and vegetables every day ensuring an equal distribution between the two.”
      http://www.fao.org/nutrition/education/food-based-dietary-guidelines/regions/countries/belgium/en/

    1. That is a very nice apron. I like that it is black.

      And that there is an image as bright as one of Dr. Greger’s ties and that there is a coined term.

      1. Deb, I think they should put it on a tee shirts & sweatshirts, too. Having said that, I love the new tee shirt & sweatshirt designs as well. I especially like the sunburst design.

        1. LOL,

          Nancy, I am glad that you love the sunburst!

          I gave them a hard time about it and felt like I really responded to the sweatshirt design. Wholesome. Soothing. Simple. Came to mind looking at that.

          With the t-shirt, I found the sunburst distracting and confusing.

          When I was in high school, a humanities teacher had us “read” paintings as if they were books.

          I still read every corner of paintings and photographs and logos. When I went out to California, editing was the same process.

          You analyze what order you look at things and what the emotional and intellectual response is.

          For the sunburst, I didn’t enter in the words. I entered in the sunburst and pondered whether it was a sunburst or fireworks and paused at that question for a very long time.

          Then instead of reading Whole Food Plant Based my eyes went to FOOD and if a person was standing in front of me wearing that shirt, the fireworks and FOOD would have been what I experienced because whole was receding and so was plant based.

          My eyes did bounce back and forth between the fireworks and the word FOOD several times and I decided that it was a sunburst, but it was a short which was complicated to “read” and if I had been in humanities discussing what was important to the designer my first thoughts would have been that it was celebrating FOOD.

          1. Whole was at the bottom of the fireworks but FOOD is what was more important and plant based was divided by a strong boundary and that was like “the invisible rules” part.

            In contrast, if you look up WHole Food Plant Based t-shirts on-line there is one where each word is highlighted in a different color and all of the colors play off of each other and that one I would buy for a tshirt versus this one I would buy to help this site.

            1. The thing about art or design is that whether we want to or not, we are communicating and I would suspect at some level the person who designed it is subconscious about WFPB in some audiences, like I am around my family and friends.

              If I wasn’t part of this community, I wouldn’t understand Plant Based as food. I would think it was like solar power or something.

              1. Art is subjective though.

                Talking about it caused me to go to Flickr and look up one of the genres I used to follow.

                This tells you nothing about my artistic likes because my likes are too varied, but the point is that I just wanted to put up some things so other people can have opinions about my sensibilities.

                https://www.flickr.com/photos/johnnyshakedown/30030345537/in/pool-poeticstreet/

                https://www.flickr.com/photos/draketoulouse/29339908698/

                https://www.flickr.com/photos/lonesomefoghorn/44936588842/in/pool-streetfeelings/

                https://www.flickr.com/photos/dprezat/8656927293/in/pool-portraits_of_old_people/

  4. A CUP of blueberries? 2? I like them, but that’s a lot, cost-wise and appetite-wise. I read somewhere maybe here, that black beans have 12 times the anthocyanins as blueberries. Anthocyanins are the ones that reach the brain and prefer to lodge in the areas of memory and learning. And I could easily eat that smaller amount of one food regularly.

    1. I could perhaps use a distinction on that as well while…”Flavonoids are the largest family of polyphenolic compounds; that is why the words ”polyphenols” and “flavonoids” sometimes may be used interchangeably. However, although all flavonoids are polyphenols, polyphenols not necessarily are flavonoids. Plants produce flavonoids as a protection against parasites, oxidative injury and harsh climatic conditions. Flavonoids are further divided in several subclasses: anthocyanins, flavanols, flavanones, flavonols, flavones and isoflavones.”

      He specifies in this video polyphenols. And then more specifically as mentioned they are anthocyanins. I personally think of blueberries as being flavonoids in benefit.
      But yes the question becomes is this only blueberry specific? Or is it type specific? Seems black beans are yes…way cheaper? Why then not a study on black beans?Is it the anthocyanins or as he mentions only polyphenols is the finding something within a greater whole specific only to blueberries?

      In any event I am not going to eat that amount of them every day. I do eat a mix blackberries cranberries and this and that which probably approximates that.

    2. Appetite-wise will depend on the individual. I tend to eat 2 or 3 cups of blueberries several times per day yet I weigh under 140 lbs. Cost-wise, simply buy frozen organic blueberries. I get them at Walmart and Costco. 3 pounds of them is less than $10.

      Dr. Ben

      1. “I tend to eat 2 or 3 cups of blueberries several times per day”
        — – – – – – –

        Gagworthy-wise, I’d get awfully sick of blueberries if I ate so much in one sitting — several times a day yet! :-(

  5. Now we just need our wonderful government to stop subsidizing for the production of meat, eggs, dairy, and start subsidizing non-gmo and organic produce so we can all afford to eat a cup or two of blueberries a day!

