Does Paratuberculosis in Meat Trigger Type 1 Diabetes?

Does Paratuberculosis in Meat Trigger Type 1 Diabetes?
3.67 (73.33%) 3 votes

The majority of specialists in the field agreed that paraTB in meat and dairy likely represents a risk to human health and should be a high- or medium-priority public health issue.

Discuss
Republish

Below is an approximation of this video’s audio content. To see any graphs, charts, graphics, images, and quotes to which Dr. Greger may be referring, watch the above video.

The compelling finding of MAP bacteria circulating disproportionately within the bloodstream of type 1 diabetics was subsequently confirmed by culturing it straight out of their blood. But, just because being infected and type 1 diabetes appeared to go together, we don’t know what came first.

Yes, maybe the infection made kids more susceptible to diabetes. But, maybe the diabetes made kids more susceptible to infection. Maybe, this bug just likes hanging out in sugary blood. In that case, we might expect to see it in type 2 diabetics too. But no; paratuberculosis infection is not associated with type 2 diabetes—which would make sense, since type 2 is not an autoimmune disease.

For this infectious trigger idea to be sound, there would have to be an immune response mounted to the bug. And indeed, there is an extremely significant antibody response against paratuberculosis bacteria in type 1 diabetics. But, do the antibodies attacking the bug cross-react with our own insulin-producing cells to generate that autoimmune reaction? Apparently so. Antibodies recognizing the molecular signatures of mycobacterium paratuberculosis cross-react with the molecular signatures present on our insulin-producing beta cells in our pancreas.

Okay, but is this just in Sardinia? Or, might we find these same results elsewhere? The same results were found on mainland Italy, with a group of type 1 diabetics with different genetic backgrounds—a strong association between paraTB bacteria exposure and type 1 diabetes. And then, confirmed again, and again in other pediatric populations, as well as a group of type 1 diabetic adults.

The paratuberculosis bacteria also explain why type 1 diabetes risk is associated with a specific gene on chromosome 2, called SLC11A1. What does that gene do? It activates the immune cell that eats mycobacteria for breakfast. So, that could explain how a mutation in that gene could increase the susceptibility to type 1 diabetes—by increasing the “susceptibility to mycobacterial infections,” like mycobacterium avium paratuberculosis.

This is all part of this accumulating line of evidence pointing to MAP bacteria as a trigger for the development of type 1 diabetes. And, it’s no coincidence. These types of bacteria have evolved to disguise themselves to look like human proteins for the express purpose of avoiding detection by our immune system. These are not the droids you’re looking for. But, if our immune systems see through the disguise and start attacking the bacteria, our similar-looking proteins can become a victim of friendly fire, which is what these studies have all been pointing to. Or, almost all.

This 2015 review found that all seven out of seven human studies found an association between type 1 diabetes and paratuberculosis exposure. But, it’s actually only seven out of eight. Since that review, a study in India was published, finding no link. A few possible explanations were offered. Maybe it’s because they have compulsory vaccination for regular TB, which might offer cross-protection against paratuberculosis, as it does with leprosy. Or, maybe because they eat so much less meat.

Or, maybe it’s because of their “compulsory boiling of milk before consumption.” If you measure the heat inactivation of milk with high concentrations of naturally infected feces, which is probably the main source of milk contamination, pasteurization may not completely inactivate the bacteria. But, sterilization at boiling temperatures should—though this may depend on the degree of fecal clumping. That may be one way MAP bacteria ride out pasteurization—by hiding in tiny fecal clumps. But, only rarely should MAP survive over 100 degrees Celsius—perhaps explaining the disparate India findings. 

Bottom line: “To reduce human exposure to MAP via consumption of dairy and meat products [more] studies are needed for estimating” how much MAP is in the milk, meat, and feces, and how much fecal material is in the milk and meat, to figure out what we need to do to kill it. In the meanwhile, what’s the potential public health impact of mycobacterium paratuberculosis? “The majority of specialists [in the field] agree that it’s likely a risk to human health and…[should be] a high- or medium-priority…public health issue. “

Please consider volunteering to help out on the site.

Image credit: Mark Doliner via flickr. Image has been modified.

Below is an approximation of this video’s audio content. To see any graphs, charts, graphics, images, and quotes to which Dr. Greger may be referring, watch the above video.

The compelling finding of MAP bacteria circulating disproportionately within the bloodstream of type 1 diabetics was subsequently confirmed by culturing it straight out of their blood. But, just because being infected and type 1 diabetes appeared to go together, we don’t know what came first.

Yes, maybe the infection made kids more susceptible to diabetes. But, maybe the diabetes made kids more susceptible to infection. Maybe, this bug just likes hanging out in sugary blood. In that case, we might expect to see it in type 2 diabetics too. But no; paratuberculosis infection is not associated with type 2 diabetes—which would make sense, since type 2 is not an autoimmune disease.

For this infectious trigger idea to be sound, there would have to be an immune response mounted to the bug. And indeed, there is an extremely significant antibody response against paratuberculosis bacteria in type 1 diabetics. But, do the antibodies attacking the bug cross-react with our own insulin-producing cells to generate that autoimmune reaction? Apparently so. Antibodies recognizing the molecular signatures of mycobacterium paratuberculosis cross-react with the molecular signatures present on our insulin-producing beta cells in our pancreas.

Okay, but is this just in Sardinia? Or, might we find these same results elsewhere? The same results were found on mainland Italy, with a group of type 1 diabetics with different genetic backgrounds—a strong association between paraTB bacteria exposure and type 1 diabetes. And then, confirmed again, and again in other pediatric populations, as well as a group of type 1 diabetic adults.

The paratuberculosis bacteria also explain why type 1 diabetes risk is associated with a specific gene on chromosome 2, called SLC11A1. What does that gene do? It activates the immune cell that eats mycobacteria for breakfast. So, that could explain how a mutation in that gene could increase the susceptibility to type 1 diabetes—by increasing the “susceptibility to mycobacterial infections,” like mycobacterium avium paratuberculosis.

This is all part of this accumulating line of evidence pointing to MAP bacteria as a trigger for the development of type 1 diabetes. And, it’s no coincidence. These types of bacteria have evolved to disguise themselves to look like human proteins for the express purpose of avoiding detection by our immune system. These are not the droids you’re looking for. But, if our immune systems see through the disguise and start attacking the bacteria, our similar-looking proteins can become a victim of friendly fire, which is what these studies have all been pointing to. Or, almost all.

This 2015 review found that all seven out of seven human studies found an association between type 1 diabetes and paratuberculosis exposure. But, it’s actually only seven out of eight. Since that review, a study in India was published, finding no link. A few possible explanations were offered. Maybe it’s because they have compulsory vaccination for regular TB, which might offer cross-protection against paratuberculosis, as it does with leprosy. Or, maybe because they eat so much less meat.

Or, maybe it’s because of their “compulsory boiling of milk before consumption.” If you measure the heat inactivation of milk with high concentrations of naturally infected feces, which is probably the main source of milk contamination, pasteurization may not completely inactivate the bacteria. But, sterilization at boiling temperatures should—though this may depend on the degree of fecal clumping. That may be one way MAP bacteria ride out pasteurization—by hiding in tiny fecal clumps. But, only rarely should MAP survive over 100 degrees Celsius—perhaps explaining the disparate India findings. 

Bottom line: “To reduce human exposure to MAP via consumption of dairy and meat products [more] studies are needed for estimating” how much MAP is in the milk, meat, and feces, and how much fecal material is in the milk and meat, to figure out what we need to do to kill it. In the meanwhile, what’s the potential public health impact of mycobacterium paratuberculosis? “The majority of specialists [in the field] agree that it’s likely a risk to human health and…[should be] a high- or medium-priority…public health issue. “

Please consider volunteering to help out on the site.

