Yellow Bell Peppers for Male Infertility & Lead Poisoning?

Yellow Bell Peppers for Male Infertility & Lead Poisoning?
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Daily supplementation with 1000mg of vitamin C was put to the test to see if it could improve male fertility and lower lead levels.

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Below is an approximation of this video’s audio content. To see any graphs, charts, graphics, images, and quotes to which Dr. Greger may be referring, watch the above video.

What is the “[c]linical relevance of vitamin C among lead-exposed infertile men”? Compared to controls, lead battery industry workers given 1,000mg of vitamin C every workday for three months experienced “a significant increase in sperm motility and sperm count, as well as a decrease in abnormal sperm,” as well as “a significant reduction in the incidence” of damaged DNA. Okay, but the ideal endpoint would be bouncing baby boys and girls. Enter this extraordinary little study from the University of Texas from over 30 years ago.

Twenty-seven men with fertile wives, yet trying to have kids for years, to no avail. Twenty of them were given 1,000mg of vitamin C a day for two months, and 7 acted as controls: no vitamin C. They followed up at the end of the 60 days, and by then every single one of the 20 women became pregnant—20 out of 20! Years of frustration, and then boom: 100% pregnant, and not a single one of the women in the control group got pregnant. Rarely does one see these kind of black-and-white results in the medical literature for any intervention.

Is the vitamin C just lowering the oxidative stress from the lead, or actually lowering the level of lead? Sure, antioxidant supplementation can have antioxidant effects, but may fail to actually lower lead levels in the blood. Now, this was in a group of lead workers that were breathing the stuff day in and day out, and the way vitamin C may work is to just block the “intestinal absorption of lead.” An earlier study showed C supplementation apparently cut lead levels by a third within six months—but that was with a whopping two-gram dose, with added zinc. Another small study found the same 30% drop with just 500mg a day; no zinc—and, in only one month. But neither of these studies had a control group that didn’t take anything. So, you don’t know if maybe their levels would have fallen anyway.

It’s like this almost too-good-to-be-true study on the “[r]ole of [vitamin C] in scavenging…lead toxicity from biosystems”—by which they meant children. 250 to 500mg a day of vitamin C for a few months, shaving hair samples every month, and saw up to a 69% decline in lead levels. So, they repeated it in two other small groups of kids, and saw the same amazing kind of drops in every single child. But, maybe lead levels were just dropping throughout the whole community during that time? Without measuring lead levels in a control group of kids not taking vitamin C, we can’t be sure.

Here’s a good study to illustrate. Eight weeks of vitamin C and lead levels dropped in the blood, and rose in the urine. One could conclude that the vitamin C was like pulling lead out of the body, but the same things happened in the placebo group: blood levels dropped, and urine levels rose. So, it had nothing to do with the vitamin C at all. That’s why it’s always important to have a control group.

The same with studies that appeared to show no benefit. 36 battery workers, all given vitamin C; no change in their lead levels. But maybe their co-workers during that same time period suffered a huge increase in lead levels, and the vitamin C was actually successful in keeping levels from rising. You don’t know without a control group.

That’s why studies like this are so important: “Vitamin C or placebo.” Vitamin C versus an identical-looking sugar pill, and the vitamin C failed to help. That really put a damper on enthusiasm for using vitamin C for lead poisoning—until this now-famous study was published in 1999, which showed that vitamin C supplementation could lead to a decrease in blood levels. But, check this out. Here’s where the control group started, and after four weeks of taking a placebo, pretty much nothing happened, which is what you’d expect. Okay, but check out the vitamin C group. Started out at about the same, but within one week of taking 1,000mg of vitamin C a day, lead levels dropped 81%. So, “[vitamin C] supplementation may provide an economical and convenient method of reducing blood-lead levels, possibly by reducing the intestinal absorption of lead.”

See, the urine lead levels didn’t change; so, it’s not like they were peeing out more lead to bring down their blood levels. But, most of the lead in our blood is in the red blood cells, which are recycled in the liver, and discharged through the bile into the gut where the lead could just get reabsorbed—unless, perhaps, you’ve got a lot of vitamin C in there to block the re-absorption. But 1,000mg is a lot of vitamin C. Would something like 200mg work, which is just like an orange and a cup of broccoli or strawberries? They tested that, too! The 200mg group started out about the same, and didn’t really budge. Bummer! So, 1,000 seemed to work, but 200 didn’t. Isn’t 1,000 a bit unnatural, though? I mean the RDA is only 60.

