Industry Response to Bovine Leukemia Virus in Breast Cancer

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What was the response to the revelation that as many as 37% of breast cancer cases may be attributable to exposure to bovine leukemia virus, a cancer-causing cow virus, found in the milk of nearly every dairy herd in the United States?

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Below is an approximation of this video’s audio content. To see any graphs, charts, graphics, images, and quotes to which Dr. Greger may be referring, watch the above video.

What was the response to the revelation that as many as 37% of breast cancer cases may be attributable to exposure to bovine leukemia virus, a cancer-causing cow virus, found in the milk of nearly every dairy herd in the United States?

The industry pointed out that some women without breast cancer harbored the virus, too. Indeed, the virus was also found in the tissues of 29% of women who did not have breast cancer—to which the researchers replied: yet.

It can take decades before a breast tumor can be picked up by mammography. So, even though they’re harboring this virus in their breast, and feel perfectly fine, the cancer may still be on its way. That’s how other cancer-causing delta retroviruses appear to work. These viruses can make proteins that interfere with our DNA repair mechanisms. Infected cells are then more susceptible to carcinogens, and slowly accumulate mutations over time. Therefore, the evidence of BLV in normal breast tissues, prior to malignant and premalignant changes, would be expected. Kind of like what you see with cervical cancer, in which the causative virus is not just found in the cancerous tissue, but also the precancerous tissue, and the normal tissue surrounding the malignant tumor.

If bovine leukemia virus is really causing thousands of cases of breast cancer every year, then, hey, since it’s a retrovirus, maybe some of the antiretroviral therapies (like some of the AIDS drugs) may be able to counter the virus—but, best to not get infected in the first place.

The cattle industry appeared more concerned about “consumer confidence” than consumer cancer. “A public relations brouhaha”—concerned that they might actually be forced to control these diseases in dairy cattle, and how the public would perceive it.

What would control look like? Well, bovine leukemia virus is a blood-borne virus. Wait a second; then how’s it spread? Is Bessie sharing dirty needles? Yes! Blood-contaminated needles, and saws, and gougers, pliers, taggers, knives, and tongs that they don’t disinfect between animals. So, if you’re gouging or sawing at their heads instead of burning, they’re “likely to drive blood into the next animal.” Or, when you’re sticking your arm into her rectum for artificial insemination, it’s not “uncommon for [there to be] rectal bleeding,” and then, they just go from one cow to the next.

More than 20 countries have successfully eradicated bovine leukemia virus from their herds by changing their practices—whereas in the U.S., it remains an epidemic, in part because we’re not cleaning and disinfecting blood-contaminated equipment for things like “supernumerary teat removal.” See, “extra teats detracts from the beauty of the cow.” So, “gently pull…[it] from the udder and cut [it off] with a pair of scissors.” Just make sure you clean those scissors. Otherwise, you could be spreading bovine leukemia virus from calf to calf, and ultimately into someone’s breakfast, lunch, or dinner. Of course, you could just not slice off their teats at all. But then, how would you improve the appearance of their udders?

Please consider volunteering to help out on the site.

Image thanks to Roswell Park via flickr

Below is an approximation of this video’s audio content. To see any graphs, charts, graphics, images, and quotes to which Dr. Greger may be referring, watch the above video.

What was the response to the revelation that as many as 37% of breast cancer cases may be attributable to exposure to bovine leukemia virus, a cancer-causing cow virus, found in the milk of nearly every dairy herd in the United States?

The industry pointed out that some women without breast cancer harbored the virus, too. Indeed, the virus was also found in the tissues of 29% of women who did not have breast cancer—to which the researchers replied: yet.

It can take decades before a breast tumor can be picked up by mammography. So, even though they’re harboring this virus in their breast, and feel perfectly fine, the cancer may still be on its way. That’s how other cancer-causing delta retroviruses appear to work. These viruses can make proteins that interfere with our DNA repair mechanisms. Infected cells are then more susceptible to carcinogens, and slowly accumulate mutations over time. Therefore, the evidence of BLV in normal breast tissues, prior to malignant and premalignant changes, would be expected. Kind of like what you see with cervical cancer, in which the causative virus is not just found in the cancerous tissue, but also the precancerous tissue, and the normal tissue surrounding the malignant tumor.

