How to Reduce the Risk of Sudden Death

How to Reduce the Risk of Sudden Death
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Diet and lifestyle improvements started even late in life can offer dramatic benefits.

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Public health workers tend to work in their own separate domains. The tobacco folks rarely talk to alcohol, nutrition, or sexual health folks, with no apparent recognition that, far from being unique and separate, the behaviors they all address may comprise a typical Saturday night out for large sectors of the population. But this blinds us to the importance of individual empowerment. We beetle away at micromanaging specific behaviors and ignore the key message emerging from the public health evidence base—that for the first time in human history, we now know how we can take a measure of control over our own health and longevity.

So much control, as I’ve previously addressed, that we may be able to effectively turn back the clock 14 years in terms of mortality. But whether the benefits observed in those studies are the result of life-long good health habits or can be achieved by people who make changes later in life needs to be confirmed.

And it was. People who newly adopt a healthy lifestyle in middle-age appear to experience a prompt benefit of lower rates of cardiovascular disease and mortality. In this study, they found that a midlife switch (late 40’s, 50’s, early 60’s) to a healthy lifestyle that includes a diet of at least five daily servings of fruits and vegetables, exercise, maintaining a healthy weight, and not smoking results in a substantial reduction in mortality over just the subsequent four years; surprising first, because the benefit appeared so quickly, and second, because the lifestyle changes were so modest. The findings emphasize that making the necessary lifestyle changes is extremely worthwhile and it’s never too late to get with the program.

If we can get such dramatic benefits, so late in life, in such short amount of time, why can’t we just live lives of gluttony and sloth and then around 50 or so just clean up our acts? Because it may be too late: our first symptom may be our last.

Sudden cardiac death. Sudden cardiac death accounts for more than half of all heart disease deaths. Hundreds of thousands of Americans just drop dead every year. Sudden cardiac death is the first manifestation of heart disease for the majority of individuals, particularly among women, meaning they had no idea they even had heart disease until they were literally dying from it. For many, their first indication of the presence of coronary heart disease is their demise. That’s why prevention is the key.

So, does prevention work? Women who don’t smoke, walk a half-hour a day, eat a prudent diet, defined here, for example, as greater than average fruit, vegetable, nut, whole grain, and bean consumption, and who aren’t overweight, had a 92% lower risk of sudden cardiac death. When it comes to sudden death, an ounce of prevention is truly worth more than a pound of cure, because there is no cure for dead.

To see any graphs, charts, graphics, images, and quotes to which Dr. Greger may be referring, watch the above video. This is just an approximation of the audio contributed by Katie Schloer.

Please consider volunteering to help out on the site.

Images thanks to PublicDomainPictures via Pixabay.

Public health workers tend to work in their own separate domains. The tobacco folks rarely talk to alcohol, nutrition, or sexual health folks, with no apparent recognition that, far from being unique and separate, the behaviors they all address may comprise a typical Saturday night out for large sectors of the population. But this blinds us to the importance of individual empowerment. We beetle away at micromanaging specific behaviors and ignore the key message emerging from the public health evidence base—that for the first time in human history, we now know how we can take a measure of control over our own health and longevity.

So much control, as I’ve previously addressed, that we may be able to effectively turn back the clock 14 years in terms of mortality. But whether the benefits observed in those studies are the result of life-long good health habits or can be achieved by people who make changes later in life needs to be confirmed.

And it was. People who newly adopt a healthy lifestyle in middle-age appear to experience a prompt benefit of lower rates of cardiovascular disease and mortality. In this study, they found that a midlife switch (late 40’s, 50’s, early 60’s) to a healthy lifestyle that includes a diet of at least five daily servings of fruits and vegetables, exercise, maintaining a healthy weight, and not smoking results in a substantial reduction in mortality over just the subsequent four years; surprising first, because the benefit appeared so quickly, and second, because the lifestyle changes were so modest. The findings emphasize that making the necessary lifestyle changes is extremely worthwhile and it’s never too late to get with the program.

If we can get such dramatic benefits, so late in life, in such short amount of time, why can’t we just live lives of gluttony and sloth and then around 50 or so just clean up our acts? Because it may be too late: our first symptom may be our last.

Sudden cardiac death. Sudden cardiac death accounts for more than half of all heart disease deaths. Hundreds of thousands of Americans just drop dead every year. Sudden cardiac death is the first manifestation of heart disease for the majority of individuals, particularly among women, meaning they had no idea they even had heart disease until they were literally dying from it. For many, their first indication of the presence of coronary heart disease is their demise. That’s why prevention is the key.

So, does prevention work? Women who don’t smoke, walk a half-hour a day, eat a prudent diet, defined here, for example, as greater than average fruit, vegetable, nut, whole grain, and bean consumption, and who aren’t overweight, had a 92% lower risk of sudden cardiac death. When it comes to sudden death, an ounce of prevention is truly worth more than a pound of cure, because there is no cure for dead.

