How Not to Die from Heart Disease

How Not to Die from Heart Disease
4.71 (94.29%) 21 votes

Lifestyle approaches aren’t just safer and cheaper. They can work better, because you’re treating the actual cause of the disease.

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Below is an approximation of this video’s audio content. To see any graphs, charts, graphics, images, and quotes to which Dr. Greger may be referring, watch the above video.

The most likely reason most of our loved ones will die is heart disease. It’s still up to each of us to make our own decisions as to what to eat and how to live—but, we should make these choices consciously, educating ourselves about the predictable consequences of our actions.

Atherosclerosis, hardening of the arteries, begins in childhood.

By age ten, the arteries of nearly all kids raised on the Standard American Diet already have fatty streaks—the first stage of the disease.

Then, the plaques start forming in our twenties, get worse in our thirties, and then can start killing us off. In our heart, it’s called a heart attack. In our brain, it can manifest as a stroke.

So, if there is anyone watching this, older than age ten, then the choice isn’t whether or not to eat healthy to prevent heart disease; it’s whether or not you want to reverse the heart disease you likely already have.

Is that even possible? When researchers took people with heart disease, and put them on the kind of plant-based diet followed by populations that did not get epidemic heart disease, their hope was that it might slow the disease process down—maybe even stop it. But, instead, something miraculous happened.

The disease started to reverse; to get better. As soon as patients stopped eating artery-clogging diets, their bodies were able to start dissolving some of the plaque away, opening up arteries without drugs, without surgery—suggesting their bodies wanted to heal all along, but were just never given the chance. That improvement in blood flow to the heart muscle itself (on the left) was after just three weeks eating healthy.

Let me share with you what’s been called the best-kept secret in medicine. The best-kept secret in medicine is that sometimes, given the right conditions, the body can heal itself.

You know, if you whack your shin really hard on a coffee table, it can get all red, hot, painful, swollen, inflamed—but, will heal naturally, if you just stand back and let your body work its magic. But, what if you kept whacking your shin in the same place, day after day—in fact, three times a day (breakfast, lunch, and dinner). It’d never heal!

You’d go to your doctor, and be like, “Oh, my shin hurts,” and the doctor would be like, “No problem,” whip out their pad, write you a prescription for painkillers. You’re still whacking your shin three times a day. Oh, it still really hurts like heck, but oh, feels so much better with those pain pills on board. Thank heavens for modern medicine.

It’s like when people take nitroglycerine for crushing chest pain—tremendous relief, but you’re not doing anything to treat the underlying cause.

Our body wants to come back to health, if we let it. But, if we keep redamaging ourselves three times a day, we may never heal.

One of the most amazing things I learned in all my medical training was that within about 15 years of stopping smoking, your lung cancer risk approaches that of a lifelong nonsmoker. Isn’t that amazing? Your lungs can clear out all that tar, and eventually, it’s almost as if you never started smoking at all.

And, every morning of our smoking life, that healing process started, until… wham!…our first cigarette of the day, reinjuring our lungs with every puff—just like we can reinjure our arteries with every bite, when all we had to do all along, the miracle cure, is just stand back, get out of the way, stop redamaging ourselves, and let our bodies’ natural healing processes bring us back towards health. The human body is a self-healing machine.

Sure, you could choose moderation—hit yourself with a smaller hammer. But, why beat yourself up at all?

I don’t tell my smoking patients to cut down to half a pack a day. I tell them to quit. Sure, a half pack is better than two packs a day—but, we should try to only put healthy things in our mouths.

We’ve known about this for decades: American Heart Journal, 1977. Cases like Mr. F.W. here; heart disease so bad, he couldn’t even make it to the mailbox—but, started eating healthier, and, a few months later, he was climbing mountains. No pain.

There are all these fancy, new, anti-angina, anti-chest pain drugs out now. They cost thousands of dollars a year. But, at the highest dose, may be able to prolong exercise duration—as long as 33 and a half seconds. It does not look like those choosing the drug route will be climbing mountains anytime soon.

See, plant-based diets aren’t just safer and cheaper. They can work better, because you’re treating the actual cause of the disease.

Please consider volunteering to help out on the site.

Videography courtesy of Grant Peacock

Below is an approximation of this video’s audio content. To see any graphs, charts, graphics, images, and quotes to which Dr. Greger may be referring, watch the above video.

The most likely reason most of our loved ones will die is heart disease. It’s still up to each of us to make our own decisions as to what to eat and how to live—but, we should make these choices consciously, educating ourselves about the predictable consequences of our actions.

Atherosclerosis, hardening of the arteries, begins in childhood.

By age ten, the arteries of nearly all kids raised on the Standard American Diet already have fatty streaks—the first stage of the disease.

Then, the plaques start forming in our twenties, get worse in our thirties, and then can start killing us off. In our heart, it’s called a heart attack. In our brain, it can manifest as a stroke.

So, if there is anyone watching this, older than age ten, then the choice isn’t whether or not to eat healthy to prevent heart disease; it’s whether or not you want to reverse the heart disease you likely already have.

Is that even possible? When researchers took people with heart disease, and put them on the kind of plant-based diet followed by populations that did not get epidemic heart disease, their hope was that it might slow the disease process down—maybe even stop it. But, instead, something miraculous happened.

The disease started to reverse; to get better. As soon as patients stopped eating artery-clogging diets, their bodies were able to start dissolving some of the plaque away, opening up arteries without drugs, without surgery—suggesting their bodies wanted to heal all along, but were just never given the chance. That improvement in blood flow to the heart muscle itself (on the left) was after just three weeks eating healthy.

Let me share with you what’s been called the best-kept secret in medicine. The best-kept secret in medicine is that sometimes, given the right conditions, the body can heal itself.

You know, if you whack your shin really hard on a coffee table, it can get all red, hot, painful, swollen, inflamed—but, will heal naturally, if you just stand back and let your body work its magic. But, what if you kept whacking your shin in the same place, day after day—in fact, three times a day (breakfast, lunch, and dinner). It’d never heal!

You’d go to your doctor, and be like, “Oh, my shin hurts,” and the doctor would be like, “No problem,” whip out their pad, write you a prescription for painkillers. You’re still whacking your shin three times a day. Oh, it still really hurts like heck, but oh, feels so much better with those pain pills on board. Thank heavens for modern medicine.

It’s like when people take nitroglycerine for crushing chest pain—tremendous relief, but you’re not doing anything to treat the underlying cause.

Our body wants to come back to health, if we let it. But, if we keep redamaging ourselves three times a day, we may never heal.