Image credit: Mark Doliner via flickr. Image has been modified.

Doctor's Note

I started speaking out about the link between paratuberculosis infection in milk and meat and human disease 15 years ago. Even cynical me is shocked that the industry hasn’t done more to clean up their act. It reminds me of the bovine leukemia virus story. See:

If you missed the first two installments in this series, check out Does Paratuberculosis in Milk Trigger Type 1 Diabetes? and Meat Consumption & the Development of Type 1 Diabetes.

If you haven’t yet, you can subscribe to my videos for free by clicking here.

63 responses to “Does Paratuberculosis in Meat Trigger Type 1 Diabetes?

Commenting Etiquette

The intention of the comment section under each video and blog post is to allow all members to share their stories, questions, and feedback with others in a welcoming, engaging, and respectful environment. Off-topic comments are permitted, in hopes more experienced users may be able to point them to more relevant videos that may answer their questions. Vigorous debate of science is welcome so long as participants can disagree respectfully. Advertising products or services is not permitted.

To make NutritionFacts.org a place where people feel comfortable posting without feeling attacked, we have no tolerance for ad hominem attacks or comments that are racist, misogynist, homophobic, vulgar, or otherwise inappropriate. Please help us to foster a community of mutual respect. Enforcement of these rules is done to the best of our ability on a case-by-case basis.

  1. Oh man! You had me at fecal clumping in milk and meat. That is truly disgusting.
    I’m wondering how many people would transition to a plant based diet if they realized just how much sh!t they were eating from their contaminated cheese burgers and milkshakes.




    0



    0
      1. There should be a warning label on that stuff:

        “…the Surgeon General of the United States has determined that there is a high likelihood the ingestion of poop, puss and pathogens along with an increased risk of cancer, cardiovascular disease, diabetes and death from the consumption of meat and dairy, and recommends everyone switch to a whole foods plant based eating plan…”

        That might get the attention of those seemingly indifferent 80%.




        0



        0
        1. You would think people would freak out over clumps of fecal matter in their food, but the sad thing is, in my experience, most people actively choose to remain oblivious to anything that might cause them to take action….”la la la I don’t wanna hear or see it!!!”




          0



          0
    1. I grew up on my families dairy farm and just like most farm boys I got to do my fair share of milking cows. I would sometimes wonder how many people would lose their appetite for milk and dairy if they were to see the dirty, shit covered udders of the cow when they would come into the milking parlor to be milked. Or the thick mastitis that would come out of a cow’s udder if she had an infection. Or to see the filter in the milk tank after milking 80 to 100 head of cattle that filtered out the shit, hair, and mastitis so it wouldn’t get into the milk in the storage tank. Pretty gross stuff.




      0



      0
      1. Ron,
        Puss, poop and cow hair? Yum, yum! That does sound tempting, but I believe that I will pass. :-P

        I’ve even lost my taste for soy and almond milk after your description of the milking process and they are only tangentially related products.




        0



        0
  2. Hi there, love your videos! Wondering if you have, or would consider doing, a piece on how to read research reports, what to look for etc.? I am a plant based chef working with a medical team to produce a nutrition for diabetes workshop. Not only do I need to use content based on solid research but a deeper understanding of the reports would allow me to find the most appropriate data as well.
    Thanks!
    Meg




    0



    0
    1. hi Meg, I agree it would be a great topic for a video, though Dr Greger frequently points out characteristics and features of studies, and points to areas that distinguish good from poor or deceptive types of work. If your project is starting sometime soon though, you might want to search on the net for resources like this to help
      https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=t2K6mJkSWoA Many universities offer students a downloadable ‘handbook’ of sorts to help them decifer research articles.




      0



      0
    2. I was wearing socks after running this morning.. or this video would’ve knocked my socks clean off and I’d be standing here barefooted.
      Is because:
      I am astonished, having followed Dr. Greger for all of a year, that his sleuthing and presentation of MEDICAL, scientific FACTS (not much in vogue at this time) regarding nutrition are laid out in irrefutable manner in a crumb trail an old dog could follow…
      Now, that wasn’t what my socks would’ve been blown off about, but having shared this site’s information with HUNDREDS of colleagues, friends and neighbors, VERY few people seem to take their EATING seriously, as in ‘plant based diet’.
      Now my socks were still on, until after watching this video a second time, observing the ‘star rating’ for a *PERFECT* dissemination of SCIENCE and PROOF which humans should act upon, the merely ‘rating” was at 4.5 stars. (Clearly evident to me that the beef industry is watching, too)

      At this point, I was flabbergasted: Not only is this insidious industry so driven by profit and selfishness that they will place the health of all humanity on the sacrificial altar, they have the gall to falsify information, intimidate doctors and celebrities (Oprah!) even threaten mere vegans for the ‘very Christian behavior’ of looking out for their fellow beings.
      There really is no hope for human beings if we are so stupid as to be following our urges and ignoring our health. The planet will survive: we will not.




      0



      0
    3. I hear you Meg.
      Every time I read one of those papers, I have to stop and search for the definitions of the technical language being used to tease the implications and meaning of the published findings.

      Reading these research results is is an education in itself.




      0



      0
      1. HI Joe,

        I am really interested in how to tell if the data in a study is sound, or if it is biased or paid for by an organization that wants a certain outcome. What is the criteria for a “good” study? Is there a guideline somewhere? it seems like the wild west out there in research. There seems to be a certain criteria too for medical professionals before they will buy into a certain theory (like a plant based diet!). Would like to be able to present them with sound data.




        0



        0
  3. Personally, I think there are already enough videos on how consuming animal products can cause heart disease or diabetes, which are the some of the leading causes of death. Anyone without any knowledge on nutrition should have been able to get the information after so many videos. However, there are still problems for people who just stepped into diet and nutrition, such as such as saturated fats and cholesterol, all kinds of anti-nutrients, human physiology, etc., because of so many misleading information on the Internet. Take cholesterol as an example, we claim that we do not need that much protein because so little is in breast milk, but this is basically supporting a high-cholesterol diet because there is so much cholesterol in breast milk. In my opinion, if new videos on meat, dairy, and eggs are to be published, they should get on to these real controversies, as these might be the real concerns of people still sticking to the paleo diet. Unless these issues were addressed, people would still be unwilling to make the switch, no matter how much new science on meat, dairy and eggs you pull out in front of them. I know they have been discussed before, but definitely not enough.
    Also, I hope that more videos get published about how to eat more healthy as a vegan, or some unexpected benefits of some fruits or veggies.




    0



    0
    1. Xiao Wang,

      If you will look for the subjects you’re interested in on Dr G’s website you’ll find a wealth of information in videos and blog entries.

      You will find more on http://www.drmcdougall.com, PCRM.org, and there are many good talks on Youtube about reversing heart disease and even cancers by Dr T Colin Campbell, Dr Esselstyn, Dr Joel Fuhrman, and Dr Dean Ornish. Campbell, Esselstyn, McDougall and Ornish have published research in respected medical journals. On Youtube and websites there are talks by Jeff Novick to help people with plant based whole foods cooking and shopping, both for health and to spare the budget.

      This is just the tip of the iceberg of good information out there. But if you find your friends aren’t interested, check out a TED Talk by Dr Doug Lisle, The Pleasure Trap, which explains why it’s hard for them to make the change and how to talk with people who criticize or question your choices. His website, http://www.esteemdynamics.org also has a number of good videos on why people are resistant to making the change.