To see any graphs, charts, graphics, images, and quotes to which Dr. Greger may be referring, watch the above video. This is just an approximation of the audio contributed by Katie Schloer.

Please consider volunteering to help out on the site.

Images thanks to PublicDomainPictures via Pixabay.

100 responses to “How to Reduce the Risk of Sudden Death

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  1. My husband had a heart attack, switched to a plant-based diet and reversed his heart disease. Friends and family are shocked when I talk about the percentage of people who die the day of their first heart attack. Everyone thinks my husband’s story is the norm…unless they have lost someone to a sudden heart attack. “There is no cure for dead.” That statement makes the point.




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          1. I have read and seen all of that Guest…But that’s not what I’m asking I would like to know how BB knows her husband reversed his disease not how u can or the definition.




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        1. Lawrence I think what Charles and I would like to know is how does BB know her husbands was reversed…Before and after angiograms or some other way to determine this.




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          1. I can’t speak for BB, for myself I reversed congestive heart failure. I
            knew I had it because I was waterlogged, swollen and weak and short of
            breath. And mainly because the doctor told me i did. Then I started
            eating right and all the symptoms went away, and the doctor no longer
            talked about me having it. I have seen several doctors and not one has
            said I have any heart problem. Sorry no angiograms, etc.




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      1. You read that right. A low fat plant based whole foods diet is the ONLY diet that can reverse heart disease and clear out clogged arteries. and if that was the only thing a plant based low fat diet could do, yet it can do so much more like reverse T2 diabetes, low BP, lower cholesterol, fight cancer 8x better than non-plant based diets, heal digestive issues, and the list goes on and on. That is why this site is so revered and appreciated by so many.

        I recommend this video to everyone who is willing to listen.

        http://nutritionfacts.org/video/uprooting-the-leading-causes-of-death/




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    1. i think the other big part of the statistics it is people that survive but seriously injured for the rest of their life.. may be like jump from a second floor expecting to die.. for most of the people that life stile may bring cognitive problems animic problems, sexual dysfunctions, back pain.. etc.




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      1. Exactly. People I’ve talked with seem to think that the trade off is a somewhat shorter life of pleasurable indulgences vs. a longer life without the pleasures. What tends not to occur to them is that good health is itself deeply pleasurable, far more so than the momentary satisfaction of some food or drink, or the kind of stupor you can get into by sitting around for hours and hours and hours. I really think that many people have forgotten what it feels like to move and breathe freely and easily, to have a quiet and easy digestion, to think clearly—to feel well, in short. And when you consider how great it feels to move and stretch once you’re adjusted to it, and how seriously yummy WFPB meals can be, you see that this is a life of unmitigated pleasure—plus it’s longer, so there’s even more pleasure to enjoy!




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    2. Not if your death is preventable. It’s better to not die in that case. Sudden deaths are harder for family members, too. There is a sweet spot somewhere between ‘I didn’t even get to say goodbye’ and ‘They suffered for way too long’. I hope that my family is able to see the bucket for a few weeks before I kick it.




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  2. I really worry about the health of my dad and aunt.. the both have obesity (obesity 2 by bmi ) they eat right no smoking , no alcohol intake, but the have an absolutely sedentary life. do we know which is the risk of sudden death among people with obesity but eating a lot of fruit and vegies?




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      1. that’s it is a holistic answer :) thank you Joseph my father does meditation but my aunt don’t and she have a real stress life. i think it is never late to start . I’m still worry because it is almost all abdominal fat. And I m sure plants diet help , but it can plant based diet alone prevent a heart problem when the person is obese? im sure they have to do more exercise but i wonder if it is any risk probability measure for overweight and heart disease.
        thank you again




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        1. Getting weight under control is important and a plant-based diet will help folks loss weight. If weight is not coming down on a plant-based diet I’d want to look at the diet and make some modifications. Exercise will of course help maintain a healthy weight., as it’s married with diet. Lastly, Soy may be a great waistline slimming food.




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        1. I don’t know off the top of my head. I’d suggest pulling some of the citations we provide on cortisol and read read read! There are many biochemical pathways.




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      2. Joseph, what do you think of dried fruits as far as organic raisins, figs, apricots, things like that….are they inflammatory like white sugar even though they have fiber and vitamins, nutrients?
        Occasional treats in a plant based diet or does the science say it is safe to eat dried fruits daily? Thanks.




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        1. I think there are two concerns here. Be sure the fruits haven’t been treated with sulphur and don’t eat too much. It’s easy to eat 10 dried apricot halves, but how often would you eat five fresh apricots all at once? Actually, that’s not a good example. I grew up in an apricot growing region of California and, when they are dead ripe there’s nothing better and I could eat a bowl full. But that period only lasts a couple of weeks.




