Best Food for Lead Poisoning – Garlic

Best Food for Lead Poisoning – Garlic
4.88 (97.5%) 88 votes

The benefits of garlic powder for treating mild-to-moderate lead poisoning.

Discuss
Republish

Below is an approximation of this video’s audio content. To see any graphs, charts, graphics, images, and quotes to which Dr. Greger may be referring, watch the above video.

Dietary strategies for the treatment of lead toxicity are often based on rodent studies. However, for tofu at least, there was a population study of people, showing lower lead levels in men and women who ate more tofu. They controlled for a whole bunch of factors. So, it’s not like tofu lovers were protected just because they smoked less, or ate less meat. But, you can’t control for everything.

Ideally, what we’d have is a randomized, placebo-controlled study. Take a group of people exposed to lead, split them up into two groups; half get the food, half get some kind of identical placebo food, and see what happens. Easy to do with drugs—you can just use look-alike sugar pills as placebos; so, people don’t know which group they’re in.

But how do you make placebo food? One way to do disguised food interventions is to use foods that are so potent they can be stuffed in a pill, like garlic. There had been various studies on the effects of garlic in rats, and as a potential antidote for lead intoxication distributed among different mouse organs. But who eats mouse organs? This animal study had some direct human relevance, though: the “[e]ffect of garlic on lead content in chicken tissues.” To “explore the possible use[s] of garlic to clean up lead contents [in] chickens, which [like all of us on planet Earth] had been exposed to lead pollution,” in hopes we can “minimize the hazard of lead-[polluted chicken meat].”

And, it worked! Feeding garlic to chickens reduces lead levels in the “edible mass” of the chicken by up to 75% or more. Even if you don’t give them lead, raise them on distilled water, they end up with some lead in their meat and giblets; we just live in such a polluted world. But, actively feed them lead for a week, and the levels get really high. But, give them the same amount of lead with a little garlic added, give them some garlicky lead, and much less lead accumulates in their bodies.

Okay, but here’s the crazy part. Same amount of lead, but this time, you wait a week, and then give the garlic. And it worked even better. “The value of garlic in reducing lead concentrations…was more pronounced when…given” afterwards, after the lead was stopped, after the lead had already built up in the tissues. See, we used to think that “the beneficial effect[s] of garlic against lead toxicity was primarily due to a reaction between lead and sulphur compounds in [the] garlic” that would glom onto the lead in the intestinal tract, and flush it out of the body. But, what this study showed is that garlic appears to contain compounds that can actually pull lead, not just out of the intestinal contents, but out of the tissues of the body. So, “[t]he results indicate that garlic contain[s] chelating compounds capable of enhancing elimination of lead.” So, “garlic feeding can be exploited to safeguard human consumers by minimizing lead concentrations in meat…”

But if garlic is so effective at pulling lead out of chickens’ bodies, why not exploit garlic feeding more directly, by eating it ourselves? Well, there had never been a study on the ability of garlic to help lead-exposed humans—until now.

Actually, I’m embarrassed to say, the study was published back in 2012, but I missed it. That was when I was just setting up NutritionFacts.org, getting it up and running. Now that we have a staff, and a whole research team, hopefully important studies like this won’t slip through the cracks in the future.

But, here we go, a head-to-head comparison of the therapeutic effects of garlic versus a chelation therapy drug called D-penicillamine. A hundred and seventeen workers exposed to lead in the car battery industry were randomly assigned into one of two groups: the drug three times a day, or an eighth of a teaspoon of garlic powder compressed into a tablet, three times a day. That’s about the equivalent of two cloves of fresh garlic a day, for a month. As expected, the chelation drug reduced blood lead levels by about 20%—but, so did the garlic. The garlic worked just as well as the drug and, of course, had fewer side effects. Thus, “garlic seems safer…and as effective.” But, saying something is as effective as chelation therapy isn’t saying much. Remember how, for chronic lead poisoning, chelation drugs can lower blood levels, but don’t actually improve neurological function?

