Meat Consumption & the Development of Type 1 Diabetes

Meat Consumption & the Development of Type 1 Diabetes
5 (100%) 2 votes

Eating meat during breastfeeding is associated with an increased risk of type 1 diabetes, a consequence perhaps of meat glycotoxins or paratuberculosis bacteria that may be passed though breast milk.

Discuss
Republish

Below is an approximation of this video’s audio content. To see any graphs, charts, graphics, images, and quotes to which Dr. Greger may be referring, watch the above video.

Mycobacterium paratuberculosis is not just a serious problem for the global livestock industry, but may be a trigger for type 1 diabetes, given that paraTB bacteria have been found in the bloodstream of the majority of type 1 diabetics tested—presumably exposed through the retail milk supply, as they can survive pasteurization.

But, what about the meat supply? Mycobacterium paratuberculosis has been found in beef, pork, and chicken. It’s an intestinal bug, and unfortunately, “faecal contamination of the carcass” in the slaughter plant is simply unavoidable. And then, unless it’s cooked well-done, it “could harbor” living mycobacterium avium paratuberculosis bacteria.

Meat-wise, “[g]round beef [may represent] the greatest potential risk for harboring” these paratuberculosis bacteria, as “a significant proportion originates from culled dairy cattle,” which may be culled because they have paratuberculosis, and go straight into the human food chain. There’s also a greater prevalence of “fecal contamination” and “lymph nodes” in ground meat, and the grinding can force the bacteria deep inside the burger. “[G]iven the weight of evidence and the severity and magnitude of potential human health problems, the precautionary principle suggests that [it’s] time to take actions to limit…human exposure to [this pathogen].” In the very least, we should stop funneling animals known to be infected into the human food supply.

We know that milk exposure is associated with type 1 diabetes, but what about meat?  An attempt was made to tease out the nutritional factors that could help account for the 350-fold variation in type 1 diabetes rates around the world. Why do some parts of the world have hundreds of times higher rates than others?

Yes, the more dairy populations ate, the higher their rates of type 1 diabetes. But, the same was found for meat, lending “credibility to the speculation that the increasing dietary supply of animal protein after World War II may have contributed to the…increasing incidence of type 1 diabetes.” And, there was a negative correlation, meaning a protective correlation, between the intake of grains and type 1 diabetes, which may fit within the more general context of “a lower prevalence of chronic diseases” among those eating more plant-based. And, “the increase in meat consumption over time” appeared to parallel the increasing incidence of the disease.

Now, you always have to be really cautious about the interpretation of these country-by-country comparisons, since just because a country eats a particular way doesn’t mean that the individuals that get the disease ate that way. For example, a similar study looking specifically at the diets of children and adolescents between different countries supported the “previous research about the importance of cow’s milk and animal products in the [cause] of type 1 diabetes.”

But, they also found that in countries where they tended to eat the most sugar, kids tended to have lower rates of the disease. Now, this didn’t reach statistical significance, since there were so few countries, but even if it had, and even if there were other studies to back it up, there are a million factors that could be going on, right? Maybe, countries that ate the least sugar ate the most high-fructose corn syrup, or something. You’ve always got to put it to the test. If you analyze the diet of what people who actually got the disease ate, increased risk of type 1 diabetes has been associated with milk, sugar, bread, soda, egg, and meat intake.

In Sardinia, where the original link was made between paraTB and type 1 diabetes, a highly “statistically significant dose-response relationship” was found—meaning more meat, more risk, especially during the first two years of the child’s life. So, “[h]igh meat consumption seems to be an important early in life cofactor for type 1 diabetes development,” although we need more data.

The latest such study, following thousands of “mother-child pairs,” found that eating meat during breastfeeding was associated with an increased risk of both preclinical and full-blown type 1 diabetes by the time their child reached age 8. They thought it might be the glycotoxins—the AGEs found in cooked meat, which can be transferred through breastfeeding.

But, what can also be transferred through human breast milk are paratuberculosis bacteria, which have been grown from the breast milk of women with Crohn’s disease—another autoimmune disease linked to paratuberculosis bacteria exposure.

Please consider volunteering to help out on the site.

Image credit: Alden Chadwick via flickr. Image has been modified.

Below is an approximation of this video’s audio content. To see any graphs, charts, graphics, images, and quotes to which Dr. Greger may be referring, watch the above video.

Mycobacterium paratuberculosis is not just a serious problem for the global livestock industry, but may be a trigger for type 1 diabetes, given that paraTB bacteria have been found in the bloodstream of the majority of type 1 diabetics tested—presumably exposed through the retail milk supply, as they can survive pasteurization.

