How Much Lead Is in Organic Chicken Soup (Bone Broth)?

How Much Lead Is in Organic Chicken Soup (Bone Broth)?
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Lead from occupational exposures, shooting ranges, eggs and bone broth is reviewed.

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Below is an approximation of this video’s audio content. To see any graphs, charts, graphics, images, and quotes to which Dr. Greger may be referring, watch the above video.

“Lead poisoning still occurs the United States despite extensive prevention efforts and strict regulations.” Ayurvedic supplements, for example, specifically marketed to pregnant women, exceeded safety levels by up to 4 million percent, making “Ayurvedic medicine use and lead poisoning…a continued concern in the United States.” “[H]eavy metals are intentionally added” to the supplements. But, don’t worry, Ayurvedic practitioners claim, the lead has been detoxified with cow pee.

“Calcium supplements [can be] an additional source of lead contamination”—something we’ve known about for half a century now. Calcium supplements made from bone may have the highest lead levels. But just regular calcium supplements were found contaminated too, including a number of big national brands.

Diet-wise, the greatest contribution to the lead intake of children and their parents may be dairy, but the most concentrated source may be wild game shot with lead-containing ammunition. Concerns have been raised by hunters, though, that lead-free bullets wouldn’t have the same “wounding capacity.” But, CT scans of kills show just as much damage is inflicted—demonstrating that lead-free bullets have equivalent “killing effectiveness” even against “ballistic soap,” which evidently has a similar density to vital organs.

Workers in battery plants can be exposed to a lot of lead, but the #1 “noccupational lead exposure” is shooting firearms. Not eating lead-laden meat, just taking target practice in indoor firing ranges; 75% of target shooters have elevated lead levels in their blood. Even outside, airborne lead released by the friction of the bullet against the barrel, or lead-containing primers, can lead to substantial lead exposure both in people and in local wildlife—as well as the soil, with lead levels higher than those found next to an industrial lead factory. Most lead in urban soil, though, is from the decades of leaded paint and gasoline, raising concerns about urban gardens. Most of the lead doesn’t get taken up by the plants, though, but can stick to the leaves and roots. This is bad news in that even crops from raised beds using clean soil may get contaminated in an urban environment, but the good news is that the lead can presumably just be washed off. The health benefits of gardening and fresh produce would “likely…more than…compensate for the risk at most sites.”

Eggs from backyard chickens, however, should be tested for lead, since the lead gets inside the eggs; and so, it can’t be washed off. Most of the lead ends up in the birds’ skeletons, which raises the question: What happens when you try to make chicken soup? There may be an upswing in people boiling bones due to encouragement from paleo diet advocates. The problem is that lead is a neurotoxin, and, not just a neurotoxin. It also adversely affects the bone marrow, and digestive tract, and kidneys, and circulatory system, and hormones, and reproduction. Symptoms of too much lead exposure include impaired cognition, anemia, abdominal pain, kidney problems, high blood pressure, miscarriages, memory problems, constipation, impotence, depression,  poor concentration, etcetera.

And, we know from human studies that lead is sequestered in the bones. When there’s a lot of “bone turnover,” like at menopause or during pregnancy, lead levels in the blood can go up. This bump can be minimized during pregnancy by getting enough calcium and lowering sodium intake. When astronauts lose bone in space, the lead is released into their bloodstream. But, ironically, since they’re no longer exposed to all the lead on Earth, their overall lead levels may go down. Bones are so good at sucking up lead, they can be sprinkled on firing ranges to prevent lead from leeching further into the environment.

These researchers were concerned that the boiling of farm animals’ bones might release lead into the broth. So, they made three types of organic chicken broth—one with the bones, one with just the meat, and one with the skin and cartilage. All the soups exceeded the maximum allowable dose level for lead, even the boneless. Surprisingly, the skin and cartilage was the worst, exceeding the safety level per one cup serving by like 475%.

Please consider volunteering to help out on the site.

Image credit: Mariuszjbie via Wikimedia. Image has been modified.

Motion graphics by Avocado Video.

Below is an approximation of this video’s audio content. To see any graphs, charts, graphics, images, and quotes to which Dr. Greger may be referring, watch the above video.

“Lead poisoning still occurs the United States despite extensive prevention efforts and strict regulations.” Ayurvedic supplements, for example, specifically marketed to pregnant women, exceeded safety levels by up to 4 million percent, making “Ayurvedic medicine use and lead poisoning…a continued concern in the United States.” “[H]eavy metals are intentionally added” to the supplements. But, don’t worry, Ayurvedic practitioners claim, the lead has been detoxified with cow pee.