Okay, are you ready? This is where it gets amazing.

Significant clinical improvements were seen in the garlic group: less irritability, fewer headaches, improvements in their reflexes and blood pressure after treatment with garlic—but not the drug. So, garlic was safer and more effective. “Therefore, garlic can be recommended for the treatment of mild-to-moderate lead poisoning.”

Please consider volunteering to help out on the site.

Icons created by Gan Khoon Lay, Thomas Helbig, Creative Stall and Xinh Studio from the Noun Project.

Motion graphics by Avocado Video

Below is an approximation of this video’s audio content. To see any graphs, charts, graphics, images, and quotes to which Dr. Greger may be referring, watch the above video.

Dietary strategies for the treatment of lead toxicity are often based on rodent studies. However, for tofu at least, there was a population study of people, showing lower lead levels in men and women who ate more tofu. They controlled for a whole bunch of factors. So, it’s not like tofu lovers were protected just because they smoked less, or ate less meat. But, you can’t control for everything.

Ideally, what we’d have is a randomized, placebo-controlled study. Take a group of people exposed to lead, split them up into two groups; half get the food, half get some kind of identical placebo food, and see what happens. Easy to do with drugs—you can just use look-alike sugar pills as placebos; so, people don’t know which group they’re in.

But how do you make placebo food? One way to do disguised food interventions is to use foods that are so potent they can be stuffed in a pill, like garlic. There had been various studies on the effects of garlic in rats, and as a potential antidote for lead intoxication distributed among different mouse organs. But who eats mouse organs? This animal study had some direct human relevance, though: the “[e]ffect of garlic on lead content in chicken tissues.” To “explore the possible use[s] of garlic to clean up lead contents [in] chickens, which [like all of us on planet Earth] had been exposed to lead pollution,” in hopes we can “minimize the hazard of lead-[polluted chicken meat].”

And, it worked! Feeding garlic to chickens reduces lead levels in the “edible mass” of the chicken by up to 75% or more. Even if you don’t give them lead, raise them on distilled water, they end up with some lead in their meat and giblets; we just live in such a polluted world. But, actively feed them lead for a week, and the levels get really high. But, give them the same amount of lead with a little garlic added, give them some garlicky lead, and much less lead accumulates in their bodies.

Okay, but here’s the crazy part. Same amount of lead, but this time, you wait a week, and then give the garlic. And it worked even better. “The value of garlic in reducing lead concentrations…was more pronounced when…given” afterwards, after the lead was stopped, after the lead had already built up in the tissues. See, we used to think that “the beneficial effect[s] of garlic against lead toxicity was primarily due to a reaction between lead and sulphur compounds in [the] garlic” that would glom onto the lead in the intestinal tract, and flush it out of the body. But, what this study showed is that garlic appears to contain compounds that can actually pull lead, not just out of the intestinal contents, but out of the tissues of the body. So, “[t]he results indicate that garlic contain[s] chelating compounds capable of enhancing elimination of lead.” So, “garlic feeding can be exploited to safeguard human consumers by minimizing lead concentrations in meat…”

But if garlic is so effective at pulling lead out of chickens’ bodies, why not exploit garlic feeding more directly, by eating it ourselves? Well, there had never been a study on the ability of garlic to help lead-exposed humans—until now.

Actually, I’m embarrassed to say, the study was published back in 2012, but I missed it. That was when I was just setting up NutritionFacts.org, getting it up and running. Now that we have a staff, and a whole research team, hopefully important studies like this won’t slip through the cracks in the future.

But, here we go, a head-to-head comparison of the therapeutic effects of garlic versus a chelation therapy drug called D-penicillamine. A hundred and seventeen workers exposed to lead in the car battery industry were randomly assigned into one of two groups: the drug three times a day, or an eighth of a teaspoon of garlic powder compressed into a tablet, three times a day. That’s about the equivalent of two cloves of fresh garlic a day, for a month. As expected, the chelation drug reduced blood lead levels by about 20%—but, so did the garlic. The garlic worked just as well as the drug and, of course, had fewer side effects. Thus, “garlic seems safer…and as effective.” But, saying something is as effective as chelation therapy isn’t saying much. Remember how, for chronic lead poisoning, chelation drugs can lower blood levels, but don’t actually improve neurological function?