But, what about the meat supply? Mycobacterium paratuberculosis has been found in beef, pork, and chicken. It’s an intestinal bug, and unfortunately, “faecal contamination of the carcass” in the slaughter plant is simply unavoidable. And then, unless it’s cooked well-done, it “could harbor” living mycobacterium avium paratuberculosis bacteria.

Meat-wise, “[g]round beef [may represent] the greatest potential risk for harboring” these paratuberculosis bacteria, as “a significant proportion originates from culled dairy cattle,” which may be culled because they have paratuberculosis, and go straight into the human food chain. There’s also a greater prevalence of “fecal contamination” and “lymph nodes” in ground meat, and the grinding can force the bacteria deep inside the burger. “[G]iven the weight of evidence and the severity and magnitude of potential human health problems, the precautionary principle suggests that [it’s] time to take actions to limit…human exposure to [this pathogen].” In the very least, we should stop funneling animals known to be infected into the human food supply.

We know that milk exposure is associated with type 1 diabetes, but what about meat?  An attempt was made to tease out the nutritional factors that could help account for the 350-fold variation in type 1 diabetes rates around the world. Why do some parts of the world have hundreds of times higher rates than others?

Yes, the more dairy populations ate, the higher their rates of type 1 diabetes. But, the same was found for meat, lending “credibility to the speculation that the increasing dietary supply of animal protein after World War II may have contributed to the…increasing incidence of type 1 diabetes.” And, there was a negative correlation, meaning a protective correlation, between the intake of grains and type 1 diabetes, which may fit within the more general context of “a lower prevalence of chronic diseases” among those eating more plant-based. And, “the increase in meat consumption over time” appeared to parallel the increasing incidence of the disease.

Now, you always have to be really cautious about the interpretation of these country-by-country comparisons, since just because a country eats a particular way doesn’t mean that the individuals that get the disease ate that way. For example, a similar study looking specifically at the diets of children and adolescents between different countries supported the “previous research about the importance of cow’s milk and animal products in the [cause] of type 1 diabetes.”

But, they also found that in countries where they tended to eat the most sugar, kids tended to have lower rates of the disease. Now, this didn’t reach statistical significance, since there were so few countries, but even if it had, and even if there were other studies to back it up, there are a million factors that could be going on, right? Maybe, countries that ate the least sugar ate the most high-fructose corn syrup, or something. You’ve always got to put it to the test. If you analyze the diet of what people who actually got the disease ate, increased risk of type 1 diabetes has been associated with milk, sugar, bread, soda, egg, and meat intake.

In Sardinia, where the original link was made between paraTB and type 1 diabetes, a highly “statistically significant dose-response relationship” was found—meaning more meat, more risk, especially during the first two years of the child’s life. So, “[h]igh meat consumption seems to be an important early in life cofactor for type 1 diabetes development,” although we need more data.

The latest such study, following thousands of “mother-child pairs,” found that eating meat during breastfeeding was associated with an increased risk of both preclinical and full-blown type 1 diabetes by the time their child reached age 8. They thought it might be the glycotoxins—the AGEs found in cooked meat, which can be transferred through breastfeeding.

But, what can also be transferred through human breast milk are paratuberculosis bacteria, which have been grown from the breast milk of women with Crohn’s disease—another autoimmune disease linked to paratuberculosis bacteria exposure.

Please consider volunteering to help out on the site.

Image credit: Alden Chadwick via flickr. Image has been modified.

Doctor's Note

What’s this about paraTB bacteria having been found in the bloodstream of the majority of diabetics tested? You must have missed the last video, Does Paratuberculosis in Milk Trigger Type 1 Diabetes? I will further explore this hypothesis in my follow-up video Does Paratuberculosis in Meat Trigger Type 1 Diabetes?

The vast majority of cases of diabetes in the U.S. are type 2, though. Ironically, meat may also play a role there. See Why Is Meat a Risk Factor for Diabetes? and How May Plants Protect Against Diabetes? A good short summary can be found in How Not to Die from Diabetes.

If you haven’t yet, you can subscribe to my videos for free by clicking here.

66 responses to “Meat Consumption & the Development of Type 1 Diabetes

Commenting Etiquette

The intention of the comment section under each video and blog post is to allow all members to share their stories, questions, and feedback with others in a welcoming, engaging, and respectful environment. Off-topic comments are permitted, in hopes more experienced users may be able to point them to more relevant videos that may answer their questions. Vigorous debate of science is welcome so long as participants can disagree respectfully. Advertising products or services is not permitted.

To make NutritionFacts.org a place where people feel comfortable posting without feeling attacked, we have no tolerance for ad hominem attacks or comments that are racist, misogynist, homophobic, vulgar, or otherwise inappropriate. Please help us to foster a community of mutual respect. Enforcement of these rules is done to the best of our ability on a case-by-case basis.

