Doctor's Note

This is part two of an extended series on Type 2 diabetes that will continue for months. I’d put them all back-to-back, but then it would be diabetes all day every day for weeks. If you really want to understand this process, I suggest watching the three “prequel” videos:

The reason I’m going into all this detail is that I’m hoping to empower both those suffering from the disease and those treating sufferers so as to better understand dietary interventions to prevent and treat the epidemic. Maybe one day I’ll record hour-long disease-specific lectures that put it all together for those who’d want to watch it all straight through.

Meanwhile, here some videos on prevention:

And here’s some on treatment:

If you haven't yet, you can subscribe to my videos for free by clicking here.

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  • Paul Bashir

    ..

    • Zach

      Thanks for the information! I am wondering, would a high intake of monounsaturated fat also decrease insulin sensitivity? Perhaps a high intake of monounsaturated fat would also contribute to insulin resistance over time, but not to the same severity as saturated fat?

      • Zach

        Never mind. I just watched your previous video explaining the different fats. Thanks!

  • BB

    The diabetes patients in my family just do not know this information. They firmly believe they can eat all the protein and accompanying fat as long as they stay away from the dreaded carbs. When they do eat carbs, they go off the wagon and have sugary treats instead of the banned potatoes and whole grains. Even though they are becoming more obese and their diabetes is progressing, their blood sugar reports are good convincing them that what they are doing is working. Two of them are in danger of having amputations. I will send them this video, but they would rather follow the Paleo diet than learn sound nutritional science. As long as they keep their sugars down, their doctors tell them they are doing great! Unbelievable!!

    • b00mer

      BB, I’m so hoping that one day we see a comment from you indicating that you got through to your family. I can imagine going about disease progression apathetically when it just involves more pills or injections, but amputations?? It’s hard to believe that the risk of that isn’t so terrifying to make someone try having some meatless spaghetti for dinner. Do you have any contact info for their doctors? Maybe you could send some information directly to them. Sounds like they could use the education.

      • BB

        If their doctors would adopt the nutritional science approach and give the recommendations, I am sure it would influence and help my family members. But, my family members are so attached to their beliefs, habits and traditions surrounding food, I am not sure they could ever make the necessary changes. .This is my husband’s family and my husband had to have a heart attack eleven years ago before he adopted the McDougall program and became the healthy individual he is today. We do live away from the family and are not embedded in all the unhealthy family gatherings. I am not sure my husband would have been so successful if he had lived around his family. They are all obese and have chronic nutritional diseases. We are the oddballs and it is interesting that they admire our health, respect what we do, but cannot put 2 and 2 together for themselves. At times, heartbreaking!

        • wyman

          Hi BB, yes your families beliefs are a major influence on decision to eat healthy, as a convert to the Seventh Day Adventist faith I have reaped incredible benefits from the health message that is a major strength of this faith and has blessed my life. All the best and God bless

    • baggman744

      Most people have a misperception of what a “Paleo diet” is. Paleo diets are not at all what the Atkins diet was 10 years or so ago i.e., its not all the protein & fat you want. In fact, its a pretty well balanced approach (depending on whose interpretation of Paleo that is) consisting mostly of fresh non starchy veggies – the largest portion of your meal, a small amount of low fat protein, small amount of nuts, seeds & healthy fats, and a small amount of fruit. It excludes all processed foods, most processed grains & sugary drinks.

      • Mike Quinoa

        Maybe the reason people have misinterpretations of what a “Paleo diet” is, is because, as you pointed out, what the diet contains seems to be open to the individual Paleo-dieter’s interpretation. A whole-foods, plant-based diet is more definitive.

        • baggman744

          True, there are several “versions” of Paleo. Frankly, I think the term is a misnomer, and I don’t follow it. Then I saw one author’s recommendations, and found it quite reasonable and balanced. Its not 100% vegan, but when compared to the SAD, Atkins, even the Mediterranean diet, it looked pretty well balanced and more importantly, sustainable.

          • Mark

            I tend to prefer a slightly lower carb vegan/plant based diet, with cruciferous, leafy green, and allium vegetables providing most of my carbs, with sweet potatoes of varieties contributing to a few meals a week. I don’t avoid starchy vegetables and grains, but I certainly don’t seek them out. Protein comes mainly from legumes in various forms, and I find the supportive evidence for lauric rich fats (coconut oil) strong enough that it has become my sauté oil of choice. I suppose you could call this on the edge of paleo-vegan, I don’t. More like a carb-conscious plant based diet. It has allowed me to drop about 100 pounds over the last year (portion control and calorie intake consciousness), pretty much put my Type 2 diabetes on the back-burner (where it will hopefully remain, as it has since my becoming vegan about 3 years ago). I find this video fascinating, and the paleo-diet discussions as usual a bit overly dramatic.

      • fencepost

        baggman744, rephrasing your description of Paleo, the largest portion of my meal has very low caloric content and then I can have small portions of the high-calorie stuff. If I need to consume 3000 calories a day at my activity level, where do those calories come from?

        • baggman744

          Agree. I’m not vegan, and I still weight train, so calorically dense foods are a part of my diet. Yeah, I know there are vegan body building websites, but that wouldn’t work for me. How does one get 3000 KCals of broccoli? You’d need a wheel barrel…

          • Martica Heaner PhD

            Beans, grains, nuts, seeds, whole-grain bread–that’s how you get larger calorie amounts. You can’t possibly eat enough fresh vegetables to rack up lots of calories, but vegans need to eat more than just fresh vegetables!

          • Guest

            Boiled potatoes, rice, bread, etc. all are full of calories and they go well with beans, tomato, raisins, etc…. Vegan diet is full of calories. If you insist on Oil, there is olive and vegetable oil.

      • Paleo is morphing into many varieties as it enters the mainstream vernacular.

        • baggman744

          True. Perfect example, look Atkins 10 years and today, very different. Like most things in diet trends/ popularity / nutritional recommendations, it’ll always be dynamic. As I’ve said, to me therm “Paleo” itself is a misnomer, but we (consumers) tend to like labels And for those “selling it”, it works, if for no other reason, marketing purposes.

          • Exactly! I never thought I’d see the day when that would be Atkins branded TV dinners in the frozen food section! Paleo is showing signs of going the same route.

          • baggman744

            Well “paleo” can really be branded like Atkins is. What I meant was, Atkins used to be all the butter, lard, and fat you want. Its come a long way since the death of Dr. Atkins, and the brand was sold by his family.

      • Californiaesque

        Paleo has involved and there is no longer guidance to eat “low fat” protein.

        • Charzie

          Yeah and so was Kempner’s rice diet keeping type 2’s alive with rice, fruit, juice and SUGAR. Low fat WFPB got rid of my own diabetes, a slew of health issues, and half my body weight, so you bet your frightened ___ I believe it.

          • Californiaesque

            I’m familiar with Kempner’s work from a lecture I saw from Denise Minger at the 2014 Ancestral Health Symposium. She presented a counterpoint to High Fat Low Carb, playing Devil’s Advocate.

            Minger concedes that some very high carb and very low fat diets seem to produce what she called magical effects, but these diets are so severe that it is extremely difficult to follow. To get the desired effect, the person has to be on < 10% calories from fat, no oils or other visible fats, and very low protein. Kempner by his own admission whipped his patients to keep them in compliance and demanded his associates keep quiet about his unusual methodology.

            How effective is this type of diet for real-world issues? It is bad enough that the world is full of junk foods, CAFO meats, and HFCS additives to virtually all processed foods. LCHF diets seem the easier and more practical alternative to using nutritional health care interventions. But I will concede the patients with severe heart disease may do better by getting locked in a fat-clinic and put on this ultra-low fat diet for a few months. Will it work? Yes. But the austerity isn't practical or desirable.

          • Guest

            The magical effects of a low fat plant based diet Ms. Minger talks about are the results of how fast the body heals when we get ride of the fat in our diet. Plants have all the fat we need and in the correct proportions. No low-carb diet can claim to reverse heart disease. But whole food plant based diets do. Low-carb diets are for short term weight loss only and should be avoided for extended periods of time regardless if they taste better to people accustomed to the rich American diet already.

    • Julie

      Have them get their fasting insulin checked regularly–that will tell them what is REALLY going on! Since Type 2 Diabetes is a disease of insulin resistance from too much insulin, the lower the fasting insulin levels, the better. Most practitioners recommend fasting insulin below 10, with ideal at 3-5.

      • Mark

        Julie, Since the body’s pancreas and liver systematic functions of glucose storage, insulin and glucagon release, and systemic insulin resistance is reflected in fasting blood glucose measures, why not just measure/monitor morning blood glucose levels?

    • Please see the discussion above about the Newcastle protocol for reversing diabetes. Paleo/LCHF controls blood sugar, but that’s all it does. Whereas, the program Prof. Roy Taylor has tested actually restores normal pancreatic function.

  • Aaron Sands

    With diabetes statistics looking unfavorably for people in my age group, this sort of information and this sort of website is invaluable. Watching these videos always gives me the feeling I’m on the ground floor of important information in the nutrition field. And it’s because of Dr. Greger and his staff and volunteers. Thank you, all of you.

    • HaltheVegan

      Ditto on the ‘Thanks to Dr. Greger and his staff and volunteers’. This valuable information from this website is the primary reason I changed my eating habits to Whole Foods – Plant Based!

  • b00mer

    I took a look at the Standards of Medical Care document and while there’s some promising language, it’s still so pathetically inadequate. Some highlights were: recommending “at least” as much whole grains and fiber as for the general population, and recommending that carbohydrates come from fruits, vegetables, legumes, and whole grains as opposed to processed foods with added sugars/fats.

    Unfortunately, they still recommend increasing fish for the omega-3s while simultaneously discouraging omega-3 supplements; insisting that there’s no conclusive evidence for an ideal fat or macronutrient levels overall, so that should be individualized based on patient “preference” and “metabolic goals”; and that fat and cholesterol levels should be the same as those for the general population, in other words, way too much. I did a search for the word “meat” and came up with zero hits in the entire document. Dairy is only mentioned as something that should be increased (once mentioned as “low fat dairy”, once simply mentioned as “dairy”). Even if the message to reduce saturated fat and cholesterol does get through to a patient, I would imagine most are going to respond to that by increasing chicken, fish, and egg white consumption. And speaking of protein, the standards of care initially state explicit instructions to not reduce protein consumption even in those with kidney disease, then later state reducing protein “might” be considered if the kidney disease is progressing to a certain degree.

  • Sidney

    Even so called “good fat” in the end is fat. It’s easy to over consume fat if one uses oils in cooking and also eats a lot of nuts.

  • elsie blanche

    This Doctor in the link below claims that meat causes diabetes.

    https://www.facebook.com/drgarth/posts/942670975753811

    My question/concern……he also claims in a reply to one of his readers that
    the saturated fat in coconut does not cause diabetes. This seems to go
    against current thinking on this website here, no? I am aware that their
    are (reportedly) populations of people who ingest large amounts of plant-based
    saturated fats that do not get diabetes, but is this just a fluke? Would a diet
    consisting of 40 percent of its calories from coconuts and nuts and seeds
    eventually increase/cause type 2 diabetes?

    Has anyone here been able to maintain a high carb/sugar high plant-based fat diet
    and not have issues? Maybe for a few years I’d think it could be OK but long-term
    I’d think there’d be issues.

  • Plantstrongdoc M.D.

    Very interesting. The Medical community will soon recommend liver transplant as a solution to this deadly epidemic :-)
    Diabetes is a very serious disease – you are at high risk of heart attack, stroke, kidney failure, impotence, cancer, amputation, blindness, gastroparesis, dementia and painful polyneuropathy.
    Don’t expect a cure from Big Pharma – their goal is not to cure the disease, but to control it – keeping you as a patient for many years. Besides antidiabetic medication you will get antihypertensive drugs, simvastatin, an anticoagulant and antidepressant against the painful polyneuropathy. There are a lot of money in this disease.
    For most people type 2 diabetes is a choice. If one of your parents have the disease, and you become fat, then you will get the disease with a very high probability. Unless you do something drastic – as shifting to a mainly plant based diet.
    Sugar is not the culprit – high blood sugar is just the consequence. The villain is the fat. Lets call the disease by its real name: Lipotoxemia disease. You eat too much toxic fat!

    • elsie blanche

      https://www.facebook.com/drgarth/posts/942670975753811

      The doctor from the link i just included here claims that coconut fat is not an issue, as it is a plant-based fat
      and he says that there is evidence that cultures who consume lots of coconut fat do not have the diabetes
      issues. Your thoughts?

      • Plantstrongdoc M.D.

        My first thought is that it is BS (not blood sugar !) Coconut fat contains a lot of saturated fat (Toxins or Darryl can probably tell how much ;-) ). Cultures consuming a lot of coconut fat probably base most of their diet on plants – that could be one explanation – like a flexitarian on a mostly plant based diet, but eating meat, fish or cheese once or twice pr month. Just my thoughts for what it is worth.

        • DanielFaster

          My good friend/triathlete/bariatric surgeon Dr. Garth in Elsie’s link implies that fats vs. carbs is just a distraction. It is the animal proteins that lead to insulin resistance/diabetes. “Meat consumption is a major cause of diabetes, carbs are not.” Saturated fat only entered the discussion when the meat producers conspired to blunt the message of eat less meat and turned it into eat lean protein, accepting saturated fat as the new villain as a stand-in for animal foods. All of these diseases of excess are multifactorial, meaning that it is an exceedingly complex and varied system and you usually can’t blame just one thing when there is an endless stream of things; but meat, especially modern factory meat, embodies a broad spectrum of these causative factors: saturated fat, animal protein, heme iron, pathogens, endotoxins, antibiotics, hormones, biomagnified environmental toxins, microbiome dysbiosis, etc.

          • Plantstrongdoc M.D.