Okay, are you ready? This is where it gets amazing.

Significant clinical improvements were seen in the garlic group: less irritability, fewer headaches, improvements in their reflexes and blood pressure after treatment with garlic—but not the drug. So, garlic was safer and more effective. “Therefore, garlic can be recommended for the treatment of mild-to-moderate lead poisoning.”

Please consider volunteering to help out on the site.

Icons created by Gan Khoon Lay, Thomas Helbig, Creative Stall and Xinh Studio from the Noun Project.

Motion graphics by Avocado Video

Doctor's Note

Isn’t that amazing?! I’m sorry it took me so long to discover that study. As I said in the video, thanks to your support, and our amazing staff and volunteers, hopefully such landmark studies won’t fall through the cracks in the future. If you want to be a part of unearthing and spreading this research to the world, you can donate to the 501c3 nonprofit organization that runs NutritionFacts.org by clicking Donate above, or going directly to https://nutritionfacts.org/donate/

For the big build-up to this, check out the other videos in this series on not getting exposed to lead in the first place:

Or cutting down on lead absorption:

Next, I wrap up with the topic with Can Vitamin C Help with Lead Poisoning? and Yellow Bell Peppers for Male Infertility and Lead Poisoning?

What else can garlic do? Check out Cancer, Interrupted: Garlic & Flavonoids and Inhibiting Platelet Activation with Garlic and Onions.

If you haven’t yet, you can subscribe to my videos for free by clicking here.

71 responses to “Best Food for Lead Poisoning – Garlic

Comment Etiquette

On NutritionFacts.org, you'll find a vibrant community of nutrition enthusiasts, health professionals, and many knowledgeable users seeking to discover the healthiest diet to eat for themselves and their families. As always, our goal is to foster conversations that are insightful, engaging, and most of all, helpful – from the nutrition beginners to the experts in our community.

To do this we need your help, so here are some basic guidelines to get you started.

The Short List

To help maintain and foster a welcoming atmosphere in our comments, please refrain from rude comments, name-calling, and responding to posts that break the rules (see our full Community Guidelines for more details). We will remove any posts in violation of our rules when we see it, which will, unfortunately, include any nicer comments that may have been made in response.

Be respectful and help out our staff and volunteer health supporters by actively not replying to comments that are breaking the rules. Instead, please flag or report them by submitting a ticket to our help desk. NutritionFacts.org is made up of an incredible staff and many dedicated volunteers that work hard to ensure that the comments section runs smoothly and we spend a great deal of time reading comments from our community members.

Have a correction or suggestion for video or blog? Please contact us to let us know. Submitting a correction this way will result in a quicker fix than commenting on a thread with a suggestion or correction.

View the Full Community Guidelines

    1. Hi, This is another great video by Dr Greger about powerful effect of garlic to remove lead from our body. I am one of the volunteer dietitian at this site. In answer to your question, when garlic is cut, crushed or chewed, an enzyme [found in garlic cloves] called allinase converts allicin to allin. Allicin in garlic is the most important and the most effective substance. The way you prepare garlic influences the amount of beneficial compounds you receive from it. Heating,or even drying is found to decrease the allicin and alliin content in garlic. Best effect is when it is eaten raw and crushed.
      According to many studies – crushed raw garlic that is allowed to sit in room temperature for 10 minutes has the highest amount of alliinase enzymes. This maximizes garlic’s ability to activate its germicidal effect.If you do need to expose garlic to heat – limit the cooking time of garlic no more than 5 to 10 minutes. I hope this is helpful.

      1. Is there any evidence in this case the allin or allinase or allicin for that matter are the elements of garlic responsible for the lead reduction?