        1. hi Greg, this is another link discussing that study. http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/nova/next/body/for-a-healthy-heart-you-may-have-to-eat-more-cheese/ I am not a person working in the science field, but a couple of things are obvious to me. First, the study is sponsored by the dairy industry. Second , the trial used 15 people, 2 weeks at a time. And thirdly, there was no control in comparing the three groups of high quantities of milk, cheese or butter ! Apparently one of the so called ‘benefits’ was a lessening of the potentially dammaging TMAO.. which, those of us following Dr Greger know that those following a wfpb diet make plenty of short chained fatty acids and AVOID TMAO production.. there are great videos on this.
          Cheese not required !!

          If I was pregnant, I would be following a wfpb diet with the recommended supplements and under the supervision of a wfpb doctor or at least one that puts healthy lifestyle first.
          All the very best to you and your family Greg !




          1



          0
          1. susan: I took a look at that article discussion. I think this last quote is very telling: ““Whether or not cheese will solve French paradox, I think, remains to be seen,” Hotamisligil says. Nevertheless, “As a big cheese lover, I am loving to read these sort of findings,” he jokes. “Wine is good, cheese is good, so I’m all set.”

            Yep. Just another way of saying what Dr. McDougall is famous for saying: “People love to get good news about their bad habits.”
            .
            Nice post. As usual. :=)




            0



            0
            1. This another great video by Dr Greger.
              As for the study that Greg shared a link about beneficial effect of cheese during pregnancy I agree with Susan reply, the study does indicate that it is sponsored by Danish dairy industry.




              1



              0
              1. Julie Lu: Thank you for the recommendation. My opinion is that the information here concerning dairy in particular and animal products in general is most compelling. There are so many problems that we know can be attributed to dairy, it makes no sense to me to limit such problems to calcium, if calcium is even a culprit. If you haven’t had a chance to check out the information on this site concerning dairy, I do recommend it. Following is a summary page: http://nutritionfacts.org/topics/dairy




                0



                0
          2. Curious about the PBS piece, I read through the text and discovered Dr. Kim Williams, cardiologist at Rush University Medical Center and president of the American College of Cardiology, is skeptical cheese explains the so-called “French Paradox”. According to Williams, the study which needs to be done is to compare a vegan diet with the typical French diet, to isolate the real factors at work.




            0



            0
            1. hi alphaa0010, yes, I am not surprised by the comments of Dr Williams – I enjoy listening to his talks. He is an amazing man , and always inciteful, encouraging, and positive in his views. Here is just one talk you might enjoy as well. https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=q1oB569xq88

              Dr Greger covered the topic of the french paradox in this video http://nutritionfacts.org/video/what-explains-the-french-paradox/

              I just find it a bit funny.. the researchers were happy to find a decrease in the evidence of production of a substance they themselves call harmful – which can be eliminated by eating a plant based diet.




              0



              0
              1. susan: Several similar posts like this coming from you were getting caught in the new automated “pending” area. I have no idea why this happens. I have rescued all three posts.




                0



                0
                1. Thanks Thea ! though you can certainly delete the second one, or any post of mine that repeats. Im not sure why this happens.. there are times when it posts immediately, np. Maybe it has to do with internet connection? anyway, thanks again!




                  0



                  0
    1. I changed to eating “The Gregger Way”, grin. Nearly two years ago. My health that was taking a nose dive back then eating Paleo is now making a total reverse it seems eating a total plant based life style.
      I am able to bike several miles aday instead of using a walker, and I am off all meditations.
      My question to the moderators is this. Day after day I receive information via email video and blog about the extensive research the Gregger team does to warm those willing to listen but what about those ofus who have listened, adjusted our lifestyles so mow we are spending our lives hiking in the woods instead of spending our lives in survival mode?
      Do you have blogs, video feeds,or other social media group where those of us who went from deaths door to Zing!
      Can share lifestyle changes?

      Thank you




      0



      0
    2. Well, at first glance, I won’t give it a second glance because the URL has “news” in it. I find “news” sources to be the ABSOLUTE WORST places to find anything FACTUAL. Yes, far worse than marketing and advertising because folks EXPECT dishonesty in those areas and generally realize that NO THING performs as well in real life as it did on the infomercial.

      Facts aren’t any “news” sources game. Their game is selling, and they do whatever it takes to make that buck. Controversy and “oppositism” are their specialties.

      Oppositism I define as the “news” media’s LOVE to lead with anything that they think is contrary to your long-held beliefs, without any regard to veracity.

      This is why folks are so confused about everything that isn’t right up their own field of expertise. How’s that you ask? Because their “news” media constantly tells them the opposite thing from what they told them previously about everything.