If bovine leukemia virus is really causing thousands of cases of breast cancer every year, then, hey, since it’s a retrovirus, maybe some of the antiretroviral therapies (like some of the AIDS drugs) may be able to counter the virus—but, best to not get infected in the first place.

The cattle industry appeared more concerned about “consumer confidence” than consumer cancer. “A public relations brouhaha”—concerned that they might actually be forced to control these diseases in dairy cattle, and how the public would perceive it.

What would control look like? Well, bovine leukemia virus is a blood-borne virus. Wait a second; then how’s it spread? Is Bessie sharing dirty needles? Yes! Blood-contaminated needles, and saws, and gougers, pliers, taggers, knives, and tongs that they don’t disinfect between animals. So, if you’re gouging or sawing at their heads instead of burning, they’re “likely to drive blood into the next animal.” Or, when you’re sticking your arm into her rectum for artificial insemination, it’s not “uncommon for [there to be] rectal bleeding,” and then, they just go from one cow to the next.

More than 20 countries have successfully eradicated bovine leukemia virus from their herds by changing their practices—whereas in the U.S., it remains an epidemic, in part because we’re not cleaning and disinfecting blood-contaminated equipment for things like “supernumerary teat removal.” See, “extra teats detracts from the beauty of the cow.” So, “gently pull…[it] from the udder and cut [it off] with a pair of scissors.” Just make sure you clean those scissors. Otherwise, you could be spreading bovine leukemia virus from calf to calf, and ultimately into someone’s breakfast, lunch, or dinner. Of course, you could just not slice off their teats at all. But then, how would you improve the appearance of their udders?

Please consider volunteering to help out on the site.

Image thanks to Roswell Park via flickr

Doctor's Note

Up to 37% of breast cancer cases attributable to exposure to bovine leukemia virus? See The Role of Bovine Leukemia Virus in Breast Cancer, and Is Bovine Leukemia Virus in Milk Infectious?

The meat and dairy industry’s intransigence in the face of a human health threat reminds me of the antibiotics and steroids issues—continuing to place the public at risk to save a few bucks. See, for example, Antibiotics: Agribusinesses’ Pound of Flesh, and Zeranol Use in Meat and Breast Cancer.

If you haven’t yet, you can subscribe to my videos for free by clicking here.

122 responses to “Industry Response to Bovine Leukemia Virus in Breast Cancer

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    1. It seems to me that each day in this world we reach a new level of insanity plant_this_thought. Its hard not to feel discouraged and ovefwhelmed by it




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    2. A connection between what we eat and disease is still not something majority of people will accept . They have charity events out in front of the largest grocery store in this town every week. Every week it’s the same thing sausage, hotdogs and bbq hamburgers . Almost no one sees the irony.




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      1. Thank you Dr G. for this great educational video. It is true that food is medicine and information for our DNA. However, majority of food industries and drug industries their first purpose is profit. That is why I think this website is great for educating ourselves to make a best decision for our health and health of our families.




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        1. Looking at the big picture/evolution, which is hard to do in these days of science dissecting everything into smaller and smaller pieces to see if they can figure out how Nature works (not out of curiosity or self improvement, but for profit), it’s interesting to know the Saints say there are 4 ages. The Golden age, where Truth and contemplation reigned, The Silver age, the age of worship and devotion, The Copper Age, the age of idol worship, and the present would be the Iron Age, of age of matter/greed.




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      2. Indeed. I was reading about neurological disease in “How not to die” just today and I thought to myself: maybe all the madness I see daily is related to what the vast majority eats. People are feeding on disease.

        And they give money and buy more disease to get rid of it. What a sick vicious circle.




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    3. How pathetic and infuriating! Different “charity” but I still get calls and emails from the Diabetes Assoc. pleading for donations to “help find the cure” after curing my own diabetes almost 5 years ago with a WFPB diet.




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    4. I’m waiting for PINK MILK…that will be the sign that our spiritual overlords are WITH US. March here…march there…wear pink this…pink that…hope that all the pink makes the problem go away?




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    1. Yes . The technician uses a plastic sleeve on his arm and reaches in through the rectum to open or a least to feel if the cervix is open and then uses a straw with the semen in it into the vulva of the cow and depositing the semen in the uterine body of the cow.