            Interesting. “All of these diseases of excess are multifactorial” – agree, biology is complex

          • DanielFaster

            That’s why magic bullets are so elusive

      • b00mer

        Hi elsie, I didn’t see anything about coconut in that post? Is there a different one where he elaborates on this issue or did I miss it somehow?

        For what it’s worth, I think Dr. Davis is fantastic! We need more docs like him and especially on social media.

        Re: coconut fat, I know I’ve seen some things before about particular Pacific islanders and coconut consumption, and when you really break it down, they’re eating mostly tubers with a very small volume of coconut, maybe 20% calories from fat in the diet overall. Which is higher than e.g. an Esselstyn recommended diet, but still much lower than a standard American “low fat” diet. So with enough sweet potatoes and exercise, maybe a little extra fat isn’t the end of the world (or maybe there are in fact significant differences in long term health outcomes that aren’t being addressed), but unfortunately these nuances often get lost in translation and the average reader thinks oh goody, coconut oil ad libitum, and will surpass what the islanders were eating in total fat consumption, without incorporating all of the other health promoting diet and lifestyle factors: activity, sweet potatoes and other low fat high fiber foods, community, stress reduction, etc. Just my two cents. If you can share an actual study he’s referenced, we can look at the details more. :)

        • elsie blanche

          Yeah, good points you make. If you read the comments toward the end of the page, you’ll see the Dr.’s comments to someone on coconut fat.

        • elsie blanche

          from the link/page:

          DR. GARTH DAVIS “There is an island where they eat large quantities of coconut and do not appear to have diabetes. Saturated fat is a major culprit but no the kind in coconuts”

          QUESTION: do you recommend avoiding nuts, seeds and avocados because of their high fat content? In the “rant” you often speak about “fat” – can one assume that you are, in general, referring to animal sources of fat, and not to plant sources? Because of the recent data coming out of the Adventist HS-2 (vegans who consume nuts and seeds regularly end up living 7-8 years longer than vegans who do not), I have been enjoying flaxseeds, walnuts, pecans, cashews, pumpkin seeds, poppy seeds on a daily basis. Might these fatty foods lead to insulin resistance?

          Also, do you know anything about the effect of whole coconut flesh (coconut butter, which is puréed whole coconut) on insulin resistance? After all, it is saturated fat – but does it have the same effect as animal-source saturated fat?
          2 · 13 hrs
          Dr. Garth Davis The studies I have reviewed show no harm to nuts, seeds and avocados. I include them in my diet. I caution patients on the calorie content however.
          2 · 13 hrs
          DR. GARTH DAVIS “There is an island where they eat large quantities of coconut and do not appear to have diabetes. Saturated fat is a major culprit but no the kind in coconuts”

          • Joseph Gonzales R.D.

            Dr. Greger has a few thoughts on coconut and I am planning to update any new research in the Ask the Dietitian section, as this is always a hot topic. In the meantime, here are a few notes from Dr. Greger’s video on coconut oil. I took this straight from the transcripts.

            “Walter Willett’s recommendation from Harvard, if you are going to use it use it sparingly. Now look, if you’re eating so healthy that your LDL cholesterol is under 60 or 70, then I don’t see coconut oil as a problem. Unlike saturated animal fats, coconut oil doesn’t cause that spike inflammation immediately after consumption of animal foods, which makes sense because as you’ll remember it may be the dead bacterial endotoxins in animal products ferried into the body by saturated fat that are to blame. ”

            There are 3 videos in the “Doctor’s Note” section that discuss animal fat and endotoxins. I think they may helpful. More to come on this…

            Thanks ,
            Joseph

          • baggman744

            This seems to be the consensus. Without mentioning any names, two respected Harvard grads, one an MD/ researcher & author, the other a respected nutritionist & author whose recommendations I trust, share this exact opinion. I’ve never bought into the whole “miracle of coconut oil” thing, never used it, don’t see a reason to start.

          • b00mer

            Yes, I would agree with Dr. Davis and others that nuts, seeds, coconut, and avocado can certainly play a beneficial role in a healthy diet, and being plants, certainly they all have unique phytonutrients, but of course as he mentions, watch the calories. This is an area where I definitely think individual considerations are warranted. For those seeking rapid heart disease reversal, or having trouble losing weight, restricting them might be for the best. For others, they might provide unique health benefits. I think everyone should eat mindfully, and watch their own weight, cholesterol levels, insulin levels, etc, and do what appears to keep them happiest and healthiest. One thing I think does need to be treated with caution is qualitative wording like “large quantities”, for reasons stated in previous comment. Americans certainly have their own unique perspectives on what “large quantities” are, and also as MacSmiley mentions, coconut itself and the currently super trendy coconut oil are very different foods.

      • The coconut-centered cultures with little or no diabetes (Kitavans?) eat whole food coconut, not gobs of coconut oil.

        • DeeK

          ………and they don’t sit in front of a TV or a computer all day; they engage in physical labor 8-12 hours a day.

    • elsie blanche

      Yeah, I’m inclined to believe that the coconut oil fat is not so good as well. I think Darryl has commented on this before, and I gather he knows what he is talking about. The only thing that makes me pause, though, is I meet a fair amount of seemingly healthy and fit people who costume a fair amount of saturated fats. I think that the benefit that coconut has going for it is that it is not too high in omega 6, and the other plant-based fats in nuts and avocados can, in excess of omega 3 fats, cause issues.

      • UCBAlum

        I just stick with the science and chalk anecdotes up as diversions. It really doesn’t matter that sometimes some people claim to eat some saturated fat and have the outward appearance that someone might consider healthy, does it? I believe we are beyond that now.

        Stories of someone’s great grandmother living to 102 smoking cigarettes, eating eggs and bacon for breakfast, or doing a shot of whisky every day only make me wonder how long they would have lived if they had not done those unhealthy things.

        • Wil Bremers

          Alas, science contradicts itself a lot! There is scientific proof that low carb is healthier then high carb and vice versa. Plant proteins are better than meat proteins BUT meat has B12 so you have to supplement if you’re eating only plants. So eat some meat every now and then? Some plant fats are good (avocado) some are bad just like some animal fats. I prefer to eat as much variety as possible: some veganistic, fish and meat.

          • UCBAlum

            I think evidence is different than “proof”, that “science” doesn’t answer questions like “is high carb healthier than low carb”, and that contradictory evidence means our understanding is incomplete rather than being an indictment of “science”.

            Having said all that, I would much rather make dietary decisions based on today’s knowledge than the knowledge we had 20 years ago or more. I certainly wouldn’t decide today, for example, that I needed to eat meat because it contains B12. B12 is created by bacteria, and we have to get it from alternative sources due to modern hygiene and living standards. This is not evidence that meat is required for health or survival. It is evidence that we can have profound impacts on our environment. But we already know that.

          • Alan

            I think that if you do some research you will find out that a lot of meat eaters are low on B12. It is not just Vegans that have the problem.

          • Wil Bremers

            Yes, I know that the older you get the less able you are to get B12 out of your food. And of course meat is not the only source of B12: yeast (inacitvated) is also a great source of B12. And of course science of today can be very helpful. Still every now and then practical wisdom from long ago gets attention as science (finally) sees the evidence of it. People and apes always have ben eating nuts, seeds etc. Eating no or hardly any fatty veggies or fruit (avocado) is just not a good idea.

      • Aaron Kester

        The best and most extensive review of coconut oil on the internet is probably this one done by the American Heart Association, they do address why it probably should be limited: http://www.heartfoundation.org.nz/uploads/Evidence_paper_coconut_August_2014.pdf

  • MikeOnRaw

    So, the question now becomes, if we have fat invading our organs, how do we get the fat back out? If I drop 50lbs, how do I make sure those first 50lbs are the organ and muscle fat? Is the body protective of that fat or does it give it up first?

    • b00mer

      Hi Mike, I assume from your name that you’re vegan, so the good news is that if we accept the principle that ectopic fat stores are the underlying cause of the disease, and if we look to the results (i.e. those on low fat vegan diets with unrestricted carbohydrate intake are able to reduce or even eliminate insulin dosage) it follows as a reasonable conclusion that ectopic fat stores are in fact being reduced by such a diet.

      Speaking solely of weight loss in itself, it appears that hepatic lipids are mobilized first, followed by visceral, subcutaneous abdominal, and then skeletal muscle lipids. Reduction in skeletal muscle lipids may have been the lowest, however it is still a significant reduction:

      “[…] ~27 kg weight loss improved both hepatic as well as peripheral insulin sensitivity. The largest reduction occurred in hepatic TG content (−85%), whereas IMCLs accumulation in the skeletal muscle decreased by 38%. The relative reduction in visceral fat was larger than the reduction in subcutaneous abdominal fat (−60% and −45% resp.) (accepted for publication in Obesity [98]).”
      [http://www.hindawi.com/journals/ije/2012/983814/]

      Studies from the above review are mostly dealing with results from low calorie or very low calorie diets; if the studies referenced are in line with American standard dietary recommendations for diabetics, then the fat content by caloric percentage may be 3-5 times higher than what a low fat vegan diet would provide. It sure would be nice to see the results of hepatic/skeletal muscle/etc lipid mobilization in a low fat vegan diet trial.

      • MikeOnRaw

        Thanks for that information, and I will be reviewing it. Yes, I am a high carb low fat vegan switching Jan 1 of this year from a Standard American Diet.
        This also brings up another question. If that fat is released, where does it go? Could this be part of the cause of elevated triglycerides reported by some moving to a high carb, low fat plant based diet.

        • fencepost

          If you are on a low fat vegan diet and losing weight (maybe 1/2 lb/day), and you wake up around 4 am and are really hot, that is a tipoff of where the fat is going. If your body wants to, it can burn it off while you are sleeping.

  • DairyIsVeal

    Sadly, my mother did die from just this scenario. Diabetes. Liver Cancer that grew to include Bowel Cancer. Pancreatic fail. Congestive Heart Failure. Three years before she died, she said she’d rather die than give up meat. The last words she said to me the day before she died were, “I love you. Thank you for taking care of me. I’ll start eating (whole foods, vegan) like you.”

    • psisai

      wow. Oh man that hits me really hard because my mother is also not vegan. And she smokes. Those last words are almost too sad to hear. I pray I can keep her from a painful end. I sympathize with you so much friend. That is too sad.

  • Wil Bremers

    OK, so how to get rid of the fat. I did it by eating no bread, pasta, rice, sugar. Lost all my fat and kilo’s while eating nuts like almonds and pecan and seeds with chick peas etc. Now this story tells me that I must have loads of fat in my muscles? I don’t think so. I learned that sugar (carbo) is turned into fat which I can confirm for I had quite some fat in the days I was still eating a lot of bread and pasta. If I want to put on weight I only have to eat pasta for a couple of days and presto I’m getting fat again. So how come eating fat would turn me fat without me seeing it?

    • b00mer

      Ectopic fat is found within skeletal muscle tissue and in and around the internal organs, e.g. the liver, pancreas, and heart. It is different from subcutaneous fat which is found just under the skin and is what most people think of when they think of the word “fat”.

      • Wil Bremers

        Ectopic fat was my beer belly :-) http://www.myhealthywaist.org/ This Canadian organization talks about that. So, it is something that shows quite clearly and I do not have it anymore. Nonetheless I eat 1 to 2 handfull of nuts/seeds a day. And use coconut oil in my coffee, a recommendation from Dr. Perlmutter http://www.drperlmutter.com/tag/coconut-oil/ I know that vitamins like A, D and E are only available in fat. I do not know of any vitamins that are only available in carbo like bread and pasta. After a week not eating bread, pasta, pizza, potatoes and rice the beer belly was almost gone :-) I feel a lot better so would I need to be eating grains again?

    • MikeOnRaw

      This video almost indicates for an analysis of your fasting glucose numbers. As it indicates that the more fat stored in the muscles, the poorer the insulin response which should drive up your glucose numbers. Perhaps not high enough to be considered diabetic, but perhaps on the high side of “normal”

  • JR

    What about paleo eaters who eat mostly animal fat and protein and do crossfit workouts? They look lean and healthy, so it’s hard to argue they aren’t. Are we worried about those folks? Is it more about excess calories or more about dietary fat?

    • b00mer

      A recent video may help to answer that for you:
      http://nutritionfacts.org/video/paleo-diets-may-negate-benefits-of-exercise/

      That video only deals with cholesterol and insulin levels. More important, “looking” lean and healthy is not really any indication of health at the cellular level. Many chronic diseases e.g. heart disease, cancers, degenerative diseases, etc, will not be visible just by looking at someone and seeing how many momentum propelled “pull-ups” they can do.

      • JR

        Thanks for the reply. I refreshed myself on the video re paleo. I agree that eventually my paleo friends will have health concerns as a result of their diet. One friend sadly even went from a vegan diet to paleo because her fitness results were better. I should ask her for her cholesterol numbers. Perhaps ultimately, as vegans, we may have to accept that some athletic high fat meat dieters can have a healthy profile and physique and we elect to choose vegan for multiple reasons in addition to health. Or perhaps I should be worried about my friends (in addition to the animals and planet).

  • Joe Caner

    So let me getting this straight. Intramyocellular lipid toxicity, a.k.a. Lipotoxicity, leads to cancer, impotence, vaginal dryness, obesity, metabolic syndrome, fatty liver disease, diabetes, stroke, vascular and coronary heart disease. Did I miss any? Talk about digging your own grave with your teeth.
    If I were to compose a song to describe this dynamic, I would entitled it:
    “Killing me slowly with barbecue double bacon cheese burgers with onion rings”

    • Gary

      Elvis could sing the song after his fav snack.
      The peanut butter, banana and bacon sandwich, or peanut butter and banana sandwich, sometimes referred to as an Elvis sandwich or simply the Elvis,

      ELVIS’ AILMENTS

      HEART DISEASE – The autopsy revealed Elvis suffered at least 3 heart attacks before the final one.

      CANCER OF THE LIVER & BONE – Elvis believed he had cancer, and at least one of his doctors (according to Elvis) diagnosed it. It was said to be caused by PERNICIOUS ANEMIA, coming from a GENETIC LIVER DISEASE.