  1. Garlic has blood thinning effects does it not ? Would it be safe for someone eating wfpb diet and on aspirin therapy to take two cloves of garlic daily for 30 days? Or would this increase risk of stroke ?

    1. Hi Susan, thanks for your question. I am one of the volunteer dietitian on the website. I checked out a study regarding your question about taking garlic while on Aspirin. In this study they found out that garlic tablet did not have anti platelet activity as Aspirin. However, they used powdered form of garlic in the study. I would say one has to be careful when mixing powerful food as garlic with medications as it might enhance the activity of pharmaceutical compounds in the food and medicine. Having garlic with your food is good for you however, taking it as a dosage of form of medication while on another medication I would recommend you check with your doctor. I hope this is helpful to you.

      Comparison of antiplatelet activity of garlic tablets with cardio-protective dose of aspirin in healthy volunteers: a randomized clinical trial

      1. Thank you so much Spring03, it’s very helpful. I do enjoy eating garlic in recipes almost daily, but it wouldnt come up to the dosage of 2 cloves daily. I did have to stop with the omega 3 supplement recommended by dr greger due to bleeding issues.
        I will ask my doctor about it, and also about lead /metals testing. Thanks again!

    2. Susan – Spring03 gave you useful advice. An additional piece of information is this: the majority of strokes in this country are ischemic strokes . .. lack of blood to the brain from a clot of blood which interrupts the flow of blood. This is the opposite of hemorrhagic strokes which are of the bleeding type. Something to be aware of.

      1. hi Jan, my issues are around bleeding. Consuming a diet packed full of greens, beans, sweet potatoes, tomatoes and green vegies, flax, and spices like cumin on a daily basis is wonderful but I find I run into problems taking omega supplements for example. My father suffered a brain hemmorage and I really dont want to go there. I’ll happily continue to use garlic in my recipes though.

      2. Careful here. I am a registered nurse and this post is increasing in scope beyond dietary recommendations. Consult your doctor regarding stroke risks and the medications your doctor is prescribing. The descriptions of ischemic and hemorrhagic strokes in this post are not thorough enough.

  2. If it hasn’t happened already, the general public and health officials in Flint, Michigan (and all the other cities where lead poisoning is a problem) need to hear about this.

    1. Hi, Thanks for your comment. You raised a very good point about Michigan lead poisoning and their water supply. This is a great source of information from Dr Greger about practical solution to get rid of lead from our body.

    2. I thought that this would be good information for people in Flint, Michigan, so I contacted the group “Water You Fighting For?”, which is a grassroots organization that is working for clean and safe water for everyone in their community. The director thanked me for the information, and said she would definitely check it out. I think that is a start, but there are lots more people and organizations in Flint that could be told about these videos.

  3. I use both roasted garlic powder and not roasted garlic powder. Wonder if there is a difference in helping with lead. . I do use raw garlic riced into homemade dressing. You read about raw garlic -in oil- can grow some funky ill causing bacteria. Is it better to use raw or cooked/roasted or does it all have helpful benefits. Be well friends!

      1. Hi Ayn6, thanks for your question. I am one of the volunteer dietitian at the website. Garlic contains anthocyanins, water-soluble pigments that turn blue, green or purple in an acid solution. While this color transformation tends to occur more often with immature garlic, it can be diffrent among cloves within the same head of garlic. It is safe to comsume.

    1. Ayn6 – I have seen my garlic turn blue, green on a regular basis when I’ve added it to my fresh cooked pasta. I crush it through a garlic press and let it sit and do its thing while the pasta cooks. I add the fresh raw garlic to my pasta directly. That is when it turns colors. And yes, I am a garlic lover and do not mind the odor.
      Enjoy your garlic!

  4. I came across this video years ago about the effects of garlic on the brain. It is disturbing to say the least. I ate a steak that had been covered in diced garlic and spices one time and quickly could not concentrate on reading some simple instructions. A day later when it had dissipated, the instructions were clear. The effect was very real.
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xft0CLkgLpE

    1. bob luhrs: Where’s the scientific evidence to back up this claim? A guy just talking in a video is not evidence. Anecdotes are not scientific evidence.