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          1. Yeah, makes sense. I’d think that even more so for raisins your logic applies…..a handful of raisins is a whole lot of grapes. It almost seems like dried fruit is a luxury, only available to us because we have the farming (and techniques to prevent the other creatures in nature from eating the dried fruit off the ground, or on the trees, vines). Maybe to the point where dried fruit has never been a plentiful food in human food supply until recently this past century.




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            1. Right, until this past century, food was seasonal and came whole…you got what you could when you could. People can now get whatever they desire at their supermarket with no thought of seasons…unless you grow your own food, as I do. You enjoy whatever bounty is current, dry, ferment, or freeze some for later, and make do with your stores instead of going to the store! I am lucky to live in FL, and I still have to pick up some stuff of course, but it’s a great feeling to have healthy food security just outside your door, and I even get exercise I enjoy! How cool is that!




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              1. Hi Charzie. A short while ago, SeedyCharacter went a little bit public in this posting:
                http://nutritionfacts.org/video/anti-inflammatory-diet-for-depression/#comment-2379017180
                and I lifted the following article that I know you will enjoy directly from her FB page:
                http://www.yesmagazine.org/issues/good-health/the-curious-case-of-the-antidepressant-anti-anxiety-backyard-garden-20151112

                For a really interesting talk by Daphne Miller M.D. have a look at this:
                https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Z_VC4Ya6i1I

                You have a great holiday season. We’re all just a little bit jealous of you basking in the Florida sunshine!




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            2. Forgive me for not hyperlinking the videos. I have above. I am big on fruit of any kind and Rebecca is right avoid the stuff laced in preservatives if possible.

              Best wishes,
              Joseph




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        2. It’s a good question do you mind if I point you to some videos on dried fruit and raisins? I cannot link them at the moment but please search “raisins” and “dried fruit” in the Heath Topics section and I know you’ll find the answer! In short, yes they can still be beneficial :-)




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  3. But is there a cure for the brain-worm I’m now infected with that keeps repeating “There is no cure for dead” to the tune of “There ain’t no cure for love?” ;-)




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  4. Great info as always!
    Hey everyone I want to plug a great interview with the man, the myth, the legend Dr. Greger on Rich Rolls podcast regarding his new and fantastic life changing book How Not to Die.
    If you would like to get the inside scoop on how he got started and created NutritionFacts.org and came to writing his life’s work into an incredible tome visit http://www.richroll.com/podcast/Michael-Greger-how-not-to-die/
    Enjoy!




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      1. Didn’t even think of that. I’ll leave a note for Rich roll to see if they can start transcribing his podcasts




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        1. Oh, that would be awesome!!! Thank you!
          On a related note, Youtube has auto captioning for videos which is nice, but essentially useless most times, unless the speaker is meticulous! However, it definitely has it’s own amusing, often pornographic entertainment value!!!! Case in point, I was looking up a video about creating your own “scoby” (Symbiotic Colony Of Bacteria & Yeast) to make kombucha, and ran across one that dropped my jaw in the first 10 seconds, and had to have someone ACTUALLY translate it for me! What she says is: “For those of you who enjoy a glass of kombucha”….Now go here and make sure you put the CC on for the video. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3ViZR89ViZg I laughed so hard I almost hurt myself!




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                1. Well I’m Polish, so I didn’t understand them! Ha ha, kidding! I AM Polish but they were hilarious! I also enjoyed the link at the bottom for the dumb criminals and church bulletins! Thanks for the belly laughs!




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                  1. Yay for belly laughs. Do you sign in ASL? I was fluent at one time. Kinda rusty now because my deaf and HOH friends moved away. :-( I love the language.




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                    1. Yeah I do sign! I wish more people could appreciate what a beautiful, expressive, visual language ASL is, (as opposed to signed English) and and what a lovely, complex cultural history it has. (Kind of interesting that American sign language is actually based more on French than English) I wish everyone could sign! Did you ever hear of the book: “Everyone Here Spoke Sign Language”, by Nora Ellen Groce?… “From the seventeenth century to the early years of the twentieth, the
                      population of Martha’s Vineyard manifested an extremely high rate of
                      profound hereditary deafness.” … so everyone, hearing and Deaf alike, signed regularly! Fascinating read!




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                    2. Yes, a gorgeous language. Thanks for letting me know about Groce’s book. It sounds fascinating. I also really wish everyone signed. It would be a perfect language to teach kids since it’s the best first language for babies!