Well, actually, we may have evolved for millions of years getting closer to 600mg a day: ten times the current RDA, because we were shoveling in so many fruits and greens. Yeah, but could you reach 1,000mg without having to take pills? Sure! That’s the amount of vitamin C, for example, that can be found in three bell peppers.

Please consider volunteering to help out on the site.

Icons created by Jamison Wieser from the Noun Project.

Image credit: milanmarkovic via 123RF. Image has been modified.

Below is an approximation of this video’s audio content. To see any graphs, charts, graphics, images, and quotes to which Dr. Greger may be referring, watch the above video.

What is the “[c]linical relevance of vitamin C among lead-exposed infertile men”? Compared to controls, lead battery industry workers given 1,000mg of vitamin C every workday for three months experienced “a significant increase in sperm motility and sperm count, as well as a decrease in abnormal sperm,” as well as “a significant reduction in the incidence” of damaged DNA. Okay, but the ideal endpoint would be bouncing baby boys and girls. Enter this extraordinary little study from the University of Texas from over 30 years ago.

Twenty-seven men with fertile wives, yet trying to have kids for years, to no avail. Twenty of them were given 1,000mg of vitamin C a day for two months, and 7 acted as controls: no vitamin C. They followed up at the end of the 60 days, and by then every single one of the 20 women became pregnant—20 out of 20! Years of frustration, and then boom: 100% pregnant, and not a single one of the women in the control group got pregnant. Rarely does one see these kind of black-and-white results in the medical literature for any intervention.

Is the vitamin C just lowering the oxidative stress from the lead, or actually lowering the level of lead? Sure, antioxidant supplementation can have antioxidant effects, but may fail to actually lower lead levels in the blood. Now, this was in a group of lead workers that were breathing the stuff day in and day out, and the way vitamin C may work is to just block the “intestinal absorption of lead.” An earlier study showed C supplementation apparently cut lead levels by a third within six months—but that was with a whopping two-gram dose, with added zinc. Another small study found the same 30% drop with just 500mg a day; no zinc—and, in only one month. But neither of these studies had a control group that didn’t take anything. So, you don’t know if maybe their levels would have fallen anyway.

It’s like this almost too-good-to-be-true study on the “[r]ole of [vitamin C] in scavenging…lead toxicity from biosystems”—by which they meant children. 250 to 500mg a day of vitamin C for a few months, shaving hair samples every month, and saw up to a 69% decline in lead levels. So, they repeated it in two other small groups of kids, and saw the same amazing kind of drops in every single child. But, maybe lead levels were just dropping throughout the whole community during that time? Without measuring lead levels in a control group of kids not taking vitamin C, we can’t be sure.

Here’s a good study to illustrate. Eight weeks of vitamin C and lead levels dropped in the blood, and rose in the urine. One could conclude that the vitamin C was like pulling lead out of the body, but the same things happened in the placebo group: blood levels dropped, and urine levels rose. So, it had nothing to do with the vitamin C at all. That’s why it’s always important to have a control group.

The same with studies that appeared to show no benefit. 36 battery workers, all given vitamin C; no change in their lead levels. But maybe their co-workers during that same time period suffered a huge increase in lead levels, and the vitamin C was actually successful in keeping levels from rising. You don’t know without a control group.

That’s why studies like this are so important: “Vitamin C or placebo.” Vitamin C versus an identical-looking sugar pill, and the vitamin C failed to help. That really put a damper on enthusiasm for using vitamin C for lead poisoning—until this now-famous study was published in 1999, which showed that vitamin C supplementation could lead to a decrease in blood levels. But, check this out. Here’s where the control group started, and after four weeks of taking a placebo, pretty much nothing happened, which is what you’d expect. Okay, but check out the vitamin C group. Started out at about the same, but within one week of taking 1,000mg of vitamin C a day, lead levels dropped 81%. So, “[vitamin C] supplementation may provide an economical and convenient method of reducing blood-lead levels, possibly by reducing the intestinal absorption of lead.”