“Calcium supplements [can be] an additional source of lead contamination”—something we’ve known about for half a century now. Calcium supplements made from bone may have the highest lead levels. But just regular calcium supplements were found contaminated too, including a number of big national brands.

Diet-wise, the greatest contribution to the lead intake of children and their parents may be dairy, but the most concentrated source may be wild game shot with lead-containing ammunition. Concerns have been raised by hunters, though, that lead-free bullets wouldn’t have the same “wounding capacity.” But, CT scans of kills show just as much damage is inflicted—demonstrating that lead-free bullets have equivalent “killing effectiveness” even against “ballistic soap,” which evidently has a similar density to vital organs.

Workers in battery plants can be exposed to a lot of lead, but the #1 “noccupational lead exposure” is shooting firearms. Not eating lead-laden meat, just taking target practice in indoor firing ranges; 75% of target shooters have elevated lead levels in their blood. Even outside, airborne lead released by the friction of the bullet against the barrel, or lead-containing primers, can lead to substantial lead exposure both in people and in local wildlife—as well as the soil, with lead levels higher than those found next to an industrial lead factory. Most lead in urban soil, though, is from the decades of leaded paint and gasoline, raising concerns about urban gardens. Most of the lead doesn’t get taken up by the plants, though, but can stick to the leaves and roots. This is bad news in that even crops from raised beds using clean soil may get contaminated in an urban environment, but the good news is that the lead can presumably just be washed off. The health benefits of gardening and fresh produce would “likely…more than…compensate for the risk at most sites.”

Eggs from backyard chickens, however, should be tested for lead, since the lead gets inside the eggs; and so, it can’t be washed off. Most of the lead ends up in the birds’ skeletons, which raises the question: What happens when you try to make chicken soup? There may be an upswing in people boiling bones due to encouragement from paleo diet advocates. The problem is that lead is a neurotoxin, and, not just a neurotoxin. It also adversely affects the bone marrow, and digestive tract, and kidneys, and circulatory system, and hormones, and reproduction. Symptoms of too much lead exposure include impaired cognition, anemia, abdominal pain, kidney problems, high blood pressure, miscarriages, memory problems, constipation, impotence, depression,  poor concentration, etcetera.

And, we know from human studies that lead is sequestered in the bones. When there’s a lot of “bone turnover,” like at menopause or during pregnancy, lead levels in the blood can go up. This bump can be minimized during pregnancy by getting enough calcium and lowering sodium intake. When astronauts lose bone in space, the lead is released into their bloodstream. But, ironically, since they’re no longer exposed to all the lead on Earth, their overall lead levels may go down. Bones are so good at sucking up lead, they can be sprinkled on firing ranges to prevent lead from leeching further into the environment.

These researchers were concerned that the boiling of farm animals’ bones might release lead into the broth. So, they made three types of organic chicken broth—one with the bones, one with just the meat, and one with the skin and cartilage. All the soups exceeded the maximum allowable dose level for lead, even the boneless. Surprisingly, the skin and cartilage was the worst, exceeding the safety level per one cup serving by like 475%.

Please consider volunteering to help out on the site.

Image credit: Mariuszjbie via Wikimedia. Image has been modified.

Motion graphics by Avocado Video.

Doctor's Note

Did you just experience a little déjà vu? If so, you’re doing better than me! About two years ago, I did a video about this very same study and then totally forgot about it. Then, when I was doing my big lead series last year, I ran across the article again, and I was like hey, I should do a video about it! It was fun for me to go back once I realized it, and see how such a different video can be done around the same science. You can check it out at Lead Contamination in Bone Broth.

Here’s the video I alluded to in the video Filled Full of Lead, and, of course, got tons more on lead:

For those interested in the paleo diet, here’s the science I could find:

If you haven’t yet, you can subscribe to my videos for free by clicking here.

57 responses to “How Much Lead Is in Organic Chicken Soup (Bone Broth)?

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    1. I don’t normally waste my time on Weston Price nonsense, but I had a few minutes to spare so gave it a read. It seems the gist of their meandering article is that the study only tested one source of chicken, so maybe it happened to be a particularly contaminated source. That is obviously a fair point, but I think the bigger picture is that animal broth is not needed for health (there are no “side effects” to avoiding it), so why accept any contamination risk at all? I think they have the burden of proof in the wrong place. Oh, and ironic that their claims that broth has “healing” properties doesn’t require the same rigorous standards that are apparently required for lead contamination… As far as I can tell, none of the broth health claims hold up to scientific scrutiny.

      1. Please read the article more carefully. This is actually what a complete, non-technical analysis of the scientific literature looks like. The article says that the amounts of lead detected in all of the sample broths were actually less than the amounts allowable in ordinary public drinking water. So if your thesis of avoiding unnecessary risk is to hold, it makes sense to start by avoiding ordinary drinking water, not with chicken broth.