      0



      0
    2. Take cholesterol as an example, we claim that we do not need that much protein because so little is in breast milk, but this is basically supporting a high-cholesterol diet because there is so much cholesterol in breast milk.

      I do not know of any adults that are still being breast fed, so your analogy is false.

      That being said, many people still like momma’s milk… except it’s from a different species!




      0



      0
      1. Hi, Xiao Wang. I am Christine, a NF volunteer moderator. We do need our mothers’ milk when we are babies, but we do not need milk after the age of weaning. We also need cholesterol, but our livers make all that we need as adults. We do not need cholesterol in our diets as adults. I hope that helps!




        0



        0
  4. Had a question…
    I was womfering if even eating a 100% plant based diet could expose all of us to the fecal matter problem explored in the above video since crop fertilizer is fecal matter




    0



    0
    1. Cities in New Zealand near rural areas have circles of MAP infection from the measurable fecal dust. U.S.D.A. is not measuring.
      Fecal matter is abundant on fresh greens -more so on organic- for example.

      This MAP is abundant and sticking around whether or not one consumes meat and dairy. However, a healthy plant-based gut is protective of many beasties.

      https://anti-map.org/index.php




      0



      0
    2. A Vegan I have been composting all my body waste with food waste and sawdust for decades which leads to flourishing vegetables. 74 this year, no problems so far :-)




      0



      0
      1. That’s really interesting. (I do the same but with ox manure.) I read that some rural vegan communities in other countries do the same and that accounts for them not having to supplement B12. Any B12 they excrete would be recycled back to the soil where they grow their food. Do you take any B12? Or any other supplements?




        0



        0
  5. this pretty interesting article regarding Tom Brady’s diet but wondered about “inflammatory berries”? http://www.feelguide.com/2017/01/15/the-tao-of-tom-how-tom-brady-uses-an-80-20-diet-meditation-yoga-one-book-to-age-backwards/

    [http://www.feelguide.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/01/Brady0.jpg]

    The Tao Of Tom: How Tom Brady Uses An 80-20 Diet, Meditation, Yoga & One Book To Age Backwards
    http://www.feelguide.com
    Everything you need to know about the remarkable diet, health regimen, workout program, and spiritual life that keeps Tom Brady #1 and forever young.




    0



    0
    1. Hi Karen and Jeff, I’m one of the site moderators. Thanks for sharing the interesting article on Tom Brady. I, too am unsure what he means by inflammatory berries but later in the article he says he’s never eaten a strawberry in his life! That may be the inflammatory fruit he’s referring to and if you look at the Environmental Watchdog Group website strawberries are part of the “dirty dozen” in that you should only purchase the organically grown ones so there’s that negative about them. The only other thing that sets them apart is that their seeds are on the outside of the berry and most seeds are coated with an acid to ward off animals that want to eat them. I have no knowledge of this being the case for strawberries but it probably would not be a stretch for one of his nutrition gurus to postulate something similar and tell him that they are off limits. Just my opinion here. Thanks again.




      0



      0
  6. As someone who grew up on a farm where we had a milk cow and had her calf slaughtered to provide meat when the calf reached about 600 lbs, I was raised on raw milk. And yes, the cow would often have a dry-manure covered tail and would swing it to slap flies causing in-bucket collateral damage and/ or step her foot in the milk bucket on occasion. We just fished the dry stuff out or strained it out through a cup towel.

    And sometimes the milk would taste “weedy”, a term we used to describe the milk during a certain time of the year when the cow would graze on certain weeds. This was back during the ’50s and ’60s… a time when there was a smaller population foot-print plus fewer man-made chemicals and their attending effects and environmental (like plants for instance) toxins and their dangers were common knowledge.

    In this day and age I don’t think I would chance drinking raw milk (or any bovine milk for that matter.) Heck, I won’t even drink municipal water in today’s world. I instead buy RO water and distill it before adding back in colloidal minerals.

    But when all is said and done, I think my farm raising helped me get through my later chemically polluted time as a farmer by perhaps training my immune system to offer me protection. Thankfully I have not been a farmer for about the past 40 years, so that probably has helped keep me free from any debilitating disease throughout my life.

    And thanks to Dr. Greger and his communicative skills (if the knowledge he imparts were done in a less interesting way, he wouldn’t have such a wide following’-) I expect to maintain that status right up to the distant end. He and the replies he triggers expands my knowledge base.

    Oh, and I don’t follow his teachings to the letter. While not a Vegan, I do not eat red meat and eat fowl only occasionally—small herring fish often. I practice a Ketogenic diet, getting almost all of my fat from MCT oil and Walnut oil… the Walnut oil to thwart IGF-1 activity. I’m also a proponent of fasting… I fast when others feast (holidays.)

    Classify me as someone who believes in supplements-as-medicine (not pharmaceuticals… I went 50 years without seeing a Dr. before Obamacare forced me to sign up for health monitoring through the VA.) Still, if my blood tests show something that concerns me enough, I will consider going full Vegan sans an easier path to satisfactory health.

    For now, however, I’m hoping to get in on a trial for transfusing young plasma to hopefully revert my blood’s aging proteins back to a younger state, as an organ repair and protective mechanism.




    0



    0
      1. Exactly bhrollin! We should just allow the cows (grass-fed and all!) to provide milk for their baby calves as nature intended. It behooves me ( LOL) to say that human beings were just not meant to suckle on another species.




        0



        0
  7. So many reasons I’m glad I gave up my lattes, but two questions…

    Would the high-heat pasteurization in shelf-stable UHT milk be enough to kill the bug?

    Second, I’m curious about why type 1 diabetes would affect mostly children. Does our immune system get more accurate? Plenty of people continue to consume milk beyond childhood, so I assume it’s more than just consumption patterns.




    0



    0
    1. russb: I can’t remember where I read it, but I remember reading not too long ago that people are getting T1 diabetes diagnoses much later than childhood now-a-days.




      0



      0
      1. Absolutely right Thea. The (I would say) almost epidemic development of T1 in adults is why it is no longer referred to as “juvenile onset diabetes”. I developed it at 21 though probably from chemical exposure, and two individuals out of 20 I worked with developed it at 37 and 45 respectively. I did not work with anyone who developed it as a child.
        The growing consumption of meat with all its pro inflammatory factors in addition to MAP and saturated grease with its lipotoxicity is likely to be playing a part as well in the adult onset destruction of beta cells.

        I will now guess…. When I was a kid the emphasis was always on the need for children to drink milk “to strengthen their growing bones”. At least that was the case in my home and I will infer that this was broadly the case. By no means am I sure of this but adults may consume more dairy now than say 60 years ago.

        In any case we now have the slow development of T1 in adults which is usually misdiagnosed as T2. Then when the oral meds no longer work the docs figure is might be T 1 1/2 if they have heard of it and then T1 This T1 1/2 seems to me to be a valid diagnosis only because the full blown T1 is developing relatively slowly.

        Now I go off the rails a bit. I would hypothesize that, when an adult is first diagnosed with T2 diabetes that is in reality the early stages of T1, the auto immune destruction of beta cell progression might well be halted by a strict wfpbd that halts most or all the auto immune phenomena. Wait and the damage is done.




        0



        0
  8. I love that Dr. Greger has been doing a series on T1 diabetes. We have received lots of questions about this in the past. While I had heard about connections between T1 and dairy before, I am learning a lot more details in this NutritionFacts series. Very interesting.