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  5. 4 years of longer is NOTHING with lets say, 20-30 or even more years, which seem to be a tradition among Rockefeller family!!! How about expressing some genes which directly respond to electromagnetic signals and literally drive our metabolism?? It was done in 90’s already!! Isn’t heart and brain THE MOST electromagnetic organs we got, which status actually tells us we are dead (EKG, EEG)?? Eating, exercising, positive mind is all good and can give us the 4 years, unfortunately not so long as the Rockefellers, but still at least something..
    The MOST lethal weapon which actually can cause the SUDDEN DEATH, cardiac arrest, is an external burst of energy directed on the victim, at the right time and space, in my opinion… Wish I were wrong, and it is all my imagination.




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  6. I’ve been following for a while but this my first time posting. I have a dilemma, I would love to give books to several family members who are overweight and have many of these ‘preventable/reversible’ diseases. But I’m pretty sure they’re not going to read it (I’ve given some of them books before and they didn’t read them) and if they actually do crack it open they most likely won’t change their diet/lifestyles. I know this because I’ve been eating a plant based diet for close to 10 years now. And have always talked about the health benefits of it and reducing the use of chemicals on your body, home etc. After years of being ridiculed, laughed at and thought of as the crazy ‘hippie vegan’ in the family I’ve almost given up on trying to get thru to them. I would really love for them to be healthy but I don’t like throwing money away either. I’m thinking I could ask them “If I give you a book that could give you the best shot at reversing your diseases and/or preventing new ones, would you read it? Any thoughts?




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    1. I’ve almost given that project up. In our family it’s cancer. One cousin and I email all the time and she’s on board, but her sister, a near lifelong vegetarian who has had three separate breast cancers (not metastases) won’t give up milk. She practically lives on chi, as she learned to make it in India, with half milk. She is very thin and mostly eats healthy food aside from all that milk and olive oil.

      My SIL weighs 300 pounds and my grandchildren are obese, my daughter, too, after marrying into his meat-eating, overweight family. She is offended if I give her books or say ANYTHING.

      I bought two extra copies of Dr G’s book, which should arrive today. I thought I’d give one to my son and one to my daughter, but I’m having second thoughts. They would all listen to someone else before they’d listen to dear old Mom.




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      1. Rebecca I know exactly how you feel. It’s so hard to see loved ones suffering. And knowing that you have the solution but they won’t listen to you is the worst! Maybe give one to your son and ask him to show it to her. Maybe she’ll be interested if it’s coming from someone else.




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    2. I wonder if it’ll entice at least one of your loved ones to pick up the book , if you just have one casually placed on your coffee table or the kitchen counter ? If s/he likes the book you could offer to lend it or give one as a birthday present .
      Then you wouldn’t be throwing away your money or waste your energy just to get ridiculed.
      Sometimes the transformation we go through ourselves can become a source of curiosity to others (even if they don’t acknowledge it verbally) , and may motivate them to start by just making one change in their diet and lifestyle.
      If they don’t , at least you know you’ve informed them !




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        1. I wish you success & for your loved ones ! My mother is the same, it could be a generational barrier (not all but some people). I’m going to use the strategy when she visits a few months later as she is an avid reader. If she picks it up and start leafing through the book I will do my best to pretend I’m busy with something else !
          The title “How not to die” will make anyone want to at least pick it up, in my opinion.
          Another idea which could work is to make a really yummy whole food/plant based/vegan/with no refined sugar – snack or dessert , serve it when people visit or take it to a family gathering and only tell them it’s vegan after they eat the whole lot. People are usually amazed and comment that they got the same satisfaction texture & taste-wise but without the heavy feeling(eg. Vegan Quiche with a nutty crust base instead of the conventional pastry with 50% butter). They may not go all Whole food at one go, but some of my relatives switched from dairy to non-dairy.




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    3. save your money,
      stop your thinkin’,
      a nod to a blind man
      is as good as a jackass winkin’.

      if a decade living as a beacon
      nor letting your resolve weaken,
      is not enough to make a change
      in seeing you as somehow strange,

      to your local library
      donate books,
      where you’ll need not endure
      strange looks.

      Burma Shave.




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    4. You’re not alone JackyA: We all health-concious people have that experience: we want to help our friends and loved ones to be healthy but they don’t want to be helped. Food habits one develops at a very young age and they are very difficult to change. I used to forward videos to people, but they never watched them. Now i don’t waste time. I have a friend who had bypass surgery a few years ago but still eats crap and brags that his cholesterol was normal, and that is due to statins. Are your family members readers in general? If they’re not readers, they won’t read the book. If they’re, forming a family reading group might do the trick




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    5. I think the best way to convert family members is to serve ridiculously delicious veg foods at family gatherings. Take baby steps and conduct a desensitization-like process to debunk the veg=ick stereotype. Nothing weird! No sprouts, homemade kombucha complete with the mother, brown stews with lots of mystery items, no natto . . . I started with some faux meats at family BBQs. I chose the burgers that tasted and looked as much like meat as possible–faux grill marks and all. Now half my family eats those instead of the meat versions. (Yes, we could debate the merits of faux meat til the cows come home–pun intended–but better that the cows come back to the barn than to the slaughterhouse.) Sweet and sour glazed tofu squares for appetizers that half the folks thought were chicken bites and ate with gusto. Salads with romaine and a few spring greens instead of iceberg–along with really tasty salad dressings. Pretty vegan cupcakes. After fingers were duly licked and the cupcakes were declared yummy, sharing with family I was trying out a vegan recipe . . .