See, the urine lead levels didn’t change; so, it’s not like they were peeing out more lead to bring down their blood levels. But, most of the lead in our blood is in the red blood cells, which are recycled in the liver, and discharged through the bile into the gut where the lead could just get reabsorbed—unless, perhaps, you’ve got a lot of vitamin C in there to block the re-absorption. But 1,000mg is a lot of vitamin C. Would something like 200mg work, which is just like an orange and a cup of broccoli or strawberries? They tested that, too! The 200mg group started out about the same, and didn’t really budge. Bummer! So, 1,000 seemed to work, but 200 didn’t. Isn’t 1,000 a bit unnatural, though? I mean the RDA is only 60.

Well, actually, we may have evolved for millions of years getting closer to 600mg a day: ten times the current RDA, because we were shoveling in so many fruits and greens. Yeah, but could you reach 1,000mg without having to take pills? Sure! That’s the amount of vitamin C, for example, that can be found in three bell peppers.

Please consider volunteering to help out on the site.

Icons created by Jamison Wieser from the Noun Project.

Image credit: milanmarkovic via 123RF. Image has been modified.

Doctor's Note

Lead series:

Phew! There it is, the 11th of my 11-part video series on lead. If you missed the first 10, here’s the list:

Note there is nothing special about yellow bell peppers (other than the extraordinary vitamin C content!). That was just my attempt to figure out some doable way to get 1000mg of vitamin C in whole-food form (easier than eating ten oranges!). Though remember that Parkinson’s video—Peppers & Parkinson’s: The Benefits of Smoking without the Risks?. So, one would expect to get all the benefits of the 1000mg of vitamin C, with benefits. Why not just take vitamin C supplements? See Do Vitamin C Supplements Prevent Colds but Cause Kidney Stones?

If hundreds of milligrams day of vitamin C sounds like a lot, check out What is the Optimal Vitamin C intake?

Then there’s the vitamin C and cancer series I did, for anyone interested:

And finally, more on male fertility here (but nothing like those crazy results in that Texas study):

For those of you sick of lead, eat garlic (see Best Food for Lead Poisoning – Garlic)! :) Seriously, for those of you ready for me to move on to another topic, your wish is my command. Next, it’s The Role of Burger Viruses in Cancer.

If you haven’t yet, you can subscribe to my videos for free by clicking here.

43 responses to “Yellow Bell Peppers for Male Infertility & Lead Poisoning?

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    1. Indeed, but I’d rather just eat lots of different plant foods everyday which adds up to lots of vitamin c, rather than feeling restricted to HAVE to eat 3 bell peppers every single day. I’d love to see more examples of easily getting 1000 mgs of vitamin c from whole foods in a day. Though it will always come down to a diet rich in fruits and veggies.




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  1. Ha ha, what a coincidence! Just sitting eating my yellow bell pepper, soup and salad for breakfast and saw this. Great news! Food continues to heal us and detoxification could never taste oh so good.

    This makes me think of the Constables that I used to work with as an occupational health nurse and I sure wish I knew what I know now so that I could pass it on to them. Occupational exposure to lead for them (practice range) and for hunters and others who do not use lead free bullets is a real threat to health. In fact, the late caretake of the shooting range died of complications related to lead exposure because he had for years picked up the spent bullets by hand. There were no strong occupational health and safety standards back when he started his job.

    I wonder what the infertility rate is for Constables and if it affected female fertility? We did tell them to never take their clothes and shoes home after using the shooting range. Imagine what those crawling and hand mouthing toddlers at home could be exposed to.

    Great video and I love the new format that helps me to zero in as Dr. Greger wants me to on those great graphics.

    Off to buy more peppers.




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    1. No sympathy for hunters, but I’ve been wanting to go to the shooting range for a while, now I’m kind of terrified of the lead… any suggestions?




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  2. B”H
    I have been staying out of the presentations on how to deal with lead poisoning but want to share an amazing experience. More than 25 years ago a friend of ours wanted to have children with her husband but the lead levels in her blood were so high that she was cautioned to not do so. She worked as a stain-glass artist in studio where lead was used in between the glass. I happened to read an article in the East West Journal about how kelp sea vegetable chelates heavy metals and I suggested that she try incorporating kelp into their diet when they make beans and soups. The happy ending is that her lead levels came down to normal (and when she cooke plant based whole foods her husband’s colitis went away) and they had three beautiful, healthy children.




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    1. Wow! what a great friend you are and what happy ending. Great affirmation of this information. I sure that infertility sites pick up this information.




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      1. And it sure looks like there could be a correlation or whatever the scientific word may be, for a connection to lead exposure for females.