      [/soapbox]




      0



      0
      1. For better or worse, it is a news-industry standard practice to point out exceptions to a rule or common presumption. In part, that is an advantage in avoiding rule-bound thinking. The better-written articles actually cite sources for any rule or presumption.




        0



        0
    3. The article is easy to critique. In reality, this is a well-known B12 issue spun to promote cheese. It does raise the point of B12 deficiency in Vegans being a common problem. Dr. Greger states clearly that B12 is recommended for Vegans in the form of cheap supplements of Cyanocobalamin.




      0



      0
  1. Interesting information but rather academic for someone like me who is already a type 1 diabetic. However after following your site I have switched over to a largely whole food plant based diet. My goal was to have this diet AND to achieve good control of may blood sugar values. But alas i have not been able to achieve that. My blood sugar values were clearly better when I incorporated more animal protein in my diet. However, since going on the plant based diet the numbness in my feet has been greatly reduced if not completely gone. Over the last 8 years or so I could not feel the vibrations of the pitch fork test. But now after about a year on the plant based diet I clearly feel the vibrations. In summary with the new diet I get higher blood sugar levels but measurably less side effects. Just a coincidence? Have there been any studies that a plant based diet can protect from the side effects of type 1 diabetes? Perhaps such a study should be done?




    0



    0
    1. It would seem like you are indeed enjoying benefits from your diet change. I was wondering if you were able to reduce the amount of insulin needed as you changed your diet and if this might be a factor despite your blood sugar level.




      0



      0
      1. If anything my insulin use has gone up. I guess I need to manage more carefully the glycemic index of the foods I eat as suggested by someone in response to my comment. I still have hope of achieving good control thanks to the comments of at least one of the responders.




        0



        0
    2. My husband is also a Type I Diabetic, and he has seen much improvement in his blood sugar and A1C values. When eating a plant based diet, you need to be very aware of the glycemic index of the foods to achieve good blood sugar control. As just one example, white potatoes have a very high glycemic index, so we select the smallest ones and eat them peel and all. The extra fiber makes all the difference.




      0



      0
      1. AS a T1 Diabetic, I find that my glucose does a lot better w/sweet potatos (yams), than while russets. And beans are also beneficial. Dr McDougal and Jeff Novick (unlike Dr Fuhrman) say not to worry abt glycemic index, but for type 1, there is a limit to this advice.




        0



        0
        1. Mike, this is interesting, since my (internal) perception of when I’ve had too much high-glycemic food seems to come after eating a single sweet potato, steamed in the microwave. Of course, this is not to suggest russet potatoes would not be even worse. Since my typical raw sweet potato can be between 1.0-1.5 lbs or more, do you recommend eating a sweet potato all at once, or to distribute the meal by literally cutting the potato into pieces, to eat through the day? Maybe I need to distribute my sweet potato intake, to avoid the “rush”.




          0



          0
        2. Interestingly I read somewhere that salad (waxy?) potatoes have about half the starch as mealy potatoes. So I have been growing only salad potatoes in my garden. Unfortunately sweet potatoes do not do well here in the cool climate of Lower Saxony, Germany so they are not a part of my diet. I probably should increase the amount of pulses on my dinner plate or in my soup bowl.




          0



          0
        1. Yes purple potatoes are better. More polyphenols. If you cook, then refrigerate them, that starch will become resistant starch which Dr. Greger has written about the benefits. If you put chile or other spices like oregano or rosemary, they’ll be better. Something sour will decrease glycemic index too: vinegar, yogurt, olives. Avocado, hemp seed, chia, or flax seed or other fat will help too.
          John S




          0



          0
    3. * not promoting this…just some relevant info….

      http://www.advancedbionutritionals.com/Nerve-Supplements/Tingling-Or-Numbness-Hands-Feet.htm

      Fortunately, Japanese scientists found a way to solve this problem: They created a fat-soluble form of thiamine that stays in the body much longer.

      This fat-soluble form of thiamine is called benfotiamine (ben-foe-TIE-uh-men). And it has been shown safe and effective in dozens of studies around the world.3

      In one study, doctors tested people’s ability to sense vibrations.4 First, they placed a tuning fork next to a person’s foot. Next, they vibrated the fork until the patient could feel the vibration. This is the standard test that measures how well a person can feel things in their limbs.

      Many of the patients started this study with little or no sensitivity to vibrations in their feet.

      Then the doctors separated the patients into two groups and gave them either benfotiamine or a placebo. Neither the doctors nor the patients knew which group received the benfotiamine treatment.

      Nine weeks later, the doctors conducted the same vibration test. And they were amazed by the results:

      Patients who weren’t able to feel any vibration just 9 weeks earlier were now able to feel their feet. They were able to feel in toes which were numb just weeks before.