        More importantly, Dr. Greger’s general thesis is that meat is toxic (in this and other videos), which is a much stronger statement than saying it is unnecessary for health. Showing that vegetarian broth has similar properties to chicken broth would demonstrate your assigned thesis. This was not done.

        1. I find it misleading to say that the lead levels in the broth were “lower than the EPA limit” for drinking water. EPA’s Maximum Contamination Level Goal (MCLG) is in fact 0 for lead, because there is no safe level at which no adverse health effects have shown. The 15 ppb limit mentioned in the WAP article is the level at which the EPA is legally required to take action (MCL). The WAP article itself actually acknowledges that MCL is not to be confused with what’s acceptable for health.

          I do agree with your advice to be concerned about drinking water too. We use a reverse osmosis system which is certified to remove 98%+ of lead.

    2. After first coming to this conclusion:

      “The mystery that now remains is why this study was so poorly done. For all the reasons discussed above, a useful study needed to have been larger, and included the testing of broth made from chickens grown in several locations. It should have thoroughly documented the chickens’ living conditions, and tested not only the broth and cooking water for lead but also the chickens’ feed, water and soil.
      Instead, the three researchers choose to do a quick and dirty study that casts aspersion on a traditional healing food. At most, their finding of lead in broth should serve as a warning to consumers that the careful sourcing of broth is warranted in our toxic world.”

      The WestonPrice author then states:

      “we would like to announce the results of testing performed by The National Food Lab on bone broth from grass-fed beef and pastured chicken from California.65 These two broths were prepared in stainless steel soup pots by the Three Stone Hearth Co-op in Berkeley. As tested on February 14, 2013 at a Minimum Detection Level of 10 parts per billion and again on March 1, 2013 with an MDL of 5 parts per billion, the results were as follows:
      Grassfed beef broth. No lead detected
      Pastured chicken broth: No lead detected
      Reverse osmosis water: No lead detected”

      However, the author did not discuss whether the concerns of the study critiqued were addressed in the tests the results for which were posted, and if so how. I find that peculiar. Also, the units in the paper reviewed in the video are presented as ug/liter, e.g., 9.5 and 7.01 ug/liter, which is about 9.5 and 7.01 parts per billion. Which would be below the Minimum Detection Level of 10 parts per billion in one test touted by the WestonPrice author. Always compare results in the same units.

      Though I agree with you: Just skip the chicken broth. There are many reasons to avoid it beyond potential lead contamination.

    3. You greatly underestimate your critical reasoning skills. Anyone educated in the basic methodologies of science in an introductory college science course should be qualified to interpret this article. It is written for that audience. Interpreting literate articles like this (with easily verifiable sourced citations) are actually why universities and colleges make general science courses mandatory to satisfy general degree requirements. This is a very thorough article.
      https://www.westonaprice.org/health-topics/bone-broth-and-lead-contamination-a-very-flawed-study-in-medical-hypotheses/

      “Medical hypotheses”

      Firstly, the journal that published the paper in question (‘Medical hypotheses’; the name of this journal itself sends up all kinds of red flags) publishes only speculative papers that contradict the current preponderance of evidence. In otherwords, no one has any business quoting anything out of this journal as anything more than fringe speculation:

      “The journal will consider radical, speculative and non-mainstream scientific ideas provided they are coherently expressed.”

      https://www.elsevier.com/journals/medical-hypotheses/0306-9877/guide-for-authors

      Secondly, just to not let messy things like empirical data and rigorous laboratory testing get in the way of confirmation bias and good story writing, the jounral’s editors actively reject the publication of any reliable data (present or future) that could contradict the author’s speculative hypotheses:

      Empirical data: Inclusion of extensive new data is not usually acceptable in Medical Hypotheses papers … pilot data may be included when it is required for support of the proposed hypothesis, and when it is unlikely to be published in its own right.”

      I’ve never seen anything quite like this: a journal that only accepts inherently biased data that has been selected to fit the hypotheses and is of such dubious quality that it would be rejected in any other pubication. Moreover, it explicitly rejects good quality data that could be used to debunk the hypothesis: So if you want to disprove the hypotheses, you will have to do it in a legitimate journal that accepts good data. So this dubious journal will benefit from publishing crappy data by being cited in legitimate articles in legitimate journals that call out the shoddy science. I’m not sure if the thud a just heard was my jaw hitting the keyboard or Richard Feynman rolling in his grave.