    2. No offense but do you really fall for random youtube video opinions in favor of a body of actual scientific studies? At least I got a good laugh out of the comments where someone said the reason he is bashing garlic is because he looks like a vampire! lol

    3. Bob – I can’t help but wonder if the problem was the steak? How did you isolate your problem to the garlic?

      I watched the video you linked to. If this man’s argument is that eating garlic is bad for your health and will kill you with the smallest amount, then I must be dead. Because I eat a boatload of garlic on a regular basis and have done so for 6 decades now. I eat it raw often and cook with it regularly.

      All this talk of garlic is making me hungry .. .off to make some pasta with raw crushed garlic on it. Yum!

    4. If garlic were neurotoxic, how is it possible that the average IQ of Italians is 2 pts higher than that of other european nationalities (102 vs. 100)?

      I’m not worried (about garlic, that is…).

    5. The dark side of the information age. You have to filter all the crap. This guy sounds like one of those cult leaders. Tell a big lie convincing enough and there will be people willing to pay you money for more lies. Look….people have been eating garlic since the beginning of time and nobody has died from it. This guy also mentioned the “third eye”……this should be proof to you that he is out of his mind. He also sells zappers that will kill parasites in your body….the guy is nuts. Eating garlic is good for you. If Dr. Greger eats garlic…then so should the rest of us. Believe Dr. Greger over everyone else….because he practices what he preaches and he backs up everything with PURE SCIENCE and not some off the wall crap as this guy.

  5. On the chelating effects of garlic, I wonder of garlic will chelate the calcium in our arteries. This is worth a PubMed search

  6. OK, I get it – d-penicillamine was found to be as effective as garlic in lowering blood lead levels, BUT patients had better “lead poisoning” outcomes (cognition, behavior etc) when using garlic.

    Therefore we should stop treating patients with d-penicillamine or severely question why it should even be used.

    Is that what happened ?

    Welcome to the magic of Pharma marketing!

    NOOO. d-pencillamine (cuprimine) is being sold for $1,600 for a two day supply (and presumably prescribed by doctors). So if you were to take it for 4 weeks as in the study, you (your insurance) would be paying $22,400 for a drug that is not effective.

    This is quackery!

    1. Agree, and it is one more example which makes me reluctant to refer to technicians in the medical trade by honorary titles.

  7. I seen this one video somewhere where a farmer guy was cured by eating his own fresh garlic on an empty stomach and the CANCER was gone!

  8. Raw garlic also has other positive effects. I have seen Dr. G cite it as the healthiest vegetable years ago. Also, some have cited its effects on low level parasites and virii, which are surprisingly common. Sorry I don’t collect all of the sources for all of the research I read. Chopping it up makes it much more palatable for me. I can chop it up into blueberry sized pieces and eat it in hummus, which already has garlic in it. Most foods can taste really good with this size of bites, and you get the full power. Yes I do wait the ten minutes after crushing it.
    John S

  9. Does growing garlic in soil with high levels of lead or other contaminants reduce the garlic’s effectiveness as a chelation agent? Will the garlic grown in such soil absorb the contaminants and become hazardous to the consumer?

  10. Hi,

    Great site, very motivating!

    I understand if one has a question about something one can ask in the comment section even though it is not about the video.

    My question is about the recent study:

    Dietary intake of fibre and risk of knee osteoarthritis in two US prospective cohorts
    http://ard.bmj.com/content/early/2017/05/04/annrheumdis-2016-210810

    and article in NYTimes, High-Fiber Diet Tied to Less Knee Arthritis

    https://www.nytimes.com/2017/05/24/well/eat/high-fiber-diet-tied-to-less-knee-arthritis.html?rref=collection%2Fsectioncollection%2Fhealth&action=click&contentCollection=health&region=stream&module=stream_unit&version=latest&contentPlacement=31&pgtype=sectionfront

    Could Dr. Grieger or anyone explain the mechanism behind this?