      0



      0
    4. Hi Jerry, Your remarks are very interesting. I too am T1 and confront many of the same issues you do. However I will say carbohydrates matter and I have increased mine since my diet change. I am more careful to keep them complex though. I do generally feel better since I managed to completely eliminate my psoriatic arthritis with a wfpbd and I haven’t even had a cold in over 3 years now.
      I actually lowered my insulin requirement 20 to 25% and it seems this is typical. I am less impressed with this than A1c control. Mine has not significantly improved. However that is less than half the story. The hemoglobin A1c is measuring an endogenous advanced glycation end products. So you and I have higher levels than the non diabetics out there and that is very much responsible for much of the diabetic side effects such as the peripheral neuropathy you have experienced. But that assumes we were still getting the same level of dietary AGEs.
      So how did your improvement occur with higher A1c? The answer is likely to be the dramatic reduction of exogenous advanced glycation end products. Animal products are the prime source of these dietary AGEs and by eliminating them you have made a difference. Normally our bodies will eliminate most excess AGEs until they reach a certain level. Then they start to accumulate and cause more problems like; diabetic neuropathy, nephropathy, retinopathy, impaired immune function and a host of other stuff including accelerated atherogenesis. This is a good part of the basis of “diabetic side effects.”
      So,, when we eliminate up to 1/2 of our serum AGEs the effects are likely to be very healthy. Now you are starting to enjoy some of the benefits. In all probability, by changing your diet, you have reduced your dietary AGEs and consequently your total serum AGEs below the critical threshold that allows them to accumulate and do extra damage. Hopefully that will continue since that reversal of neuropathy strikes me as a tremendous cause for excitement in your household.
      I have never seen this really quantified but the studies and reviews I have seen suggest that more than half of our serum AGEs come from exogenous or dietary sources. (If anyone ever sees this quantified please let me know.)
      The bottom line here is that though your A1c levels have not improved, by changing your diet you are still improving your health by eliminating most of the exogenous AGEs.




      0



      0
      1. Stewart E.: I just want to mention again how much I appreciate your help for the T1s out there. Your personal experience combined with your knowledge of the issue is invaluable. Thank you! (If we still had an up-vote, you would have gotten them from me.)




        0



        0
      2. Thanks for the info! My doctor thought my A1c values were too high (up to 7.7) compared to my daily blood sugar tests. Thus he had “fructose amine tests” made. They gave good values that are apparently equivalent to a A1c in the range of 6.4 to 6.7. Now I am wondering if these fructose amines are a part of your AEG’s?




        0



        0
        1. Hi again Jerry.
          Curious, how long have you had diabetes?
          As to a high A1c on a plant based diet, Mine does go up occasionally but rarely over 7. My problem usually comes from excess simpler carbs that will send me higher overnight.

          Now, assuming completely healthy sources of the carbs, you still have to balance that with insulin intake. I have found that easier to do since my insulin resistance has gone down. Still after a lot of potatoes and bread for dinner and maybe come crackers for the bean dip, I can easily have high blood sugar at 1 or 2:00 am. And yes, I do get up at that ungodly hour to test my sugar.

          How many tests do you do per day? Are you on a pump or are you taking multiple injections. Remember, if you track it closely you might see that it goes to 300+ but comes down fairly quickly. On the other hand it might be at 200 for an extended period and cause more damage as a result. This is why I will test my sugar at 1 or 2 am. Without an adjustment, I could easily be at say 220 at 2:00 am and by sunrise show a fasting 80-100.

          Now as for fructose amines. They are indeed another endogenous advanced glycation end product that will contribute to the total serum AGEs.
          Evidently they may be less stable so they more effectively measure average blood sugar over a 1-3 week period instead of a 1-4 month period. So yes there are equivalencies but they measure something a bit different. (Now I gotta study them when I can’t sleep sometime in the middle of the night.)

          Again the bottom line for us is that we will not be able to get our A1c or Fructose Amine tests to a normal person level but we can do better on the dietary side by eliminating most of the dietary sources of AGEs.

          Great hearing from you and about the success with reduced neuropathy. With that as an indicator, other things are likely getting better as well.

          Hope to hear more.




          0



          0
          1. I started on the more extreme version of the Fuhrman diet four years ago, and it allowed me to avoid quadruple bypass surgery and get off statins. Since I am T1, I modified to diet to avoid all starches (starches can easily be replaced by beans). If your BMI is on the higher side, this will also result in some weight loss and an ideal BMI, and lower your insulin requirements. However, this alone did not lower my HA1c. But in the last couple years I got a pump and a CGM. Once I got an Apple Watch, which allowed me to see my CGM numbers in near-real-time, and learned the Sugar Surfing method of control, I was able to lower my HA1c to the mid 6 range. (My goal is sub-6.) The key for me was to eliminate starches (potatoes, rice, pasta, etc.) avoid processed foods, and focus intensely on good blood sugar control.