      Secondly, sending single NF.org videos to family members where the topic is relevant–along with a friendly but not overbearing message. More like “thought this was an interesting perspective” rather than “you should really read this article on obesity.” When we hear or sense a “should” we submit (temporarily, with resentment), resist, or rebel. It’s pretty much true for all of us.




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      1. I’ve tried bringing veggie burgers to BBQ’s but sadly didn’t have any takers. I did get some interest in some portabella ‘burgers’ at the last BBQ I went to, but it didn’t stop them from having a hot dog along with it LOL! I do like the cupcake idea I know they’ll dig into those (and so will I of course). I think it’s just too ingrained in some people, they think if they don’t eat meat at every meal and have their daily glass of milk they’ll die from malnutrition. Maybe when a government agency finally comes out and says meat is bad for your health they’ll finally give it up. Wait, that just happened a few weeks ago. And it’s pretty much been forgotten already :(
        I’m guilty of sending videos with the “you have to read this…” I’m going to try the subtle approach next time. Or maybe I’ll trick them and say it’s a funny cat video…




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        1. I think you’re right about the ingrained nature of peoples’ food preferences. People are so attached to their foods that even after heart attacks, some are unwilling to make serious changes. And most doctors (except the ones here on NF.org, of course!) don’t emphasize the importance of dietary changes. However, I do become hopeful when I hear how popular Dr. Greger is. I’m guessing his book will sell well; hopefully folks will implement at least some of his recommendations.

          Yes, funny cat video will definitely get a click! And your opening line could be: “Well, not exactly a funny cat video, but here’s a tip for ______ cuz ___________ is no laughing matter.”




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    6. I think that the year in summary videos here on NF.org are a great low investment
      (on the part of the recipient as well as the giver) way to help people
      get their feet wet as it were. The first video in particular can really
      grab people’s attention once they see what the science clearly shows is
      the power of plants to prevent and heal 14 of the 15 leading causes of premature death in this country.

      And echoing SeedyCharacter, bring foods to events and family gatherings that replicate favorite comfort foods, but also look for other pathways related to diet that might be important to the listener. Our veg group at church served a plant-based meal and showed the film Cowspiracy to the environmentalist group. These folks are passionate about reducing climate impacts and preserving natural ecosystems. Cowspiracy made it absolutely clear that preserving the environment and eating animal products simply are not compatible. And then we served bedrock comfort foods to show that they won’t have to eat “punishment” food in order to align their diet with their philosophy. I brought “beef” stew that used Butler Soy Curls and dried porcini mushrooms that together replace the beef. Adding the mushrooms and their soaking water add a huge umami flavor note (that comes from the browning that you do to the meat before stewing) and the soy curls soak that up and give a very convincing imitation of beef strips. They just couldn’t believe that it wasn’t meat and several said that if this is the kind of food they can eat, then they don’t have any problem giving up meat.

      And lastly DON’T ask them to totally give up meat, dairy and eggs. Most people have a very hard time imagining themselves never eating animal foods, so don’t make it an either/or choice. If the person I am talking to is still healthy (i.e. their diet induced diseases haven’t yet reached the clinical stage) the image I plant with people is “turning your plate inside out”. By that I mean is move the starchy foods from the edge of the plate to the middle and increase the amount so that they can fill up and not feel hungry pretty much from the starches alone. Then put a largish pile of non-starchy vegetables next to it and lastly put very small bit of meat on the side for “flavor”. Or use a strip or two of bacon to flavor a pot of beans. This will start to shift their diet to something that is much healthier than they are eating now. Or if they are really open to the idea but their concern is not being able to eat out, then I suggest that they stay plant based at home and continue to eat at their favorite dishes at their favorite restaurants when they do go out. Not the healthiest, but much better than eating crap for every meal. They get they get to keep something familiar and comforting while at the same time getting used to eating the healthiest foods at home. This in fact is the way that my wife and I started. Within a very short period not having any meat in our meals at home stopped feeling weird, rather having it in the meals we would eat out starting being what felt weird (especially as we learned more about the science behind eating plant based). But we still have “food holidays” every great once in a while where we eat some something with meat, dairy or eggs in it when eating out.