      ERYTHEMATOUS & SYSTEMIC LUPUS – This is a painful and sometimes deadly disease. There is both an outer epidermal form of it and a type that effects the internal organs. Elvis had both, although for him it was mostly an internal malady.

      HYPERTENSION & HIGH BLOOD PRESSURE

      DIABETES

      INSOMNIA – a chronic, hereditary clincal disorder.

      GLAUCOMA – This is an extremely painful eye condition which is the third leading cause of blindness in the U.S.

      CLUSTER/MIGRAINE HEADACHES

      ENLARGED AND OBSTRUCTED COLON – caused severe CONSTIPATION. Elvis’ colon was actually deformed. He was born with this abnormality.

      A PARTIAL COLON BY-PASS

      THREE COMPRESSED SPINAL FRACTURES

      SEVERE ARTERY DETERIORATION

      A SUPPRESSED IMMUNE SYSTEM

      • Joe Caner

        Nice, and all fried in either bacon grease or butter. The only thing to make it complete is to dip it in egg batter, deep fry it and smother it in chocolate. It’s no wonder that he had an obstructed colon.
        Put that in your green smoothie and drink it.

      • Joe Caner
  • Bruce Rogers

    Best diabetes tutorial I’ve ever experienced! Kudos once again, Dr. Greger.

    • So happy to hear that! I was afraid it was going to be too academic for folks. I’m glad at least someone understood it! :)

  • Dr. Greger does an excellent job of pulling it all together! I have been recommending this approach for the last 8 years or so… although folks like Dr. John McDougall have been having success for much longer… not to mention Dr. Walter Kempner’s work see video http://nutritionfacts.org/video/kempner-rice-diet-whipping-us-into-shape/ in the early part of 20th century. The science keeps coming but as our understanding grows it only reaffirms what works. The devil is in the details and it is a bit complicated but the take home message is clear… diabetes whole food plant based diet with adequate starches to ensure adequate calorie intake. If you eat just non starchy vegetables and fruits you don’t get enough calories. At least the message is starting to get out that the “glucose” processing problem is caused by “fats” in the diet. Jeff Novick RD was the first one I saw tie exercise to calorie density(calories/pound). It is very useful concept. It helps explains how folks like Jim Fixx can exercise, be lean and die suddenly. Lean doesn’t necessarily mean that your arterial system is healthy. The fitness helps stabilize the arteries but to stack the odds in your favor you need to eat properly. Folks can and do change but at different rates. It would be nice if the environment would encourage proper eating but that would mean government, business and especially the health care professionals would start recommending the best lifestyle approaches. Until that happens we can keep getting the information out there and leading by example. I believe referring folks to NutritionFacts.org for the latest science, Dr. McDougall’s website for those who want a more clinical perspective… see his December 2009 newsletter article on treating diabetes, and PCRM for some practical tools to help make the transition… Vegetarian Starter Kit, Nutrition for Kids, and 21 Day Kickstarter programs available in english, spanish and mandarin! Patients on medications need to work with their providers. This is especially important for patients on diabetes and high blood pressure medications. Of course it would help if health care professionals were reimbursed in a manner to support creating healthy citizens and not for visits for procedures and drugs that aren’t healthy over time. Keep tuned.

    • HungryShrew

      ‘… Fixx was genetically predisposed (his father had a heart attack at 35 and died of another at 43, and Fixx himself had a congenitally enlarged heart), and had several lifestyle issues. Fixx was a heavy smoker prior to beginning running at age 36, he had a stressful occupation, he had undergone a second divorce, and his weight before he took up running had ballooned to 220 pounds (100 kg).[6]’ –wiki

      • There are of course many contributing factors but Esselstyn’s work at the Cleveland clinic published last year showed it is possible to stabilize the arterial tree and almost eliminate arterial events… 0.6% over 3 1/2 years as opposed to standard medical care of 20% per year (Courage study). His study involved persons with proven coronary artery disease. Stopping smoking for 3 years returns your risk to baseline. In my clinical experience the biggest problem with stress is what patients do when under significant stress… eating and exercising typically are poorer. Given a genetic predisposition all the more reason to pursue lifestyle habits since we can’t change our genes but diet has significant effect on whether they are expressed. Be well.

        • HungryShrew

          still…someone with a genetic predispostion doesn’t seem to be a good example to use.

          [..and stress does cause health problems directly, but you know that].

          An appropriate response would have been ‘yeah, ok, my bad’.

  • This is great advice for diabetic patients. Most people believe that sugar and carbs are the culprits, but this shows that a high fat diet is also detrimental to their health. Not only is a low carb diet beneficial, but a low fat diet is too: http://www.aboutlowcarbfoods.org/low-carb-diet-diabetes/low-carb-diet-and-diabetes/
    Will make sure to counsel my diabetic patients about a low fat diet too. Thanks Dr. G!

    • Bob413

      The reason most people believe sugar and carbs are the culprits it’s because they are.

      What causes a bigger insulin spike, sugar/carbs, or fats? Remember, one of insulin’s primary functions is to clear glucose out of the system. Fat doesn’t create the same glucose response as sugar/carbs because there is in fact no sugar in fat. So obviously for diabetics, they want more fat in their diet than sugar/carbs.

      That is all you really need to know to derive any common sense from this

  • HungryShrew

    AMERICAN DIABETES ASSOCIATION
    STANDARDS OF MEDICAL CARE IN DIABETES—2015

    http://professional.diabetes.org/admin/UserFiles/0%20-%20Sean/Documents/January%20Supplement%20Combined_Final.pdf

    ‘Carbohydrate amount and available insulin may be the most important
    factors influencing glycemic response after eating and should be
    considered when developing the eating plan.

    ‘Monitoring carbohydrate intake, whether by carbohydrate counting or
    experience-based estimation, remains critical in achieving glycemic
    control.’

    ‘Carbohydrate Management- Individuals with type 1 diabetes should
    be offered intensive insulin therapy
    education using the carbohydrate counting
    meal planning approach
    (37,39,40,43,50), which has been shown
    to improve glycemic control’

    A variety of eating patterns have been
    shown to be effective in managing diabetes,
    including Mediterranean-style
    (53,65), Dietary Approaches to Stop
    Hypertension (DASH)-style (66), and
    plant-based (vegan or vegetarian) (67),
    lower-fat (68), and lower-carbohydrate
    patterns (68).’

    • b00mer

      These excerpts illustrate perfectly why following the mainstream dietary recommendations for diabetes results in diabetes being considered a lifelong, incurable disease.

      The operative word in these guidelines is “glycemic” control. This type of diet ignores and makes no attempt to fix the underlying cause of the disease (lipid induced insulin resistance), but rather “works” by simply managing a symptom (excess carbohydrate in the blood).

      By promoting carbohydrate restriction, this type of diet inevitably increases insulin response and decreases insulin sensitivity due to increased protein and fat in the diet; both of which resulting in progression of the disease.

      These guidelines are designed perfectly to prevent people diagnosed with diabetes from actually seeing any improvement in their disease status over time. A focus only on glycemic response rather than insulin response will keep them diabetic, and most likely promote a gradual worsening of the disease over time. This is in contrast to high carbohydrate low fat nutritional intervention, which actually fixes a broken system (elevated insulin levels and interference in signal transduction) and can result in actual reversal of the disease over time.

      • HungryShrew

        Do you think the advised ‘Mediterranean-style’ diet might also ‘fix the broken system’ in addition to improving glycemic control ?

        Or is high carbohydrate low fat the only path to the fix?

        • b00mer

          Well first we have to define “Mediterranean” diet. In the U.S. this often means a salad with a big fillet of fish covered in feta cheese. Going back to the studies leading to the original inception of the “Mediterranean” diet concept, we see the Cretans were eating 93% of their calories from plants (largely from grains, fruits, and legumes), with approximately 3 tbsp of olive oil per day (and in addition to diet, walking approximately 8-9 miles per day on hilly ground). Certainly eating a mostly plant based diet would point a person in the right direction. Though considering the known effects of both protein and saturated fat on insulin response and function, respectively, along with the complete lack of blood sugar-modulating fiber and phytonutrients, certainly one would guess that less animal products would be better.

          So the remaining question in regards to the true Medi diet is that of olive oil. People often associate olive oil with unsaturated fat, but of course it is a mix of both unsaturated and saturated. 3 tbsp of olive oil offers about 6 g saturated fat, which to put in perspective is about the same amount as in a 6 oz sirloin steak. Which still, if the main source of saturated fat in the diet, is going to be much lower than the average American’s intake. However for someone like me on a low fat plant based diet, adding that to my diet could easily double or triple my intake for the day. So personally, if I already had the disease, and wanted to clean out and retool the cellular machinery as efficiently as possible, I would choose less saturated fat rather than more and leave out the oil, again based on what we know of the mechanisms of saturated fat induced insulin resistance.

          Since excess body fat in general is also implicated in diabetes (see http://nutritionfacts.org/video/the-spillover-effect-links-obesity-to-diabetes/ ), that would make me wary of adding so much (even unsaturated) fat to the diet, which would obviously increase the caloric density of the diet, making it easier to achieve a surplus of calories and prevent the reduction of body fat itself. Frankly I don’t think we have any studies testing an authentic “Mediterranean” diet for the reversal of diabetes. If we did have a true Medi diet vs truly low fat plant based diet though, my bet would be on the lower fat diet at least for speed of recovery from the disease.

          • HungryShrew

            ok, fair enough. thanks.

        • Bob413

          high carb low fat is not a fix, it’s a detriment. The American populace has been following a high-carb low fat diet since the early 80’s and they havn’t got healthier, they’ve gotten worse. No not everyone is at McDonalds, they are actually trying to abstain from fats in the diet and it’s killing them.

          Mediterranean diet fixes the broken system but so does paleo, and mediterranean was derived from paleo.

          • kylemeister

            As far as I know, American fat intake has been averaging about 80 grams per day since at least the 1970s, though it has slightly decreased as a percentage of calories basically due to an increase in consumption of junky carbs. Last I checked, most of the world was getting a greater share of their calories from carbohydrate, and a lower share from fat, than Americans.

      • Wil Bremers

        You say “..carbohydrate restriction…. inevitably increases insulin response”. How can that be? Does’nt rising(!) blood sugar leads to rising insulin which leads to storing the glucose as fat in the cells?

        • b00mer

          Hi Wil, this statement was in reference to the fact that calories come from only three sources: carbohydrates, fatty acids, or proteins. By limiting one (carbohydrate), the proportion of the other two (fat, proteins, or both) will inevitably see a relative increase in the diet.

          See the effect of protein on insulin response here:
          http://nutritionfacts.org/video/if-white-rice-is-linked-to-diabetes-what-about-china/
          http://nutritionfacts.org/video/paleo-diets-may-negate-benefits-of-exercise/

          And the effect of fat on insulin signaling pathways here:
          http://nutritionfacts.org/video/what-causes-insulin-resistance/

          So high fat-high protein foods (or an overall high fat/protein diet) essentially pack a one-two punch: stimulate insulin surges while simultaneously inhibiting insulin function.

          • Bob413

            B00mer, your link on insulin in regards to fat is wrong. A simple experiment on your own body will tell you that.

            Go eat a couple of spoonfuls of olive oil and see what happens to your energy.

            Now go eat dougnut and see what happens to your energy.

            A rise in glucose causes a rise in insulin because the insulin needs to clear the glucose out of the system to acceptable levels. B00mer, what has more sugar in it, a doughnut or a olive oil? Come on, this isn’t difficult.

            Your own point even proved your wrong “high fat/protein diet “inhibiting insulin function”. That’s the point B00mer, it inhibits it, it slows it down so things are stored more slowly, but fat doesn’t create an insulin response, protein does. So now we have a case of a high protein/fat diet inhibiting the insulin response which is what WE want. We don’t want our insulin blowing through the roof.

            Where your getting stuck is you think protein/fat is causing an insulin surge which it isn’t, and I bring you back to common sense here..

            What has more sugar, steak or an apple?
            What has more sugar, chicken breast w/ olive oil or carrots?
            What has more sugar, Fish w/ coconut oil or a bowl of pasta?

            You can’t honestly sit there and think all those proteins with fats carry more sugar than the latter. So if they don’t carry as much sugar, then how are they going to carry a surging insulin response compared to their sugar-ladened counter parts?

            Have your forgotten what insulin’s primary jobs were? Aside from storing nutrients, its’ meant to clear glucose from our system, so how is it that you think protein/fat foods are creating a larger sugar response than the foods which actually have more sugar in them?

          • b00mer

            so how is it that you think protein/fat foods are creating a larger sugar response

            First, your comment displays an extreme lack of knowledge and understanding about a very important distinction: insulin response vs glucose response. These are inversely proportional. If you had an even minimal amount of knowledge on the subject, you would know this. Google these, learn the difference, then re-read my comment.

            What I said was that high protein foods induce a higher insulin response. Let’s clarify something else: I don’t “think” that they do. They do. This is observable reality, based on science. If you disagree with the use of modern scientific inquiry to obtain meaningful results to questions about the world around us, then there is nothing to discuss. I prefer to base my scientific knowledge on reality, not musings and thought experiments by non-scientist internet commenters.

            So now we have a case of a high protein/fat diet inhibiting the insulin response which is what WE want. We don’t want our insulin blowing through the roof

            I’m sorry if this sounds harsh, but again you display a complete ignorance on the subject. In your phrase “inhibiting the insulin response” you have conflated two entirely separate phenomena. Again, please google these. Use of incorrect terminology (you are in fact using things that mean the opposite of what you are intending) renders the conversation meaningless.

            1. There is NO inhibiting of the insulin response between fat or protein. First, protein induces an insulin surge significantly higher than fat or carbohydrate. This is science. This is real life. Accept it.

            2. Second, fat does not inhibit the response. Saturated fat inhibits insulin function. This is the signalling cascade that occurs within a cell upon insulin binding. This means your insulin isn’t working. This is called insulin resistance.