    0



    0
  9. I agree this is a legitimate public health issue. But lets get a little perspective:

    1. Incidence of Type 1 diabetes in Australia: – approx. one person in 10,000, with no increase in the past 10 years.

    http://www.aihw.gov.au/WorkArea/DownloadAsset.aspx?id=60129550898

    2. it appears susceptibility to MAP infection from milk may also require a relatively uncommon genetic fault (polymorphism in a certain portion of the SCL 11A gene)

    3. globally, ‘probability of detecting MAP in 50-mL samples of pasteurized milk is lower than 1%’

    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18041953

    4. ‘sterilization at boiling point (100 C) should’ (destroy paratuberculosis) – Dr Greger – in this report

    5. UHT treatment is well in excess of boiling point = 135 °C for 1-2 seconds

    6. ‘The work conducted in this study describes the efficacy of direct steam injection (105 C for 3 seconds) a thermal process commonly used in the dairy industry, to eliminate M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis and a surrogate bacterium in milk, thus ensuring the absence of M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis in dairy products subject to these process conditions.’

    *Potential conflicts: Research undertaken by Nestlé Research Center, Nestec Ltd., Lausanne, Switzerland

    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26944840

    7. HTST pasteurization conditions equal to 15 s at > or =72 degrees C result in a more-than-sevenfold reduction of M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis.

    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17496131

    Summary.
    1. There is no such thing as a risk-free world. You might be surprised at the degree of fecal contamination (including human feces) we are exposed to. Somehow, we seem to adapt to it – albeit, not as well as my Labradors.
    2. ‘You can live to be a hundred if you give up all the things that make you want to live to be a hundred.’ (the incomparable Woody Allen).
    3. The vast majority of scientific studies indicate that milk consumption is health-beneficial in a host of ways. You have to weigh this against the very remote possibility of MAP infection.
    4. If you dont already have T1D by the time you are an adult (and I assume most on this forum are adults), you have even less to stress about.
    5. So long as you do not have a genetic mutation, and so long as you consume either boiled milk, UHT milk, or direct steam injected milk, you do not have to be overly concerned about MAP.
    6. If you are concerned about young children, choose UHT milk in preference to other milks. Or pre-heat pasteurised milk to boiling point. However, restrict this to milk from grass-fed cows.




    0



    0
    1. There is enough evidence that the consumption of cow’s milk products contribute to several chronic illnesses to probably avoid it altogether?




      0



      0
      1. Andrew, this is not the case. I have posted dozens of references in the past few weeks demonstrating the overwhelming benefits of milk consumption.
        Check my previous posts. If you prefer, nominate the chronic diseases of interest, and I will send what research I have.




        0



        0
      2. Hi, Andrew Fenwick. I am Christine, a NF volunteer moderator. Yes, there is plenty of evidence that the consumption of cow’s milk products contribute to chronic illnesses. We at NF recommend avoiding dairy products altogether. I hope that helps!




        0



        0
    2. Thanks for your comment. However, Dr Greger’s research bringing awareness of adverse health related effect of meat and dairy is based on a great number of studies. The statement below is from the website I shall include written by Dr Greger with over 300 references regarding this important topic.

      “The USAHA statement reveals the gamble the industry is willing to take. In Britain, when asked what the industry planned to do about paratuberculosis, spokespersons said that it was “something that bears watching”[347] but that they “preferred to defer action” until paraTB is proven to cause disease in humans.[348] This sounded all too familiar to the British public after the mad cow debacle, where the beef industry made the same wager–and lost.[349] According to some social science studies, it was the British public authorities’ decade-long insistence on the safety of beef that did the most damage to the public trust”.[350]
      Paratuberculosis And Crohn’s Disease: Got Milk?

      The American dairy industry is similarly gambling not only with the health of consumers, but with their own financial health. The financial impact of paraTB is enormous;[351] paratuberculosis currently costs the American livestock industry over a billion dollars a year.[352] A collapse in consumer confidence could raise that figure much higher.




      0



      0
      1. Thankyou Spring03 for your comments. From an animal welfare perspective I share an unease about the consumption of farmed animals. Those who conscientiously object to doing so have my admiration. In many ways, it is a higher human consciousness. Nonetheless, I am unconvinced farmed animals would preferentially choose extinction over the status quo. Conversely, many animals suffer terribly at the hands of humans. So for me at least, it is an ethical dilemma. I very much enjoy Dr Greger’s reports. I agree with much of what he says. His presentation of the subject is without peer. He has wisely avoided the trap of commercialising his message. Nonetheless, at times I find the scientific evidence to be selective and over-stated.
        Ostensibly, this is an evidence-based forum. My concern is the science (at times) is fashioned to suit an ethical premise, more in the manner of a religion. In response to Dr Greger’s recent video we had various hysterical responses from individuals in regards to milk consumption. These comments were completely disproportionate to the small risk of contracting T1D from consuming dairy. This risk cannot exceed 1 in 10,000 even if milk were responsible for all cases, which clearly it is not. That is, you have a higher chance of being hit by lightning in your lifetime (1 in 12,000). So, there is a legitimate public health concern with paratuberculosis. But some interpret Dr Greger’s report as if there is a degree of certainty to contracting type I diabetes if they consume milk. This is not the case, and I urge a greater sense of proportion. The overwhelming evidence is that dairy is beneficial in regards metabolic syndrome, obesity, cardiovascular disease, type 2 diabetes, and some (not all) cancers. It does not make any sense for the world to cease consuming dairy on the basis of a miniscule risk of contracting type 1diabetes. You cannot completely eliminate risk, and should not do so if it means forsaking a much greater benefit.




        0



        0
        1. You really do love your cow secretions Pete.

          I see overwhelming evidence of how dairy is deleterious to our health.

          I have previously linked you to the information collated on this website on dairy here http://nutritionfacts.org/topics/dairy/

          Thea also did to above.

          You’re either a dairy farmer, in the dairy industry or a milk addict lol.

          I really don’t think you’re going to convince anyone frequenting this site that what Dr Greger has reported on dairy over the years is wrong and in fact dairy is healthy.

          One final thing: cow’s milk is for baby cows. Not our body, not our milk. Make the connection.




          0



          0
          1. Hi Scott.
            Like everyone else from 1970 – 2000 I thoughtlessly abandoned milk, butter and cheese because ‘the science’ at the time told us dairy was bad, and margarine etc was good. This all turned out to be a load of mytho-makeup. I am long retired – which has allowed me time to study the research for myself. I can say with a high degree of confidence, pound for pound, dairy is the most beneficial food/drink on the planet. If I had more time (I dont) I would dedicate more of my remaining life in pursuit of replacing sugar/salt electrolyte drinks, colas (and even some milk-alternatives) with cows milk. The latter is a superior electrolyte, let alone the fat soluble vitamins, essential protein and dental protection it also provides. [In the spirit of objectivity, there is one study which indicates that young male milk milk drinkers benefit from increased height during their teenage years, but with an increased risk of osteoporosis in later life. This does not appear to apply to females who are protected by estrogen. In effect, additional male height comes at the expense of bone density in later life.
            My own theory (and it is mostly unproven) is that additional vitamin D and K would resolve this problem. ] Electrolyte drinks and colas (and even fructose-laden juices for that matter) are a far greater public health risk than milk. Seems to me Dr G’s obvious brilliance would be better spent deconstructing junk food and drinks, rather than attacking the remarkable alternative we have at our disposal.
            Cows are amazing animals. They take a relatively low value raw material (grass) and turn it into a very high value product. Thus, humans exploit cows, but in exchange the cows obtain an existence they would otherwise not enjoy. I will not attempt to place a value on a cows existence, other than to say the alternative (non-existence) has no value at all. I have the completely opposite view for animals that are forced to suffer their entire life. If we are to exploit animals, it is essential we protect them from unnecessary suffering. Otherwise, there are no ethical grounds for us to ‘create’ them. If I have any reservations about dairy, it is ‘factory-farms’, and the routine slaughtering of cows at the end of their milking life. I do not like that aspect one bit. On that basis alone I am perfectly OK for people to cease consuming milk. However, I am not perfectly OK for those decisions to be made under the guise of science. On balance, the science against dairy is overstated and just does not stack up.