      If they are already suffering from a chronic disease, I suggest that they just try going “whole hog” for a month with no commitment to go any further (“hey its only for a month and you can do anything for a month”). It is just an experiment and they can go back And I tell them, very correctly, that if they do try the diet 100% and they are on blood pressure or diabetic drugs, they will have to work very closely with their doctor because the diet can be so effective that within days the combination of drugs and diet can knock their BP or blood sugar down so much that they could be at risk. That usually gets their attention. As we all know most of the really sick people will feel so good at the end of the month that most of them will never want to go back to their disease inducing diets. Things like the PCRM 21-day Kick Start program are great because they provides structure and support so they don’t feel like they are leaping into the void.




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      1. All terrific ideas here, Jim! I love how you worked with the environmental group at your church! I also love your point about “warning” folks on meds that they will have to be careful since the WFPB diet is so effective they might have to adjust their meds soon. Great strategy!

        I grew up in a family that resisted going to the doctor’s office and strongly resisted medications. They didn’t know much about WFPB meals but I did have basically good nutrition when growing up, so was rarely sick. I’m surprised by how readily my peers will just start taking prescription meds and will continue even when they are plagued with side effects. Mind boggling to me.




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  7. Has the video format been changed? I’ve been able to watch videos here all along. Until NOW! I’m getting Adobe Flash death messages. Running Windows Vista and really can’t afford to change right now. Had the same problem in MS Internet Explorer and for a while now in Mozilla Firefox, both latest updates. Getting really frustrated.




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    1. Oooh…my sympathies. Had an HP running Vista and it was a costly, frustrating, slow-motion train wreck. I now have an Acer running Windows 7 (and refuse to upgrade to Win 10, btw), and it has been a great experience so far… I’m not a techie, but a couple of things. First, abandon IE. Second, see First. Third, try using Chrome, it’s clean and each tab is its own process which means, unlike Firefox, if a tab locks up, simply close the tab and open a new one. No need to restart the browser like using Firefox. Finally, your Adobe Flash player issues may be related to running with protected mode enabled. See the following for details. Good Luck!
      https://support.mozilla.org/en-US/questions/1006932




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      1. Thanks Charzie, Wade, Lawrence.
        Charzie, for some mysterious reason, the help sites think I’m running Win XP. I wonder if Vista Home Premium is more like it than like subsequent Windows versions.
        Wade, my versions are up to date, they just don’t play well together.
        Lawrence, thanks for the link. I abandoned IE toward the end of last year and have been using Firefox since, all my favorites imported from IE plus lots of new bookmarks added in FF. I have Chrome, tried it though don’t recall why I stuck with FF. Perish the thought of hauling favorites/bookmarks over to Chrome. FF keeps kicking me out of the Adobe help pages and isn’t that helpful!? Gotta take a break from all this time consuming problem solving (?). Will get back to it tomorrow. Maybe.




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        1. Your system sounds like it’s haunted. Forget tech support, try an exorcist! But, before you dial that Vatican help line, if you are not already using this free tool, I highly recommend that you (everyone, for that matter who’s running a bloat-prone windows system) download the free version (the only version I have used for years now) of Ccleaner here: This file will download to your default location (usually Downloads)
          https://www.piriform.com/ccleaner/download

          This software does to your computer for free what these glorious ads you see on TV to clean up your computer, make it run faster, etc.and is very highly rated by people who know computers for real.

          To install, double-click on file and run it. Easy. Don’t worry about the default checked boxes, they won’t hurt you. Run the program and click on Registry and Scan for Issues. If your screen fills up with stuff, you know you are about to do something good. Click on Fix Selected issues… and click Yes to backup changes to the registry. Take note of the location where the file is being saved for future reference, and then click Save. Next, click Fix All Selected Issues, watch the magic, and then click Close.

          Now, close any windows applications you are running including any browsers, click Cleaner from the main menu and click Analyze. When Analysis Complete, click Run Cleaner and wait. Ccleaner will exit automatically. At this point, I recommend restarting your computer. You should clean the registry after installing any new software, and periodically run both Registry and Cleaner to keep you system squeaky clean.

          This may not seem like it is directly addressing your issues with Adobe Flash player, but it is true that if windows gets so clogged up with flotsam and jetsam-which it definitely does-the computer will start to act really strange. Another thing you should do is defrag your disk drive. Click Help and Support and search on ‘defrag’ and you will find it. Once you have done all this, go back to the Adobe Flash problem. Good luck!!!




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          1. Okey dokey, Lawrence. Breaking news: I have not had one incident of freeze today! Can hardly believe it.

            I did download ccleaner and install it and run it. I don’t _think_ that made any discernible difference, except for deleting my history and, I suppose my cookies and whatnot. Possibly leaner and cleaner.

            I did not check off Ask to Activate, nor disable Adobe Flash (per Mozilla – or Adobe – suggestions), because I did a search on Mozilla -or Adobe – support and found something that mentioned RealPlayer, which I cannot update because the latest version requires Win7 and I have Vista (not supported). Run-on sentence alert. So, I uninstalled RealPlayer.