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    2. The The artificial insemination technician inserts his hand into the rectum and then the issemination toube goes into the cervix area through the vulva and that is what he’s talking about he knows what he’s talking about




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      1. Yeah, we are 95 percent vegan in our household, and this is one of the main reasons why. But I admit I did not know about the rectal thing. And now that I know about this virus….heavens! But probably too late for those of us raised on dairy. :-(




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      2. If I posted this on FB it would get totally bypassed because it’s so “inconveniently unpleasant”, unlike the latest celeb gossip, meme, or umpteenth selfie. Even the awesome Dr G videos get no play because they are just too real for most I guess, it scares how oblivious the masses chose to be. Ignorance isn’t bliss when it causes suffering!




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        1. yes Vege-tater, seems thats the way.. look how many comments a video about supplements (omega 3) gets recently, over 500 ! And here we have a topic that affects most of us , and people barely blink. I don’t understand it.




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        2. Most people are motivated by three things: greed, aversion, and delusion. That’s what the man they call the Buddha taught 2500 years ago. Seems like it still holds today.




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  1. It’s unbelievable. I have story after story like this. I live in Salina KS and we regularly have hot dogs and candy served at so called Cancer fund raisers it’s unbelievable. My husband passed away of breast cancer 2 years ago, we went to MD Anderson and they had a Milk Shake Recipe for cancer patients which included ice cream, milk, and protein powder. And my husbands Dr. Said that there was no way for my husband to improve his immune system through diet. I was dumb founded by the ignorance in one of the so called premiere institutions for Cancer treatment.




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    1. At the hospital I used work at, the top heart surgery center in our region, a sparkly new MacDonald’s was front and center in the lobby. I once saw a thoracic surgeon, one of the best, a pioneer in heart/lung transplant, puffing on a cigarette during a break.




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      1. Personally, It’s my opinion that ALL physicians should be required to tell any of their patients who wish to know what their (the physician’s) blood work numbers are: cholesterol, etc., so that we can decide if they know enough about health to keep themselves healthy. If they’re taking drugs for cholesterol, blood pressure, gout, etc. perhaps we have some right to know that.




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        1. Haha that would be interesting! I have seen some of the plantbased doctors actually share theirs at conferences! I think I’ll start doing that with patients haha




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      2. Do you deny ” one of the bes pitoneers in heart/lung transplant” a puff on a cigarette during a break? For Christ’s sake, cut the guy some slack, his job must be one of the worst. So righteous!




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        1. Seriously??? You want the guy that cuts into your chest to fix your lungs to say, “hey, its cool for me to light up a Malboro, but, you know, its bad for you, so don’t do that”. And I should trust that advice, right? Don’t you see the issue here? If as an expert of the body, this guy abuses his and sets a terrible example, has double standards. And I am sure that’s okay for you, but not for everyone that has lung cancer or some other terrible disease.




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          1. Unfortunately it seems to have become the “hypocritic oath”, a stigma that only a few genuine doctors manage to transcend through their own hard won efforts! Do I need to name names? :)




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          2. You forgot the small text.. As long as prevention gets me paid…. Which we all know DOESN’T get the doctor or big pharma paid. There’s no profit in prevention. The oath means nothing when it comes time to pay the 1/2 million in medical school bills.




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    2. I am sorry to hear about your loss. I wish you good health and it is great that you are using Dr. G. website for evidence based information about health and nutrition.




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    3. I’m sorry for your loss. So sad. Unfortunately this is FAR too common! The foods fed to cancer patients and prescribed by dieticians when they are at ‘malnutrition risk’ is just embarrassing. In cancer guidelines here there is a drug for oesophageal and throat/mouth cancer pain that is described to be sprinkled over icecream… I couldn’t believe my eyes!




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    1. It would be amazing if they could take their marketing insistence and public promotions and applying it to fruit and vegetables though!




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      1. They will the moment they think it will make them a more profit. Corporate structure has become the cancer, companies have grown too large (again) and the only reason to form a corporation is to make a profit, and then the corporation must of course-make a profit.




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  2. I just commented on Facebook and noticed that there were only about 350 shares. Please, everyone, social media is such a powerful tool, we need to get this out there.