            0



            0
            1. Hi Poona. I found your post very interesting. Congratulations on avoiding surgery and statins. Just within a short space of postings here we have Jerry Leverenz beginning to reverse diabetic neuropathy, you avoiding very major surgery, and yes I did reverse psoriatic arthritis. Hellofa recommendation for a plant based diet for those with T1 diabetes and everyone else.

              You mentioned that you have eliminated starches and replaced them with beans. Actually beans are also mostly starch. However, they do have a fairly high percentage of resistant starch with a great deal of fiber which would also help reduce blood sugar swings. So I can easily see how legumes would make blood sugar somewhat easier to control than even the complex carbohydrates in whole grains or potatoes.
              Unfortunately I have never heard an endocrinologist talk about advanced glycation end products other than to generally talk about lowering HA1c. The glycosolated hemoglobin or A1c is but one form of our total advanced glycation end products. The dietary ones are perhaps even more important than the A1c we produce with higher blood sugar. They become more important for diabetics because they are easier for a diabetic to control and the positive effects from eliminating most of these dietary sources can also be very dramatic.
              By that I mean that even with what is considered good blood sugar control with an A1c of <7, many diabetics still have the side effects. On the other hand Jerry Leverenz indicates above that he is beginning to have of remission of side effects even with a relatively high A1c. He has done this by eliminating the worst sources of dietary advanced glycation end products, i.e. animal products, even though his A1c remains somewhat excessive.
              You, by eliminating much of those dietary sources have reversed your heart disease, lowered your advanced glycation end products and cholesterol at the same time. Keep in mind that the advanced glycation end products promote atherosclerosis and will make any elevated cholesterol even more dangerous.
              By the way, I had not heard of “sugar surfing” but I have been doing essentially the same thing since my first pump in the late 70s. I think it is extremely important. I also did not know the CGM would interface with the Apple watch. In any case that CGM is the next step I will try in order to take my A1c down a bit more. I did get a reading one time of 5.7 but that was very much exceptional. I’m sually in the mid 6 range. I might be able to hit your goal with a CGM.




              0



              0
              1. Hi Shawn. Not sure how advanced glycation end products ended up in this discussion. These are in foods that are browned and also in meat. I am vegan and avoid browned foods. Maybe you were hinting that when I stopped eating meat it helped clean up my arteries. That is true. But animal products cause a vast array of health problems beyond the fact that they contain advanced glycation end products. Research now also shows that avoiding oil is important for heart health, and I do that as well. But the Fuhrman focus is on prioritizing foods with the most micro-nutrients (it is called a Nutritarian diet) which puts things like kale at the top and rice and potatoes at the bottom. Personally, I find it easier to control my blood sugar (and achieve an optimal BMI) if I consume less carbohydrates. With Fuhrman’s diet, I would just de-emphasize foods with less nutrient value. For better control, (and better nutrition) I avoid them completely. Beans are very important on the Fuhrman diet. Because of the resistant starch, how they calculate as carbohydrates varies from one diabetic to another.




                0



                0
  2. A problem with the audio– after the initial “BOOOOOOOOOOOOOM !” (which nearly blew out my windows, because the audio was set to Dr. Greger’s normal narration level), I could not hear Dr. Greger until I once again adjusted the audio.

    The audio problem–
    1. Opening “BOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOM !” is set much too loud for the following video narration level
    2. Dr. Greger’s narration volume level is set too low

    Please balance them.




    0



    0
  3. I have also had difficulty hearing this one- I had to put the bottom of my laptop to my ear to hear this video.

    Thanks for all the info from your organization. I have recently started eating completely vegan after years of reducing animal based foods. The main motivator is Dr. Gregor’s videos. I have no great health issues besides a tendency to have higher blood pressure, but have lost my wife and 2 brothers in law to cancer at too young an age, so health is a big concern for me.

    Terry




    0



    0
    1. alpha0010 and Terry Kuipers: I forwarded your experiences with the audio to the NutritionFacts staff. Thanks for letting us know.

      FYI: Oddly, I did not have the problem you had when it comes to the audio. It may make it harder for the video people to problem solve if the audio problems only affect some people/machines/circumstances.




      0



      0
  4. Remarkably, data graphs at 2:26 show diabetic risk rises in proportion to energy intake from meat and dairy, but actually falls to negligible as the energy intake from cereal grains increases to about 50 percent.