      This journal is notorious for publishing (without peer-review) a paper rejected by all other publications that claimed that HIV does not cause AIDS. They have since added a peer review process, so that bad papers lke this don’t make the cut.
      https://www.nature.com/news/paper-denying-hiv-aids-link-secures-publication-1.9737

      Legitimate studies could not reproduce the speculative results

      The old 2013 study cited by Dr. Gregor (The Risk of Lead Contamination in Bone Broth Diets) has no place on a website or video that claims to be “evidence-based”. Ignoring more recent and thorough studies published in better scientific journals is irresponsable and a mark of shoddy research. The 2017 article below, for example, reviews the known medicinal benefits of chicken soup and documents with good data and clear methodology the relatively (small) risks associated with heavy metals in bone broth
      Essential and toxic metals in animal bone broths (2017)

      Dr. Greger’s video is more “tin-foil hat” as opposed to “lab coat”. Dr. Greger’s uses an old, speculative paper to exagerrate the risks of heavy metals in chicken broth and ignores more recent papers that fail to reproduce the findings. He presents data from a journal that explicitly rejects good data. This shows how the negative effects of publishing speculative papers in the days of “fake news”: once sensational, speculative “findings” hit the fake news mill, all the good data in the world isn’t going to stop the circulation of the bad data.

      1. WW I agree that “Medical Hypotheses” and indeed the entity responsible for the original article should be regarded with considerable caution.

        Nonetheless, you wrote

        “The 2017 article below, for example, reviews the known medicinal benefits of chicken soup and documents with good data and clear methodology the relatively (small) risks associated with heavy metals in bone broth
        Essential and toxic metals in animal bone broths (2017)”

        That article only mentions chicken soup when it states that there may be some benefits because of a mild anti-inflammatory effect and an increase in nasal mucus velocity. It also refers to a belief in some Asia cultures that soaking chicken bones in vinegar to make soup may benefit iron and calcium absorption in women.(but notes that there is no or only weak evidence for this). In fact the study was about heavy metals in pig and cattle bone broths. They also examined some street food bone broths purchased locally. Again these were pork and beef – nothing to do with chicken bone broths (although the article also briefly refers to some other studies on chicken wings). Interestingly though, it also refers to the Medical Hypotheses article .when it notes
        “For lead, the overall mean dose for commercial broths was 1.73 μg, based on a mean 500 g serving size. This was compatible with a lead level of 7.01 μg/l found in the broth that had been made from chicken bone. Unfortunately, the method by which the chicken-bone broth was prepared in that study was not described [5].”

        Given that the article which you yourself commend takes the time to discuss the Munro study, it is perhaps a little unreasonable to criticise the NF team for doing the same thing.

  1. Yes, the Weston A Price article is referring to the same study as Dr. Greger. Hey if the chickens are ingesting lead in their feed or their environment, it makes sense that their bones and any bone broth made from them will contain lead.

      1. Six things I could never do without

        (I DON’T recognize the ” GENESIS CREATION NARRATIVE ” which is a ” CREATION MYTH “.)

        1. Proposition

        2. Fear of the dark

        3. Fiction

        4. Cowardice

        5. Circular reasoning

        6. Begging the question

      2. Is it true that chicken fesses are used to fertilize mushrooms that are sold in supermarkets? Yuck . Please somebody tell me it isn’t true. I love mushrooms but after reading this I don,t know if I want to ever eat mushrooms.

        1. Six things I could never do without

          (I DON’T recognize the ” GENESIS CREATION NARRATIVE ” which is a ” CREATION MYTH “.)

          1. Proposition

          2. Fear of the dark

          3. Fiction

          4. Cowardice

          5. Circular reasoning

          6. Begging the question

  2. Some say Bentonite Clay can be used to help a person detox heavy metals from the body owing to it’s binding properties. But has it been put to the test!! Has anyone seen a study regarding this claim?

    1. I was just reading about Bentonite Clay yesterday and am interested in your question.

      I was reading about it on PubMed and was looking at it on the Gerson website.

      https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2904249/

      Feels like you would have to know what you are doing, because I got to a sentence regarding bacteria and one type of clay increased the bacteria and one type killed the bacteria.

      I guess I would trust Gerson’s site more than I trust others, but that is just intuitively.

      I ponder it, because of things like mercury in flings, but am interested that it can help with bacteria.

      1. I was hoping that they would have Hershey’s Cocoa, which is low priced and 100% cacao. Put it in almond milk and you’re ready to go. Plant based and no sugar.