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    1. I plan on it as I often do, but like I already said, people now ignore all my posts because I always share health info which apparently is too real or guilt inducing. So frustrating.




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    1. My thoughts are that overall, it’s hard to say without the evidence, especially if we are talking something encoded into DNA, however like many other viruses, perhaps this one can lay dormant, and this can be influenced by lifestyle factors, for example by eliminating the growth and cancer promoters in meat and dairy foods and environmental contaminants, so that even if the virus causes DNA damage, a cancer is less likely to grow as the damage can be detected and cleared by a healthy immune system in a healthy host AND the growth promoters aren’t present encouraging its growth, if that makes sense? So even if you cannot remove the virus, you may be able to prevent it leading to a cancer. That was my interpretation anyway!




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    2. Here’s your first step. STOP DRINKING MILK (and stop all other dairy intake for that matter). You can really only control what goes in your mouth. You can educate and influence others on your decision without condemning their choices. If others want to drink milk that is still their responsibility and they must consider that there are consequences (as there are in all actions in life, both good and bad). Point them to the research you did (like this website) and bring up an article or 2 that you found interesting. Ask for their honest opinion and listen. Your relationship is more important than their diet.




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  3. Did I miss something? This video was billed as an industry response! It is hardly that in any terms!
    I am no fan of the dairy industry and don’t consume their products. Therefore I am wholly supportive of bringing them to comment on the situation. This recent blog billed as a response is virtually no response at all.
    Were they given a platform? How can this post be remotely considered an industry response?
    Did they have anything else to say? Were they given a chance between the findings and the accusations?
    Again as a life long vegetarian who doesn’t consume milk etc, I am on your side, but to call this an industry response, is utter nonsense.




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    1. As with the tobacco industry, they will respond when they have to. When milk sales drop or the government gets involved and forces them to respond. We may get warning labels on milk cartons.




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      1. Yes because everyone reads warning labels, or believes them. An ethical company removes the product, not warns people it’s harmful!




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      2. There is a huge glut of cheese in the US right now as consumption has decreased dramatically . (Yeah!) and, so the government has decided to help out and buy it. The plan supposedly is to give it to the schools. Great, and poison our kids further. Dr. Neal Barnard and the PCRM are pushing for it to be used for filling potholes in our roads!




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    2. It is great because now we know. Industry response to the news that that their product is a via of cancer was a ‘best management practice’ to minimize economical damage to themselves.




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    3. I have seen a few conferences and talk shows where dairy representatives have been invited and cease to show. Their efforts tend to be on hiding and ‘correcting misinformation’ by focusing on protein and calcium requirements of women and children…. I wouldn’t be surprised if this has been all their response in so far!




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    4. >Did I miss something?
      Yes.

      >Were they given a platform?
      A giant industry like dairy has the cash and public relations staff to create their own platform if they want to.

      >How can this post be remotely considered an industry response?
      The industry response in 21 countries was to successfully eradicate BLV
      from their herds. The industry response in the USA so far has been to
      ignore the problem. When a choice is made not to do anything then that
      is a response.

      >Did they have anything else to say?
      I don’t know. Perhaps, “Oh, shit! Cardiovascular disease and now cancer! Sell my shares, Gloria!”

      >Were they given a chance between the findings and the accusations?

      They’ve know about BLV transmission to humans for years. Certainly 21 other countries have known about it long enough to do something about it. In the USA oversight and industry are highly linked and money concerns often override health concerns, especially in the short term.




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    5. Yeah…the sad fact that their “reaction” was a NON response shows total unconcern, except perhaps for their profit margin, while denying the connection.




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  4. Knowing what we do to other animals, we have to truly wonder if we do not deserve all this, after all. Human cruelty towards non-humans and human stupidity becomes self-inflicted karma. Support the abuse and death of trillions and get terminally ill. Interesting.




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  5. The information presented here can be used for litigation. If you are tested positive for the virus and have been sold milk products, you can have reasonable case against farms and the government for promoting it. Save your receipts.




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    1. It would actually be so awesome to see that happen, but seems unlikely if you look at the track record of the insanity the big indu$trie$ can get away with… like Monsanto suing the innocent organic farmers polluted with the over-blow of neighboring GMO pollen! Hearing about injustices like that makes me want to go ballistic, it is so beyond ludicrous!