One of the most amazing things I learned in all my medical training was that within about 15 years of stopping smoking, your lung cancer risk approaches that of a lifelong nonsmoker. Isn’t that amazing? Your lungs can clear out all that tar, and eventually, it’s almost as if you never started smoking at all.

And, every morning of our smoking life, that healing process started, until… wham!…our first cigarette of the day, reinjuring our lungs with every puff—just like we can reinjure our arteries with every bite, when all we had to do all along, the miracle cure, is just stand back, get out of the way, stop redamaging ourselves, and let our bodies’ natural healing processes bring us back towards health. The human body is a self-healing machine.

Sure, you could choose moderation—hit yourself with a smaller hammer. But, why beat yourself up at all?

I don’t tell my smoking patients to cut down to half a pack a day. I tell them to quit. Sure, a half pack is better than two packs a day—but, we should try to only put healthy things in our mouths.

We’ve known about this for decades: American Heart Journal, 1977. Cases like Mr. F.W. here; heart disease so bad, he couldn’t even make it to the mailbox—but, started eating healthier, and, a few months later, he was climbing mountains. No pain.

There are all these fancy, new, anti-angina, anti-chest pain drugs out now. They cost thousands of dollars a year. But, at the highest dose, may be able to prolong exercise duration—as long as 33 and a half seconds. It does not look like those choosing the drug route will be climbing mountains anytime soon.

See, plant-based diets aren’t just safer and cheaper. They can work better, because you’re treating the actual cause of the disease.

Please consider volunteering to help out on the site.

Videography courtesy of Grant Peacock

Doctor's Note

You can imagine how overwhelming NutritionFacts.org might be for someone new to the site. With videos on more than 2,000 health topics, where do you even begin? Imagine someone stumbling onto the site when the new video-of-the-day is about how some spice can be effective in treating a particular form of arthritis. It would be easy to miss the forest for the trees. That’s why I created this new series of overview videos, which are basically taken straight from my hour-long live 2016 presentation HOW NOT TO DIE: The Role of Diet in Preventing, Arresting, and Reversing Our Top 15 Killers.

Stay tuned for:

If this video inspired you to learn more about the role diet may play in preventing and treating heart disease, check out some of these other popular videos on the topic:

If you haven’t yet, you can subscribe to my videos for free by clicking here.

177 responses to “How Not to Die from Heart Disease

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  1. Good morning! I am a volunteer moderator with Nutritionfacts – a plant based dietitian located in Scottsdale, Arizona. Today’s video is a wonderful reminder of the power and control we have over our health. Overview videos are excellent – I use them with my students at Arizona State University to help them learn more about plant based eating and problems with the Standard American Diet. An awesome deep dive for quick learning. Thanks, Dr. G!!




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    1. Posted this a a week ago with no answer so will try again.
      How accurate are blood tests for hormone level? I have read that they are not really accurate and that saliva testing is more so. Blood testing showed that my hormones are fine except for progesterone. I’ve tried the bio-identical but am not convinced that it does anything. So is it really a problem that progesterone tests low?

      P.S. Anybody have an answer? Opinion?




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      1. Hi Jean! I initially didn’t answer because I really didn’t know :-) However, I did some research and learned that there is some effort underway to elevate saliva testing in its reliability over serum or urine testing. This may indeed be an effort by those who can profit from sales of saliva testing, so I was a bit suspicious. I then found this very interesting article on hormone testing</a from Women's International Pharmacy, where I have purchased bio identicals over the past several years. I found this article helpful to understand the strengths and weaknesses of each method.
        You have come across a very interesting and useful consideration: just how accurate is blood testing for hormones? It makes me remember that lab testing is BIG BUSINESS and driven ultimately by profit motivation. It also reminds me that lab tests are typically ordered to support a physician's identification of a possible medical issue of a patient based on patient self report of troublesome symptoms. When female patients of a certain age come into their physician and report fatigue, loss of interest in sex, trouble sleeping, dry skin, and other symptoms, it is rare for a physician to drill down and inquire as follows: 1) What is your diet like, 2) are you taking care of aging parents and children at the same time? 3) do you work outside the home and are you primarily responsible for caregiving 4) what is your regular exercise routine like 5) do you have a regular stress management (meditation, yoga) practice 6) do you drink alcohol, etc, etc. I think you get my drift. It is appropriate for most women to FEEL TERRIBLE as they reach midlife dependent upon their answers to my top 6 questions. What is the cause of this? LOW HORMONES – and an MD will order a test to diagnose that condition.
        Out of respect to my physician colleagues and readers/commenters of this website, I offer apologies for my overly simplistic answer which minimizes the important role that the physician patient relationship plays in our own health. However, when we go to the MD and look for a quick fix to what might be a complex answer, what is a physician to do?
        As for you, Jean, I would check and see what "normal" progesterone levels should be for women of your age group, remembering that it is normal for estrogen, progesterone and testosterone levels to decline with aging. It's what happens. There is no fountain of youth, despite those who claim there is (and who make money off of our own desire to stay forever young). Good luck, thanks for your participation, and let me know what you decide to do!
        –Lisa




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      2. Hi Jean! I initially didn’t answer because I really didn’t know :-) However, I did some research and learned that there is some effort underway to elevate saliva testing in its reliability over serum or urine testing. This may indeed be an effort by those who can profit from sales of saliva testing, so I was a bit suspicious. I then found this very interesting article on hormone testing hormone testing</a from Women's International Pharmacy, where I have purchased bio identicals over the past several years. I found this article helpful to understand the strengths and weaknesses of each method.
        You have come across a very interesting and useful consideration: just how accurate is blood testing for hormones? It makes me remember that lab testing is BIG BUSINESS and driven ultimately by profit motivation. It also reminds me that lab tests are typically ordered to support a physician's identification of a possible medical issue of a patient based on patient self report of troublesome symptoms. When female patients of a certain age come into their physician and report fatigue, loss of interest in sex, trouble sleeping, dry skin, and other symptoms, it is rare for a physician to drill down and inquire as follows: 1) What is your diet like, 2) are you taking care of aging parents and children at the same time? 3) do you work outside the home and are you primarily responsible for caregiving 4) what is your regular exercise routine like 5) do you have a regular stress management (meditation, yoga) practice 6) do you drink alcohol, etc, etc. I think you get my drift. It is appropriate for most women to FEEL TERRIBLE as they reach midlife dependent upon their answers to my top 6 questions. What is the cause of this? LOW HORMONES – and an MD will order a test to diagnose that condition.
        Out of respect to my physician colleagues and readers/commenters of this website, I offer apologies for my overly simplistic answer which minimizes the important role that the physician patient relationship plays in our own health. However, when we go to the MD and look for a quick fix to what might be a complex answer, what is a physician to do?
        As for you, Jean, I would check and see what "normal" progesterone levels should be for women of your age group, remembering that it is normal for estrogen, progesterone and testosterone levels to decline with aging. It's what happens. There is no fountain of youth, despite those who claim there is (and who make money off of our own desire to stay forever young). Good luck, thanks for your participation, and let me know what you decide to do!
        –Lisa