  3. I’ll just stick with my Veg broth thankyou… Too simple and delish.. The last batch I threw in a cut up parsnip and a touch of miso. Sweet and salt.
    m

  4. Great video, on an important problem. for everyone, including those eating a WFBP diet.

    In another video, https://nutritionfacts.org/video/lead-contamination-in-fish-and-game/ (not listed in the “tons more on lead” links above) Dr. Greger acknowledged that ” . . . half of our dietary exposure to lead probably comes from plant foods.”

    More to the point for most people who visit NFO, I’d like to see a video with an overview withe lots of specifics on “Lead Contamination in Plants.”
    And this unfortunately holds true even for some superfoods, like green tea or turmeric. Some sources (especially from India through adulteration) of turmeric powder, even organic turmeric powder, can have high levels of lead ( http://journals.sagepub.com/doi/abs/10.1177/003335491770010 ), and the same applies to some sources ( especially from China) of green tea, and yes even organic green tea. (https://nutritionfacts.org/video/lead-contamination-of-tea/). Chocolate seems another food to look out for ( https://www.asyousow.org/our-work/environmental-health/toxic-enforcement/lead-and-cadmium-in-food/lead-and-cadmium-in-food-faqs/ )

    If you routinely include such foods as staples in your diet, organic does not seem good enough – look for sources that certify that they test their products for lead and optimally, also that their product meets California Prop 65 limits ( http://www.americanbiosciences.com/product/prop-65/ ) of 0.5 mcg / day for lead.
    Aside from its other toxic effects that Dr. Greger mentioned (“impaired cognition, anemia, abdominal pain, kidney problems, high blood pressure, miscarriages, memory problems, constipation, impotence, depression, poor concentration, etcetera.” ), lead inhibits telomerase, and if a food seems heavily enough contaminated can transform an extremely beneficial food into a harmful one, that will not only cause disease, but may well accelerate aging through shortening your telomeres. leading to premature cellular dysfunction and death. To me becoming an informed consumer, and making discriminating choices has become essential.

    (If you want to learn more about telomeres and telomerase, I highly recommend The Telomere Effect, by the Nobel prize winner Dr. Elizabeth Blackburn, and found it a real eye opener, as it referenced a number of studies with results I had not heard about and would not have expected. It combines easy to understand reports of research, with comprehensive references, followed by practical recommendations, many of them well worth considering, both for preserving one’s telomeres, and even lengthening them.

    What has the most harmful effect on telomeres? Surprisingly, lead poisoning (https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3694068/ ), although acute and chronic stress (like care-giving) and especially poor sleep (they have a chapter just on this) can have profound effects as well. For me the fact that research shows that shortened telomeres can often spontaneously recover from these kinds of impacts seems best news in the book, and the worst news, that babies can inherit shortened telomeres if their parents have them, beginning life at a real disadvantage.)

    1. Incidentally, as far as lead contamination goes, turmeric powder seems a particularly bad example. Turmeric has pretty much made it to the top of my list as a superfood, a food that now has an impressive set of benefits, validated by an ever expanding set of well-controlled research studies. And because of this, many people for the best of reasons have started increasing the amount of turmeric in their diet, or begun taking it as a supplement to improve their health.

      Unfortunately, some of these people – perhaps even many of these people – may have instead metaphorically shot themselves in the foot because of the deliberate adulteration of this product with lead chromate, a known poison, to improve (believe it or not) its COLOR ( http://www.astaspice.org/the-american-spice-trade-associations-statement-on-lead-in-turmeric . See also “Ground Turmeric as a Source of Lead Exposure in the United States” http://journals.sagepub.com/doi/full/10.1177/0033354917700109 )

      As a consequence, I give most manufactured powders and liquids made (according to the label) from whole foods a green-yellow light rating, not a green light, and I do at least a quick search to find out if any of them have problems. Some, like conventional turmeric powder, get a red light. And I often make my own powders from whole foods – especially spices – from their whole food counterparts using my coffee grinder. Anise powder from anise seed for example. This has the added benefit that I’ve found spices made from scratch far more flavorful that commercial powders that have sat on the shelf for months or even years after grinding before anyone purchases them. With respect to green light “whole foods,” I personally limit that designation to actual whole foods, not processed in any way unless I do it myself. So while I have found a source of turmeric powder I trust, these days I often use whole organic turmeric root instead.

      1. Alef1, Regarding your statement : “So while I have found a source of turmeric powder I trust, these days I often use whole organic turmeric root instead.”

        Which brand of Turmeric powder do you trust? TIA.

        1. Nature Restore sells an organic turmeric powder I use – that at least claims it tests it products for heavy metals, and according to the manufacturer at least, that they pass the very stringent Prop 65 test or come as close as possible to doing so.