    0



    0
  5. The last article shown on the video is discussing the similarity in symptoms between Johne’s Disease in cattle and Crohn’s Disease in humans. Is their any link between the ingestion of MAP bacteria and the development of Crohn’s Disease, and if so, an antibiotic that could eradicate MAP from our intestines? My daughter had a “GI bug (virus)” at age 13 from which she was not fully recovering. 2 months later she was diagnosed with UC (ulcerative colitis), and ultimately she was diagnosed with Crohn’s Disease. Her disease has been in remission for 2 years on a whole foods plant based vegan diet (very grateful!). But I am wondering if she could still be harboring this bacteria and if antibiotic treatment of MAP could be important in preventing relapse. Thank you :) !!!




    0



    0
  6. HI guys, i will glad if someone can help me, does any one familiar with a good websitte to check nutrios values of all the foods, lets say i want to check type on a nuts, and i type it and it givs me how much protin carbs vitamins and stuff?

    and what i can do to be more flex, i am very stiif, like a rock !, what i can do to help my body?+




    0



    0
    1. Itamar Ben Ezry: I have two suggestions for your first question. One suggestion is a website where you can search for a food and if they have it (they have lots in there), then you can get a ton of information about the nutrients in the food, both the macro nutrients (fat, carbs, protein) and the micronutrients (vitamins and minerals etc). The data on the site comes from the USDA database. Here it is: http://nutritiondata.self.com/ Another suggestion I have is to use cronometer.com. In that site, people enter details about their diet. Then, at the end of the day, you can see all sorts of details about the nutrients you have eaten.

      For your stiffness problem, have you tried stretches?




      0



      0
      1. i think its i need more than streches, my back spaciliy spaciliy the neck and all the areaa from the shoulders to the neck is tight
        and the legs, like under the knee its very tight!
        i usally get in the morning and the neck and shoulders are liitle sore, in total all the back is tight.




        0



        0
        1. Itamar: I forwarded your original post to our volunteer medical moderators. We get more questions than we are able to answer, but at least your question is in the pile. Good luck.




          0



          0
    2. Hi Ben, I’m one of the moderators and I’d like to suggest you use Cron-O-meter to determine the nutrients of your food. I was introduced to this great site and app by the wonderful nutritionist Jeff Novick who works very closely with Dr. McDougall. Here is the website. https://cronometer.com/ You can plug in any food and it will give you not only calories but every nutrient as well. Hope this is helpful




      0



      0
  7. While searching for more info on MAP, I came across this website http://crohnsmapvaccine.com/
    It seems that they are working on a MAP vaccine (and an improved test for MAP)

    “The test is an essential ‘companion diagnostic’ to the Vaccine trial; a simple blood test allowing doctors to confirm MAP infection prior to vaccination and to monitor patients’ responses to the vaccine.”
    “A Phase I trial (first-in-man trial) of the anti-MAP vaccine in HEALTHY human volunteers is due to begin at The Jenner Institute, Oxford later this month (January). ”
    “Funding for Phase II trials is still being sought”

    * Note that I am in no way affiliated with the site or its organizers *




    0



    0
  8. I have a question – I just switched from a vegetarian to a whole foods plant based diet (who knew life could feel so good?) a few weeks ago. I am taking medication for thyreoiditis (that’s what they call it here in Germany, thyroid underfunction). I take 75 micrograms of euthyrox (which I think isn’t very much?). I have heard so much about people who could stop taking all medication after switiching to a WFPB diet for various conditions. Or worse, that takin the medication after the switch is actually bad for you (cause you don’t need it anymore). But that was usually for diseases caused or strongly affected by diet. Is that something that can happen for thyroids as well?
    I have done some research but couldn’t find anything on diet and thyroid dysfunctions.

    And can I just say I adore this website. Dr Greger is a hero.




    0



    0
    1. Hi Anna, Thanks for your question, I am one of the site moderators. It is true that for many disease caused or worsened by lifestyle changing your diet will affect the amount of medication you may need to be on. There are many causes for thyroid problems and some get better while others may not. Thyroid hormone is intricately important in the function of all of your body processes and very small increases or decreases can make a huge difference in how you feel. Depending upon why you are on thyroid replacement and whether your thyroid gland can make the amount of hormone you need will determine if your method of eating can change your dosage. The best approach is to consult with your physician about what you are doing and where you hope to get as far as medication and come up with a plan to possibly taper you off the medication or change it to one that works best for you. I hope this helps.




      0



      0
  9. Current mis-interpreted info hits the Press ( World Economic Forum) on how “vegetarians” do not live longer because of what they eat, but because of healthier lifestyle.

    I have been deluged by readers who share this proof that there is no point in eating as I do! We would love a video by Dr. Greger soon to counter this from the World Economic Forum:https://www.weforum.org/agenda/2017/02/do-vegetarians-live-longer-this-is-what-the-latest-research-says?utm_content=bufferd5111&utm_medium=social&utm_source=facebook.com&utm_campaign=buffer

    which does not in the article I read define vegetarian so let’s help people understand WFP vegan! Dr. Greger has the chops to do it and we can share his video all around!