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      3. Hi Jean, I hope one of the wonderful physician volunteer will respond to your query. They would probably need more information such as age and any medication that you take. However, as far as diet and life style that can help with body balancing its hormone there are a few things I can suggest. The mineral magnesium, vitamin C, B6, Zinc,Vitamin E. If ones diet is based on whole plant based food all these minerals and vitamins would be available in the diet. Also another issue is Estrogen dominance that happens as women ages. The life style and diet improvement for that could be to increase fiber in the diet and detoxifying liver with sulfur containing food such as broccoli, onion, garlic as well as avoiding “Xenoestrogens”which are foreign estrogen compounds like Bisphenol A in plastics, Petro chemically-derived pesticides, herbicides and fungicides,Solvents found in fingernail polish and polish remover, glue, cleaning supplies. These are some of the suggestions that I hope helps. Mean while tune in to Dr. G. website for further recommendation.
        Xenohormones and xenoestrogens




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    2. Wt??? Dr Katz who is the president of.the American College of Lifestyle Medicine where dr Greger is a fellow had this article last year where he claims that egg board funded studies are valid because he performs them. As evidence he sites some studies at least one of which is obviously engineered to make eggs look good because the conclusion says that eggs aren’t damaging for people with high cholesterol. Well duh, they compare the egg to sausage/ cheese. He says in the article that he eats eggs occasionally, I wonder how much the egg board pays him to do that. What I want to know is why is he the president of ACLM?
      http://www.huffingtonpost.com/david-katz-md/cholesterol-unscrambled_b_6692940.html




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      1. Thanks for your comment.

        It seems to me that has been a previous discussion to this topic already carried in nutritionfacts.org (see here).

        In the comments sections you will see an interesting discussion between what Dr Katz defends in this Huffington Post article and what the other side of the story is.

        Hope this answer helps.




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        1. Thanks Dr. G. for this great video. Also, thanks you Darchite for your reply and the article. It is important when we are removing a food source from the diet what we are substituting it with? If the replacement is with a WFPB food as Dr. G. indicates in his videos then the diet will improve as body gets the nourishment to heal itself.




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  2. Hi doc

    One of your LOVERS, and i would like you to comment on the inactive ingredients in vitamin supplements (B12 or D) such as Di-calcium phosphate or magnesium stearate. i really appreciate what you are committed to do and i know that your time is as narrow as some people’s arteries but i still need an answer that i can rely on.




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    1. I take BlueBonnet brand vitamin D drops so that I don’t get the filler and the junk. I decided on this brand because amazon users rated it high based on before and after blood tests. I get my D levels checked every few months because doctors want to make sure a previous problem isn’t present, and it has really worked for me for several years now. And one bottle is 970 servings. (I know I sound like a commercial. And yes, I’m a real person.) You can see the ingredients here. BTW, it mentions a lemon flavor, but if you drop it right on your tongue you still have to pay attention to the taste in order to notice it. So if you just add it to something it doesn’t taste like anything. I hope this helps.
      https://www.amazon.com/Bluebonnet-Liquid-Vitamin-Drops-Citrus/dp/B0046LA31U?th=1

      Mark G




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  3. Thank you Dr. Greger and team for all that you do! I’m a little confused by something, and hope someone can help. 7 months ago I stopped taking my Pravastatin, switched to a WFPB diet, try to check off as many daily dozen items as possible, and lost 12 lbs. I’ll admit I don’t get enough exercise, but I also don’t smoke or drink. My recent blood test results revealed my Cholesterol, Triglycerides, LDL, and Non-HDL are all up in the high range, and my HDL went down to the low range. But what is most concerning is my ALT level went up for the first time in my life. My doctor put me back on the statin, and has me scheduled for a liver ultrasound. I am just wondering if anyone has heard of this happening?




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    1. Hello @C.C.:disqus thank you for your comments! I help Dr. G with the comments that we receive, as do other volunteer moderators. I am a plant based MS Dietitian located in Scottsdale, Arizona. First of all congratulations on your switch, and your progress. AND your healthy lifestyle choices. If you were a client I was working with, I would want a lot more information about your total diet, other foods you are eating, fiber content of foods, more specific information on your exercise (you say you don’t get enough), your stress levels, your current stress management practices (did you know that chronic stress is a contributor to disregulated blood glucose, lipid metabolism, carbohydrate metabolism, and other biomarkers) among other factors. I would review your labs both prior to your switch and following, and trouble shoot some of the possible reasons for your change in values. There is no question that going off statins can have a rebound effect on your lab values, but more must be known. As for your ALT levels, your MD ordering a liver ultrasound is important. Statins have side effects, and in rare instances cause liver damage. It is likely your physician is attempting to rule this out. Hang in there – don’t go off any medications without consulting your physician, and find some ways to get moving and destress. Good luck!!




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        1. It’s great that you are open to the feedback. I will warn you, however, that different MDs have different beliefs about the power of mind-body interventions. Recently, when visiting my husband’s hematologist, as he whipped out his Rx pad and began his recitation of possible meds to take, for my husbands stress related symptoms, I asked: “Dr., do you think that any relaxation practices might be helpful?” He paused for a moment, then replied, “it couldn’t hurt.” My husband has been a loyal student of my therapeutic yoga class ever since!!! We now consider “it couldn’t hurt” evidence based care !!!!!! Good luck with your journey!!




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    2. Are you taking 1/4 teaspoon of turmeric a day? It’s not specifically mentioned in the daily dozen list, but turmeric has lots of unique benefits as documented in the videos on this site.




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        1. C.C. and @joshua_pritikin:disqus I know that this is coming a month after your posting, but I wanted to share how my wife and I make sure to get some turmeric every day. We simply stir about 1/4 to 1/2 teaspoon of turmeric and several grinds of black pepper (which improves bio-availability of turmeric 20 times) into 4 ounces of so of a plant milk. We like to use a vanilla soy milk. Also we add a pinch of cardamon and nutmeg which makes the whole thing taste something like eggnog (probably the vanilla and nutmeg). We also sometimes mix in some cinnamon and maybe some powdered ginger. To make it easier, we premix a big batch of our favorite spice blends so all we have to do is measure out a 1/2 teaspoon and whisk it in.