    Thanks.

    Lydia

    1. Hi Lydia,

      I am a volunteer for Dr. Greger. Thanks not only for your question, but also for bringing to my attention this interesting study.

      The researchers are not entirely clear as to the mechanisms responsible for such decreases in osteoarthritis. However, the propose that it may be due to either decreases in weight (which may put less stress on joints) and decreased inflammation associated with higher fiber diets.

      I hope this helps, although more research needs to be done to better explain the potential mechanisms.

  11. Dr Greger, what about adding garlic to the daily dozen?

    After reading your take on the most powerful anti cancer veggie being garlic, I started trying to add it to my diet. However, just like turmeric, I eventually started just taking it straight (let food be thy medicine).

    I had been throwing a 1/4 tsp of turmeric onto the back of my tongue and mucked it on down with some almond milk or water, so I added a crushed clove of garlic (held for 10 minutes) and did the same. (This tool makes it so easy: look up Joseph Joseph Garlic Rocker)

    So….Dr Greger, (or nutritionist working with Dr G) can you pass this question on to see if there is a better or more effective way than this: Crush 1-2 cloves garlic(hold for 10 min), add 1/4 tsp turmeric, 1/4 tsp Amla powder, 1/4 tsp ginger, 1/4 tsp organic non-gmo beet powder AND a shot of pure date syrup and muck that down with some almond milk?

    I just wanted to make sure I am not mixing things that should not be mixed together, but it is easier than trying to work each of these into the diet every day.

    As an airline pilot, I feel your pain of trying to eat WFPB on the road, however, I have some tips that I think might help you (my wife calls me the iron chef because I can cook on a hotel iron).

    1. John Schaeffer (aka the Iron Chef, LOL): I put turmeric into my morning oatmeal. Here’s the recipe: I start by putting 2 dried cloves into boiling water along with a 1/4 cup of dry oatmeal (I prefer steel cut). While the oatmeal & cloves are cooking, I mix in a small bowl a tsp of erithritol, a 1/2 tsp of ground cardamom, a heaping 1/2 tsp of ground turmeric, a heaping 1/4 tsp of ground cinnamon, and several shakes of freshly ground black pepper (probably about 1/8 to a 1/4 tsp). I mix the spices together well, then add the oatmeal. Once everything is mixed well, I add some kind of nut milk (usually almond), and then 2-3 tbsp of flax seeds. I call it my Indian oatmeal.

      I like steel cut, but you could also do this with instant and use ground cloves instead. And maybe if you only use 1/4 tsp of turmeric, then you could add some amla & ginger into it as well. If they make it more bitter, just add a bit more erithritol or cardamom.
      You can mix up the sweetener & spices ahead of time & bring them with you in bags or in a bottle. I’ve done that on trips.

      Love the bit about your abilities to cook on a hotel iron – very clever & resourceful!

      1. Excellent, I look forward to trying it.

        One other tip for on the road WFPB…I will vacuum seal leftover quinoa/veggie/brown rice/bean dishes that I make extra servings of and freeze in a pouch. These keep the other foods in my cooler cold for the day, then I heat them up that night…usually, since there is rarely a microwave in the room, I cook it “sous vide” (French for ‘without air’…basically under vacuum) by putting it in the ice bucket and running hot water into it for about 10-15 minutes. Throw that in a pop up silicone bowl and you’re in.

        Cheers

  12. My greatest wish in life (besides, like, world peace or whatever) is that NutritionFacts.org videos would automatically play continuously.

  13. Hi Dr Greger, I had some chest pain earlier and I don’t think it was associated with this, but it did get me on the echo stress test and got me diagnosed with have a BAV, I am Male, 25 years of age, and within the past two years I have been detoxing myself of cigarette smoking and long term drug abuse of opiates. I look healthy in the mirror, but I think I may be having a lack of energy due to depression. I was just wondering if there is anything I should be avoiding exercise wise while having this condition.