            0



            0
  10. Hi Dr Greger and team

    Can you please follow up this video with the evidence connecting MAP to Chrohns disease.

    I have seen various pieces of research to support this and the obvious connection then with cows affected by Jonnes dx and the milk they produce

    Cheers

    Andrew




    0



    0
  11. BREAKING MEDICAL NEWS! – Yet one more reason to avoid dairy.

    NutritionFacts has extensively covered the links between dairy and various diseases. Here’s one more study to back that up – from our friends at PCRM:
    ————————–

    Dairy Decreases Survival from Prostate Cancer

    Dairy intake lowers chances of survival from prostate cancer, according to a study published in the International Journal of Cancer. Researchers followed 525 men with recent prostate cancer diagnoses and tracked dairy product consumption and mortality rates. Those who consumed three or more servings of high-fat dairy a day, including butter, increased their risk of death from cancer when compared to those who consumed less dairy. IGF-1 and other hormones specific to dairy may be the mechanisms behind the increased risk. These findings support previous research on dairy consumption and prostate cancer risk.

    Downer MK, Batista JL, Mucci LA, et al. Dairy intake in relation to prostate cancer survival. Int J Cancer. Published online February 10, 2017.




    0



    0
  12. Hi Thea. You are not being told the whole truth in regards milk and cancer.

    In two previous posts I indicated that milk/dairy may increase the risk of prostate cancer. I suggested that older males with a family history of prostate cancer should be cautious about their milk consumption. It is possible the increased risk is due to a deficiency of vitamin D and vitamin K. These deficiencies result in calcium being deposited in arteries and organs – where they do not belong, and are damaging. It is speculative, but perhaps this may include the prostate gland.

    You have chosen the one cancer (prostate) that is linked to cancer, and excluded all the other cancers where dairy demonstrates a benefit. CLA in milk is protective against many cancers. For example, it may significantly reduce your risk of breast cancer and colorectal cancer- the latter by a remarkable 50% (see below). Women, even more so than men, should consume full-fat dairy:

    ‘Conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) is anticarcinogenic in experimental animal studies’.

    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11525591/

    Colorectal Cancer

    ‘High-fat dairy food and CLA intake were examined in 60,708 women of age 40 to 76 (Swedish mammography cohort study) with 14.8 yr follow-up. It was found that women who consumed four or more servings of high-fat dairy foods per day (including whole milk, full-fat cultured milk, cheese, cream, sour cream and butter) showed half the risk of developing colorectal cancer, compared to women who consumed less than one serving per day ‘

    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16210722

    CLA intake was associated with an almost 30 percent reduction in the risk of colorectal cancer:

    ‘These prospective data suggest that high intakes of high-fat dairy foods and CLA may reduce the risk of colorectal cancer’.

    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16210722/

    ‘These data indicate that the growth-promoting effects of linoleic acid (LA) in the SW480 cell line (colon cancer) may be associated with enhanced conversion of AA to PGE2 but that the growth-suppressing effects of CLA isomers in both cell lines may be due to changes in AA distribution among cellular lipids and an altered prostaglandin profile’.

    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11768161

    ‘It is currently estimated that the average adult consumes only one third to one half of the amount of conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) that has been shown to reduce cancer in animal studies’.

    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16183568

    ‘CLA has been shown to inhibit chemically-induced skin, stomach, mammary or colon tumours in mice and rats. The inhibition of mammary tumours in rats is effective regardless of type of carcinogen or type or amount of dietary fat. CLA has also been shown to inhibit cholesterol-induced atherosclerosis in rabbits. When young animals (mice, pigs) are placed on CLA-containing diets after weaning they accumulate more body protein and less fat. Since CLA is derived from the milk of ruminant animals and is found primarily in their meat and in products derived from their milk there is a concerted world-wide effort to increase CLA content of milk by dietary means.

    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/10953669

    Breast Cancer

    ‘A diet composed of CLA-rich foods, particularly cheese, may protect against breast cancer in postmenopausal women’

    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11525591/

    ‘The data indicate that milk fat triglyceride-bound CLA, consisting primarily of the c9, t11 isomer, was cytotoxic towards MCF-7 (breast cancer) cells.

    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11131667

    ..although CLA intake was not related to overall breast cancer risk, there may be associations with tumor biology at least among premenopausal women.

    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15342449/

    ‘CLA isomer inhibits growth of MCF-7 (breast cancer) cells and suggested that this may be mediated through incorporation into cellular phospholipids and interference with the function of IGF-I and related signaling proteins.

    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19266226

    ‘Incidence of rat mammary tumors …was decreased by CLA (c9, t11) in all studies and by t10, c12-CLA in just a few that included it. Those 2 isomers decreased the incidence of forestomach tumors induced by benzo (a) pyrene in mice. Both isomers reduced breast and forestomach tumorigenesis. The c9, t11-CLA isomer did not affect the development of spontaneous tumors of the intestine or mammary gland, whereas t10, c12-CLA increased development of genetically induced mammary and intestinal tumors. In vitro, t10, c12-CLA inhibited the growth of mammary, colon, colorectal, gastric, prostate, and hepatoma cell lines’.

    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18029471

    Testicular Cancer

    ‘one might speculate that a diet enriched in CLA would be a useful tool in preventing RCC’.

    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15957258/

    This all makes perfect sense. From an evolutionary perspective, of course cows produce compounds which protect their offspring from cancer. Unfortunately, this does not necessarily apply to prostates in older males. You will not get natural CLA from plants. I would emphasise that synthetic CLA is not recommended as it is not identical to natural CLA in milk from grass-fed cows.

    I will not include the numerous studies indicating the protective effect of dairy in relation to immune function, asthma, T2 diabetes, obesity and cardiovascular disease. Happy to post them if requested.




    0



    0
    1. Pete Granger: Experts like Dr. Greger and others have gone through those studies and more. They either found flaws in those studies or found them non-compelling. In the end, when comparing to the entire body of evidence, the evidence is *against* dairy. Overall, dairy is disease-promoting. Also, while I do not think it would be productive to discuss theories with you, I have to say that I don’t think your ideas around evolution, etc. matches the science either.

      I’m not going to try to go through the studies you have listed as I’m not qualified to weed through all that. I have very carefully chosen experienced people who have gone through the evidence in detail, including the studies you think are so compelling. A random person on the internet who knows how to do a google search does not count as an expert I would trust. The experts I follow, the ones that I think are honest, have concluded that the evidence is against dairy. You can read a summary of the evidence concerning dairy on the topic page of NutritionFacts: http://nutritionfacts.org/topics/dairy/

      No one is telling you not to eat dairy. This site educates people on what the body of scientific evidence says. What you do with that information is up to you.