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  6. When I became a vegan, it was for (my) health purposes rather than out of sentiment toward the animals used to provide my omnivore diet. After watching today’s video, I can assure you that, were I not already a vegan, I would become one…just so the poor cows can keep any odd or vestigial teats and damn the cosmetic flaws. Honestly, who is looking at the teats on a milk cow, other than, perhaps, the odd, passing horny bull?




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    1. I don’t think dairy cows ever see a live bull. It’s artificial insemination for most, or maybe all, of them. Can you imagine having a breast or nipple cut off without anesthesia?

      I wish my sister would pay attention to this and other info about how cruelly meat animals are treated. She truly relates to animals better than to people, but I think the only vegetable she ever eats is broccoli. Talk about denial…




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        1. Maybe I should give it to her for Christmas. The trouble is, since she doesn’t like vegetables it’s hard to imagine what she would eat. She has always been picky eater. As a kid she practically lived on sunflower seeds – the ones in little cellophane bags still in the shells. Now she can’t eat them because of diverticulosis. I can’t think of anything healthy she eats except broccoli. She and her partner have a very limited diet. He does the cooking and is NOT an inspired or curious chef.




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          1. Rebecca Cody: Ideas: She could eat a Dr. McDougall type diet? : Lot of starchy foods like beans and whole grains with just some veggies (whatever she will eat) and maybe some nut sauces. I hear you about the diverticulosis, but if the nuts are ground into cream, I wouldn’t think that would be a problem. Also if she eats fruit that’s good. And mushrooms. Maybe there is more that she would eat than you think? And then as her tastes change, she might accept more veggies over time. Just trying to help. :-)




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      1. Denial seems as ubiquitous as indifference and willful ignorance. What I find really puzzling are “ethical” vegetarians who eat no vegetables but exist on dairy and can somehow rationalize that killing an animal outright for food is wrong but enslaving, torturing, and abusing it for food is acceptable. Lesson, never question their delusions! lol




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    2. It’s quite horrible really isn’t it :( I feel that most people usually start with one reason of three for changing their diet- 1. health/nutrition 2. ethics 3. environmental… but they soon discover the interplay and become ‘vegan’ or ‘plant-based’ for everything!




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    3. I think the appearance is for market? Like when they walk them around the pens at farms shows to sell them maybe? I know aesthetics is important for that…sadly




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  7. For an individual who was exposed to meat/dairy most of their life but gave it up years ago, is the damage done in regards to bovine leukemia virus or is our immune system capable of eliminating it over some period of time?




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    1. It’s hard to say without the evidence, especially if we are talking something encoded into DNA, however like many other viruses, perhaps this one can lay dormant, and this can be influenced by lifestyle factors, for example by eliminating the growth and cancer promoters in meat and dairy foods and environmental contaminants, so that even if the virus causes DNA damage, a cancer is less likely to grow as the damage can be detected and cleared by a healthy immune system in a healthy host AND the growth promoters aren’t present encouraging its growth, if that makes sense? So even if you cannot remove the virus, you may be able to prevent it leading to a cancer. That was my interpretation anyway!




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      1. Thank you for responses. My sister, who also turned vegan just asked me if she can pass the virus on to her infant through birth process or breast feeding. A whole new can of worms to be sorted out…




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        1. No problem!

          I believe it can be transferred that way between cattle, especially when the viral load is high, especially through colostrum. I am unsure about human transfer sorry!




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        2. My understanding is that BLV is a retrovirus and
          “Transmission of animal retroviruses has been demonstrated both for oncogenic retroviruses and animal lentiviruses. In humans, breast-feeding is the major route for mother-to-child transmission of Human T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma Virus type I (HTLV-I). HTLV-I transmission by breast milk is associated with ingestion of infected cells and can be prevented by formula-feeding. Breast-feeding transmission of the Human Immunodeficiency Virus type 1 (HIV-1) has only been recently recognized as responsible for one to two thirds of mother-to-child transmission in breast-fed populations. .”
          http://www.clinicalmicrobiologyandinfection.com/article/S1198-743X(14)65206-X/fulltext

          As far as I know, transmission of BLV by human breast milk has not been demonstrated. However, the possibility exists..Nevertheless, breast feeding offers many health benefits for both mother and child, Your sister should seek professional medical advice if she is contemplating abandoning breast feeding because of the possibility of transmitting BLV. I am not sure about the possibility of transmission via the birth process.