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          1. Thanks for this one Jim. I try to be very careful to get cooked and uncooked turmeric every day. Having trouble right now because I can’t cook at home. At least for the raw turmeric your preparation looks like a nice possible treat that has the advantage of being convenient once prepared. I’ll just use the dry mix when traveling as it is usually easy to find a plant milk when traveling.




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    3. Hello. Niacin at 1.5 grams a day has been shown to raise HDL, lower LDL, and lower triglycerides. You should beware of the flush, it is a burning tingling sensation in your forehead down to your feet with red itchy skin. Niacin raised my HDL 40 percent and reduced my cholesterol to very low levels. Doctors prefer to use statins perhaps because they are marketed better. Niacin improved longevity and mortality in a study. Niacin has been known to raise ALT levels. Niacin is not liver toxic.




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    4. Hello C.C.
      You don’t mention your intake of fats and oil (especially oils). You might already be keeping your fats low and not using oil, but if you are eating oil and not watching fat, reducing it might help. Dr McDougall also recommends limiting fruit to 3 (I think) servings a day if your triglycerides are high. Also, Dr. Dean Ornish’s reversal of heat disease program does include stress reduction as a main component.

      I am 60 years old and genetically predisposed to high LDL cholesterol according to my 23&me test. But being on a WFPB diet keeps my total cholesterol in the 120s (with high HDL). Best of luck to you in solving the puzzle.

      Mark G.




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  4. Great info, as always! I’m just worried that Dr. G. might turn off some new or existing viewers with the new, dramatic style. It’s a little over-the-top, isn’t it?




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    1. Different strokes for different folks, I guess. I LOVED the “dramatic style.” It added a much appreciated note of levity to such a serious topic. In fact, I’m sending this video link to several family members who need this message in the hopes that Dr. G’s style will finally penetrate their denial.




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      1. I hope you’re right! To me, it comes across as so corny it makes me cringe. I’ll keep watching, but I hope the team pays attention and considers reverting to a slighyly more toned-down, less “preacher-like” style if the viewership declines.




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    2. I find him very hard to watch but plough through to get some information. I wish he would just talk in his normal voice without the theatrics.




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    1. Gosh, such an unkind comment! It is so easy to be unkind in a forum like this, where you don’t have the eye contact, interaction with another human. This is an amazing site and Dr Greger has dedicated his life to be helpful to people just like you. You might, as I like to say, “try a little tenderness.” In this mean spirited world, it can be just an amazing remedy. Thanks for your participation on our site, but remember to be balanced, kind, and considerate of those who spend countless hours helping others.




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        1. Julie: Done. It is deleted as you are correct that it breaks the rules. Sometimes it helps to reply to someone first to help them learn the comment culture/rules here on NutritionFacts. But that doesn’t mean a comment that clearly crosses the line will be allowed to stay.
          .
          If you see a comment that you feel breaks the rules, feel free to “flag” the comment. You can do so by clicking the little flag button on the upper right of a comment.
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          While not a specific point for you, but for anyone reading this: PLEASE only click the flag button if someone is breaking the rules. If you just don’t like what someone says, you can “down vote”. Flagging is only for posts which break the “Comment Etiquette” rules and you want to bring it to a moderator’s attention. Thank you!




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          1. i didn’t see stevemac213’s comment, but given the burgeoning stupid culture of p.c. and safe zones and hate speech, i hope this forum respects free speech, because ABOVE ALL ELSE, free speech is sacred.




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            1. Craig: Free speech has never been absolute in my country (USA) and it is not absolute on NutritionFacts either. The posting rules for NutritionFacts remains as it has from the beginning. If you are interested, you can find the rules under the FAQ link found at the bottom of every page.
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              If someone breaks the rules, we delete the post. We don’t like to delete and find that we don’t have to most of the time.




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        2. Julie, thanks for your note. As a volunteer moderator I try to balance robust discussion with respectful open communication. My “job” is to help encourage debate, sharing of opinions, and help everyone “play nice!” Once in a while, people have a tendency to type without thinking (ever happen to you??) and I like to nudge things back to niceness. Rarely, there are individuals on a mission, and their interest is to harm, destroy, or silence robust debate. In those cases, we consult with each other (the moderators and staff) and will delete comments if they cross the line. I do believe in this instance that the one sided exchange was ok. Let me know if you disagree, and I can seek counsel from our staff. Thanks for your feedback!




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        1. The Doc is tough to watch, Capt Kirk style I think. Your comments are hilarious tho… information is good but I’ll state; no vegan diet has extended the death age by all information. I still love the eat in all forms and believe plant they should be 80+ percent of our diet. But your life will not be longer by any statistics ever gathered.




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  5. I love the information provided and I am very grateful for the effort, but I’m not liking the new video production where Dr. G talks to the camera. He bounces around too much as he talks and it’s very distracting. I still like his narration. And that 3/4 side angle is just like “wut?” Can we go back to the supporting documentation and other visuals? Also the acoustics of that room are not good, as there is a slight echo.




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    1. The videos featuring Dr. Greger are part of an effort to give newcomers an introduction to WFPB diet and to summarize why it’s in their best interests. If you don’t enjoy them very much just be patient, I think there are only a half dozen left.




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    2. I love Dr Greger, his sincerity, message and information, and I deeply appreciate his mission, and the thoroughness of his research to be sure the message isn’t commercially influenced. But for some reason I can’t quite define I, too, don’t enjoy the way his recent personal messages come across.




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      1. What bouncing around? Just curious, does the bouncing around that occurs in sports or music videos also make you motion sick? I really don’t understand what is bothering you about Dr.G’s gesturing. To me it is engaging for the viewer and helps create a sort of rhythm to emphasize certain points. I think it is his natural way of speaking, perhaps exaggerated a little for the camera, and I think it reads as “we’re in this together” instead of the stiff, authoritarian “I’m the doctor and you’re not” energy that characterizes so many lectures from doctors. The only things I would change about the video would be to post the literature references at the end, and to make Dr. G’s eyes more visible if possible. I found myself wanting more eye contact, but the reflection from his glasses partially obscured his eyes. There is deep, deep compassion and wisdom in this man and it almost blazes from his eyes. Maybe if you focus on his eyes you can lock on to both the man and his message and will be less bothered by his gesturing.




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  6. I’m going to repeat a question I raised on another video, which wasn’t answered. As far as I know, the studies showing heart disease reversal involved not just a WFPB diet but one that is also very low in total fat, 10% or less. These diets are more restrictive than what Dr. G typically recommends, especially when it comes to fatty plant foods such as nuts, seeds, and avocados. In short, there are possible low-fat, moderate-fat, and high-fat variants of the WFPB diet. Does Dr. G think the latter two variants are also likely to reverse heart disease?