  6. I have about 1/4 cup of blueberries every morning. I could hardly appreciate the sight of 2 cups on my cereal. I guess i would be cereal with my blueberries.

    1. In Dr. G’s most recent blueberry video, I said the same. One-fourth cup of frozen (Wyman’s) berries on my cereal every morning is plenty enuf for me.

      Now Big Blueberry wants us to scarf down TWO cups every day? Fergit it!

        1. haha, well she may have turned into a human blueberry, but I bet she’ll never get cancer.

          That movie actually creeped me the hell out when I was little… I wasn’t sure which was scarier, the kids disappearing and turning into things or the fact that 4 grandparents shared one bed.

          1. Yes. I think it gets even creepier the older I get but those Oompa Loompa lecturing songs stay in my memory and I think that is what makes something a cult classic.

            1. The newer version in some ways is even creepier.

              There is a line from Johny Depp in the second and he says, “…. everything in this room is edible. Even I am edible, but that is called “cannibalism” and it is in fact frowned upon in most societies.”

              Was that in the first version and was I just so creeped out by everything else that I missed it?

              I like the boy and grandfather just as much in the newer version, but it is too slick and loses some of its……….. would you call it charm? I am not sure if it is charm. It is like watching something where you are disturbed, but so transfixed wondering what is going to happen that you don’t look away.

              1. It’s not just creepy, it’s full of innuendo. After all, the owner of the chocolate factory is Willy and there is the by-now venerable joke:

                …………… Charlie was surprised to be finally allowed into the chocolate factory. His wife had been dead-set against it for years.

                1. Your post urged me to do a search on Willy Wonka & the Chocolate factory and turns out the writer of the book had at least one disgusting hidden meaning behind one of the words used in the movie… unless he just later reused the word from his children’s novel and placed it ever so filthily in his later adult novel… disturbing in any case.

      1. I was affected by Dr. Greger saying in one of his videos something like, “…and oh, look, there’s a little [noodles? some sort of carb?] in there, too!” Thank you, Dr. Greger, for that comment. I’ve tried to incorporate that comment into my meal habits.

        1. Haha, I remember that and I actually thought about that right when I read your first post. A little oatmeal with some blueberries sounds good :)

  7. In his video “Food Industry-Funded Research Bias”, Dr. Greger talks about how the food industry influences nutrition studies just like the tobacco industry did it decades ago. Marion Nestle is is publishing a simlar book next month The Unsavory Truth, where she talks about industry funding and influence on research.

    While some studies are mere commercials for certain brands disguised as a scientific paper, most of the time there seem to be just honest scientists who publish something biased not because of malevolent but because they are unconsciously influenced by the study’s funding. Therefore, it seems kinda naive to carry out a randomized double blind placebo control studie without “blinding” the researchers themselfs about who is funding the work… Even if there is no funding from an industry, the study compilers often go get their products for whatever it is they are researching directly from a company for free and then note this company in the paper. Why compromise the whole thing by getting some free samples, probably worth almost nothing for them to buy themselfs, it’s food they are researching, the powders probably cost nihil in relation to the total study costs.

    I know Dr. Greger points out industry funding when it is about animal based foods being researched and sometimes he does it when a video has a trial funded by a plant based industry, but he doesn’t always do the latter. As a reason for this he states that for plants, it doesn’t cause any harm for people too eat more produce, even if the study is biased towards the potential benefits.

    Now, I would like to propose that Dr. Greger always mentiones industry funding in his video’s even for plant based foods. This no harm ideology was probably fine 10 years ago to get the train rolling but now that we are here and that plant based diets are becoming a real thing in the world out there I think it is time to trow that line of thinking overboard. We need evidence-based medecine and we need it all the way!

    The study on agility and cognition cited in this video was among others funded by the blueberry industry via the U.S. Highbush Blueberry Council.
    https://www.blueberry.org/who-we-are/

    Miller, M. G., Hamilton, D. A., Joseph, J. A., & Shukitt-Hale, B. (2017). Dietary blueberry improves cognition among older adults in a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial. European Journal of Nutrition, 57(3), 1169–1180. doi:10.1007/s00394-017-1400-8

    Also thank you to the Wild Blueberry Association of North America for providing the freeze-dried wild blueberry powder for the study;

    “Effects of Acute Blueberry Flavonoids on Mood in Children and Young Adults” Khalid, S., Barfoot, K., May, G., Lamport, D., Reynolds, S., & Williams, C. (2017). Effects of Acute Blueberry Flavonoids on Mood in Children and Young Adults. Nutrients, 9(2), 158. doi:10.3390/nu9020158.