            We’re talking about the amount of insulin that is released into the bloodstream (insulin response) vs the ability of insulin to achieve the desired effect once it binds to a cell (insulin sensitivity or insulin function).

            You can’t honestly sit there and think all those proteins with fats carry more sugar than the latter.

            I never once stated or said anything that could possibly be construed to have insinuated this. Once again, you need to learn the definitions of the following terms: glucose response, insulin response, insulin sensitivity. Then you will be at least have the opportunity to make a cogent statement on the subject.

            A simple experiment on your own body

            What is this, the middle ages? Thanks, but I enjoy living in the modern scientific age.

        • Bob413

          B00mer, you do realize that people who continue to suffer from diabetes are those who continue to follow a low fat / moderate to high carb diet?

          60 years of studies were trying to prove that low fat was the problem but every one of them failed. None were ever published and when asked they said “the results are not what they’d hoped for”

          What does that tell you B00mer?

          • b00mer

            Bob, I don’t think it is worth having a conversation with you until you have demonstrated that you understand the key terms in the discussion.

            Your characterization of scientists “trying to prove” something illustrates that you don’t really understand the practice of science itself. Here is how the scientific method works: 1) make an observation about the world around you, 2) ask questions about what you see, 3) try to answer those questions.

            If scientists make an observation high carb low fat diets reverse diabetes, they will try to answer why and how. And that has been done. Studies have been done to see which foods induce the highest insulin surges. The answer: pure refined sugar, and meat. Studies have been done to elucidate the mechanism by which insulin resistance occurs. We now know at the cellular and molecular level how saturated fat causes this. Scientists have gone on to put people on low fat high carbohydrate diets (ad libitum, meaning completely unrestrained intake of carbohydrates), and the results are as good or better than the ADA recommend diet which restricts carbohydrates from entering the bloodstream to begin with. So clearly the high carb low fat diet is improving the ability of the body to properly and efficiently process those carbohydrates.

            http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2677007/
            http://care.diabetesjournals.org/content/29/8/1777.full

            Contrast the above with your approach: you have decided on your own that protein and fat reduce insulin response and increase insulin sensitivity. Despite both of these statements being factually at odds with well established and accepted basic physiological research, you cling to them and since evidence disagrees with you, you can only support them with your personal opinions and wishful thinking. Go on believing this if you want to, but if we can’t agree on the importance and existence of evidence, this isn’t a conversation worth having.

  • Julie

    Question: So when someone eats a high fat meal, the fat enters the bloodstream. From there it enters the muscle cell, hampering insulin activity in that cell. Where else does fat from the meal go? Does the excess fat travel to the liver for processing? If so, can it temporarily cause fatty liver, resulting in insulin resistance of the liver?

    • Joseph Gonzales R.D.

      Here is an example of what happens after consuming a high fat meal. One study explaining the pathway. See if these resources help? Dr. Greger always has great info in his “Doctor’s Note” section that may also help.

      Thanks,
      Joseph

      • Julie

        Thanks, Joseph. The study kind of helps. I just want to know if eating a high fat meal can cause temporary hepatic insulin resistance in a non diabetic.

        • Joseph Gonzales R.D.

          Oh I see. I think so. This video may help have you seen it? What Causes Insulin Resistance? This should answer your question, but double check that I am thinking right.

          Thanks, Julie
          Joseph

      • Tom Goff

        Thanks, that is very useful information. The article below also indicates that high fat diets impair brain health as well as cardiovascular health. It concluded that:
        “Raising plasma free fatty acids decreased myocardial PCr/ATP and reduced cognition, which suggests that a high-fat diet is detrimental to heart and brain in healthy subjects.”

        http://ajcn.nutrition.org/content/93/4/748.full

        • Bob413

          If you’ve looked at the studies over the past 60 years, you’d find that those with cardiovascular disease were mostly people who ate a low fat diet.

          • Tom Goff

            Care to provide some evidence for that statement? I’ve looked at plenty of studies. None of them have shown that. What they show is that people whose diets are high in saturated fat, trans fat and junk foods have a greater risk of chronic disease. Sure, a low fat diet that is high in junk (refined/processed) carbs is unhealthy but Pritikin, Esselstyn and Ornish have shown that low fat plant based whole food diets reverse cardiovascular disease.

    • Bob413

      You answered your question “Fat hampers insulin activity”

      In order for a nutrient to be stored, it needs insulin to do so. Fat can’t be “stored” if insulin is impaired, hence why type 1 diabetics need to inject insulin so they can “store” the nutrients.

      If you eat a high carb / high fat meal, yes the fat can go straight to fat storage which is why it’s generally not recommended to people unless they are trying to gain weight.

      Fat by itself just gets converted to glucose in either your liver, small intestines, or kidney’s. It then just sits there until it gets burned off or shuttled out with insulin. It also activates the fat burning enzymes in the body. If your body doesn’t see fat coming in, it thinks it’s starving and wont burn it. Fats are usually consumed with proteins like in foods such as steak; however, the process is no different than above as fat blunts the absorption rate of protein. and thus creates a nice lasting effect of energy throughout the day.

      The problem with the whole Vegan approach is the low fat whole plant food diet. Fat doesn’t get stored but it doesn’t really get burned either, protein does. But because people see weight loss they think “whoohoo”; but in reality, the body will not burn fat if it’s not getting it. Fat is essential for burning fat to avoid “starvation mode”

  • DanielFaster

    Dr. Garth Davis, a triathlete weight loss surgeon, just posted a long rant on this as well, he cites the animal protein not just the fat, replete with citations for his upcoming book: https://www.facebook.com/drgarth/posts/942670975753811 Carbs vs. fat is really just a distracting sideshow to the protein type/amount

    • Joseph Gonzales R.D.

      Great info by Dr. Davis. Thanks for sharing.

  • Well worth watching, Dr. Greger’s cited source Dr. Roy Taylor at the (LCHF

    • Tom Goff

      Thanks MacSmiley but the video is down now and behind a paywall. I have previously seen some articles about Taylor’s approach but none seem to mention protein-sparing as such. Can you elaborate? I understand that the intervention diet was liquid meal replacements and salad but it was not specifically intended to be protein-sparing as I understand it.
      http://care.diabetesjournals.org/content/36/4/1047.full
      http://www.theguardian.com/lifeandstyle/2013/may/12/type-2-diabetes-diet-cure

      • Sorry, Tom. I posted the link because, even though the video was only supposed to be up for 24 hours, it actually was available for several weeks. It went unavailable about an hour after I posted the link.

        Prof. Taylor /Newcastle University in England has posted a webpage with resources.

        http://www.ncl.ac.uk/magres/research/diabetes/reversal.htm

        This is exciting work. Most diets aim to control blood sugar in the seru most diets aim to control fasting blood sugar and A1C. LCHF does this, but does not cure the diabetes. In fact, it Derain Jews carbohydrate metabolism even further.

        The Newcastle protocol, by evacuating the fat inside The liver and pancreas, actually restores the pancreas’s normal insulin spiked response to glucose!!

        I love telling people about the benefits of a whole food plant-based diet, but so many people are unwilling to make such a big long term change.

        Even though the Newcastle protocol is not pleasant (Taylor talked about hunger pangs disappearing, but both cases cited mention the opposite), it is temporary. Afterwords person is free to choose whichever diet is most suited for him from for the weight loss and maintenance. And that diet can include a baked potato.

        • Tom Goff

          Thanks again. However, I had thought that LCHF diets could reverse diabetes in (obese) people to the extent that they deliver very significant weight loss? This would only be short-term I imagine given the nature of LCHF diets.

          Anyway, on this broad topic of fat and insulin resistance, I thought that the 2011 article below was very interesting. You might also find it interesting.
          http://advances.nutrition.org/content/2/3/261.full

          • Joseph Gonzales R.D.

            The low-carb diet may work short-term, as you mentioned. I would be cautious long-term. Thanks for sharing that study. Looks like focusing on lowering fat intake (especially saturated fat) could be advantageous.

          • Ramona S

            You do know Joseph, there are a lot of studies out there showing the problems of reducing saturated fats along with the benefits of increasing it. I highly suggest you pick up some of Gary Taubes audio books, it goes through study by study with full pull on the effects and there are many studies over the past few decades. Many of these studies were trying to prove the benefits of a low fat (low saturated fat diet), but the all failed to prove their point while simultaneously proving saturated fat was a necessity (given the amount of deaths who abstained from it).

          • Veggie Eric

            Gary Taubes is a snake oil saleman. He is not a doctor or expert in the field of nutrition like the good Dr Greger and his colleges are. Taubes was paid $700,000 to write a pro-fat book with a predetermined outcome. He was funded by special interests to promote the beef, egg, dairy industry. You’ve been duped like so many other low-carbers.

            This is a low-fat vegan site. Not a Weston A price psudo-scince forum. Plenty of people who will agree with you over on the paleo sites. But this site is based on sound science and that science points to whole foods, plant based diets low in fat and animal products to promote health and healing. Saturated fat from animal sources are most certainly not your friend and not advocated on this site.

          • Ramona S

            The diet LCHF diet works both short and long term. From what I found out, there is a certain amount of glycogen in your liver and muscles, I believe someone mentioned the exact amount on this page. Glycogen holds water, if you deplete the glycogen from your body (which is what happens with LCHF), you’ll lose water, thus you will lose weight, not fat initially.

            The upside long-term effect of this is it makes your body insulin sensitive meaning it’s more welcoming to carbs to top up it’s glycogen stores without spilling over. You want to be insulin sensitive because that is when your body can burn fat. Insulin shuts off the body’s ability to burn fat. If your insulin sensitive, you don’t have any insulin in your system, hence you can burn fat. The only downside is, you lost some water in your muscles initially due to the glycogen drop.

            Create an insulin sensitive body and you create a fat burning body. One of the ways to do that is to deplete the body’s glycogen.

          • Veggie Eric

            Low carb does not work long term. Low-carb diets mask symptoms but cure nothing. Thy can be used for short term weight loss but at the detriment to your arteries and organs. Low-carb is a dangerous fad like Atkins and best to stay away from it.

      • The phrase “protein-sparing” is used by Evelyn Kocur on her Carbsanity blog in relation to the Newcastle protocol. The full phrase she used is “protein sparing modified fast (PSMF)”.

        • Tom Goff

          Thanks. OK. I am still unsure about the accuracy of the protein-sparing description because I had a look at the Optifast website and its shakes seem to be 39% protein. I couldn’t tell if Optifast products are vegan/vegetarian.
          That said, the Newcastle protocol is explicitly vegetarian since it specifically excludes meat, fish, poultry and dairy. I think eggs are out also (but not mentioned) because the recipes are described as “vegetable”.

  • Chris Hartley

    Since the brain is a big consumer of glucose, it would be interesting to know if fat accumulates in brain cells too – perhaps causing some related diseases.
    Also are the brain cells affected by the high glucose levels, do they also become insulin resistant ?

    Also I assume a diet also high in sucrose, with some alcohol thrown in makes the fatty liver worse, compounding the fat related issues.

    • Bob413

      The brain is not a big consumer of glucose, it only needs a small amount of it and it’s capable of getting it from stored fat.

      You are correct, any diet high in both sugar and alcohol are destined to have a fatty liver. The same also applies for a diet rich in starchy foods, fruits, and grains.

  • irina

    Any opinions on the fact that obese premenopausal women have a better outcome if they develop breast cancer than their normal weight counterparts ? It came to mind since the video mentions that obese wome are at a bigger risk of getting breast cancer.

    • b00mer

      Hi irina, if you could share a particular source, so that we can see study design, data, conclusions, etc, you will likely get more feedback from commenters here.

      I did just a quick search and saw many articles on breast cancer risk for pre/postmenopausal women, but not on outcomes, so if you could share a study that looks at outcomes that would be helpful.

      I did find this relatively recent (2012) review (many studies in this area appear to be from the late 90s), which focuses specifically on the conflicting findings from different studies that have looked at BMI and breast cancer risk, in both pre and post-menopausal women. It goes through in detail various potential sources of error and bias (e.g. manner and timing of reporting of weight, mammography, high risk vs average population, cancer subtypes, hormone therapies, etc) that may be confounding results, and relates results of previous studies to those of a more recent study which attempted to correct for some of these errors. In this more recent study, risk of breast cancer for premenopausal women classified as higher risk, were 50% higher for overweight women and 70% higher for obese women compared to normal weight women. Surprisingly they didn’t find a significant positive association between BMI and postmenopausal breast cancer risk. It appears that this is an area where any clear and consistent association has yet to be elucidated.

      http://cancerpreventionresearch.aacrjournals.org/content/5/4/515.long

  • Peter Westphal

    In my country, it´s common practice among GP`s to advice the newly diagnosed with type two diabetes to loose 10% of their body weight within a relatively short time since studies, and now practice shows, that the diabetes goes away in 90% of cases. So the good news are not new to me but still good Dr Greger.

  • Matt K

    What about the mechanisms the body goes through to store carbohydrates as fat in your body? Couldn’t that fat be an issue as well?

    • Joseph Gonzales R.D.

      Good question Mark. I am not sure exact mechanisms, but I do not think carbohydrates are simply stored as fat. I think it depends on the amount and type of carbohydrate. Keep in mind the body and brain thrive on glucose as a primary energy source. The liver is very efficient at making glycogen and storing it. I highly recommend Dr. Greger’s book, Carbophobia. You can read it for free, here. Fat is an issue just like excess simple carbohydrates (soda, added sugar, donuts, refined grains, etc.) for diabetes. The goal is to have plenty of fiber and antioxidants in the diet. From Dr. Barnard’s research patients received either a vegan diet or a typical diet for diabetes and found significant changes in weight loss and insulin levels. Dr. Greger presents this study in this video.

      • Bob413

        Like many of these studies debunked like Dr Barnard’s, did it ever address cortisol and it’s long lasting effects on the body, weight loss, and insulin. Did it address the catabolism of proteins and aminos?