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    1. Todd: I’m not an expert and don’t know all the studies the way that some others on this site do. Since no one answered you before, I’ll offer some thoughts in the hopes that it will be helpful:
      .
      From what I can tell, Dr. Greger prefers to express opinions on this site only when he has some scientific studies he feels are compelling enough in order to back up an opinion. As far as I know, only Esselstyn and Ornish’s diets have been definitely proven to reverse heart disease. So, as of right now, that maybe all he can say on the subject. Anything else about medium and high fat WPFB diets would speculation and personal experimentation.
      .
      Having said that, NutritionFacts does have a video or two about nuts reducing cholesterol. Depending on how many nuts were used in that experiment, you could say that there is some good evidence to show that nuts/fat levels of that amount is likely to help with heart disease problems, though you still would not know if it actually reverses heart disease in the sense of cleaning up arteries.
      .
      What do you think?




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      1. Thea: I think the position of Esselstyn and Ornish is that all dietary fast beyond what’s strictly needed (for eicosanoid synthesis etc) is harmful to the endothelium and therefore to be avoided, regardless off impact on cholesterol. I may be wrong.




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        1. Todd: Here’s where I’m coming from: I think you are probably right about Esselstyn and Ornish’s position about fats. However, I’m not talking so much about their opinions as their actual studies. These two (great) guys gave us published, peer reviewed studies showing that their diets reversed heart disease. And, as you point out, those studies are relatively low fat. (Well, I know that Esselstyn’s diet is. I don’t know as much about Ornish’s work.)

          So, my point is that the only proof we have about what kind of diet will actually reverse heart disease is the diets/fat levels used in Esselstyn and Ornish’s diet. It’s possible that a diet of whole plant foods, but using more higher fat whole plant foods would also reverse heart disease. Your question as I understand it, is “What does Dr. Greger think?” And my answer (without any inside information) is that Dr. Greger is not likely to post an opinion on that question because we just don’t know. Until someone does a study on the diets you are talking about, we won’t know.

          UNLESS there is a study or two already out there that I don’t know about. I’m not a study researcher type person…

          I mentioned the nuts video (http://nutritionfacts.org/video/new-cholesterol-fighters/ or here is one on the lining of our blood vessels and walnuts: http://nutritionfacts.org/video/walnuts-and-artery-function/ ), because such a study does show lowering of cholesterol by eating a certain amount of nuts. But I don’t know if the diets used in that study would count as medium or high fat diets in your opinion (or even Ornish’s opinion). Neither do we know if those diets actually opened up clogged arteries (though I haven’t looked at the actual study, so can’t say). Lowering cholesterol is great, but Ornish and Esselstyn actually opened up clogged arteries with their diet. And since your original question was about reversing heart disease, I don’t know if the nut study really counts.

          Does that clarify anything? Does it seem to answer your question?




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          1. Thea: Yes, thanks, that’s helpful. I’m aware that even the work of Ornish and Esselstyn was criticized, due to the presence of confounding variables and small sample sizes. I think Esselstyn eventually repeated his findings with a somewhat larger cohort, but I haven’t really scrutinized this. I’m willing to accept, for the moment, that they did what they said they did. But it’s still not clear to me whether it was the absence of (a) animal protein, or (b) saturated fat, or (c) total fat that did the heavy lifting.

            I’ve done a bit of browsing of studies of different kinds of fat on endothelial function, which is not the same as atherosclerosis, and the results are confusing. Some studies seem to show that only certain specific fats, such as corn oil, impair flow-mediated dilation. Some, like this one, suggest that saturated fats have no particular negative effect: http://ajcn.nutrition.org/content/98/3/677 Maybe the negative impact of SFA is strictly about LDL and, eventually, atherosclerosis, but the negative effect of other fats is their more immediate effect on FMD. In that case, it should be possible to work out which fats are “safe”. Keeping total fat intake below 10% is quite difficult and leads to compliance issues for many. I have to wonder whether it’s necessary, or whether it’s more important to avoid certain specific fats altogether, but not bother about others–or even be sure to get certain fats, like the half ounce of walnuts Dr. G recommends, based on https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23756586

            I guess until someone does a study that shows reversal of heart disease with a diet significantly higher than 10% fat, Dr. G is not going to make any claims or recommendations.




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            1. Todd: All great points.

              One bit I like to keep in mind is that there may be a difference between the diet that is best for reversing heart disease and a diet that does not progress heart disease nor hurt the heart. What I mean is, while 10% fat *may* be the magic number for someone with sever arterial blockage, someone who does not have heart disease may be just fine with 15 to 20 or so % fat as long as that fat comes from whole plant foods.

              I’m thinking about your point about 10% being hard for people to maintain. I don’t think the general population needs to maintain such a low amount. Conditions which are necessary for people with certain diseases is not necessarily the condition needed for the general population. I find it helpful to keep that in mind.




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    2. Hello Todd

      I just have a related comment. Dr Mc Dougall recommends always staying at a 10% or lower fat diet. But I have noticed that some other WFPB diet doctors have said to go 10% if you are trying to reverse heart disease and after you’re out of danger you can then add some other fats back into the diet. From what I’ve seen in Dr Greger and Dr Fuhrman’s advice, they recommend just a few ounces of nuts and seeds a day, and optionally a tablespoon or two of avocado and that all of these should be consumed with veggies to help take up their nutrients.

      I have also noticed that most of the WFPB diet doctors say “no oil”, meaning no oils extracted from food. And, lastly, there is an old video with Dr Greger on youtube talking about how a 40 year old vegan died of a heart attack and the results were in part determined that this can happen when omega 3 and omega 6 fatty acid intake is out of balance. Since almost all oil is heavy on omega 6, I can see how oil could cause these problems.

      Those are my comments.
      Mark G




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      1. Mark: I agree that the n-6 overload problem is real, and the “no oil” directive addresses it, but only in part. Even if you don’t add liquid oil to anything, or use dressings etc with liquid oil ingredients, it’s still possible to get a lot of extra n-6 fats in whole foods when you eat certain nuts, such as pistachios. The n-6:n-3 ratio of pistachios is 52:1. Even in black walnuts, the ratio is about 14:1. To keep total fat below 10%, you can’t consume many nuts of any kind, so maybe the “magic” of <10% is really just a way of keeping n-6 intake way down.




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        1. Your take on nut profiles is why I only eat a few regular walnuts daily, no other nuts, and flax seed.