    0



    0
  10. *Question*
    I just got some raw cacao nibs. I love adding them to my workout shakes/oatmeal. My understanding is they have a lot health benefits, Antioxidants as an example. I am concerned about the high levels of saturated fat. Should I stop eating them all together? Limit my intake? Any expert advice is welcomed.




    0



    0
        1. Hi James, I am one of the moderators and your question intrigued me as I was unaware of the high level of saturated fat in cocoa nibs. I like to the throw a few in my morning smoothie when I have them on hand. I looked them up on cronometer https://cronometer.com/#foods and was stunned to see that a serving had 18 grams of fat! As an American not as well versed in estimating grams I googled how many tablespoons in 43 grams. For some reason the manufacturer wants you to use 1/3 of a cup of their product in your smoothie. So, this is of course up to you but I typically use one Tablespoon of these guys since they are not only expensive but the chocolate taste is intense. The other suggestions of using the cocoa powder are also good but then you have to take in to account the processing of the chocolate vs. the more natural form of the nibs.




          0



          0
  11. Hi, please give me your thoughts on a supplement company in America called ‘Kyani’. As I’ve taken on the plant based diet & feel this is the way to go I have seen some amazing results with this supplement. I’d like your thoughts on this please if possible. Thankyou in advance.




    0



    0
  12. I thought i’d post on a few site,s on the off chance that someone can help me or direct me somwhere/someone who can.
    My uncle has diabetes and with a cut on his foot developed gangrene in 4 days the surgeon is going to ampitate his foot. First it was just the toe but then the infection spread. Is there a way to reverse the disease back to just the toe? Or reverse all together? Any help would be great! Thanks in advance!




    0



    0
    1. Hi Wayn: Tissue that has been damaged by gangrene can’t be saved. Treatment options can include a combination of surgery, antibiotics, and/or hyperbaric oxygen therapy. Your uncle can hopefully prevent further diabetes-related complications by following a whole-food, plant-based diet. You can find more info here: NutritionFacts.org: Diabetes. Wishing you and your family all the best!




      0



      0
  13. I have been vegan for the last three years and have gained tremendous insight into the benefits of a plant based diet, thanks to Dr. Greger’s extremely informative website and book, “How Not to Die.

    However, I have had Hashimoto’s disease for the last 30 years and now have developed additional health issues due to the progression of my Hashimoto’s disease.

    Medical professionals in the field of this disease advocate the elimination of grains, legumes, nightshade vegetables, nut and seeds, and increase in the consumption of meat.

    Do you have any thoughts on this matter. A great deal of research is done helping people suffering from Diabetes, however it is very difficult to find reliable information on autoimmune thyroid disease.

    Thank you.
    Henny




    0



    0
  14. Hi, Henny. I am Christine, a NF volunteer nutrition moderator. I found no evidence in the medical research literature that the dietary changes you describe are of benefit for those with Hashimoto’s thyroiditis. The key to dealing with this condition lies in normalizing immune function, which is related to gut health. Eating more meat and fewer grains, legumes, vegetables, nuts and seeds will not necessarily help with that.
    Zinc, selenium, and iodine status may play a role, but I recommend getting these from whole food sources rather than from supplements. Pumpkin seeds are good sources of zinc. One Brazil nut per week will fill selenium needs, and a very small amount of kelp can supply iodine. One study showed that iodized salt worsened Hashimoto’s disease markers. It may be that the form of iodine used to supplement the salt was the culprit.
    Try soaking dried legumes overnight, discarding the soaking water, and then cooking them in fresh water with a small, postage-stamp-sized piece of dried kelp/kombu. Eat cruciferous vegetables cooked rather than raw to break down so-called goitrogenic compounds in these foods that may inhibit iodine bioavailability. Regular exercise may also help with Hashimoto’s disease. This study suggests that vitamin D status may play a role:
    http://www.nuclmed.gr/magazine/eng/sept15/07.pdf
    Good plant-sourced vitamin D supplements are available, if needed. For more on vitamin D, you might be interested in this video:
    https://nutritionfacts.org/video/is-vitamin-d3-better-than-d2/
    A book that may be helpful to you is The Immune System Recovery Plan by Susan Blum, M.D.
    I hope that helps!




    0



    0
  15. any new information on type 1 diabetes? my nephew is 14 and has been diagnosed. all I know that the pancreatic cells are still growing in his age so is there something we can do? how to stop autoimmune system from killing the cells?




    0



    0

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Pin It on Pinterest

Share This