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    2. (From https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK19458/ )

      “Both arms of the immune system respond to retroviral infections, and it would appear that, depending on the virus in question, both cellular immunity and humoral immunity are important in controlling infection. The role of humoral immunity is relatively direct—antibodies against the
      Env proteins cause inactivation or clearance of the virus. The cellular immune response affects viral replication indirectly by killing cells
      that express foreign (viral) proteins. The importance of the humoral response is demonstrated by the fact that certain retroviruses, notably
      the primate lentiviruses, use extensive glycosylation of their envelope proteins to shield their virions from host antibodies. However, most
      retroviruses do not kill their host cells, which puts a special premium on the elimination of infected cells and on the cellular immune
      response. To be effective, the cellular immune system must recognize and kill an infected cell before it can release enough virus to infect at
      least one more cell.”

      I don’t know if BLV is among the ones that are susceptible to removal by the immune system. I’ll look into it.




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  8. BLV has been eradicated in 21 countries but we still allow it in the US, that’s a disgrace! I urge everyone to contact their representaive in Congress.




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  9. Different virus of concern, but has anyone any info on the SV40 virus that infected the polio vaccines in the 50’s? Considering that at least 90% of the population got multiple doses of the vaccine, including myself, I can’t help but wonder about the effects.




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    1. You could have a look at the Wikipedia article and then follow up the references provided. It concluded by noting
      “Population level studies show no evidence of any increase in cancer incidence as a result of exposure,[29] though SV40 has been extensively studied.[30] A thirty-five year followup found no excess of the cancers putatively associated with SV40.[31]
      https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/SV40




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    1. Vegan or not, an aqaintence from Europe said to me a while back, “Americans have no respect for food. We’d never treat our food the way you do.” I don’t know how much better it is over there today, but it’s better than the US.




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      1. baggman744: re: better in Europe
        From what I understand, Ireland prides itself on good treatment of it’s food non-human animals. The woman who does “Bite Size Vegan” recently did a bunch of research on what life is like for those animals there. You can see her talk along with the references for the research at the following if you are interested: “The Best We Have To Offer” http://bitesizevegan.com/ethics-and-morality/the-best-we-have-to-offer-inside-irelands-humane-farming/ Spoiler alert: It’s not pretty. In my opinion, the people “over there” are fooling themselves and have an deep cultural myth to collectively bust.




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  10. Poor cows. It’s like they are in a concentration camp. A mainstream movie that shows the plight of animals and is an entertaining movie, though it is old, is Fast Food Nation. Have your meat eating friends watch that and see if they can eat meat again.




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  11. What about food that has been made on equipment that also processes animal products such as dairy, as some labels state? Is it possible for the BLV virus to infect vegan processed food?




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  12. Would Doctor Greger’s video of October 3, 2016 “How Not to Die from Cancer” be the solution for Bovine Leukemia Virus in humans?




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    1. I have the hardest time keeping the book! I keep giving them away to anyone who shows any interest. Maybe an iBook. Not likely I’ll give my iPad away…..




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      1. I’m a volunteer with Dr. Greger. What an excellent problem to have! People are interested in learning about how to improve their health and others. Your generosity is commended!




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  13. Dr. Greger, I just read in the Sunday Express an article titled “Potatoes and cereals are health risk, while dairy is good for you, says new study” about a study done at Masaryk University in the Czech Republic and published in the Journal of Food and Nutrition Research. In all likelihood just another junk study. Could you consider doing yet another video that could be used as a counter-punch to once and for all confront this constant stream of headline grabbing misinformation. I’m sure your legion of followers would help you make it go viral and could be used to rebuke such stories in their comment sections.
    Link : http://www.express.co.uk/life-style/health/721555/Potatoes-cereals-health-risk-heart-disease-dairy-good-for-you-new-study




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    1. Hi Andrew, I’m a volunteer for Dr. Greger. I did a little bit of research on this article, and found a few issues with this publication. First, I am very surprised that such an extensive study would be published in a relatively low-key journal such as the Journal of Food and Nutrition Research, and not a more prominent journal. Second, the paper mentions that the strongest correlation in the entire study is “between raised cholesterol in men and the combined consumption of animal fat and animal protein.” Interesting how the article you shared did not mention that. Additionally, it does not appear as if the researchers differentiated between processed potatoes and cereal grains (french fries, breakfast cereals, and other highly processed foods) and unprocessed potatoes and cereal grains. If they did not account for this extremely important factor, the results of the study will not accurately depict how unprocessed versus processed cereal grains influence heart disease risk. Thank you for bringing our attention to this article. Maybe Dr. Greger will address this study in the future!