          From: https://naturerestore.com/pages/our-story

          “Nature Restore also wanted to make sure that every supplement label actually contains the exact amount stated. Each and every product we provide to you yields the lowest amount of heavy metals possible (all soil contains minute amounts of metals), no pesticides, no plant-based fillers, and no synthetic vitamins & minerals.

          All of our ingredients have a specification sheet, and each production batch goes to a third-party for independent verification of metals, pesticides and gluten status.”

          Of course, you have to take their word for it – foods and supplements often have carry labels that misrepresent the contents – but at least this California company claims to have addressed the problem for the products they sell, rather than ignore it.

    2. Our bodies do not hold onto heavy metals from plants unlike animal products as shown in one of Dr. Greger’s videos. Unless of course the produce is grown in a highly polluted area, so they tested consumption of plants grown in the or one of the most polluted areas on earth and while heavy metals went up in those consuming the plants, the benefits of the produce outweighed any negative effects of the contamination. I can’t remember the title of the video, I’d look for it but I’m on my phone and it’s kind of a pain in the ass.
      Consumer awareness is important and companies NEED to be held accountable for adulteration (and more) of products. The laws are pathetic and do not protect us nearly enough and sometimes at all when it comes to food safety, supplements, and even cosmetics. However at the same time, I wouldn’t over worry because that too can be unhealthy. I mean contacting companies and knowing where your stuff comes from, how it’s grown, tested, etc. is good and important imo, but assuming everything is contaminated and horrible for us is also unhealthy from the stress alone and possible extreme restriction and possibly mentally unhealthy potentially resulting in isolation to varying degrees. We need to be aware but relaxed in knowing that if we do our best, we’ll be good.

  5. Dear God, why are lead bullets even legal?! And why the hell can people get away with adding lead to supplements or ANYTHING?! They should be prosecuted under any government! It should be made a priority to end the use of lead and further introducing it into the environment, but what’s the health of the planet and safety of all life on it in the face of industry? People need to wake up and start demanding change.

    So the takeaway is basically animal products contain significant amounts of lead. And also I’m never going to a shooting range.

    1. S. my husband and I wonder the same thing: Why do hunters use lead bullets? I’ve read that the water where ducks are heavily hunted has high levels of lead.

      But we don’t wonder too much or too long. We don’t eat animal products. But we do have a backyard produce garden. I guess the sins of our forefathers are being visited upon us. There’s only so much we can do.

  6. 1 Chicken bone broth = dead bird bone broth

    2 Does the dead bird bone broth contain lead? Yes

    3 Is the lead in the egg or from later? Both

    4 Is dead bird bone broth healthy? No

    5 Are free range eggs safe? No

    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4141926/

    ” Sources of exposure include air, water, and soil as well as concentrated lead sources such as lead-based paint, automotive batteries, fishing sinkers, shot gun pellets, sewage sludge, lead mine tailings, oil and gasoline, as well as lead contaminated pottery and jewelry, and lead-based inks used in food packaging such as candy wrappers [2, 3]”

    1. I got a little lost about the whole cow pee purification process.

      I am not a moral vegan, but have found that the industries did enough things to make me sick to my stomach and make me so aware of those poor animals.

      Even the name “bone broth” helps me want to have nothing to do with any of it.

  7. While I realize that hunters are seeking to kill animals for the main course of their meal, I nevertheless can’t get away from the thought that the lead contamination constitutes their just desserts. Bon appétit!

    1. Indeed Steve. However it also emits lead into the environment and so often the animals are severely injured but aren’t killed (or at least live until the injury causes death later on in various ways which I could recite and it’s horrifically tragic) and so they could actually suffer the effects of lead poisoning I would imagine :(
      Then also there’s the injured animals who live then they pass it onto their babies.

  8. What about making bone broth from bones from other animals? Like grass fed beef? Is the risk of lead contamination just as great as the chicken bones?

    1. Robert, I believe so. Lead is stored in our (animals) bones so I can’t imagine a cow bone not having an issue with lead. But in his video about calcium supplements and lead, I believe cow bones are specifically mentioned, though I’m going on memory. But based on memory, I think it was just that which caused the mentioned actress’s (forget her name) lead poisoning – it was a calcium supplement from cow bone. Again though, going off sheer memory here so check out the video to verify.