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    2. Indeed, but I’d rather just eat lots of different plant foods everyday which adds up to lots of vitamin c, rather than feeling restricted to HAVE to eat 3 bell peppers every single day. I’d love to see more examples of easily getting 1000 mgs of vitamin c from whole foods in a day. Though it will always come down to a diet rich in fruits and veggies.




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      1. ^oops, mean to comment that somewhere else (hope they’re working on a delete and edit button, though I appreciate all the work they already do on this site).




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    3. That is really cool Moshe, thanks for sharing! How much kelp did she use? I take a half a teaspoon a day (sometimes less, sometimes more) of Main Coast dried kelp for iodine.




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  3. As an aside, I would like to update my payment information to continue my monthly support of Nurtionfacts.org but I could not log in or create an account because it is set for American users- I am Canadian (eh?). Please contact me help me to continue to support Dr. Greger’s work and this great site.
    Thank you.




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  4. I do not understand why Dr Greger is so ANTI vitamin C supplement ( pills ). In one of his videos he advocated taking statin drugs ( pills ) to lower cholesterol levels. Dr. Thomas E. Levy MD, JD has written a book, “Curing The Incurable, Vitamin C, Infectious Diseases, and Toxins. He supports the use of vitamin C supplements by quoting not just a few studies like Dr. Greger does in this video but Dr. Levy quotes hundreds of studies that support the use of vitamin C supplementation. Also, Dr. Levy treats patients with vitamin C in a clinical setting, whereas Dr. Greger no longer has a practice in a clinical setting. I think I will continue to take vitamin C supplements as advised by Dr. Thomas E. Levy MD, JD




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    1. It’s because vitamin C is just a fraction of the components and nutrients you get when you eat the intact food. Fractionated nutrients pale in comparison, and can sometimes even have negative attributes. Science prefers to study isolated components, but nature is much more balanced.




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    2. Vitamin c supplements can be HARMFUL. I highly suggest you read this article: http://whfoods.org/genpage.php?tname=george&dbid=143

      Because they’re isolated and have nothing to work with, extra vitamin C from the supplements can actually become PRO-oxidants and cause free radical damage. The article explains it brilliantly.

      I think people getting 1000 mg from whole foods would have much greater results and wish they had done the study using whole foods (even camu camu powder) but I’m sure they wanted to isolate it to make sure there were no other contributing factors. Nonetheless, I don’t doubt that high vitamin c intake from whole foods would have an even greater effect along with a plethora of other benefits.




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    3. John, sorry for multiple comments, but I wanted to add that Dr. Greger, form what I’ve read and watched, does NOT advocate taking statin drugs but (going by memory here) recognizes that they may save some people and the benefits might outweigh the negatives, however, Dr. Greger is always very clear about recommending a WFPB diet to both prevent and reverse disease and for general optimal health.
      Instead of taking a supplement, why not just get greater benefits by eating more vitamin c rich foods? You could also take amla and/or camu camu powder which are whole food forms. Camu camu is very high in vitamin c often containing over 1000 mgs per tsp depending on the source. Amla is more modestly high in vitamin c, but high nonetheless (containing a large amount in just a teaspoon) and is one of or is THE highest source of antioxidants currently known. Terrasoul is a great source for high quality, raw and very affordable prices in these two foods and many others. Nativas Naturals has a really good camu camu powder too (over 1000 mgs of vitamin c). I would get organic for sure if you do decide to take this route. I once bought a non-GMO but not organic camu camu powder from a local health food store and it was a beautiful bright neon pink… well, later I found out that despite not saying so on the label or ingredients, the reason it was (and some other camu camu powders are) bright pink, is because they spray dye them.




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      1. And I totally suck for having 3 comments in a row, but if someone really wanted to keep supplementing, Garden of Life makes a whole foods line of supplements with nutrients actually water extracted from organic foods. They have a vitamin C spray which could be better than a tablet because you could split it up throughout the day which would likely further absorption.




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  5. Hello John, thanks for your comment and for being part of our community. I am a volunteer moderator who helps Dr. G answer questions posted to the site. I am a plant based dietitian nutritionist located in Scottsdale, Arizona.