          I used to follow Dr McDougall’s 10% fat recommendation for years, neck in the 1980s, but I eat too much refined carbs because I didn’t understand things well enough. Because if that background I often wonder if your observation about 10% kind of naturally causing the n~3 to n~6 ratio to be better.




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    3. David Jenkins (inventor of the glycemic index) is the researcher whose most keen on plant-based diets featuring high stanol & sterol fatty plant foods. While he’s demonstrated marked lowering of LDL (greater than his high-carb arm in this study), he’s yet to do a study demonstrating plaque regression with his diet.

      Personally, I’ve been looking at CVD and other inflammatory diseases from a microbiome and intestinal permeability perspective of late. High fat diets and meals, especially those featuring saturated fats and omega-6 fats, mostly have negative effects on microbiome makeup and intestinal permeability to endotoxins. Omega-3 PUFAs (ALA, EPA, DHA) appear to have some benefits here compared to saturated and omega-6 fats but its not clear whether there’s any benefit compared to complex carbs. Nearly all the research demonstrating microbiome and intestinal permeability benefits are from high carb foods, whether its prebiotic microbiota accessible carbohydrates (beans, bulbs and bran) or polyphenols found especially in berries. There’s one study demonstrating a prebiotic effect from almonds and almond skins on microbiota composition, but whether that’s due to feeding them “resistant fat” from unchewed bits, or just the skin polyphenols culling gut pathogens (as is common) isn’t known. I’d pay to see a study of serum endotoxins after a high avocado meal, but for the time being, I still eat nuts and avocados daily.




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      1. Darryl: That’s a very helpful and very clear/understandable post.
        .
        I have a question for clarification. Todd is asking about overall whole plant food diets of (what he might consider) medium and high fat percentages. You say that you eat nuts and avocadoes every day, but don’t say how much. Dr. Greger recommends 1/4 cup nuts a day and 1 tablespoon ground flaxseed. I don’t consider those amounts, along with his other Daily Dozen recommendations, a high fat diet. I’m not asking for your personal details. I’m just wondering if you consider the amount of nuts and avocadoes that you eat would put you into a relatively high fat diet category. Just curious in light of this discussion.




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        1. The nuts and occasional pico de guacamole I eat are in the context of an otherwise McDougall-friendly very low-fat diet. I have a spray bottle with canola for sauteing onions/garlic, but that’s about it. When I’ve input my sample daily diets into tracker sites like CRONometer, it usually winds up between 12 and 20%, which is by American standards pretty low fat.




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  7. Hello. I’m a big fan. I’m also a public health specialist registrar in the UK and am quite keen on promoting plant-based eating as a public health priority. However, I have a question about the evidence regarding heart disease reversal, mainly due to the limited number of researchers publishing these results. For example – Esselstyn has shown plant-based diets to be effective in reversing aspects of heart disease, and as you describe, the research is compelling. But have these results been replicated by others to support their validity? I’m working on making a clear case to colleagues and it’s a tough crowd in public health believe it or not. Any study results to reinforce the Esselsyn research would be really helpful. Know of any?




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    1. Kristin Bash: I could be wrong, but I believe that Dean Ornish has published studies similar to Esselstyn. I saw graphs recently showing % of artery opening after X months on Ornish’s diet. Maybe you could find that study? Good luck!




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      1. Thanks Thea. I knew Essylstyn, Ornish and Barnard – but it seemed these three were the only ones up to this type of research. It’s the replicability of the studies that reinforces their validity with my crowd. I’m hoping there is sufficient evidence of this in Darryl’s amazing list of references below. Thanks again!




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      1. Thanks Julie. I’m going to take this (and Darryl’s amazing list below) and put together a position paper to share with colleagues. I really appreciate you looking that up for me.




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    2. Benefits are by no means limited to the Esselstyn trials. A few pointers into the veg*n diet + CVD risk literature:

      Review:
      2015 A plant-based diet, atherogenesis, and coronary artery disease prevention

      Dean Ornish
      1983 Effects of stress management training and dietary changes in treating ischemic heart disease
      1990 Can lifestyle changes reverse coronary heart disease?: The Lifestyle Heart Trial
      1995 Changes in myocardial perfusion abnormalities by positron emission tomography after long-term, intense risk factor modification
      1998 Avoiding revascularization with lifestyle changes: the Multicenter Lifestyle Demonstration Project
      1998 Intensive lifestyle changes for reversal of coronary heart disease
      2003 Improvement in medical risk factors and quality of life in women and men with coronary artery disease in the Multicenter Lifestyle Demonstration Project
      2007 Lifestyle changes and clinical profile in coronary heart disease patients with an ejection fraction of≤ 40% or> 40% in the Multicenter Lifestyle Demonstration Project
      2007 The contribution of changes in diet, exercise, and stress management to changes in coronary risk in women and men in the multisite cardiac lifestyle intervention program
      2008 Angina pectoris and atherosclerotic risk factors in the multisite cardiac lifestyle intervention program
      2008 Long-term effects of lifestyle changes on well-being and cardiac variables among coronary heart disease patients
      2010 Effect of intensive lifestyle changes on endothelial function and on inflammatory markers of atherosclerosis
      2010 The effectiveness and efficacy of an intensive cardiac rehabilitation program in 24 sites

      Caldwell Esselstyn
      1999 Updating a 12-year experience with arrest and reversal therapy for coronary heart disease (an overdue requiem for palliative cardiology
      2001 Resolving the coronary artery disease epidemic through plant‐based nutrition
      2006 Cardiac event rate in a lifestyle modification program for patients with chronic coronary artery disease
      2010 Is the present therapy for coronary artery disease the radical mastectomy of the twenty-first century?
      2014 A way to reverse CAD?