    The doc I believe said I have a 3% leak which is absolutely nothing to worry about, is this true? is this not causing any strain on my heart, I mean.. I can see it not causing that much strain, but it still is causing a 3% strain, right?

    I follow a strict vegan diet, supplementing with multi-vitamin packs.

    to give you an idea of my diet, Today I had a blueberry/spinach smoothie for breakfast with ancient grains granola cereal with fortified rice milk. For lunch I had a banana an apple, a bowl of quinoa with coconut oil and bragg for seasoning, and for dinner I’ve had a bowl of lentils with coconut oil, bragg, and garlic, followed by a pureed smoothie of Kale and a head of broccoli.

    I do have chest pains occasionally but I am wondering if I would be feeling it from this type of abnormality with my heart or if this is all just gas and spine related. (I know a lot of them ARE gas related, but there are odd ones that just feel like a discomfort that lingers for sometimes hours a couple inches below my left nipple. (this is where I got my running symptom too)

    Before you read this next part, understand that after reviewing my echo results, the doc said my heart was very happy and only doing the 3% regurgitation.

    The only thing that did give me a scare is I decided to run and only after a few blocks I got a servere pain in my chest right over where my heart is that just SHUT me down for a good 30 seconds, I’m guessing this was a stitch though? Because I had no light headedness and I felt my heart it was beating hard, but it felt like it was beating healthy and as fast as it should have been for what I was running. But that did give me a bit of a scare so I did the rest of my trip walking. (I did feel a lot of gas in my stomach while walking, and it may have been the gas releasing up from jogging?)

    Anyway, basically my questions are as follows:

    Anything I shouldn’t be doing with this valve?
    Anything I can do to keep it from further regurgitation and stenosis?
    Is it inevitable that I would need a valve replacement surgery in the future?

    1. Craig: I’m not a doctor, so am unable to answer any of your questions. I just wanted to give you a proverbial pat on the back for making the decision to get your health back on track. Keep up the good work!

    2. Craig, As one of the moderators for NutritionFacts.org, I also complement you on your efforts to eat plant based. You’ve indicated some symptoms that would be best to review with your doctor. Are you working with a cardiologist? Of course, Dr. Greger cannot give medical advice regarding complex medical conditions through this format but could suggest some doctors who could review your case as a patient perhaps if you want a 2nd opinion. Since you have a complete history written here, I’d suggest you go over this in detail with your doctor. Because you’ve mentioned “chest pain” you definitely want to have it evaluated and then you can ask further questions about the valve, stenosis and possible valve replacement surgery in the future. A
      As far as nutrition, I am concerned that you mentioned having coconut oil twice in one day. Please review this video because oil can certainly affect your cardiovascular health. https://nutritionfacts.org/video/is-coconut-oil-good-for-you/
      I hope you find this motivating to consider giving up the coconut oil. To your good health, Joan-Nurse-Educator

  14. Sir, I come straight to the point as somewhere you mentioned to post medicinal queries in comment box of your Videos. I am from India. I am a writer and poet. For that, I am simply not able to pouring thoughts and running ideas in my mind. More often, they run with jet speed in my mind at all times of day adding heat and anxiety to my already existing Migraine. I am 55 now. I have been suffering from Migraine since my childhood and still now it is unabated.
    I don’t like to discard my poetic instinct. I simply love it. Some times it is leading to Insomnia also as running thoughts and ideas keep me waken and I time and often run to my laptop or computer to put them in words so that I may not forget them by next day morning. I don’t know what to do. Please advice me. I like psychological advice which may be with food supplements rather than medicinal. My zodiac sign is Cancer. Please help me.

    1. Green tea might help calm your mind while not sacrificing efficiency but rather increasing it. Here is a video on that: https://nutritionfacts.org/video/dietary-brain-wave-alteration/

      Here are a couple videos he has on migraine headaches:

      https://nutritionfacts.org/video/ginger-for-migraines/

      https://nutritionfacts.org/video/lavender-for-migraine-headaches/

      Based on my own experience, I used to get occasional headaches and had a short history of severe migraines, but after going vegan and adopting a whole foods plant based diet, I stopped getting headaches altogether.