        No it didn’t. Before bringing studies like this up, you need to bring in the full pull of the study, because if you did, you’d see the study proved against what they were trying to say.

      • Cesar2

        The liver is only capable of storing 70 grams of glycogen before it’s topped out. That doesn’t make it an ideal energy source. You can blow through that in about 3 100m sprints. After that your relying on the remaining glycogen in your muscles (another 3 sprints if your lucky), then it’s all fat stores provided your consuming enough fat to create the correct hormonal balance.

        There is the reason the body can store so much fat in abundance, that is because it’s the ideal fuel source, not carbs. If carbs were the body’s preferred fuel source, it’d store more than the 225 or so that it does for the average person.

    • Bob413

      The question is then Mark, what is causing the carbs to be stored as fat. The most alarming thing about what the R.D (Joseph) said below is frightening and so factually untrue to the point they should have their licensed revoked.

      Your a dietitian and you don’t know the exact mechanisms? The body thrives on glucose as it’s primary energy source? Are you kidding me?

      Matt I can answer your question in 2 points in a nutshell.

      Why carbs get stored as fat? The liver holds roughly 70 grams of glycogen, and the muscles hold roughly 1-2% of their volume in glycogen. For the average male at 180lbs this equates to roughly 225 grams of Glycogen in total. Glycogen is stored carbs to be used for energy. If your liver and muscles are fully topped up with glycogen, it gets stored as fat, it’s as simple as that. So if one wants to eat lots of carbs without it being stored as fat, one needs to deplete the glycogen from their liver and muscles first. This is only done by intermittent fasting, exercise, and NOT eating carbs. This makes the person “insulin sensitive” so in other words the body needs glycogen to top up it’s stores. Keep in mind 225 is not a lot, a plate of pasta, couple pieces of toast, fruit, and some juice will put anyone over the top even when fully depleted.

      It’s as simple as that Matt, and that’s how body builders use it to their advantage.

      Now as for the glucose being the primary energy source, this is beyond untrue. If glucose was our primary energy source, our body’s would store more of it, but it doesn’t, it stores fat. Fat is it’s primary energy source, glucose is just the “easiest” source hence why our body burns through that first when the fight or flight mechanism is triggered. Glucose is ideally burned for intense exercise, fat is ideally burned for everything else.

  • [l]iberal [r]epublican

    Good video up until the end — but then we run into an important and unfortunately catastrophic presumption, which is that eating fat creates fat people. Physiology is of course much more complicated than that.

    Eating fat stimulates satiety, the “full” sensation, because it more effectively stimulates the release of the satiety hormones leptin, Cholecystokinin, and Gastric Inhibitory Peptide, and suppresses the release of Ghrelin as well as Neuropeptide Y, both of which stimulate hunger. Thus, even though fat is a more concentrated store of energy, because it produces a stronger and longer lasting “full” feeling, people eating a higher fat diet often tend to eat an overall lower amount of calories. This reality is not just academic — it’s part of the reason why diets such as Atkins and South Beach are effective in causing weight loss without the sensation of being hungry.

    Of course, it gets even more complicated than that, because variations in genetics means that some metabolic types tolerate fats well and some do not, so diet tests administered without regard for genetic differences will produce conflicting results, and the complication then gets even deeper in that hunger may be a generic response to nutritional deficiencies. We see this generic “eating” response, for example, in conditions such as pica in response to low iron or zinc levels — the body has a limited number of ways to communicate to us that something is wrong.

    In the end, we have to respect that the body is technology, and it is technology designed for a specific situation and purpose. We are designed to eat nutritionally dense foods with a relative paucity of carbohydrates and salt and thus crave what is normally scarce, designed to have alternating periods of feasting and fasting, designed to get a lot of sun, designed to get a lot of exercise and especially exercise that consists of bursts of anaerobic activity, and designed to be exposed to at least 8 hours if not more of complete dark. Messing up any one of these will result in a cascade of imbalances. And, our modern lifestyle unfortunately messes up all of them.

    We now eat a preponderance of carbohydrate foods that are also nutritionally deficient because they are grown on soil whose productivity has been pushed past what it is actually capable of supporting. We do this because we have figured out that we can force plants to grow and produce by giving them nitrogen/phosphorus/potassium only, irrespective of whether micronutrients (like zinc and iron and sulfur) are present in adequate amounts. This of course produces unhealthy soil and unhealthy plants that are more prone to waves of weed and pest infestations, which we keep at bay by dumping herbicides and pesticides and fungicides on the plants and soil, which of course produces even less healthy soil and plants in an endless feedback loop. These chemicals then end up in our bodies in steadily increasing amounts, where they exacerbate the nutritional deficiencies we get from eating food grown in depleted soil (Roundup is a chelator. Monsanto itself declares 5.6 mg/kg of plant weight to be an “extreme” level of glyphosphate residue, and Norway scientists recently found 9mg/kg average in GM soy from Iowa, and German scientists found that increasing levels of glyphosphate residues in human urine correlated with increasing incidence of chronic illness.) And, because our meat is raised in an artificial environment on grains their stomachs aren’t built to eat (like GM soy), their fat profile ends up being heavily tilted towards the omega 6 (pro inflammatory) pathway and away from the omega 3 (anti inflammatory) pathway, and omega 3 stimulates peripheral endocannabinoid satiety receptors that omega 6 does not. So, overeating may be a response to nutritional deficiencies and a jacked up fat balance, which is itself the consequence of the “green revolution.”

    We obviously don’t exercise. We don’t sleep as much as we need to or get good sleep or get enough sun exposure, thanks to artificial light, TV, smart phones, and increasing obesity that leads to sleep apnea, along with catastrophically poor recommendations from a medical system beset by the problem of knowledge getting stuck in silos, such that dermatologists focused on skin cancer recommend less sun for everyone without regard to the damage lack of sun will cause to the rest of the body. We don’t go without food as frequently or for as long as we need to to get our gut hormones back to to a healthy set point (fasting leads to higher levels of ghrelin and neuropeptide Y, both of which are protective against depression.)

    Our medical system is fundamentally incapable of dealing with this multifactorial problem because our medical system approaches health backwards, just like many of our farmers approach farming backwards. Many farmers believe that they “grow” crops and ignore the reality that crops actually grow themselves. All farmers are supposed to do is make sure the crops have what they need, and from this perspective it is clear that too much intervention will lead to poorer outcomes, and also clear that interventions tend to tilt soil away from a healthy balance which results in cascading failures until the deficiency is corrected. Similarly, our current medical system is built around the idea that doctors “heal” patients, when in fact most patients heal themselves. All doctors should actually do is figure out what is missing, which almost 100% of the time is most assuredly not yet another pharmaceutical, just like the problem with unhealthy crops is most assuredly not a deficiency of yet another herbicide. Type II diabetes, for example, is most definitely not due to a deficiency of metformin, so the best that adding metformin can do is to put a bandaid over the symptoms of the real problem so that we can temporarily pretend that it doesn’t exist.

    But, medicine practiced from a systems perspective is tantamount to encouraging patients to embrace discomfort (recommending fasting, diet changes towards more expensive but healthier food, exercise, more sleep, no lights at night), but much of medicine is shaped around alleviating discomfort rather than educating patients about its necessity. And thus, the medical system in the end is simply reflective of a faulty paradigm for life on the part of the population, and until we all learn to change our thinking, we cannot expect the doctors to recommend things we are not willing to accept.

  • noemarcial

    all this information it is so important , just now happen to me to have 2 persons with fatty liver, that didn’t understand at all before i have explained to them what i sow in this video. I did because they speak only spanish. and i think it is something that happen to many other people.
    Dr Greeger and all the team are doing an excellent work that may change the health of millions of people. it will be nice to find a systematic way to translate the content of the videos with volunteer work double checked in some way (talking about health mistakes may be dangerous). i we do, use or had some platform for translating another millions of people may have this wonderful possibility of understand the right actions to have a healthy life. (sorry if you have done that already, in this case i will be happy to share the content )

    • Joseph Gonzales R.D.

      Some video’s do have subtitles. Click the “cc” button at the bottom of video to see if it does. So glad you are benefiting from the website! If interested in volunteering or you have skills translating videos please let us know! http://nutritionfacts.org/volunteer/

      Thanks, noemarcial,
      Joseph

      • noemarcial

        i will need to be a little supervised but yes i have translate some videos to spanish and i will be very happy to help in my free time (it is not much, if is useful for you i will be happy to do it)

    • Bob413

      Fatty liver is soley caused by body’s ability to break down sugar because it’s flooded with it. Too much starchy foods, fruit, grain products, and dairy can cause it.

      One of the best defenses and cures for fatty liver (aside from eliminating sugar) is Choline, and that is found in abundance in egg yolks. Naturpoaths go as far as to actually inject choline into people’s systems to flush out the liver and it works wonders.

      The population that is at highest risk for fatty liver (aside from alcoholics) are those who abstain from eggs and partake in a diet that’s heavy in starchy foods, fruits, and grains.

  • guest

    Some saturated fat is Protective against diabetes, according to a recent study. Please see:
    http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/280645.php

  • Guest1980

    Some saturated fat is Protective against Diabetes, according to a recent study:
    http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/280645.php

    • Veggie Eric

      I would be cautious of articles like the one you linked to as it seems to
      promote dairy products. Dairy is a major source of Trans-fats and is
      associated with acne, ashma, calcium LOSS and a host of other ill
      effects. See what Dr Greger has to say about dairy here~>
      http://nutritionfacts.org/video/dairy-hormonal-interference/

      • Bob413

        Dairy is not associated with any of those things, it all depends on the individual, and 99% of the people who consume dairy don’t get those symptoms. They do however tend to gain weight.

        • Veggie Eric

          Bob, I’m not sure why you are here on a low-fat vegan site throwing rocks when you have plenty of cigarette-science low-carb sites to frequent with people who would agree you, but I am not one of them… Dairy IS associated with the things I mentioned above and your blanket dismisal without watching the videos I provided was not appreciated. Dairy is a very degenerative and harmful food. It’s meant for baby cows, not humans.

    • Bob413

      saturated fat is protective against diabetes but dairy is a strict no no. Lactose has the same insulin response as drinking a can of pop or a bowl of pasta.

      Saturated fats from animals definitely helps protect against diabetes.

      • Tom Goff

        This is rubbish. Where is the evidence for such claims/

        • Cesar2

          There have been several scientific researches that have picked apart the studies over the past 60 years on this and various other issues regarding the food pyramid. All the research done generally was trying to prove that low fat with moderate to high carb was ideal for health. This included saturated fats in regards to diabetes.

          The problem with the research is all of it failed to prove low fat w/ moderate to high carb was ideal. In fact, it proved the exact opposite. It proved saturated fat was essential for countless things: Protection against disease, diabetes, weight loss, cardiovascular health and hormonal balance to name a few. The most interesting part of all those studies is that none of them were ever published and their reasoning was that they were disappointed in the results.

          One of them was Gary Taubes (scientific researcher), listen or read his books, it goes very in depth with all those studies over the long haul. If you are interested in nutrition in regards to health, it’s quite fascinating to read how all those studies turned out (and were kept quiet).

          • Tom Goff

            Gary Taubes is not a researcher. He is a journalist – you know, one of those people who never let the facts get in the way of a good story. I have read one of his books – if I remember correctly, it was remarkable for the science it omitted to mention as well as including some downright falsehoods (eg about Ancel Keys). if you want to know about low carb high fat diets check the professional literature. And as far as I know, the body makes all the saturated fat it needs.
            it’s amazing how people can believe that a journalist selling a mass market sensational book on diet, knows more about nutrition and health than the expert panels convened by the World Health Organization, the UN Food and Agriculture Organizations,the World Cancer Research Fund and countless dietary guidelines advisory committees around the world. If people want to know about saturated fat they can read the latest study at the US National Evidence Library.

        • Ramona S

          Hi Tom! Cesar is correct. There has been tons of research on this over the past few decades. Most all of the research was attempting to prove one thing while it ended up proving the exact opposite. None of the studies ever really got published, nor held up to any criticism when other scientists started asking questions.

          Gary Taubes is an interesting author and a great scientific researcher. The amount of studies he covers is immense and you might be pleasantly surprised at all the findings when all these studies are fully exposed.

          • Veggie Eric

            Gary Taubes is a sudo-science book profiteer. He is by no means an expert in anything health related. He was a paid shill for the beef, egg and dairy industry. If you look at the studies he sites, they are all smoke and mirrors. Heve a look…

            http://plantpositive.com/11-the-journalist-gary-taubes/

  • Kathy

    I agree. But I have a type 1 diabetes friend who swears by low carb high fat diet to control her blood sugar. She says it works great and her weight and cholesterol and LDL are low. How can this be healthy? Maybe Type 1’s are different?

    • Bob413

      The difference between Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes are:

      Type 1 – Insulin dependent meaning they need to inject insulin so they can in fact store their nutrients, otherwise they starve (this is why they are generally thin)

      Type 2 – Insulin resistance meaning their bodies have been flooded with insulin over time rending their insulin receptor cells resistant. This is reversed by minimizing the insulin response foods over the long term along with intermittent fasting and exercise. Insulin stops the glucagon hormone from releasing stored energy (glycogen and fat), this is why type 2 diabetics are generally hefty.

      The reason your friend is doing well on a low carb high fat diet is because it’s never a good idea to flood insulin in your system regardless of whether you have to inject it or not. I’m also willing to bet your friend is more satisfied with her meals and not starving like those who try to eliminate fats.

  • marlon

    are diabetics ok to eat 1 Tablespoon of ground flaxseed daily?

    • Joseph Gonzales R.D.

      Depends on overall diet, but to me 1 TBSP of flax is fairly innocent and a small dose, therefore I would see no concerns.

    • Bob413

      You have to consider if your thyroid is healthy or not. If it isn’t, flaxseed oil will do more harm than good to your body overall. Usually people who over-consume grains have thyroid issues.