    I’m sure the universities involved couldn’t have go out and buy some freeze-dried packets without your generosity.

    (Please don’t mention free samples in you videos Dr. G but it would be really nice if you would always mention clear industry funding, even if it makes us more healthy overall). That’s just my two cents.

  8. The reffered (by Barb) nutritionfacts video that spoke about the inhibition of tea phytonutrients by the addition of soymilk was citing this study.
    M. Lorenz, K. Stangl, and V. Stangl. Vascular effects of tea are suppressed by soy milk. Atherosclerosis, 206(1):31-32, 2009.

    Here, the researchers used blood vessel cells in vitro. This cuts out the entire human body from the picture, not a good idea when you know that the phytonutrients from blueberries are predominantly procesed by the microbiome in the human gut.

    Correddu F (2013) suggests that anti-oxidants belonging to the flavanoid family could be transferred to milk directly or after metabolic transformation by (rumen) microbes. These substances are coming from grape material thus one would expect these phytonutrients to be similar to blueberry foods. Polyphenols : anthocyanins, flavanols, flavanol glycosides and phenolic acids.

    So please keep eating your blueberry oatmeals. :-) You are not wasting money by eating blueberries with plant milks in the morning.

  9. I was wondering what are your thoughts and research on salicylate sensitivity.

    I saw your video on blueberries but am cautious because it contains salicylate.

      1. YR, Thanks for the link to the Fats Domino video. He was an excellent singer, one of the first during the Rock & Roll era of the 1950’s. I remember seeing a Youtube video of a jam session he had with Ray Charles and Jerry Lee Lewis in the Storyville night club in New Orleans recorded around 1986. Great video, it was. It can probably still be found by searching Youtube. I read where Fats passed away just last year at age 89.

  10. I am or was an almost daily consumer of blueberries and mixed them in a smoothie along with some ginger, turmeric and cinnamon. I went to the doctor and my blood tests showed that my platelet levels were low. I researched and found that blueberries and ginger can apparently decrease platelets. I have cut back on the berries etc. to a couple of times a week. I have not had another test to see whether be my results have improved yet. Anyone else experiencing these effects?

    1. Very fascinating because I have eaten a BAG of frozen blueberries on my 1 cup dry oatmeal cooked with two cups of water daily to include a huge sprinkle of ginger mixed in for flavor. I recently had blood work and nothing was said to me about any thing in my blood work. My doctor has told me if my blood work had any irregularity in the past….

      1. By way of explanation, I had been eating pears and ginger on my oatmeal and finding that combination understandably delicious, but when pear season abated, I switched to blueberries and found the ginger equally delicious with the blueberries. Now pear season is once again upon us, so I’m keeping the blueberries but adding pears in, as well…. I LOVE ginger, especially fresh grated in soups….

      2. “….I have eaten a BAG of frozen blueberries on my 1 cup dry oatmeal cooked with two cups of water daily.”
        – – – – – – – –

        OMG.

  11. Maile,

    I spent some time looking for literature that collaborated your contention regarding the blueberries and came up empty. The Platelet Disorder Support Association’s (PDSA) (https://www.pdsa.org/about-itp/warnings.html) warning regarding blueberries refers to a study on coffee and not blueberries.

    I think it wise to make a complete spreadsheet of any changes your experiencing both in terms of food, supplements, prescriptions, environmental and other factors that you experienced over the last few weeks to months to evaluate the single finding of low platelets. Please share this with your physician and then start to experiment with appropriate interventions.

    Dr. Alan Kadish moderator for Dr. Greger http://www.Centerofhealth.com

  12. Speaking of blueberries, can Dr. Greger responds to these claims: https://www.cancerresearchuk.org/about-cancer/causes-of-cancer/diet-and-cancer/food-controversies#food_controversies6

    “(…) Many so-called ‘superfoods’ contain natural chemicals that have been shown to have positive health effects in laboratory studies. These include antioxidants, vitamins and minerals. It is true that some of these ingredients can affect cancer cells in a laboratory setting, including killing them and stopping them from growing. However, foods contain many chemicals and laboratory studies are usually carried out using a purified ingredient from a particular food. So if researchers want to test the effect of an antioxidant contained in blueberries, they will use a purified version of that chemical rather than fresh blueberries.
    (…) For example, the dose may be different. Often, scientists have to use very large doses of these purified compounds to see any effects in their studies. Typically these doses are much higher than what we would actually get in our diet. So even eating very large portions of a ‘superfood’ might not provide enough of a specific ingredient to have any effect on our health.”

    Thank you.

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