    Dr G deals with what the science tells us. As he says, “that’s why I stick to the facts!” As Dr. G notes in his video series on this subject Vitamin C is tightly controlled in the body. (I learned this in Graduate school, too, that the body self regulates the amount of Vitamin C, among other substances, by “speeding up” elimination of excess amounts. Big side effect of Vitamin C over supplementation is diarrhea.) In the video, he says, “It turns out vitamin C concentration in our bloodstream is tightly controlled, such that if you try to swallow more than you’d get eating five servings of fruits and vegetables, your body cuts down on the absorption in the intestine. For example, if you go from eating 200mg to eating ten times more—2,500 mg, the level in your bloodstream only goes up three mg per liter or quart of blood.”

    For this reason, some clinicians go to intravenous administration of Vitamin C as a way of bypassing the digestive tract. Here is a link for this video where he talks about intravenous Vitamin C administration in the treatment of Cancer. Here’s the bottom line: “after trials which have included at least 1,600 patients over 33 years, we have to conclude that we still do not know whether vitamin C has any clinically significant antitumor activity.”

    What I see in my private practice are terminal clients who are spending thousands of dollars a year on Vitamin C infusions (by Naturopathic Medicine MDs) for a treatment that simply provides false hope. We can convince ourselves that Vitamin C supplements have health benefits, but this position is simply not supported by the science. To quote my late pharmacist father: “you just make expensive pee.” Well said, Dad!

    Thanks for being part of our community!




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    1. Garry Gordon MD writes in the forward of Dr. Thomas E. Levy’s Book, “Curing The Incurable, Vitamin C, Infectious Diseases, and Toxins the following: “Through the extensive published literature compiled by Dr. Levy (with over 1,200 scientific references), many now know which forms and in what dosages vitamin C is the most beneficial – proving that the accepted daily requirements of vitamin C are far too low for maintaining healthy cellular funciton and fighting off infections. Vitamin C in what appears to be mega doses of 5000 to 20,000 miliigrams or ore orally – and 20 to 200 grams intravenously – can and has SAVED LIVES even after all else has failed.” Dr. Levy has scientific proof to back up his clinical use of vitamin C, and he also has hundreds of patients that have been healed by this therapy. I understand that you and Dr. Greger need to be pure to your agenda for the vegan diet and to do everything to debate any information that comes against this agenda. You spin your arguments well.




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    2. Lisa, will you please summarize for us newbies to the NF speak what are the conclusions on this lead series? Does garlic help? Does vitamin C in food helps? What amount? I was just reading today an NPR article by Alan Alda on the failure to cummunicate and that is how I feel with this.

      ww.npr.org/sections/health-shots/2017/06/04/531271710/alan-aldas-experiment-helping-scientists-learn-to-talk-to-the-rest-of-us?utm_source=npr_newsletter&utm_medium=email&utm_content=20170611&utm_campaign=&utm_term=




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  6. “a whopping 2 grams of vitamin C”….hahahahahaha. “1000mg, that’s a lot of vitamin C”HAHAHAHAHAHA

    Where do you get your information??? We used to make our own vitamin C until we lost that ability back some 60+ million years ago. Most animals make their own vitamin C. For reference a 150 lb. goat will make about 13,000 mg (13 grams) of vitamin C a day for normal activities. Under duress that number can go up 100 grams A DAY. Face it – we are physiological cripples compared to most other animals because of this aberration. And yet the mutation was continued and not selected against, so the question that is baffling so many is why didn’t the “defective humans” die out. Why did the humans still making their own vitamin C not predominate? I don’t know. It is a fascinating question. A more bewildering question to me is, “Why aren’t we taking advantage of the incredible health properties of high dosage intravenous vitamin C when it has been shown clinically to be superior to pharmaceuticals for infectious diseases, especially viral infections where pharmaceutical are particularly weak. Every single disease for which we currently have a vaccine is treatable and confers a better long term resistance with intravenous vitamin C treatment (Mumps, measles, polio, scarlet fever, whooping cough, swine flu, hepatitis, etc. etc.). Hard to believe but the clinical use and proof is there. Read Dr.Thomas Levi’s, “Curing the Incurable,” with over 1200 scientific references. 52 pages of references just for chapter 3 alone (“The Ultimate Antidote”) which includes a section on lead poisoning. I can only figure that the threat to the pharmaceutical companies financial bottom line is the reason this information isn’t well known and in fact propagandized against in medical schools as a result of Big Pharma contributions to the medical schools institutions.




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    1. I hear what you’re saying Humzee! With my normal fruit and veggie intake, I eat multiple times more than the vitamin C RDA everyday as I’m sure a lot of WPFD followers do. Very interesting tidbit about goats too!