    • Cesar2

      If you have thyroid issues, one shouldn’t be consuming any flaxseed at all. Thyroid problems also go hand in hand with insulin resistance, so if a person is borderline diabetic or diabetic, they shouldn’t be consuming flax seed.

      When the thyroid is struggling to produce energy, Flaxseed is not it’s friend.

  • BB

    If Type 2 diabetes is characterized by the insulin-producing cells being killed off, then how come the condition is said to be reversible with diet? Do the insulin-producing cells regenerate?

    • Joseph Gonzales R.D.

      Good question. Not sure it is that simple. Type 2 diabetics still have insulin-producing cells, however, the cells may be compromised and not working properly (perhaps they operate at 80% or less?). Insulin may not be working correctly, but the body still producing it. Once all insulin producing cells are dead, (now we’re talking type 1 diabetes or insulin-dependent diabetes) then of course the body will require insulin. I have never heard of pancreatic beta cells regenerating. The thought is that a healthful diet (supported by weight loss in obese diabetics) may be able to control blood sugar and insulin levels and keep the remaining insulin-producing cells in the pancreas alive.

    • Type 1 or Insulin Dependent Diabetes is an autoimmune disorder where the body attacks the insulin producing cells in our pancreas (i.e. beta cells). Some authors have posited that the breakdown of dairy products result in compounds similar to the proteins on the surface of the beta cell. These compounds can get into the body similar to other substances aided by the saturated fats see.. http://nutritionfacts.org/video/the-exogenous-endotoxin-theory/. The focus on diabetes has shifted to type 2 diabetes see… http://nutritionfacts.org/video/how-to-prevent-prediabetes-in-children/ Autoimmune to intake of dairy products. For me as a Family Medicine physician my recommendations given current science as they relate to type 2 diabetes… low fat… whole plant based diet emphasizing starches for adequate calorie intake excluding all oils and limiting avocados and nuts see… http://nutritionfacts.org/video/plant-based-diets-and-diabetes/. I make the same recommendation relating to the avoidance of Type 1 Diabetes especially avoiding the tendency of my colleagues to use age 2 to start recommending the intake of dairy products. I believe the bulk of science shows that whole food plant based diet with adequate Vitamin B12 intake represents the best nutritional approach to minimizing your chance of getting both type 1 and 2 diabetes. I haven’t seen any good studies on the actual mechanism of how the beta cells “wear out” after years of over production of insulin… but stay tuned to NutritionFacts.org as the science keeps coming!

      • Bob413

        We actually had a doctor in town here get sued for recommending a plant based, starch style diet that was low fat to diabetics. If you want good studies to prove how damaging the over production of insulin is, comb through all the studies Gary Taubes mentions in his book for the full pull on the results and you’ll see just how bad it is.

        • DanielFaster

          Dr. Greger addresses this extensively at http://www.atkinsexposed.org

          • Ramona S

            Atkins is a poor example to use as Atkins diet has changed a lot since it first came out. At one time it was eat as much protein and fat as you want and it doesn’t matter where it came from. Now it’s more in line with paleo, eat your protein and fat till satiety, and make sure it comes from good healthy sources, not processed foods.

            Doctors have to be careful when addressing Atkins because if they fall in the trap without actually knowing where it came from compared to what it is now, they basically show their ignorance on the subject.

          • Veggie Eric

            Atkins was a perfect example of how dangerous a low-carb diet is. He was a resort entertainer and salesman when he came up with his crazy diet that actually killed people himself included. Dr Greger has done great work exposing Atkins here ~> atkinsexposed.org as well as exposing the lies put forth by the paleo low-carb crowd.

            Here is a video talking about fat and its roll in insulin resistance (not carbs or sugar)

            http://nutritionfacts.org/video/what-causes-insulin-resistance/

        • kylemeister

          Here’s some of that crazy non-Taubesian kind of talk from a few months ago: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4329824/ .

  • DanielFaster

    Some evidence that it is not the fat at all, it may be the meat proteins and heme iron (thanks to Dr. Garth Davis for the tip). But you can’t separate the two. Satfat started out as code for meat, we shouldn’t carry on the discussion in the way it has been framed by the food deconstructors http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25832335

    • Bob413

      It’s not meat proteins and it’s not fat. Ask yourself this, what foods cause the biggest insulin response, aka, what foods cause the biggest flood of glucose in the system causing your insulin to go sky high to clear it? What foods make people crash?

      It isn’t meats & fats. People even crash hard after eating fruit.. that is the first clue..

      • DanielFaster

        Nope definitely something in the neat. Watch the vid glucose spike is a symptom not a cause.

    • Cesar2

      If this were the case, then all body builders would have Type 2 Diabetes would they not? I mean the amount of protein they consume in the form of chicken, beef, and fish would surely make them diabetic would it not? They also consume considerable amounts of fat.

      Better question, how about you go find a diabetic body builder and we’ll start from there. Problem is, you won’t find one because meat proteins don’t cause it, nor does fat.

  • David Colin

    Hi! PCRM is recommending and ultra low fat diet to treat type 2 diabetes. This includes animal fats, added refined oils and natural vegetable fats such as those in nuts, avocados and olives. I am wondering if there is any data showing that whole food plant based fats are bad for type 2 diabetics?

    • Joseph Gonzales R.D.

      Hi David. This video discussed dietary interventions conducted by PCRM: http://nutritionfacts.org/video/plant-based-workplace-intervention/

      I have not seen any negative research on whole food plant-based diets and diabetes.

      • David Colin

        Thank you Dr. Gonzales

        • Joseph Gonzales R.D.

          No problem. FYI I am a dietitian ;) and lastly this video I forgot to mention this video reveals the actual PCRM study if you’d rather hear it from Dr. Greger.

      • David Colin

        I did find a Harvard paper that talks about type of fat and its relation to risk of type 2 diabetes. Here’s the link. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2654180/pdf/nihms91661.pdf

        So there appears to be some controversy around this issue since PCRM advocates avoiding all types of fat. This paper seems to suggest it’s the type of fat that’s important.

        • Joseph Gonzales R.D.

          Interesting. Yes it may depend on type of fat. Please note PCRM does not advocate avoiding all types of fat, but simply keeping fats low. I forgot to show the actual study that PCRM conducted comparing a vegan diet vs a diabetes friendly diet. Both diets worked, but it appeared the vegan diet faired better. At any rate, diabetes need to find a diet that helps them control their blood sugar and insulin levels, lose weight (if overweight), and hopefully decrease medications (if prescribed). A vegan diet is one way to achieve this, according to this study.

  • MikeOnRaw

    For those that have type 2 diabetes, is their pancreas no longer functioning properly only due to the fat in the pancreas? i.e. if you start on a low fat diet and start exercising, will the fat eventually leave the pancreas and the beta cells in the pancreas will regenerate or heal? Or are those damaged cells lost, and even if the fat eventually leaves the pancreas the function of the pancreas will be lower than it originally was?

    • Joseph Gonzales R.D.

      Hey MikeOnRaw. Dr. Forrester and I posted some information below (a few comments down) see if they help?

      • MikeOnRaw

        found them, and yes they did. So basically, it would be best not to get in a position that you need to worry about your beta cell health.
        This seems terribly important information. So much of what we hear in the media is focused on treating diabetes, we need a lot more focus on how important it is to prevent through diet, not drugs.

    • Bob413

      Their pancreas are continually pumping out insulin because the insulin receptors on the cells are resistant due to having too much insulin in the system. It’s a vicious circle.

      Think of it this way, insulin is this really annoying dude that keeps knocking at the door. An insulin receptor is another dude who lets the guy in. At some point in time, the guy inside gets sick of hearing the knocking on the door so he just ignores it. The knocking gets louder and louder, but the guy continually ignores it. The pancreas don’t give up and continually produce more insulin so the knocking becomes so unbearable that guy finally lets insulin in. It’s almost like the boy who cried wolf.

      The ideal situation is the knocking on the door is suttle and the guy lets him in. The problem is though, when you eat foods that cause mass pounding on the door, your insulin receptors get a tad annoyed.. even more so if it continually happens over time.

      So what causes the knocking to get really loud? What releases tons of insulin? Simple sugars: table sugar, fruit juice, candy bars, and soda being the biggest culprit. Not far behind is white breads, rice, and most grains. All cause big surges in insulin and will thus become quite annoying to your insulin receptors. We know this to be true because how often do people crash from the flood of glucose in their system from the above foods? How often do people crash from eating a piece of chicken or a salad with olive oil? Fat isn’t the culprit, simple carbs are.

      The only way to make your insulin receptors more welcoming to insulin when it comes knocking at the door is to make insulin more welcome. There is a whole other tangent involved with this, but the short answer is intermittent fasting, exercise, and eating foods that minimize insulin response. Aka stay away from simple sugars and most grains.

      • MikeOnRaw

        Did you watch the video? The process is clearly one related to excess fat, not sugar. Though industrial sugar may be a contributing factor, the cause is excess fat. I regularly eat 170-250g of sugar from raw fruit and vegetables per meal. My glucose doesn’t spike, nor does it crash.

        • Cesar2

          That’s because your constantly flooding your body with sugar, it doesn’t have time to crash. Eating that much sugar per meal, you have bigger things to worry about like a fatty liver.

          The only real “visual” symptom is it’s normally associated with Type 2 Diabetes. This is due to the main cause of Type 2 being the insulin constantly elevated due to the amount of glucose being flooded into your blood stream from sugary foods. Unfortunately the only way you’ll find that out is getting a liver test + ultrasound , but god help you if you do, that is a long uphill battle to flush it out. It can be done and naturopaths are a big help by injecting choline into your system to speed up the process.

          The unfortunate reality though is, if you do have it, you’ll be looking at minimum of 1.5 years on basically a no sugar diet, which includes no fruit, and no starch. Basically it’s all green veggies, protein and fat.

          • Veggie Eric

            No, that is not true… Where are you getting this information from? A low-carb blog site? Jimmy Moore or West A. Price foundation? Those are not real science based organizations. Chronic elevated blood sugar is only a SYMPTOM of insulin resistance. Saturated fat is the CAUSE of insulin resistance like this video above shows. Can you provide any non psudo-science sources to back up your claim that something gets ‘burned out’ from to much sugar or carbs? Because that’s not what real world science shows.

    • Cesar2

      Type 2 diabetes is insulin resistance. Your insulin receptors attached to your cells no longer want to accept it so they become resistant to it. This happens when the insulin levels are chronically elevated. That happens because too much glucose floods into your blood stream causing the insulin to get secreted to clear it. This is cause by foods that convert to glucose rather quickly like sugars and starches.

      In regards to your question about fat in the pancreas (or liver), the only way that gets reduced is when you stop consuming the foods that put it there, sugar and starches.

      • Veggie Eric

        No that is wrong and dangerous misinformation….. Did you watch the video? It shows very clearly that saturated fat works against insulin’s ability to let glucose into the cells having nothing to do with sugar or carbs. This notion put forth by the low-carb gurus that something gets ‘burned out’ buy to much carbs/sugar is completely false. Nothing gets ‘burned out’ buy to much sugar. There is no science to back up that myth. Have a look at this video debunking the Paleo-low carb smoke and mirrors.

        http://nutritionfacts.org/video/low-carb-diets-and-coronary-blood-flow/

  • Andrew Shenava

    Honest question, what confused me the most is how people with pre type 2 diabetes and type 2 diabetes who on a low carb and high fat diet get improve. That some type 2 diabetes can come off medication and apparently to even reverse the disease in some cases. If you go on diabetes forums they is a fair few type 2 diabetes that look to be doing well on a high fat diet.

    What I don’t understand is how to square this circle, if fat cause diabetes then how can eating more of it help halt or reverse it?

    Are they lying? faking the results? some other reason?

    I am on a low carb diet and check my fasting insulin and its always in the 4-5 mmol range. should I be worried I will get diabetes? I feel ok, I have lost weight and feel the need to be more active.

    • Bob413

      Are you asking this question honestly? One just has to understand how both insulin works and it’s relation to diabetes (Type 2). We know that Type 2 diabetes is insulin resistance so the next question is what exactly is insulin resistance.

      Insulin resistance – Where your insulin receptor cells fail to let insulin do it’s job when insulin comes knocking at the door. Essentially the cells just won’t answer it though. The pancreas could care less and just continually produce insulin until the receptors open the door to let all the nutrients in. The downside, the more this goes on, the more resistant the cells become, hence “insulin resistant”

      Now the question is, why is this bad, I mean the body is doing it’s job right? Yes it is, but there is 2 problems with this; for one, insulin shuts off the glucagon hormone and it’s ability to release stored energy (fat and carbs). Putting 2 and 2 together, this obviously is going to cause weight gain as the body loses it’s ability to burn fat. The other problem is having too much insulin in your system wears down the receptors in general and degrading them further. The ultimate goal for someone is to be insulin sensitive, not insulin resistant.

      So the next question is, what causes insulin to flood into the body? This is where the disconnect with this video (and doctor) seem to come in. We already know what causes insulin and the blood sugar to spike, simple carbs; things like table sugar, fruit juice, pop, candy bars, white pastas, and most grains etc.. Next on this list is complex carbs like fruit and oatmeal and some whole wheat pastas. Next up is proteins (beef, fish, and poultry), and that is where it pretty much ends. All those foods cause an insulin response whereas protein is lowest on that list. Protein also slows down the insulin response, so this is why all successful weight loss plans and type 2 diabetic diets consist of eating carbs (preferably veggies) WITH protein to slow down the insulin response.

      Notice how I didn’t mention fats on here, that’s because fats have little to no effect on insulin. If you want to take 10 spoonfuls of olive or coconut oil, guess what, your insulin won’t even bat an eyelash. This is why diabetics not only get improvements in health, but often reverse the disease entirely. They stick to a higher fat (good fat) diet with proteins and minimal foods that cause an insulin response. If your looking at a dinner plate, it’s filled half with green veggies (very little response), quarter with protein (to blunt the response), and some sort of fat to blunt insulin even further and increase satiety.