  15. Sir, in addition to my query just uploaded above, I would like to add a few more lines. Sorry for that. When ideas run with jet speed in my mind at odd times like mid-night and office hours ( I am working in a bank), my head gets excess heat (which I feel really) and unrest just like a cell phone which gets over heated with excess use. I think if I am fortunate to switch-off my mind for a while as we do with our heated cell phone. When I get excess heat in my mind, I pour chilled water om my head to get the heat down. But, it lasts only for a maximum one hour. Please help me sir.

  16. I actually add 3 cloves of crushed/chopped raw garlic to my morning smoothie… I know it sounds disgusting, but I swear you cannot even taste it.

  17. My understanding of the crush and hold for garlic is only if you plan to cook it. If you eat it raw like in hummus, a dressing or a smoothie or raw soup you can just throw the whole cloves into the blender. The enzyme should be able to do it’s work in the dish or your stomach if you don’t blend for too long. Am I wrong? In that case I leave the skin on. .

  18. I love this site! Thanks Dr. Greger and staff for daily augmenting my education! You just know somewhere along the line it’s going to be a life saver!

      1. Hi. Thanks for the reply.

        I think too this is the pathway of excretion, but I have a friend who is convinced that the main pathway is the liver => fecal matter. He keeps asking for the scientific evidence for the urinary pathway excrecion hypothesis, but I can’t ever find it. I ask him too for his evidence, and he can’t find his source, but I’d feel a lot better if I could shut him down with an actual compelling scientific citation, but all I can ever find is assertions/assumptions without evidence. It’s frustrating. I was hoping someone here could reference some science.

        Thanks.

        1. Hi Karen, Thanks for your question. It is the liver cells that do the detoxification in our body and then filtered out of the body through kidney as mentioned by Curciotara earlier on.
          I found two scientific studies that go into detail of human hepatocyte cell function that you can share with your friend.

          A modeling approach to evaluate the balance between bioactivation and detoxification of MeIQx in human hepatocytes.

          Constitutive Effects of Lead on Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor Gene Battery and Protection by β-carotene and Ascorbic Acid in Human HepG2 Cells.

  19. All excellent advice about garlic but I am concerned that the garlic I buy is not pure or organic garlic. Can anyone suggest the best place to buy garlic?

  20. Ok…sounds good, but wait a minute. A previous study cited by Dr M indicates that the body removes lead from the blood quickly on it’s own. How do we know that the drug or the garlic were significantly responsible for the lower lead levels without a control group that took nothing at all? Or were the subjects still being exposed to lead while the study was taking place?

  21. I hope this message saturates the airways to reach people in Flint, Michigan…and all other places our local governments have failed our children.

  22. Three months ago, my blood lead level was was tested by Mayo Clinic and found to be 6.8 mcg/dL (normal range 0.0 – 4.9). Since then, I’ve been taking 3 garlic tablets/day and 1tbs. chlorella/day. Today, my blood lead level was down to 5.7 mcg/dL. I know that 1.1 mcg/dL over 3 months doesn’t seem like much, but I’m thrilled. if I continue this regimen, I’m hoping that I will be within the normal range by the end of the 2018.

    I have found that if your lead level is above normal, but below catastrophic levels, there is nothing to be offered in terms of medical intervention. I was told by a leading toxicologist, that in spite of being above normal, “we simply don’t treat numbers that low.” So, while studies have shown that chronic low level exposure to lead can ultimately damage the heart, kidneys, liver and nervous systems as well as disrupt bone metabolism, for someone like me, my only option has been to seek out a natural system of chelation, and it looks like it’s working.

    Thanks for listening! I would be interested to hear stories from others who have successfully reduced their lead levels via natural method of chelation.

    JMS

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Pin It on Pinterest

Share This