  9. I think all subscribers of Dr. Greger’s NutritionFacts.org’s videos would be highly interested in watching this 12 minute YouTube video of an interview of Mel Gipson where he talks about the success of his 92 year old father regaining his health by using umbilical cord stem cells. Mel Gipson took his 92 year old father down to Panama for this umbilical cord stem cell therapy. Today, 8 years later, the father is 100 years old and has improved eye sight, healed prolapsed heart valve, healed kidneys, improved lung function, vastly improved joints and is now able to walk around independently. This is a fascinating interview. I believe that using umbilical cord stem cells in conjunction with a whole plant food diet is the next level to attaining superman health. Here is the link.
    https://youtu.be/dmd7-KjE62o

    1. Thanks for sharing, Bill. They’re doing amazing things with stem cells now. Apparently they can take out our own stem cells (through fat, I believe) and re-inject them into our own bodies which can significantly help with arthritis and I’m sure other ailments as well. Naturally insurance does not cover this though and instead only “help out” with pharmaceutical drugs. I would imagine that using our own bodies’ stem cells would be the best because it’s our own DNA, however maybe it’s easier and even cheaper to use from umbilical cords or maybe it works just as well. Awesome stuff nonetheless! Gotta love all the amazing things they can do with nature, WITHOUT harming anyone! But insurance needs to start covering these ground breaking discoveries which actually help patients.

      1. Tom, Thanks for the link.

        I am interested in which sources of information you use.

        I see McDougall and Mirkin.

        I am trying to learn more and love Dr. Greger, but there are topics I am looking for, which he hasn’t covered.

      2. I haven’t heard of any clinics, but I learned about it while waiting for someone close to me getting a medical procedure. There are books there by one of the doctors who’s doing all this research apparently, so there were a few books on stem cells, one was for arthritis, one for facial aging, and one for something else that I can’t remember. So I was reading through them and according to him, it was a sort of accidental discovery when plastic surgeons were trying to advance fat injections (which apparently is a thing) and it turned out that it wasn’t really the fat showing the results, but rather the stem cells that were incidentally extracted from the fat and re-injected into the skin which was (to put in extreme layman’s terms because I don’t quite remember the scientific process) reactivating the fat underneath the aged skin allowing it to build like it would in a younger person. So they started looking into it for arthritis and apparently are seeing good results but I only read what I could while I was in the waiting room. Anyways, it sounds like promising research with evidence of it working… But it also sounds like something big pharma would not like because they make a lot of money off of pain killers and other medications for arthritis which might be why there hasn’t been as much attention on it as perhaps there should be.

      3. The Stem Cell Institute in Panama City, Panama is a world renown research center in the field of adult stem cells. Many famous people have received stem cell treatments at this institute. It is certified by the heath department of Panama. It’s stem cells are regularly inspected by officials of the Panama Health Department. The Stem Cell Clinic in Panama works in conjunction with many well respected hospitals and clinics in the U.S. that are only allowed to do clinical studies. The doctors at the Stem Cell Clinic in Panama regularly write peer review papers, present seminars to main stream doctors in America and abroad. I personally would have no qualms about getting an intravenous injection of a few million stem cells originating from the wall of the umbilical cord. Before criticizing the work being done at The Stem Cell Institute in Panama you should first watch their videos on their YouTube channel. Here is the link:
        https://www.youtube.com/user/cellmedicine

        1. Thanks Bill but that is a promotional video. It is highly unlikely that it would be a frank, warts and all depiction of the evidence. In fact, it just appears to be a series of personal testimonials. however, if you go online you can find other testimonies eg

          “The treatment costed me 22500 US$. With the travel (from France) and accomodation expenses for me and the accompanying person, the total amount was approximately 26000 US$.
          Unfortunately, 6 months after the treatment, I still don’t feel any improvement.
          (but the treatment has not worsened my condition either).”
          https://www.msworld.org/forum/showthread.php?106202-My-experience-with-stem-cells-therapy-in-Panama

          I believe that that clinic was also closed down by the Panama Government some years ago (however, presumably it is now operating again?)

          “The health ministry last month ordered the country’s largest stem cell clinic to stop offering treatments, arguing there is no evidence that the treatments work or are safe.

          “If (stem cell treatment’s) efficiency and safety has not been proven, we don’t believe it should be used,” said Dr. Ileana Herrera, chief of the ministry’s research council. “As a health ministry, we must always protect the human being.

          The clinic’s owner, Arizona entrepreneur Neil Riordan, told Reuters he closed the clinic and admitted the treatments, involving the removal and re-injection of stem cells, had not been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration.

          …. other experts note that without controlled clinical trials, there is no way to know if the treatment is making such differences or some other factor, and worry that the clinic exploits ill patients’ desperation with an unproven remedy.”
          https://www.reuters.com/article/us-costarica-stemcells/costa-rica-puts-brakes-on-popular-stem-cell-tourism-idUSTRE6516UR20100607

          I gather that the prime mover here is Neil Riordan who also owns the Riordan Clinic (founded by his father), sells supplements and is a director of the ITL cancer clinics in the Bahamas
          https://riordanclinic.org/speaker-archive/neil-riordan-phd/
          https://www.bloomberg.com/research/stocks/private/person.asp?personId=10039177&privcapId=10039196

          If you prefer to take the word of people selling high priced services and discount the reservations of other health and medical professionals, that’s fair enough if you have done your reserach.