      0



      0
      1. Thanks Thea, for your response. Lets be quite clear. This site encourages people not to consume milk. It advises that milk consumption is associated with a multitude of chronic diseases. This puts at risk those who unquestionably believe this nonsense:

        ‘The most recent evidence suggested that intake of milk and dairy products was associated with reduced risk of childhood obesity. In adults, intake of dairy products was shown to improve body composition and facilitate weight loss during energy restriction. In addition, intake of milk and dairy products was associated with a neutral or reduced risk of type 2 diabetes and a reduced risk of cardiovascular disease, particularly stroke.
        Furthermore, the evidence suggested a beneficial effect of milk and dairy intake on bone mineral density but no association with risk of bone fracture. Among cancers, milk and dairy intake was inversely associated with colorectal cancer, bladder cancer, gastric cancer, and breast cancer, and not associated with risk of pancreatic cancer, ovarian cancer, or lung cancer, while the evidence for prostate cancer risk was inconsistent.
        Finally, consumption of milk and dairy products was not associated with all-cause mortality. Calcium-fortified plant-based drinks have been included as an alternative to dairy products in the nutrition recommendations in several countries. However, nutritionally, cow’s milk and plant-based drinks are completely different foods, and an evidence-based conclusion on the health value of the plant-based drinks requires more studies in humans’.

        Conclusion The totality of available scientific evidence supports that intake of milk and dairy products contribute to meet nutrient recommendations, and may protect against the most prevalent chronic diseases, whereas very few adverse effects have been reported.

        https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5122229/

        My strong advice is to critically analyse everything you read, have an open mind, and not just blindly accept everything as gospel. The latter is best confined to religion, not science. This site purports to educate people on ….the ‘body of scientific evidence’, but unfortunately, it does so quite selectively. Which, with respect, you were also doing. If it was presented as the (obviously objective) vegan/vegetarian scientific point of view (Veganfacts?) I would not object. If it just represented the positive elements of a plant-based diet (which are instructive and I mostly agree with) I would not object. But it is not presented this way. It focuses a lot of attention on the negatives of consuming milk, and selectively culls the majority of studies which demonstrate its overwhelming positives.
        Ceasing milk consumption may well lead to a more caring world, but it is not going to improve health. I completely respect, and in many ways support Dr G’s life-choice. But I dont want it to be represented as exclusively scientific in origin.
        I certainly do not compare myself to Dr G, but (like him) I am a graduate in agricultural science. I have a some idea how to read scientific reports.
        I do precisely what he and his team do, scour databases (generally via the internet) for research on the subjects of interest to me. I have been studying nutrition (as a hobby) for the past 10 years. In particular, research articles relating to dairy nutrition.
        We humans are quite adept at forming belief systems, and then subconsciously justifying them in spite of all the evidence to the contrary. There are hundreds of research studies which demonstrate the many benefits in consuming milk. But if the science is full of uncomfortable truths, the obvious temptation is to simply ignore it, or dismiss it as being flawed, or assign it to Big Dairy. The evidence is too consistent to dismiss it so lightly. We could argue the detail till ‘the cows come home’, but systematic reviews, and peer-reviewed meta –analysis are probably the best method of establishing the prevailing scientific consensus. On this basis Dr Greger and team are on very shaky ground when it comes to dairy.
        Here are 3 recent (2016) meta-analysis:

        2016 systematic review. ‘Moderate-quality evidence suggests:

        favorable associations between intakes of total dairy, low-fat dairy, cheese, and fermented dairy and the risk of stroke; intakes of low-fat dairy and milk and the risk of hypertension; total dairy and milk consumption and the risk of metabolic syndrome total dairy and cheese and the risk of T2Diabetes.

        High- to moderate-quality evidence supports:

        neutral associations between the consumption of total dairy, cheese, and yogurt and cardiovascular disease risk; the consumption of any form of dairy, except for fermented, and coronary artery disease risk the consumption of regular- and high-fat dairy, milk, and yogurt and stroke risk the consumption of regular- and high-fat dairy, cheese, yogurt, and fermented dairy and hypertension risk the consumption of regular- and high-fat dairy, milk, and fermented dairy and T2 Diabetes risk.

        http://advances.nutrition.org/content/7/6/1026.abstract

        2016 systematic review. Data from this systematic review indicate that the consumption of various forms of dairy products shows either favorable or neutral associations with cardiovascular-related clinical outcomes’.

        https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28140321

        ‘The results of this meta-analysis of prospective cohort studies have shown that dairy consumption may be associated with reduced risks of cardiovascular disease’

        https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26786887

        Another 2016 meta -analysis. ‘The highest level of milk consumption was significantly associated with a decreased risk of cognitive disorders, and the pooled OR (95% CI) was 0.72 (0.56, 0.93), with evidence of significant heterogeneity (I² = 64%, p = 0.001). ‘

        This is almost 30% reduction in cognitive disorders!

        https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27999380

        2016 meta-analysis. Milk and cheese consumption were inversely associated with stroke risk.

        https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4889169/

        In my last post, I presented research showing a possible 50% reduction in colorectal cancer.

        In regards to milk and evolutionary forces. Milk was not magically created in 7 days. It is the culmination of millions of years of mammalian evolution. Its obvious purpose is to nurture and protect offspring. There are components that are beneficial, but in other respects potentially harmful. There are other components which protect against its harmful aspects. CLA is a prime example. There are other paradoxes which help demonstrate milk’s connection to evolutionary forces. Despite the role of human milk to serve as a sole nutrient source for mammalian infants, the majority of milk oligosaccharides are not digestible. Why would this be so?
        We humans have recently discovered prebiotics are essential for our gut health, that gut health is crucial to wellbeing, and indigestible oligosaccharides are ideal prebiotics. Evolution resolved these issues millions of years before we had any understanding of them. It did so by creating prebiotics in milk. [The average mammalian species lifespan is a million years. Homo sapiens only evolved about 100 thousand years ago. So, other mammals had evolved these techniques long before humans]

        ‘The genomic sequence of this strain revealed approximately 700 genes that are unique to Bifidobacteria infantis, including a variety of co-regulated glycosidases, relative to other Bifidobacteria, implying a co-evolution of human milk oligosaccharides and the genetic capability of select intestinal bacteria to utilize them. The goal of ongoing research is to assign specific functions to the combined oligosaccharide–bacteria–host interactions that emerged from this evolutionary pressure’.

        https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2861563/

        Just to better demonstrate the commonality and importance of mammalian evolution and prebiotics, consider also the following:

        If B. infantis doesn’t dominate potentially harmful bacteria can move in and take over. “If you don’t have infant-associated bifidobacteria, a type called bacteroides can become dominant, and encourage the growth of E.
        coli,” says Mills.

        Now Mills’s team has found that a component of cow’s milk can encourage B.
        infantis to thrive. They used an enzyme to separate the oligosaccharides and proteins out of cow’s milk, and tried growing the bacteria on each of the two components. B. infantis failed to grow on the proteins extracted from cow’s milk. But the oligosaccharides had striking effects, encouraging the bacteria to grow dramatically.

        “It’s a bit of a surprise, because human milk is so different to cow’s milk,” says Mills.

        Because of those differences cow’s milk is thought to provide few benefits for babies. But, in terms of the oligosaccharides at least, the two types of milk are actually similar, says Mills.

        Journal reference: Applied and Environmental Microbiology DOI: 10.1128/AEM.00547-16

        https://www.newscientist.com/article/2084542-cows-milk-has-vital-prebiotic-for-a-healthy-babys-microbiome/

        ‘Most of the oligosaccharides detected in domestic animal milks have some structural features in common with human milk oligosaccharides’.

        http://jn.nutrition.org/content/137/3/847S.full

        Voila! Cows and humans faced the same evolutionary pressures over hundreds of thousands of years. We independently evolved a similar technique of improving gut health in infants. Without evolutionary forces we would have remained very simple organisms, rather than the complex ones we have become.