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    1. pretty much shoulder deep up the poop shoot to feel the vagina and cervix located just below the rectum. Then guide the syringe/pipette through the reproductive tract through to the front side of the cervix.

      TMI? This is nothing compared to the treatment farm animals get on modern “farms”




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      1. On the mark….and clearly, with time and money and the environment of farming cross contamination is inevitable…..Worked on a farm as a youngster and will never forget the amount of fecal material literally everywhere from cows…. Cleaning equipment and clothing was a daily chore and never 100%, ever….. Dr. Alan Kadish Moderator for Dr. Greger




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  14. Since last night (10/15) I am unable to Login or to access the 2nd in this 3 video series on BLV. Anyone else having a problem? I hope it’s just a technical glitch at NF.org.




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    1. Marian: Thanks for saying something. I’m having trouble too, but thought it might just be me. Looks like there is a problem with the site? Hopefully it will be resolved soon.




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  15. I thought about this today, that perhaps the main stumbling block to getting rid of the ludicrous cattle/dairy industry is mostly related to the insecurity of the unknown if it was eliminated, for those in the industry, rather than providing lots of evidence about how unethical and how unhealthy it is. The reason they would respond with ‘yeah but 29% of those carrying it don’t have cancer’ is so blatantly foolish, that they would have actually had to think hard to come up with it. I believe wholeheartedly that they are aware of the truth of dairy’s damage to health, but to be honest, what would they do without the industry (in their eyes)? If society could create a passage/transition system for people to get out of the industry into something else and maintain a similar degree of income, I suspect it would function well.




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    1. The problem is deeper than that , the dairy industry is very large . while some dairy products show a decline like white milk and ice cream ,cheese ,yogurt sales are up . People are just not educated to know how bad it is for their health and health of the cows too.
      Dairy in Canada is a $6 billion industry , compare that to all fruits and vegetables at $1.5 billion.
      That is just the milk , dairy cows are a major part of the fast food hamburger joints.
      Then we have supply management in Canada , you need a license to produce milk in Canada . The right to produce one kilogram of milk costs $24000, so a herd of say 50 cows around 1.5 million . Anybody with cows are very wealthy anyways.




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  16. The reference to artificial insemination at 02:40 is a little confusing , as it implies that this takes place via the rectum. I am not a veterinary doctor, but this might need some further examination.




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  17. I also posted this in another video so sorry if some of you read this twice.

    Hello Dr. Greger & Team, hello NF community. I need your help.

    My 70 year old mother was recently diagnosed with breast cancer. She was shocked because she was always very positive that she would not get cancer. She is a very active person and you would not guess her age correctly if you see her. :)

    After all the routine checks her doctor made a biopsy and found out that it is an invasive carcinoma. They operated very quickly and removed 3 small tumors. Operation went by quickly and she is also recovering very well from the operation. Just minor pain and she should not lift heavy things.

    Now the doctor recommends chemotherapy and radiation. Furthermore she has a few friends, some doctors as well, who also had cancer and also recommend she should do chemotherapy and radiation. It’s a problem. I gave her several books to read, Overdiagnosed, China-Study, Whole, and several NF videos. She only speaks german and very little english so i can not give her the actual studies to read. I also started her on a WFPB diet with focus on cancer fighting food.

    I am afraid that all the talk about chemotherapy and radiation from her friends and doctors won’t let her make an objective decision.

    I will go with her to her next meeting with her doctor and try to find out if her doctor is open to a WFPB approach.

    It would be great if you can point me to studies that show that chemotherapy and radiation does more harm than good and that a WFPB diet with meditation and exercise is at the very last as effective in stopping cancer growth and spread.

    Thanks a lot for all your help.




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