      Other trials or risk marker studies
      1987 Plasma lipids and lipoprotein cholesterol concentrations in people with different diets in Britain
      1990 Dietary intake and plasma lipid levels: lessons from a study of the diet of health conscious groups
      1997 Effect of a diet high in vegetables, fruit, and nuts on serum lipids
      1998 Cardiovascular disease risk factors are lower in African-American vegans compared to lacto-ovo-vegetarians
      2000 Effectiveness of a low-fat vegetarian diet in altering serum lipids in healthy premenopausal women
      2000 LDL of Taiwanese vegetarians are less oxidizable than those of omnivores
      2000 Vegan diet-based lifestyle program rapidly lowers homocysteine levels
      2007 Long-term low-calorie low-protein vegan diet and endurance exercise are associated with low cardiometabolic risk
      2008 Total cardiovascular risk profile of Taiwanese vegetarians
      2009 Effects of plant-based diets on plasma lipids
      2011 Arterial function of carotid and brachial arteries in postmenopausal vegetarians
      2011 Relationship of carotid intima-media thickness and duration of vegetarian diet in Chinese male vegetarians
      2014 Effect of a 6-month vegan low-carbohydrate (‘Eco-Atkins’) diet on cardiovascular risk factors and body weight in hyperlipidaemic adults: a randomised controlled trial
      2014 The association between a vegetarian diet and cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors in India: the Indian Migration Study
      2014 The influence of a whole food vegan diet with Nori algae and wild mushrooms on selected blood parameters
      2015 A whole-food plant-based diet reversed angina without medications or procedures
      2015 Effects of vegetarian diets on blood lipids: a systematic review and meta‐analysis of randomized controlled trials
      2015 Plant-based, no-added-fat or American Heart Association diets: Impact on cardiovascular risk in obese children with hypercholesterolemia and their parents

      Prospective epidemiology with hard outcomes:
      1982 Vegetarianism, dietary fiber, and mortality
      2001 The effect of fruit and vegetable intake on risk for coronary heart disease
      2007 Increased consumption of fruit and vegetables is related to a reduced risk of coronary heart disease: meta-analysis of cohort studies
      2012 Risk of ischaemic heart disease among British vegetarians and non-vegetarians: results from the EPIC-Oxford cohort study
      2013 Risk of hospitalization or death from ischemic heart disease among British vegetarians and nonvegetarians: results from the EPIC-Oxford cohort study

      That was one folder from my research. I’m presently scouring the others and will update this.




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      1. Darryl, That’s an incredible list. I’ve saved it to my documents file for future reference. I’d love to have my skeptical 53-year-old son, who loves his charcuterie and butter, to read some of these studies.




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    3. Darryl’s reply is excellent. These minor comments below may possibly add a little to that very comprehensive picture of the evidence to date. Good luck with your efforts.

      You may want to look at Nathan Pritikin’s work back in the 1980s. These were small studies of self-selected volunteers with no controls. Nor do they focus on heart disease as such. That said, they may be useful for wider background?

      Like Ornish’s work they also do not always allow the effects of diet to be disentangled from those of other concurrent interventions. In this study below, exercise was also used
      “The purpose of the present study was to investigate the effects of a high-complex-carbohydrate, low-fat, low-cholesterol diet and daily exercise on levels of serum estradiol, testosterone, and lipids in males. Twenty-one males participating in the Pritikin Longevity Center 26-day residential program volunteered for the study. During the program, serum estradiol levels were significantly reduced from 47.2 ± 4.6 to 23.8 ± 2.5 pg/ml (mean ± SE) whereas serum testosterone levels were unchanged (5.1 ± 0.3 versus 5.1 ± 0.2 ng/ml). Total serum cholesterol levels were reduced from 229 ± 9 to 181 ± 7 mg/dl whereas triglyceride levels were reduced from 301 ± 66 to 151 ± 13 mg/dl. High-density lipoprotein-cholesterol levels fell from 41 ± 3 to 35 ± 1 mg/dl whereas the ratio of total cholesterol to high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol was unchanged (5.5 ± 0.4 versus 5.1 ± 0.3).”
      http://www.amjmed.com/article/0002-9343(85)90456-5/abstract

      (As an aside, it would be interesting to speculate whether these sorts of results tell us something about why the hazard ratios of different dietary patterns seen in the 7th Day Adventist studies varied between men and women).

      This earlier study on Type 2 diabetes patients has the same weaknesses but nevertheless displays reversal of disease indicators.
      http://care.diabetesjournals.org/content/6/3/268

      Professor RJ Barnard also published separately some articles on the effects of the Pritikin programme (ie diet and daily exercise) eg
      https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/6827033
      and this 1990 letter to the NEJM
      http://www.nejm.org/doi/full/10.1056/NEJM199010183231613

      All of these studies are methodologically weak by modern standards but may nevertheless be regarded as trailblazing. They may therefore be useful for scene-setting before discussing more modern research findings.

      Even Harvard seems to accept that the Esselstyn approach works (while setting out the conventional objections to such an approach and recommending the Mediterranean diet instead).
      http://www.health.harvard.edu/heart-health/halt-heart-disease-with-a-plant-based-oil-free-diet-

      It may also be worth mentioning that, in the US, Medicare apparently provides reimbursements for qualifying patients (with a history of CVD events) undergoing the Pritikin and Ornish programmes, which says something about the strength of the evidence for these approaches which share a very similar dietary prescription.
      http://www.health.harvard.edu/newsletter_article/ornish-pritikin-get-medicare-okay-for-cardiac-rehab




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      1. Tom Goff: Also an excellent post. This line made me laugh: “Even Harvard seems to accept that the Esselstyn approach works (while setting out the conventional objections to such an approach and recommending the Mediterranean diet instead).”




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        1. Yes although I can understand the argument even if I do not find it convincing.

          However, there are other, more complex reasons why mainstream medicine is not rushing to embrace the Esselstyn/Ornish approach. This Aetna document discusses them in some detail. I have not had time to follow through on the references but it seems to offer an intelligent discussion of the issues.
          http://www.aetna.com/cpb/medical/data/200_299/0267.html




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      2. Thank you Tom, this is really helpful as well. Put together with Darryl’s list above I definitely have enough for my paper and presentation now. I suppose we can only hope that more researchers take on clinical trials (with larger groups, ideally) similar to Ornish and Esselstyn to reinforce their validity in the eyes of evidence-based practitioners.

        The cohort studies (even the Adventist ones) are questioned in terms of potential confounders, including the genetic or other population similarities of participants which may negate applicability to a wider audience.

        To an extent I think it’s a matter of not wanting it to be true. It was interesting when the WHO classified processed meat as a carcinogen last year, public health went out of its way to define attributable risk as a way to calm people down and say it was still OK to have their “bacon butties” (a sandwich with soft bacon on a white roll slathered in butter). But attributable risk for passive smoking had similar numbers: in 2004, prior to indoor smoking ban BMA estimated 1,000 UK deaths annually attributable to second hand smoke; eating processed meat was estimated to have population attributable risk of 8,400 additional cases of cancer annually, many of which would be colon cancer with a 5 year mortality rate of 66% currently – so, more than 1,000 extra deaths. Public health would ever suggest that kids are fine to just get a bit of second hand smoke (“Don’t worry about it, it’s still OK!”) but that’s exactly what they said about eating bacon. It’s amazing the blinders that are on.

        Off topic there a bit, sorry. Thank you again for the info! I’m determined to get this message across even if no one is yet ready to absorb it.




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        1. Thanks Kristin.

