New Dietary Guidelines for Americans

New Dietary Guidelines for Americans
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Following the recommendations of the 2010 Dietary Guidelines Advisory Committee to “shift food intake patterns to a more plant-based diet,” the latest USDA guidelines include a vegan adaptation.

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“Ultimately, the best and most accurate dietary advice is only likely to come from those willing to follow the science, even when it is contrary to industry interests.” And indeed, with less corporate influence on the advisory committee, the 2010 guidelines are definitely a step in the right direction. The Committee had four main recommendations, including: “Shift food intake patterns to a more plant-based diet that emphasizes vegetables, cooked dry beans and peas, fruits, whole grains, nuts, and seeds.”

Included in the new official guidelines, a 100% plant-based adaptation, for those who aim to eliminate cholesterol, saturated animal fat, and trans fat from their diet by taking tolerable-upper-daily-limits-of-zero to their logical conclusion.

And now, we have the plate! Remember the ancient pyramid in 2000? That was actually a big step forward, implying that some foods were healthier than others. The meat, egg, dairy, junk food industries were not happy, and so, under a Texan administration in 2005, the pyramid got twisted onto its side, and replaced with unlabeled vertical stripes. Can’t you tell that orange represents grains, and purple, the meat and bean group?

But now, at least you can tell which is which.

To see any graphs, charts, graphics, images, and quotes to which Dr. Greger may be referring, watch the above video. This is just an approximation of the audio contributed by Peter Mellor.

Please consider volunteering to help out on the site.

“Ultimately, the best and most accurate dietary advice is only likely to come from those willing to follow the science, even when it is contrary to industry interests.” And indeed, with less corporate influence on the advisory committee, the 2010 guidelines are definitely a step in the right direction. The Committee had four main recommendations, including: “Shift food intake patterns to a more plant-based diet that emphasizes vegetables, cooked dry beans and peas, fruits, whole grains, nuts, and seeds.”

Included in the new official guidelines, a 100% plant-based adaptation, for those who aim to eliminate cholesterol, saturated animal fat, and trans fat from their diet by taking tolerable-upper-daily-limits-of-zero to their logical conclusion.

And now, we have the plate! Remember the ancient pyramid in 2000? That was actually a big step forward, implying that some foods were healthier than others. The meat, egg, dairy, junk food industries were not happy, and so, under a Texan administration in 2005, the pyramid got twisted onto its side, and replaced with unlabeled vertical stripes. Can’t you tell that orange represents grains, and purple, the meat and bean group?

But now, at least you can tell which is which.

To see any graphs, charts, graphics, images, and quotes to which Dr. Greger may be referring, watch the above video. This is just an approximation of the audio contributed by Peter Mellor.

Please consider volunteering to help out on the site.

Doctor's Note

Be sure to check out all my other videos on dietary guidelines and industry influence

For more context, also check out my associated blog posts: Dietary Guideline Graphics: From the Food Pyramid to My Plate, Harvard’s Healthy Eating Plate, and PCRM’s Power Plate; and Stool Size and Breast Cancer Risk.

If you haven’t yet, you can subscribe to my videos for free by clicking here.

13 responses to “New Dietary Guidelines for Americans

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  1. Yes, stereotype reinforcement and also misclassification. Vegetables (a culinary class) being contrasted with protein (a biomolecule that widely present in vegetables, grains and even present to a lesser extent in fruit).

    I wonder where they would place seitan (which is mostly wheat protein) … I guess double counted as both grain and protein.




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    1.  Further to the point, our bodies don’t need protein, they need amino acids.  Specifically the nine essential amino acids that our bodies can’t make themselves.




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  2. Peer Pressure and a Vegan lifestyle

    My wife and I have found it very awkward at times when we “come out” and advise that we have become vegans, given the varying negative reactions, that we generally receive.

    The reactions range from hostility (don’t do it) to we will still love you anyways, (although you are weird).

    Any resources you could suggest to minimize or avoid this sort of thing.




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  3. The word “vegan” is too political and basically meaningless from a true health perspective. To most people, a “vegan” is a person who actively engaged in “animal rights,” and avoiding all things from animals, including honey. Moreover, a person can live on potato chips and cola and be a junk-food vegan. Consequently, to avoid adverse reactions, simply don’t use a politically charged word. Instead, just tell people that you are giving up foods that contain saturated fat and cholesterol so that you can improve your health. Who can argue against that?




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    1. I puked when I saw the pyramid in 1992. Instict! I have lived anti-obesity many years before it was announced. And– I have outlived all vegans allready.  Life is a breeze if you let it run your intake. Diet?  More pyramid jokes?
      Hart Oldenburg
      I Cause health—Hart Health




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  4. New Dietary guidelines for Americans? Are they not fat enought yet? The Guidelines  are man-made and have a track record, decades long, to destroy normal nutrition.
    Vegetables are fattening and increasing their consumption can only be defined (My new word). Food Folly!This “Experiment” has absorbed trillions, shrugged off by food science.
    I have disclosed Obesity and sent an announcment to Harvard. I did not rceive a reply but it was erased from their health portfolio. Heart & Stroke continues to dabble with the Pyramid guide.
    Why do I succcide when science fails? I live by instinc, lifelong experiencest rejecting any and all medical influences.
    I cause health —Hart Health




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