      As far as humans losing the ability to make our own vitamin C… It became disadvantageous to us. Why spend energy to make our own vitamin C when our natural diet (whole plant foods) typically provides so much that our bodies routinely decrease absorption from the digestive tract? From Lisa Schmidt’s post a little above “It turns out vitamin C concentration in our bloodstream is tightly controlled, such that if you try to swallow more than you’d get eating five servings of fruits and vegetables, your body cuts down on the absorption in the intestine. For example, if you go from eating 200mg to eating ten times more—2,500 mg, the level in your bloodstream only goes up three mg per liter or quart of blood.”




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    2. I can almost hear Dr. Greger saying, “but, we’re not goats…”

      …although, I find it fascinating that goats synthesize some much vitamin C. It would be interesting to know if other in their lineage such as ungulates in general or more closely related ruminants are similar in this respect. They eat a diet that is almost completely plant based except for the odd insect or worm so one would think that they too are getting plenty of vitamin C so why indeed do some species loose this facility when others maintain it?

      Humans may be physiological cripples when compared to goats, but since we are as so phylogenically removed from them, and evolved exploiting different ecological niches. It may be more instructive to consider animals who are more closely related to Homo Sapiens such as anthropoid primates which, like man, have also lost the ability to synthesize vitamin C. Presumably, humans inherited the inability for vitamin C synthesis from our progenitors since it a common familiar trail.




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    1. Thanks for your comment.

      According to a publication:

      “Cilantro has been reported to enhance mercury elimination via unknown mechanisms, although evidence remains limited”

      But that is just a review, see the original publication here.

      Hope this answer helps.




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  7. Have heard for years that strawberry leaves were really high in vit. c . Even though that info is readily easy to find on the internet , I can’t find how much is actually in them . strawberry leaf tea is fairly good drink .




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    1. Thanks for your question Atticus,

      Thought I could not find anything credible on the subject either, but luckily I found a study that compared the antioxidant levels of leaves.

      Strawberry leaf water extracts samples contained 2202 to 3295mg of Ascorbic Acid per 1 Litre of infusion.

      Hope this answer helps.




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    1. …”But there was an interesting study giving people high-dose vitamin C, also known as ascorbic acid. The vitamin C, but not placebo, group experienced a decrease in depression scores, and also greater … penile-vaginal intercourse, an acronym that makes no sense to me.

      But evidently, high-dose vitamin C improves mood and intercourse frequency, but only in sexual partners who don’t live with one another. … psychological change that motivates the person to venture forth to have intercourse. The mild antidepressant effect they found was unrelated to cohabitation or frequency, so it does not appear that the depression scores improved just because of the improved FSI.” =-https://nutritionfacts.org/video/antioxidants-and-depression/ ; accessed 13 June 2017




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    1. Yes Julot, I remembered that link as well as Darryl’s comments that are always well worth reading. He notes that the body actively excretes levels above 80 uM and that high supplemental doses actually increase oxidative stress post exercise among other things. In another post he notes that whole food supplements can carry a risk of hepatoxicity. Thanks for posting the link.




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    2. Thanks for your comment Julot.

      I watched both videos again and it seems context is really important. When it comes to improving fertility and lowering lead levels, supplementing 1000mg a day seems to be effective. However, this does not invalidate the video you mentioned and when it comes to optimal health, 200mg of dietary Vitamin C is what the research recommends.

      Hope this answer helps.




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  8. I wonder how orange bell peppers compare with respect to vitamin C? I eat them for their zeaxanthin content. Cronometer has data for yellow, red and green, but not orange bell peppers. If they are as high or almost as high in C as the yellow, then I would probably stick to eating orange peppers. It would be nice to eat a lot of all types, but they are expensive.

    http://bjo.bmj.com/content/82/8/907




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  9. Off-topic: there is a video from Dr. Greger regarding the height of vegan/vegetarian kids vs omnivores but I couldn’t find it. Could you help me in retrieving it?




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  10. Studies with children who have high lead levels show modified citrus pectin removes lead. A couple of years ago, I had a challenge test and found to have high lead and high mercury. After taking MCP for about six months, I retested. I had zero levels of mercury in the blood and a negligible amount of lead. This wasn’t the same test, however. I need to do the urine challenge test again in order to get an accurate comparison.




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