        As for plant-based milk alternatives, its buyer beware, especially with children:

        Rice Milk: ‘The court was told that Eliana Diskin was severely malnourished when she died at age five months after her loving parents fed her only on organically-grown brown rice milk with added vitamin supplements. – http://www.theage.com.au/articles/2002/05/13/1021002430788.html




        0



        0
        1. Pete Granger: You clearly have strong opinions, but your post is not proving anything. As an example, take your last point about someone who fed their kid rice milk only and the kid died. That tells us nothing since a) no authorities I am aware of suggest that feeding only rice milk to a baby is a good idea and b) when we tell people to avoid dairy in order to protect their health, we are telling them to avoid dairy after they are weaned (or should be weaned…). NutritionFacts has a video that very clearly states that breast milk (ie, dairy) is best for babies when it can be done. If you are mixing up this very basic concept, I have no reason to explore the rest of your thoughts or reason to believe that you have a good grasp of the research…

          I’m not going to get into all your points. You have made up your mind. I would say, however, that there is nothing in your posts which contradict what NutritionFacts explains: the body of scientific evidence concerning dairy is that dairy is disease promoting for humans who are past infancy. To review a summary of the body of scientific evidence, you can go to the link I provided in my previous post.




          0



          0
          1. Hi Thea.

            Some wise advice. “Doubt everything. Find your own light.” (Buddha).
            Yes, I am passionate because I believe some misleading is going on. That tends to get me a little cranked-up.
            Re: rice milk vs cows milk. If solely relied upon, cows milk (and much better still, human milk) will maintain infant human life. I simply used this to demonstrate two things: 1. The superior nutritional quality of milk when consumed by adults – in comparison to plant-based alternatives.
            2. The Diskins were educated, good parents who lived nearby. Mrs Diskin could not breast feed. Their antagonism to cows milk effectively cost them the life of their child. In the circumstances, this antagonism was completely unjustified and unwarranted. Some might say delusional. I am suggesting this same principle applies to the modest consumption of milk by adults within an otherwise plant-based diet. It sure works for the Mediterraneans. Conventional wisdom is not without flaw, but it pays to maintain a good deal of caution when departing too far from it. Go well.




            0



            0
            1. Pete Granger: I heard that cows milk fed straight (undiluted) to human babies would kill the baby just as surely as the rice milk did to the other baby. Cows milk is not designed for humans. There’s too much protein for one thing. Also, I’ll point out again that the nutrition we need as infants is different than the nutrition we need after we are weaned. Plant based diets have been proven again and again to contain the nutrition we need. (You can explore this site to learn what backs up that assertion.) Also, it is so off to compare rice milk to dairy milk and think it proves anything about eating the diet recommended here on NutritionFacts: a diet of *whole* plant foods. When it comes to justifying dairy consumption, your logic at its base does not hold.

              Another example: “Population ___ ate some dairy, so surely it’s good.” Again, faulty logic. A healthy population who consumes a very small amount of food X could be doing well in spite of food X, not because of it. We don’t know the answer to that until we get lots of studies from various angles. Luckily, we have those studies with dairy. We know from lots of studies and various angles that overall, dairy is a disease promoting food, even if some people can get away with eating small amounts. In other words, in the context of a whole plant food based diet, someone can eat some cookies (or dairy) now and then and be fine. That does not mean that cookies (or dairy) are health promoting…

              As for the Diskins, I’m sure they were very loving parents, but obviously they were not educated on nutrition, especially infant nutrition. That’s the point. The Diskins example shows us nothing other than people should educate themselves on nutrition. NutritionFacts, including it’s very important information about the dangers of dairy, is a good place to do that. If you believe the information here is lacking, then maybe this isn’t the place for you…

              Some advice back at you: Doubt is good when is causes us to question assumptions. Doubt is not good when it blinds us to the evidence our questions unfurl. The evidence concerning dairy is here if you are interested.




              0



              0
              1. Too bad they didn’t feed their child an infant formula. But they probably had an irrational fear of anything “not natural” or “synthetic.” But if you cannot breast feed, infant formula is clearly the best option. Not cow’s milk or rice milk.




                0



                0
                1. Benjamin Dowell: I agree with you. Some basic education about infant nutrition needs would have pointed them to infant formula in the absence of being able to breast feed. Or get a wet nurse. Or I’ve even heard that human milk can be purchased online. (Though I don’t know if that’s true or how safe it is…) Regardless, a very sad tragedy. My heart goes out to them.




                  0



                  0
              2. Hi again Thea.

                The milk/vegetable thing is not an either/or situation. The ideal diet contains both – as you would logically expect.

                The Diskins are American-born Australians. The Diskin family in Melbourne are well-established chiropractors and ”wholistic health and life care service’ operators. I suppose you would describe them as alternative health practitioners. I am unclear on the family connection, but the Diskins in this case were also alternative health adherents that consumed rice milk as an alternative to cows milk. If you like, the parents in this case experimented on the child on the basis of ‘beliefs’ (dairy is bad, plantfoods are good) that had no scientific foundation.

                Infants should be breast fed the first 6 -12 months of life. The Diskin child died from candidiasis bought on by malnutrition. Many children die of this same condition in third-world countries. Those poor starving children who are not blessed with the option of milk we in developed nations take so much for granted and so gratuitously forsake. I wonder what the 40 million Chinese starved by Chairman Mao would have done for a daily glass of milk?
                Or the 5 million Russians who starved to death and resorted to cannibalism to survive. Or my Vietnamese neighbor (a doctor) whose father and brother were shot in front of him, and was placed in a darkened hellhole for 16 years living on one small bowl of rice/day, supplemented with insects and rats. Or the 37 million starving people in Africa as we speak.
                http://www.independent.co.uk/news/world/africa/africa-drought-starvation-crisis-international-aid-zimbabwe-malawi-madagascar-horn-of-africa-a7493221.html I dont expect any of the unfortunates would be stressing too much about the one in 100,000 who might contract T1diabetes as a result of consuming milk.
                Its all about a stepping outside one’s little comfort zone and developing a healthy sense of proportion in regards the real world – as harsh as it may be. The alternative, is to crawl into a hole and hide from it all, and pretend it doesnt exist – which at times seems to be the prevailing theme on this website.

                In effect, the Diskin infant had adequate energy from the sugar in rice milk, but an absence of essential amino acids and proteins. Plant-based milks contain much less protein than cows milk. Milk is high in protein, carbohydrate (lactose), B-vitamins, vitamin A, vitamin D and zinc. It contains about three times the protein of breast milk. However, the principal proteins of human milk are a casein which is homologous to bovine B-casein, a-lactalbumin, lactoferrin, immunoglobulin IgA, lysozyme, and serum albumin. As indicated in the Diskin case, an excess of protein is much preferable to a shortage.

                Plant-based milks should not be fed to children under 5 years of ago. The treatment in cases like that of the Diskin child (if discovered in time) is very gradual introduction of milk products and otherwise increasing the intake of proteinaceous material.

                Its a somewhat different situation with cows milk. An infant will not be starved of essential nutrients. There are exceptions. Cows milk is low in iron, which may contribute to anemia – especially in the allergic infant with an irritated, abnormally ‘slow to mature’ intestinal lining. In these susceptible infants proteins may also enter the bloodstream causing runny nose, wheezing or rashes, and occasionally ear infections. Those who are lactose intolerant (which is rare in infants) may bloat, get diarrhea, and abdominal pain.