            Ergo, apparently something about RealPlayer was the problem, and what a headache it was. Who knew!

            I just checked FF plugins and found Adobe Reader was suddenly outdated. Hit the update button, only to be told that the latest version was already installed. Is it any wonder we’re confused?

            I uninstalled something else on my system, I’m pretty sure, can’t recall what it was, but not anything I thought pertained, just old and not used. I KNOW I kept a running account, saving frequently, of all this, but now can’t find that account. Wouldn’t you know! Duh.

            Oh, my last defrag was that morning (Wed.); it’s automatic, in the wee hours.

            There’s a list of programs FF says I need to research, but I think I’ll do that mah-nyana.

            Thanks very much for breaking my paralysis and getting me going on this successful search. I do appreciate your taking the time.




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            1. Way cool! I’m happy for you. BTW, now that you’re using CCleaner, I should have mentioned that whenever you uninstall a program, you can use the Registry tool to remove the detritus that accumulates from having removed a program.

              This RealPlayer thing stirred some cobwebs in me cabeza, but the dust is settling. Glad you are now back in control and not the other way around!




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              1. Sadly, it didn’t last. But happily, it seems not as bad. That is, Adobe Flash crashes sometimes, but it rather quietly waits for me to click on submit report and then goes away for the moment and I can go on with whatever; so far, no total lockups requiring reboot. Before every dadgummed advertisement had its own separate crash and report and you know how many ads there are on some pages. I will be unable to view some videos, I suppose, but haven’t been online today until now, so have yet to find out what’s what.

                There was something else I uninstalled – Loki ActiveX Control by Skyhook Wireless, installed in 2009, I think. Maybe one other program, too, that I uninstalled. These were ones with no relatively recent updates or of whose utility I was totally ignorant (or forgetful).




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                1. Adblock Plus will virtually eliminate the ads. It will work with Firefox or Chrome, but must be downloaded for each browser individually. I hate ads, they turn a simple web page into a mind-altering experience. If you’re feeling generous, you can disable Adblock for a given website, but otherwise just keep it enabled and wonder where all the ads go…ad heaven, I presume.
                  https://adblockplus.org/
                  I think you should really try Chrome. You don’t have to move all your bookmarks, just bookmark the sites you use with Chrome.. No big deal. You don’t have to make it your default browser to use it, either.
                  I use Chrome with Adblock Plus. Every now and then I use Firefox, but Chrome is my default browser.




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                  1. Lawrence, sorry, I’m just seeing your latest message (of 9 days ago!). Yes, aren’t all the ads a pain, especially when one clicks on one of those ads that lure one onto a site to see the cute little animals (or some heartwrenching subject like rescued dogs, cats, elephants…, or George and what’s her name splitting up, or …;-) which I do sometimes without thinking. FULL of ads, every one of them a likely freeze. Will look into AdBlock, thank you!




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    2. I’m running Mozilla FF on a Linux distribution and have no troubles here.

      But Amazon Videos stopped running and they insist I update my browser…which is the latest edition. I also updated my Adobe. Still no Amazon Video for Firefox. It does run in Chrome, but I don’t like running Chrome.

      I only run Windows when I have video editing/gopro stuff to do.




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    3. I am still running XP, how sad is that, it isn’t even supported anymore! Anyway, try Chrome like someone else mentioned. I actually prefer it but had to switch because I couldn’t get the Silverlight plugin to play nice for Netflix streaming! We have no TV so it’s nice to see a few doc. or movies, and I sure can’t afford to upgrade my system!




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      1. Take heart.. There’s no ‘shame’ in still running XP. In fact, I think it’s safe to say that many business enterprises still use it due to its relative stability and ease of administration. Upgrades are overrated, and the manufactured demand for such creates needless anxiety. Think Black Friday doorway riots. Be glad you’re not among them.




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        1. Oooo, shivers, I am one female who never got the shopping gene, I hate the idea even! Hey, thanks for your support, I actually like XP despite the inconvenience. We had Vista on another computer a while back and it took forever to boot, XP is way faster. It’s just my system is “ancient” in computer years, even purchased refurbished then, so now kinda slow…but functional. Sorta like it’s owner! LOL!




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  8. I have been studying health and nutrition for over four decades. This is the finest siteI have ever seen. I ordered the book and am recommending all of our 300 members purchase it for themselves. Dr. Greger is a huge asset to those who will follow his advice.