      This in a nutshell is called paleo, non processed foods where calories primarily come from good fats (olive oil, coconut oil, nuts, seeds, egg yolks, and saturated fat from animals. The macro nutrient ratio is essentially around 60% fats, 20-30% proteins, and 10-20% carbs (from veggies primarily). This is what diabetics generally eat and are prescribed to treat the disease.

      Now the last question, is this video lying? Yes, but more so why.. The doctor brings up studies that are void of truth. The studies have already been exposed to neglect important pieces of the puzzle as to cherry pick their own data. Over the past 60 years, scientists have been trying to prove many things that are in essence bad for our health (though saying good for us). Many of funders were driven either by corporations or the government been funded by the corporations. The end result, all the studies out there never proved their point. In fact, the vast majority of them completely went against their intention, while the rest showed no effect. The studies were never published, but when asked why, they replied with “it wasn’t what we had hoped for”.

      Now as to why the doctor is using these studies but not disclosing the “whole” study, that is a mystery. I compare it to someone trying to prove meat causes brain damage. A study is done on 20 people. Ten had brain damage eating meat while the other 10 didn’t being vegan. The study chalks it up as meat is the culprit but neglects to inform everyone those 10 were also boxers who got clocked in the head one too many times. It’s all relative and this is why most scientific studies are cherry picked data.

    • Bobby5939

      The reason people get results with low-carb high fat diet is because of the minimal effects on insulin fat provides. There is no 2 ways around it. The camp that is lying is the camp that promotes starchy and moderate to high carb as either a cure or a mean to prevent diabetes. It’s all completely just wrong.

      Put it this way, you ever heard of the term “if it ain’t broke don’t fix it”? Well there is a reason the primary and go-to cure from nearly every doctor (including the mainstream western doctors) is low-carb & high fat.

      The other issue is, there was a person here who wrote up a decent little spiel on how insulin and diabetes go hand in hand. It got tons of likes, and consequently the mods of this forum pulled it, because I guess it “didn’t agree” with their views. Therein lies the problem, they don’t want people to know the truth for some odd reason.

      I’ll break it down in a nutshell:

      Type 1 Diabetes: Insulin dependent. People are usually born with this or acquire it at a very young age. These people are usually paper thin. They need to take insulin so they can in fact store their nutrients, otherwise they starve and die.

      Type 2 Diabetes: Insulin Resistant – People acquire this through bad diet and partly (possibly) pre-disposed to it at birth making them a little more likely to get it if they aren’t careful. Insulin resistant is at it sounds, the body (or cells in this case) are resistant to the insulin the body produces.

      So the question is, why? Well when you think of insulin as some annoying dude who continually knocks at the door, and your insulin receptors attached to cells are the guy inside who opens the door.. well eventually that guy inside gets sick of hearing the door knock so he ignores it. The more he ignores it, the louder the knocking gets. By this I mean the more insulin the pancreas produce to force the cells to store the nutrients. Do you see where I’m going with this? More and more insulin flooded into the body? Eventually the cells become resistant to it.

      Well you look at the foods that causes the biggest insulin secretion, and luckily we have that beautiful little glycemic index plastered all over online. You’ll notice that list is heavily titled to towards sugars and foods that get converted into glucose rather quickly. This we know as our friend the carbohydrate, they dominate the top of that list from straight table sugar, fruit juices, candy bars, starchy carbs, all the way down to vegetables. Then on the low end you have proteins like meats, fish, and poultry. Then on the complete low end, you have fats because they produce little to no insulin which has been proven, hence why doctors prescribe it.

      So if you want to “fix” Type 2 diabetes, you keep your insulin levels low so your body becomes more insulin sensitive. Basically think of it as your giving your insulin receptors a break, let them heal a bit, breathe, and get a new lease on life before they deal with that annoying guy (insulin) knocking at the door again. There are a few ways to accelerate the process: Intermittent fasting, exercise, and certain foods like cinnamon help with insulin resistance.

      The biggest question of all is, why the moderators on this forum refuse to believe it, yet their being concrete proof and thousands upon thousands of success stories and testimonials on it. Then to further the problem, the research this site uses to try and prove their claims, was debunked by scientific researcher a few years ago.

      • Veggie Eric

        I’m sorry Bobby but you are dead wrong and trolling this site way to much with your low carb pseudo-science. There is a great web series at Plantpositive.com that addresses the cigarette-science tactics employed by the low-carb movement. Low carb gurus like the ones you speak of use confusion tactics to trick people into thinking that a high fat & meat diet is somehow healthy. It is not and no amount of low-carb smoke and mirrors with change that. Here is an interesting video on Mr. Taubes.

        http://plantpositive.com/1-the-journalist-gary-taubes-1/

    • Ramona S

      As Bobby below said, it’s the high fat low carb is what fixes it, not vice versa. Keep sticking to what your doing (low carb) because it’s working.

      Fat has little to no effect on insulin so you don’t need to worry about it causing insulin resistance.

      • Veggie Eric

        That is not true. Saturated fat IS the culpret and cause of type II diabetes as Dr Greger shows in this video. High fat diets are a dangerous fad. You are regurgitating old low-carb lies that are being spread around by book selling profiteers like Gary Taubes, Westman, Jimmy Moore and the rest of the pseudo-science book hucksters. You can eat all the bacon wrapped butter you like but please don’t come here to this site and try to misguide these good folks that somehow fat and meat are healthy. They are not and this site shows that.

        http://nutritionfacts.org/video/uprooting-the-leading-causes-of-death/

    • Veggie Eric

      Hi Andrew, My advice would be not to listen to the low-carb trolls like Romona and Linda. They are fake accounts most likely by this Bobby character who’s been running around here stinking up the place lately. The science based evidence that Dr Greger and his colleges present here is correct. This video above explains why Lipotoxixty (saturated fat) is the root of many of our most common diseases. Here is another one of Dr Greger videos on the subject.

      http://nutritionfacts.org/video/the-problem-with-the-paleo-diet-argument/

      The reason some low-carbers see improvements in health is because the diet restricts calories and in turn you lose weight and weight-loss by any means will improve health makers… doesn’t make it healthy, just caloric restriction in disguised… but at what cost and damage to your organs and arteries? A much safer and healthier way to lose weight would be the diet advocated by this site. A low fat, low protein, plant based diet devoid of animal foods, oils and processed junk…

    • Joseph Gonzales R.D.

      It may be attributed to the weight loss or short-duration of study. There are concerns about following a low-carb diet long-term (and even short-term), but please do what you feel is best. I think it is a silly argument to say sugar causes diabetes or fat causes diabetes. It is all relative to amounts and types of food and severity of the disease. From Dr. Barnard’s research, study participants received either a low-fat vegan diet or a typical diet for diabetes and found significant changes in weight loss and insulin levels. Dr. Greger presents the study in this video. So this is an opposite approach from the low-carb diet. I would worry about not obtaining enough fiber and antioxidants from a low-carb diet and yes this kind of diet may accelerate diabetes risk. If interested in a low-carb plant-based diet check out this video. I do not necessarily recommend it because I have seen excellent clinical results from a strict plant based diet A multicenter randomized controlled trial of a plant-based nutrition program to reduce body weight and cardiovascular risk in the corporate setting: the GEICO study.

      Best,
      Joseph

  • Bob413

    There is so much factually wrong with this video it’s staggering and borderline ignorant. It’s almost to the point you forget what they’re even trying to prove.

    Type 1 Diabetes – Insulin Dependent, needs insulin to store their nutrients so they take insulin. Usually these people are on the thin side

    Type 2 Diabetes – Insulin Resistant, body constantly flooded with insulin to the point the insulin receptors fail to use the circulating insulin. Usually these people are on the heftier side.

    What are the primary functions of insulin? To store nutrients and to clear glucose out of the body.

    What causes insulin to get released? Sugar, carbs being converted to glucose and Amino Acids from protein, and to a lesser extent fat.

    What determines the amount of insulin to get released? The amount of glucose “said” food produces. Obviously simple sugars like sugar itself, pop, fruit juices, candy bars, doughnuts, and non whole-wheat pastas create the largest response. We know this because generally consuming them on their own usually produces a “crash” effect in people. Aka, a lot of glucose was released in the blood so a lot of insulin needs to be released to clear it. Usually insulin gathers a head of steam and clears too much leading your blood glucose to dip too low. The problem is because insulin shuts down your body’s ability to burn fat, your body can’t release fat to convert to glucose to level out your blood sugar.

    So what causes Type 2 Diabetes? Having too much insulin in your system to the point your insulin receptors are sick of hearing insulin knocking at the door. The pancreas continue to produce insulin until the receptors let them in. This floods your body with insulin and keeps it chronically elevated, AKA “insulin resistance”.

    So how do you treat Type 2 Diabetes or reverse it? Not consuming foods that produce a large insulin response is where you start. Intermittent fasting and exercise also go leaps and bounds with this too.

    So, we need to avoid foods that produce a big insulin response.. or is it a case of eating foods that blunt the insulin response. The answer is both. Proteins blunt the insulin response, while fats drastically blunt the insulin response. We know this because neither of those have any sugar in it, so their insulin response is dreadful to the point it slows down the response that carbs would generally create. We know foods like steaks have less sugar in it than apples; chicken breasts have less than carrots, and fish have less than potatoes. Who are we kidding, they have absolutely no sugar unless we put it on them in the form of sauces. This isn’t even debatable. The only reason these cause an insulin response is because of the amino acids.

    This is exactly why diabetics whom are successful in treating their disease have been prescribed to eat all their veggies with protein foods like beef, chicken, or fish. This is also why they are prescribed a high fat diet to create satiety because the calories have to come from somewhere if carb foods are eliminated (aside from veggies). If low-fat is prescribed, the fat burning enzymes aren’t activated, the body thinks it’s starving and will refuse to burn fat.

    So what should this mean to you? If you want to avoid Type 2 diabetes like the plague, don’t eat foods that cause a big insulin response, or minimize those foods. Eat all your veggies with proteins, and get your calories primarily from fat as to create the right hormonal balance and to prevent your body from thinking it’s starving. There is no secret to this, this is exactly what diabetics are prescribed today.

    The same goes if you want to lose weight, don’t keep your insulin levels chronically elevated because insulin turns off the body’s ability to release stored energy (carbs and fat). I say this like a broken record, but eat foods that don’t cause a big insulin response and eat them with proteins, this can’t be stressed enough. Fill the rest of your calories up with fat so you aren’t starving, and most importantly, don’t starve yourself, which brings me to my next point, cortisol.

    Cortisol is released in your body’s response to stress. Instead of me trying to explain it, i’m just going to copy/paste this from another article that sums it up nicely:

    “Blood Sugar Imbalance and Diabetes”

    “Under stressful conditions, cortisol provides the body with glucose by tapping into protein stores via gluconeogenesis in the liver. This energy can help an individual fight or flee a stressor. However, elevated cortisol over the long term consistently produces glucose, leading to increased blood sugar levels.

    Theoretically, this mechanism can increase the risk for type 2 diabetes, although a causative factor is unknown.1 Since a principal function of cortisol is to thwart the effect of insulin—essentially rendering the cells insulin resistant—the body remains in a general insulin-resistant state when cortisol levels are chronically elevated. Over time, the pancreas struggles to keep up with the high demand for insulin, glucose levels in the blood remain high, the cells cannot get the sugar they need, and the cycle continues.”

    In a nutshell avoid chronic stressors as much as possible. Starving yourself when hungry is a stressor. Starving your body of fat is a stressor. Too much exercise is a stressor. Even worrying about your diet is a stressor & not enough sleep is a stressor. To sum it up, don’t starve yourself; eat to satiety which includes fat.

    If you are someone that may have insulin resistance due to lack of sleep, cinnamon is supposed to help reverse this, and it’s tasty too.

    • Tops_Dog

      This was summed up very well. It may be hard for some people to understand the link between insulin, weight gain, and diabetes, but when you understand what food effects insulin the way it does and why, it’s easy to see the real culprit.

      The most basic way to look at it is foods that get broken down into glucose the quickest with sugar being the top dog (no pun intended here). Using that as your basis, you start to scale down with how much sugar exactly is in each type of food and you start to see the correlation with the glycemic index. The more carbs/sugar in food, the greater the insulin response. This is why you see proteins on the low end of the spectrum with fats not even on the spectrum.

      So if were going to use common sense in regards to what causes diabetes (specifically type 2 because type 1 is usually inherited), you’ll see foods with the greatest impact on insulin is what causes it. This is foods with the most carbs/sugar, not proteins, and certainly not fats. Fats have nothing in them to get broken down into glucose rapidly. It’s a slow and arduous process, that’s why people often say to burn fat you need long bouts of steady cardio, because it takes a while to metabolize.

  • LindaHensley

    There is so much factually wrong with this video it’s staggering and borderline ignorant. It’s almost to the point you forget what they’re even trying to prove.

    Type 1 Diabetes – Insulin Dependent, needs insulin to store their nutrients so they take insulin. Usually these people are on the thin side

    Type 2 Diabetes – Insulin Resistant, body constantly flooded with insulin to the point the insulin receptors fail to use the circulating insulin. Usually these people are on the heftier side.

    What are the primary functions of insulin? To store nutrients and to clear glucose out of the body.

    What causes insulin to get released? Sugar, carbs being converted to glucose and Amino Acids from protein, and to a lesser extent fat.

    What determines the amount of insulin to get released? The amount of glucose “said” food produces. Obviously simple sugars like sugar itself, pop, fruit juices, candy bars, doughnuts, and non whole-wheat pastas create the largest response. We know this because generally consuming them on their own usually produces a “crash” effect in people. Aka, a lot of glucose was released in the blood so a lot of insulin needs to be released to clear it. Usually insulin gathers a head of steam and clears too much leading your blood glucose to dip too low. The problem is because insulin shuts down your body’s ability to burn fat, your body can’t release fat to convert to glucose to level out your blood sugar.