          1. Tom, no medical treatment is 100 percent perfect. Just look at the failure rate of chemo therapy. Yes, there are people who receive stem cell treatment and do not receive any improvement, but then there are many people who do get improvement. Just like with a whole plant food diet, there are people who complain that they do not benefit from a whole plant food diet. Did you listen to Mel Gipson talk about how his 92 year old father drastically improved his health after receiving 3 different treatments of stem cell therapy. He can now walk. His prolapsed heart valve healed. His lung and kidney functions improved. His eye sight improved. He even regained his sex drive. Mel Gipson himself has received the treatments and has healed his rotator cuff tear. A lot of MMA and UFC fighters go down to Panama for stem cell therapy to repair shoulder, and other joint injuries with success. Bas Ruten and Joe Rogan both fighters have had great success with the stem cell therapy. If you are waiting for a therapy that is 100 percent therapeutic and discount stem cell therapy because it is not 100 percent….then that is fair enough.

  10. LEAD in garden soil DEFINITELY is absorbed into the plant itself,it doesnt just stick to the roots.There is a programne/service run in australia by Macquarie university called vegesafe where people send in samples of their soil to test for lots of heavy metals including lead because it does contaminate plants.sone more than others

      1. Thanks for the link, S.

        From the video:

        “Even if a vegetarian diet contains more lead and cadmium than a mixed diet, it is not certain that it will give rise to higher uptake of the metals…because the absorption of lead and cadmium is inhibited by [plant compounds such as] fibre and phytate.”

        And ” “In spite of the significantly higher blood cadmium concentrations as a consequence of a greater cadmium intake from [polluted plants], all the antioxidants in those same plants were found to help “inhibit [the] harmful effects of higher free radical production” caused by [the] cadmium exposure. “

  11. I am an avid supporter of Dr. Greger, whose work and efforts are deserving of the highest accolades. However, I was a bit put off by what appeared to be a rather cynical and condescending put-down of Ayurveda, suggesting it is just a system using a bunch of lead poisoned remedies that attempt to purify out the lead with “cow pee.” The implication is that it is somehow primitive and crude. Nothing could be further from the truth, and I am afraid this a classic case of throwing the baby out with the bath water.

    Undoubtedly, there is much adulterated Ayurvedic medicine on the market, as is the case with many traditional remedies and modern supplements sold in top health foods stores for that matter. However, there is a sound foundation of healing in the centuries-old medical system of Ayurveda when properly practiced and the remedies correctly prepared, and it shouldn’t be dismissed offhand with cynicism and mocking.

  12. This is misleading and fear based marketing. Lead is part of the earth. It was here before dinosaurs or humans. It is part of everything, just like oxygen, carbon, nitrogen etc. How many autopsies have found cause of death to be lead poisoning? Probably few to none.

    Care should be taken regarding growing children to prevent lead in toys, paint, water, etc. This is just obvious. Also, we don’t want animals to have lead in their food.

    Chicken soup and beef broth, come on; they have been around for centuries. Cartilage from making broths can be anti inflammatory and helpful to those in chronic pain.

    Quit trying to scare people. We get enough of that already.

  13. This doesn’t apply to all bone broth though. You just have to carefully select ingredients, and cooking materials.

    I work for a business that makes a simple, organic bone broth. We had ours tested for lead, cadmium and mercury. None of our broths registered for any of the heavy metals. Our chickens come from a biodynamic farm – a combination of fruit orchards and free-ranging chickens, with hutches on wheels that are moved each day.

  14. Lead in calcium supplements? I just watched your video saying there is no longer lead in modern day calcium supplements, and the following video saying pregnant women should take calcium supplements to prevent lead leaching out of their bones to the baby. I was getting really into your videos, but I am concerned by this seemingly false mention of lead in calcium supplements without context, it seems like a needless scare tactic. I’m trying to research about having a healthy pregnancy, it is frustrating and stressful to get conflicting information from a source I was beginning to trust.

  15. Hi, Meg. I am sorry you are feeling frustrated, and I hope I can clarify things for you. Lead gets stored and concentrated in bones and shells, and so it really depends on the source of the calcium in supplements. If the calcium is from animal sources, the risk of contamination is higher than if it is from plant sources. There are some good, plant-based calcium supplements on the market, which have passed tests for lead contamination. Some of them also include vitamin d and vitamin k, which may increase bioavailability. I hope that helps!

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