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  9. A neighbor friend just had a heart attack. She was whisked to the local hospital, the episode was caught in time so that she didn’t suddenly die or suffer serious consequences. 2 of her coronary arteries were 90% blocked. They put in stents and she was out of the hospital a day later with new meds. I asked her if the doctor talked to her about any dietary changes. She said, “No, he just said “eat a balanced diet–everything in moderation.”” That was all. A generic, meaningless phrase. The CRAZY making part is that this physician could easily have referred her to the plan’s own dietitian! But, no. She is off on a cruise and says she’s “as good as new.” Her health conscious, vegetarian adult daughter asked her if she had any new dietary restrictions she should know about before cooking the Christmas meal and my neighbor said, “No. I’d like prime rib. I’ll just eat a smaller piece.” I suspect my neighbor’s experience is pretty typical.




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      1. Eye opening. And maddening. The real reason we have McDonalds on hospital grounds! Profits . . . even if one has to eat Big Macs for a while to clog up the plumbing.




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        1. There are no words. Say, I really am enjoying your FB page! Re. the amygdala, I recently read this book by Dr. Bessel van der Kolk. It was very interesting, even a little therapeutic, but somewhat depressing when one stops to think about the totality of human psychological suffering. And the body count keeps rising (e.g., ongoing refugee crisis just to give one example, PTSD of our American service men and women to give another):
          http://www.amazon.com/The-Body-Keeps-Score-Healing/dp/0670785938

          I don’t read much on psychology anymore (I think I have myself sorted out pretty much by now), but his book tour lecture intrigued me and I Kindled it on a whim. Very good read!




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          1. Yay! I wonder if that person suffered political consequences for this decision. Hopefully not.

            Does Cleveland Clinic now have a healthy food establishment?




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  10. How do you see diets such as GAPS, which is based on healing the health of the digestive system, in particular with bone broths, eggs, liver, etc, and with fermented foods (e.g. sauerkraut, kefir)? The GAPS book seems well referenced, but I am struggling to evaluate the weight of those references against what I find here (a wikipedia for nutrition research might help, and/or a littlesis.org for researchers and their funders). Perhaps there is no fundamental conflict, and what is good for healing our digestive systems, so we can get the most out of our consumed nutrients, isn’t necessarily the same as what is good for us long term.




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      1. By well referenced, I mean that the GAPS book contains hundreds of references, a majority of which seem to be to medical journals. I’m trying to understand the validity and of the references, and get an understanding of how they relate to the evidence presented on this site.




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        1. So you mean that you can’t verify that any of the important references check out in any meaningful way? Merely having references in a book doesn’t do much to qualify an argument these days, at least not in a complex field where laypeople are often ignorant and there is much bias, and many money-making schemes besides.




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          1. I can’t say that I have checked out here references either although I note that one of the one-star reviews of this book on Amazon comments:
            “I’ll list some of the reasons that this book is quackery. On page 12, she talks about Andrew Wakefield’s research and completely ignores the fact that his research was shown to be fraudulent years before this book was published. The exact paper of Wakefield’s that was shown to be fraudulent is also cited in the references section of the book. After realizing that the author references a few more well-known quacks early on in her book I started to research the author herself. Simply google “natasha campbell-mcbride quack” and you will find many references explaining why this author is a quack.”
            http://www.amazon.com/Gut-Psychology-Syndrome-Depression-Schizophrenia/product-reviews/0954852028/ref=cm_cr_pr_hist_1?filterByStar=one_star&pageNumber=1

            The fact that she seems to quote approvingly the Weston Price Foundation is also a big red flag as far as I am concerned.




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    1. As far as I can make out, there is no real science behind the GAPS diet – it is just a chain of reasoning based on cherry-picked evidence and ignores a mass of other evidence that isn’t supportive of the ideas espoused in the book. You could look at some of these reviews for critical assessments of the GAPS diet:
      http://owndoc.com/diet/gaps-diet-review/
      https://www.sciencebasedmedicine.org/gaps-diet/
      http://www.drweil.com/drw/u/QAA401277/GAPS-Diet-How-Good-Is-It.html#_ga=1.146693364.1938728804.1449793817




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      1. I can’t see those links as debunking the GAPS diet. The first one seems to base itself on refuting FAQ replies that are non-definitive in nature as if they were the basic claims made by the diet. The second two are very general for my taste. None address any of the mechanisms posited in the GAPS book.

        Thanks for the pointer to the microbiome video. To my understanding the video doesn’t at all seem at odds with the GAPS book.




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    2. As far as I can make out, there is no real science behind the GAPS diet – it is just a chain of reasoning based on cherry-picked evidence and ignores a mass of other evidence that isn’t supportive of the ideas espoused in the book. You could look at some of these reviews for critical assessments of the GAPS diet:
      http://owndoc.com/diet/gaps-diet-review/
      https://www.sciencebasedmedicine.org/gaps-diet/
      http://www.drweil.com/drw/u/QAA401277/GAPS-Diet-How-Good-Is-It.html#_ga=1.146693364.1938728804.1449793817




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