    So what causes Type 2 Diabetes? Having too much insulin in your system to the point your insulin receptors are sick of hearing insulin knocking at the door. The pancreas continue to produce insulin until the receptors let them in. This floods your body with insulin and keeps it chronically elevated, AKA “insulin resistance”.

    So how do you treat Type 2 Diabetes or reverse it? Not consuming foods that produce a large insulin response is where you start. Intermittent fasting and exercise also go leaps and bounds with this too.

    So, we need to avoid foods that produce a big insulin response.. or is it a case of eating foods that blunt the insulin response. The answer is both. Proteins blunt the insulin response, while fats drastically blunt the insulin response. We know this because neither of those have any sugar in it, so their insulin response is dreadful to the point it slows down the response that carbs would generally create. We know foods like steaks have less sugar in it than apples; chicken breasts have less than carrots, and fish have less than potatoes. Who are we kidding, they have absolutely no sugar unless we put it on them in the form of sauces. This isn’t even debatable. The only reason these cause an insulin response is because of the amino acids.

    This is exactly why diabetics whom are successful in treating their disease have been prescribed to eat all their veggies with protein foods like beef, chicken, or fish. This is also why they are prescribed a high fat diet to create satiety because the calories have to come from somewhere if carb foods are eliminated (aside from veggies). If low-fat is prescribed, the fat burning enzymes aren’t activated, the body thinks it’s starving and will refuse to burn fat.

    So what should this mean to you? If you want to avoid Type 2 diabetes like the plague, don’t eat foods that cause a big insulin response, or minimize those foods. Eat all your veggies with proteins, and get your calories primarily from fat as to create the right hormonal balance and to prevent your body from thinking it’s starving. There is no secret to this, this is exactly what diabetics are prescribed today.

    The same goes if you want to lose weight, don’t keep your insulin levels chronically elevated because insulin turns off the body’s ability to release stored energy (carbs and fat). I say this like a broken record, but eat foods that don’t cause a big insulin response and eat them with proteins, this can’t be stressed enough. Fill the rest of your calories up with fat so you aren’t starving, and most importantly, don’t starve yourself, which brings me to my next point, cortisol.

    Cortisol is released in your body’s response to stress. Instead of me trying to explain it, i’m just going to copy/paste this from another article that sums it up nicely:

    “Blood Sugar Imbalance and Diabetes”

    “Under stressful conditions, cortisol provides the body with glucose by tapping into protein stores via gluconeogenesis in the liver. This energy can help an individual fight or flee a stressor. However, elevated cortisol over the long term consistently produces glucose, leading to increased blood sugar levels.

    Theoretically, this mechanism can increase the risk for type 2 diabetes, although a causative factor is unknown.1 Since a principal function of cortisol is to thwart the effect of insulin—essentially rendering the cells insulin resistant—the body remains in a general insulin-resistant state when cortisol levels are chronically elevated. Over time, the pancreas struggles to keep up with the high demand for insulin, glucose levels in the blood remain high, the cells cannot get the sugar they need, and the cycle continues.”

    In a nutshell avoid chronic stressors as much as possible. Starving yourself when hungry is a stressor. Starving your body of fat is a stressor. Too much exercise is a stressor. Even worrying about your diet is a stressor & not enough sleep is a stressor. To sum it up, don’t starve yourself; eat to satiety which includes fat.

    If you are someone that may have insulin resistance due to lack of sleep, cinnamon is supposed to help reverse this, and it’s tasty too.

    • Ramona S

      This illustrates the connection between insulin and diabetes very well. I will admit, understanding insulin took me a while but it really helps to understand what it’s functions are because then one can use common sense to see what foods exactly trigger it and how it plays with insulin resistant diabetes.

      My experience with this came from my sister who had insulin resistant diabetes that was linked to a diet high fruit, potatoes, and pasta. She literally would be eating 2 out of the 3 at each meal. Lucky for her, she not only took control of it but completely reversed the disease. Her breakfast turned into 2-4 eggs with usually broccoli. Lunch was chicken breast or fish with a TBSP or 2 of olive or coconut oil, along with giant spinach/kale salad. Dinner was usually either chicken, fish, or steak with some other steamed green veggies. She’d snack on nuts & seeds throughout the day, mainly almonds and pumpkin seeds. The main premise of this diet was to consume her veggies with a protein source, which as you can see was either eggs, meats, poultry, or fish.

      The end result was she reversed her insulin resistant diabetes in about 4-5 months. She was also intermittent fasting 2 days a week too. This is what really got me interested in nutrition. I can attest on her behalf it was a high fat low carb diet that fixed it. We estimate that roughly about 60% of her calories was from fat, 30% from protein, and 10% from carbs (all vegetables).

      • Veggie Eric

        Trolling the Vegans again? So are you Romona or Linda? I can’t tell because you seem to be posting the same low-carb troll information under several different account names. Again, this is not the place to promote fats, oils, dairy, eggs or animal protein. This is a low-fat vegan site and your attacks on the videos and science Dr greger presents is not appreciated.

        • LindaHensley

          They are right on the money Eric. You can’t argue with what doctors prescribe as diabetic diets. It is what it is. They work and it isn’t carb and sugar ladened foods. It’s low carb and high fat.

          In regards to Gary Taubes, he isn’t a low carb guru, he is a scientific researcher. Their purpose is to take all the studies from both sides and lay out the raw data and present it. That way there is no cherry picking going on from either side like the doctor does here with his data. His data was already debunked. High carb was debunked, so was the causes of insulin resistance, and cardiovascular health. The data you should be looking at is the raw data from studies, and nothing more. It can only be interpreted one way

          • Veggie Eric

            Now your just strait up trolling again… They(you) are most certainly not ‘right on the money’ LindaBobbyRamona… Low-carbers are attempting to capitalize on the public’s ignorance about nutrition to sell fad diet books and supplements. Taubes being the poster boy for this type of ‘cholesterol-confusionism’.

            see here ~~> http://nutritionfacts.org/video/lipotoxicity-how-saturated-fat-raises-blood-sugar/

            The Journalist Gary Taubes.
            ———————————–
            Dr Greger addresses Gary Taubes directly on his site Atkinsexposed.org.

            Here is the Taubes section…
            -=QUOTE=-
            The Washington Post investigated his pro-Atkins
            article and found that Taubes simply ignored all the research that
            didn’t agree with his conclusions.

            Taubes evidently interviewed
            a number of prominent obesity researchers and then twisted their words.
            “What frightens me,” said one, “is that he picks and chooses his
            facts…. If the facts don’t fit in with his yarn, he ignores them.”[47]

            The article seemed to claim that experts recommended the diet.
            “I was greatly offended at how Gary Taubes tricked us all into coming
            across as supporters of the Atkins Diet,” said John Farquhar, a
            Professor Emeritus of Medicine at Stanford. When the Director of the
            Center for Human Nutrition at the Washington University School of
            Medicine was asked to comment of one of Taubes’ claims, he replied,
            “It’s preposterous.”[48]

            “He took this weird little idea and blew it up,” said Farquhar, “What a disaster.”[49]

            “The
            article was written in bad faith,” said another quoted expert. “It was
            irresponsible.”[50] “I think he’s a dangerous man. I’m sorry I ever
            talked to him.” Referring to the book deal, “Taubes sold out.”[51]

            What
            the researchers stressed was how dangerous saturated fat and meat
            consumption could be, but Taubes seemed to have conveniently left it all
            out. “The article was incredibly misleading,” said the pioneering
            Stanford University endocrinologist Gerald Reaven who actually coined
            the term Syndrome X. “I tried to be helpful and a good citizen,” Reaven
            said, agreeing to do the interview, “and I ended up being embarrassed as
            hell. He sort of set me up… I was horrified.”[52]
            -= END QUOTE =-

    • Veggie Eric

      LOW-CAB TROLL ALERT!
      ———————————

      Linda, you are being an obnoxious low-carb troll… and calling Dr Greger and his work ‘ignorant’ is offensive. If you haven’t noticed this is not the forum for low-carbers. This is a low-fat Vegan website. You are not going to change the mind of any of us low-fat vegans by stomping around these video forums claiming you know more that the combined medical expertise of Dr. Greger and his colleges. Dr Greger explains very eloquently how Type II diabetes is causes by lipotoxicity. Please take the low-carb dogma trolling someplace else… I’m sure there are tons of Gary Taubes low-carb sites you’ll feel right at home at. You guys can all site around eating bacon wrapped butter and talk amoungs yourself how pork grizzle is going to save the world. but this isn’t the forum for you…

  • Stan_Morely33

    There is so much factually wrong with this video it’s staggering and borderline ignorant. It’s almost to the point you forget what they’re even trying to prove.
    Type 1 Diabetes – Insulin Dependent, needs insulin to store their nutrients so they take insulin. Usually these people are on the thin side
    Type 2 Diabetes – Insulin Resistant, body constantly flooded with insulin to the point the insulin receptors fail to use the circulating insulin. Usually these people are on the heftier side.
    What are the primary functions of insulin? To store nutrients and to clear glucose out of the body.
    What causes insulin to get released? Sugar, carbs being converted to glucose and Amino Acids from protein, and to a lesser extent fat.
    What determines the amount of insulin to get released? The amount of glucose “said” food produces. Obviously simple sugars like sugar itself, pop, fruit juices, candy bars, doughnuts, and non whole-wheat pastas create the largest response. We know this because generally consuming them on their own usually produces a “crash” effect in people. Aka, a lot of glucose was released in the blood so a lot of insulin needs to be released to clear it. Usually insulin gathers a head of steam and clears too much leading your blood glucose to dip too low. The problem is because insulin shuts down your body’s ability to burn fat, your body can’t release fat to convert to glucose to level out your blood sugar.
    So what causes Type 2 Diabetes? Having too much insulin in your system to the point your insulin receptors are sick of hearing insulin knocking at the door. The pancreas continue to produce insulin until the receptors let them in. This floods your body with insulin and keeps it chronically elevated, AKA “insulin resistance”.
    So how do you treat Type 2 Diabetes or reverse it? Not consuming foods that produce a large insulin response is where you start. Intermittent fasting and exercise also go leaps and bounds with this too.
    So, we need to avoid foods that produce a big insulin response.. or is it a case of eating foods that blunt the insulin response. The answer is both. Proteins blunt the insulin response, while fats drastically blunt the insulin response. We know this because neither of those have any sugar in it, so their insulin response is dreadful to the point it slows down the response that carbs would generally create. We know foods like steaks have less sugar in it than apples; chicken breasts have less than carrots, and fish have less than potatoes. Who are we kidding, they have absolutely no sugar unless we put it on them in the form of sauces. This isn’t even debatable. The only reason these cause an insulin response is because of the amino acids.
    This is exactly why diabetics whom are successful in treating their disease have been prescribed to eat all their veggies with protein foods like beef, chicken, or fish. This is also why they are prescribed a high fat diet to create satiety because the calories have to come from somewhere if carb foods are eliminated (aside from veggies). If low-fat is prescribed, the fat burning enzymes aren’t activated, the body thinks it’s starving and will refuse to burn fat.
    So what should this mean to you? If you want to avoid Type 2 diabetes like the plague, don’t eat foods that cause a big insulin response, or minimize those foods. Eat all your veggies with proteins, and get your calories primarily from fat as to create the right hormonal balance and to prevent your body from thinking it’s starving. There is no secret to this, this is exactly what diabetics are prescribed today.
    The same goes if you want to lose weight, don’t keep your insulin levels chronically elevated because insulin turns off the body’s ability to release stored energy (carbs and fat). I say this like a broken record, but eat foods that don’t cause a big insulin response and eat them with proteins, this can’t be stressed enough. Fill the rest of your calories up with fat so you aren’t starving, and most importantly, don’t starve yourself, which brings me to my next point, cortisol.
    Cortisol is released in your body’s response to stress. Instead of me trying to explain it, i’m just going to copy/paste this from another article that sums it up nicely:
    “Blood Sugar Imbalance and Diabetes”
    “Under stressful conditions, cortisol provides the body with glucose by tapping into protein stores via gluconeogenesis in the liver. This energy can help an individual fight or flee a stressor. However, elevated cortisol over the long term consistently produces glucose, leading to increased blood sugar levels.
    Theoretically, this mechanism can increase the risk for type 2 diabetes, although a causative factor is unknown.1 Since a principal function of cortisol is to thwart the effect of insulin—essentially rendering the cells insulin resistant—the body remains in a general insulin-resistant state when cortisol levels are chronically elevated. Over time, the pancreas struggles to keep up with the high demand for insulin, glucose levels in the blood remain high, the cells cannot get the sugar they need, and the cycle continues.”
    In a nutshell avoid chronic stressors as much as possible. Starving yourself when hungry is a stressor. Starving your body of fat is a stressor. Too much exercise is a stressor. Even worrying about your diet is a stressor & not enough sleep is a stressor. To sum it up, don’t starve yourself; eat to satiety which includes fat.
    If you are someone that may have insulin resistance due to lack of sleep, cinnamon is supposed to help reverse this, and it’s tasty too.

    • Veggie Eric

      FLAGGED – TROLL ALERT AGAIN..
      ———————————————–

      This is the same ‘cut and paste’ post he did under 3 other screen names. All the same text… Guy just wont stop.

  • Loneviking

    Something about the danger of high VLDL levels doesn’t add up. You can have high VLDL levels with low/normal
    Triglycerides and Cholesterol. How is that possible if VLDL just exists to transport fat?

  • Tickious

    Which is the video that describes how consuming fat, makes us fat?
    Thanks.

    • Tickious

      Help!

  • Hendrik

    I just saw an interesting article on the development of Type 2 diabetes which adds a few more molecular details to the process at http://www.the-scientist.com/?articles.view/articleNo/46391/title/What-Causes-Type-2-Diabetes-/