                Cows milk is OK after 12 months, but preferably as a supplement to breast milk. Yoghurt is an alternative which is kinder on the gut, and higher in calcium. Many parents also use iron-fortified DHA/AA-enriched milk formula as a supplement or replacement for cows milk. I expect, milk formulas will be significantly improved with the oligosaccaride discovery referred to in my previous correspondence. Cows milk or milk formulas should be certified organic (no hormones or antibiotics). Goat’s milk is another alternative for children that are allergic. Its proteins are less allergenic than cows milk.

                After 6 months, breast milk is inadequate for the child. It requires supplementation with both vegetables and animal products (which gives you a very good clue to the evolution of human diets). Vegans and vegetarians may well have a deficiency in vitamin B12 in breast milk, which can cause brain damage to the baby, as well as parental anemia. This is a consequence of excluding all foods of an animal origin over a prolonged period of time.
                Vitamin B12 is found mainly in animal products, milk and eggs.

                After weaning from the breast, 700 ml (25 ounces) milk/day is plenty. Of course, milk must be complemented with a diet high in organic vegetables – for a whole lot of good reasons. The combination is far better than either food alone.

                As for you other (‘faulty logic’) argument. I have provided you various meta-analyses on the consumption of dairy, including the most recent three conducted in 2016. They all demonstrate the same thing. Milk protects against disease – arguably, more so than any food on this planet. There are no more reliable research studies than peer-reviewed meta-analysis. Tell me how many meta-analysis has Dr G presented demonstrating the harmful effects of dairy? I would safely say, none. And I say that, because the overwhelming evidence indicates that milk is beneficial. Sure, there will be exceptions. Some older men may be more prone to prostate cancer – but they will have 40-50% lower risk of colorectal cancer, and a lower risk of cardiovascular disease, and metabolic syndrome, and diabetes, and dental caries, and a much lower risk of cognitive decline, and I could go on.
                Women will have a lower risk of breast cancer. I am giving you the big picture, not a series of carefully selected smaller pictures. You can choose to accept it or not, but the big-picture evidence doesn’t lie.

                As for your invitation to depart this website. That is a rather unkind comment Thea. I do hope you are not making it in any official capacity?
                Ordinarily, I would put such comments down to someone who is far less mature and far more narrow-minded than your good-self.

                Dr G provides very useful and informative advice on plant-based diets – which I (in the main) support. He should stick to that, rather than meandering down the path of milk-bashing. He is wrong on milk. Its that simple. His ethics on this matter (which I respect) have distorted his otherwise keen judgement. I am certain he would be the first to argue that my contributions fall within the parameters of ‘evidence-based’. Whether he or anyone else accepts that evidence is well beyond my control. But you need to have the good sense and maturity to accept that there are many different views out there, and there is room for all of them. That is, so long as you are completely confident in your understanding of the facts.




                0



                0
  13. Dr Greger, has there ever been a study on plant-based women (maybe in the Seventh Day Adventist groups) and the incidence or non-incidence of Type 1 diabetes births. I’m past that age, but it’s such an interesting subject and I was curious.




    0



    0
  14. BREAKING MEDICAL NEWS! (from PCRM)

    Milk Consumption Increases Mortality

    High dairy consumption increases overall mortality, according to a study published online in the American Journal of Epidemiology. Researchers followed milk, fruit, and vegetable consumption for more than 140,000 participants. Those who consumed the most milk and the fewest servings of fruits or vegetables had higher mortality rates. The increase in risk was almost three-fold among the women participants. The authors suspect increased oxidative stress from components in the milk as the reason behind the elevated mortality risk, while antioxidants found in fruits and vegetables reduce oxidation and mitigate the risk.

    Michaëlsson K, Wolk A, Melhus H, Byberg L. Milk, fruit and vegetable, and total antioxidant intakes in relation to mortality rates: cohort studies in women and men. Am J Epidemiol. Published online February 10, 2017.




    0



    0
  15. BREAKING MEDICAL NEWS! (from PCRM)

    Milk and Cheese Increase Risk for Breast Cancer

    Dairy products including cow’s milk may be associated with an increased risk for breast cancer, according to a new study funded by the National Cancer Institute. Researchers looked at the dietary intakes of 1,941 women diagnosed with breast cancer and found that those who consumed the most American, cheddar, and cream cheeses had a 53 percent increased risk for breast cancer. Those with ER- breast cancer (a designation of estrogen receptor status) who drank the most fluid milk had a 58 percent increased risk for breast cancer. Components in dairy such as insulin-like growth factor (IGF-1) and other growth hormones may be among the reasons for the increased risk for cancer.

    McCann SE, Hays J, Baumgart CW, et al. Usual consumption of specific dairy foods is associated with breast cancer in the Roswell Park Cancer Institute Databank and BioRepository. Curr Dev Nutr. 2017. cdn.117.000422; DOI: https://doi.org/10.3945/cdn.117.000422.




    0



    0
  16. Just the idea of drinking bovine feces would be be unappealing enough for most folks to think twice about milk, even without the health problems of dairy products. Add in the nightmare lives that 99% of dairy animals live, and even the tastiest cheese seems a little rank to anyone with empathy.




    0



    0
  17. I am curious if organic farms that grow veggies in compost made of manure have a similar paratuberculosis problem, or does the aging of the compost change the biology of the compost sufficiently to kill off the paratuberculosis.




    0



    0
  18. I was diagnosed with Type 1 DM about 34 years ago. Three years ago, my mother was diagnosed with mycobacterium avium complex and recovered after an intense 18-month regimen of clarithromycin, ethambutol, and rifampin. Although conventional clinical opinion regarding T1DM has been that beta cells are destroyed by the immune system and thus nonfunctional, C-peptide tests have shown I still produce some residual insulin. My questions: 1) is there a link between these two mycobacteria species; 2) could these subspecies be ‘shared’ within family microbiota; 3) is it possible that beta cells are only inhibited from producing insulin, due to chronic mycobacterium infection; and 4) would a treatment similar to that for MAC be effective for people with T1DM in order to eliminate the mycobacterium and rebalance the immune system? Thank you, in advance, for any comments you can provide and for your terrific work in nutrition and health!




    0



    0
  19. Hi Amy, I am one of the site moderators. You bring up some really interesting questions. Without further testing it is impossible to know the subtype of the mycobacterium that your mother had as it might possibly be the same thing that may have infected you 34 years ago and caused your T1DM. Reading up on the treatment of MAC the many antibiotics she was given have apparently not always worked 100% for this species and at times just gets rid of the symptoms. Mycobacteria is a “slow grower” that can be dormant for a really long time and may only be symptomatic once a person has a decrease in their own immunity to keep it at bay. So she may have the same infection or it could be related. For people with Type 1 the islet cells of the pancreas are usually fibrotic after being attacked in the autoimmune fashion. This is why they don’t improve the way type 2 diabetics can turn things around. They have never lost their ability to make insulin. It appears you can still make some insulin which there have been people that have put people on programs that enhance that ability and they can at times greatly reduce – although never eliminate – the amount of insulin they use. An immersion plan run by Gabriel Cousins, MD at his ranch in New Mexico helps people with diabetes by putting them on a 100% raw vegan diet. The primary focus of the plan is for T2DM but his video of the program includes a young man with type 1 who after being on the raw diet was able to reduce his insulin to just the bedtime dose. I am assuming the diet helped to decrease the total inflammation in the body and enhance whatever insulin producing capacity he had remaining. If you are interested in learning more the link to the program is here: http://treeoflifecenterus.com/retreat/diabetes-recovery-program/




    0



    0
  20. any new information on type 1 diabetes? my nephew is 14 and has been diagnosed. all I know that the pancreatic cells are still growing in his age so is there something we can do? how to stop autoimmune system from killing the cells?




    0



    0

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Pin It on Pinterest

Share This