          Thanks especilaly for the reminder about bacon butties too – I am originally from Liverpool and still consider chip butties to be culinary perfection (although I have not had one for 40 years).

          Yes, confounders are always an issue – it works the other way too of course. How many people, for example, take up a WFPB (or vegetarian) diet for therapeutic reasons following a health shock? i suspect, but have no data, that it could be a significant proportion and this could be why some studies show no benefits or even adverse effects associated with WFPB/vegetarian diets eg
          http://www.independent.co.uk/news/science/vegetarians-are-less-healthy-and-have-a-lower-quality-of-life-than-meat-eaters-scientists-say-9236340.html
          and
          “Vegetarians displayed elevated prevalence rates for depressive disorders, anxiety disorders and somatoform disorders. Due to the matching procedure, the findings cannot be explained by socio-demographic characteristics of vegetarians (e.g. higher rates of females, predominant residency in urban areas, high proportion of singles). The analysis of the respective ages at adoption of a vegetarian diet and onset of a mental disorder showed that the adoption of the vegetarian diet tends to follow the onset of mental disorders.”
          https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3466124/

          Here are a couple of studies on the “healthiness” of vegetarian diets generally which may also be relevant.
          https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3967195/
          https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4245565/




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  8. Great comment and pretty great format with the perfect mix of live commentary and images of studies referenced. I would offer that the main camera is cropping part of the head, which I find odd. The side, offset view is still odd to me, and I wonder if that should be a tight close up? just to add some effect. A big issue with the side shot is the background which just doesn’t seem to form a good composition with the speaker to me Either needs more or too much in it or needs arranging? IDK. Actually I think the side shot should have what’s called a short depth of field, so the background is heavily blurred out, and maybe a lower angle reminiscent of the view from an audience. I also wonder about turning slightly to speak to another front facing camera that is perhaps backed out, more upper body shot or almost full figure. I don’t know id that has been experimented with.. All the best? :)




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  9. Sorry that this is off topic but in Dr. G’s Sept. 26 video on DHA supplements, he mentioned that the next video would be a follow up to that one and I was wondering if any NF insiders knew when that would be posted (I’m almost out of DHA supplements and contemplating re. whether or not to refresh my supply :-)). This is just a question, not a complaint ! I’m a huge fan of the service Dr. G. performs for us all.




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  10. Hey doc, quick question.

    Should I bother taking the skin off vegetables and potatoes? for example sweet potatoes, normal white potatoes or the ones with the red skin but white inside, carrots? I don’t do it but people are telling me I should because of pesticides. What do you think? does cooking effect the pesticides in any way? I also don’t buy these organic, they are not available organic here. Pretty much no vegetable or fruit is (Ireland).




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    1. My understanding is that most authorities agree that we should leave the skin on but washing and brushing are advisable. The benefits significantly outweigh the risks. The US Consumer Reports organisation discusses the issue here:
      http://www.consumerreports.org/cro/health/natural-health/pesticides/index.htm
      http://www.consumerreports.org/cro/news/2015/07/can-peeling-fruits-and-vegetables-reduce-the-the-risks-from-pesticides/index.htm

      If you live in the Republic of Ireland, then pesticide residues in food should be regulated to EU standards which are pretty stringent.
      http://www.pcs.agriculture.gov.ie/foodsafety/foodsafetyassessments/assessingtherisktopeopleshealth/

      You may also find this blog a worthwhile read
      http://blogs.scientificamerican.com/science-sushi/pesticides-food-fears/




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    2. With fruit like apples, its clear that most of the pluripotent polyphenols are in the skins. However, there’s little evidence of similar benefits from the skins of root vegetables: the nutrition is distributed throughout the flesh. Personally, I skin potatoes for soups, and leave on for baking.




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          1. Thank you! I’ve tried to use that link several times but it keeps telling me “page not found”.

            All cooking methods included boiling and baking?

            In this video: http://nutritionfacts.org/video/the-best-way-to-cook-sweet-potatoes/ Dr. Greger recommends boiling sweet potatoes with the skin on for maximum nutrition and shows that the skin retains much more of its antioxidant power when boiled compared to baked, for instance. So shouldn’t there be a significant difference between different cooking methods? What am I missing? Or perhaps there should be an update about this?




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      1. Hi, Darryl, Mind citing some sources that show the polyphenols in root vegetables are distributed throughout the flesh rather than concentrated in the outer layers? When you say “root vegetables,” are you including any vegetables that grow underground?




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        1. I used “nutrition” above in the sense of macronutrients and essential micronutrients, which are not notably concentrated or limited to the skins of the tubers and taproots for which both whole and skinned nutrition data are available.

          As for polyphenols, the commonly consumed root vegetables with fairly significant quantities are radishes and onions, high in quercetin throughout. The vivid red skins of radishes also offer the little studied pelargonidin and of red onions a mix of other anthocyanidins. There are also some in the skins of certain varieties of sweet potato, markedly reduced by any cooking method.




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          1. Thanks, Darryl. I spoke to an onion researcher, Dr. Irwin Goldman, University of Wisconsin, about the important issue you raise. He says that most quercetin is in the outer layers of onions, although there is some throughout the onion. Please peel onions gently, friends, and cook them quickly (4 to 5 minutes max, says Goldman). If you cook them too long, they make your blood sticky, he says. https://eatandbeatcancer.com/2013/04/20/anti-cancer-recipes-should-you-cook-onions/




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  11. An interesting bit of information to share. So I had my cholesterol checked the other day. Of course I already knew my LDL would be 70 or below as it always has been. So much to my surprise it was 100!

    A bit of a back story–I injured my Achilles’ tendon and have pretty much de-trained over the last 6 months to heal it. We don’t often stress the importance of exercise and heart health as this is a nutrition website. But after receiving the numbers I hit the various cardio equipment today! What a shock..

    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17395756




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    1. Interesting. I’ve been WFPB for about 7 or 8 years but my LDL seems to constantly hover around 90. I always assumed there was a genetic component as my mother always had high cholesterol, even when she was on a diet low in meat, saturated fat,… I’m in reasonably good shape but it sounds like hitting the cardio equipment might actually lower the LDL a little.




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      1. Hi Karl
        It does by raising HDL. I have always run and this is the first time I actually had a test done when I wasn’t running. To see the result of a 180 total cholesterol made me realize I have to cross train. I love running! (I have never been higher than 150)

        I have a family history also so this kinda woke me up. I would normally run 45′ to much more daily. Obviously so important for me!




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        1. Thanks for the comment; I admire your running regime ! (or maybe just lucky that you love it :-)). I’m built sort of like a goat and slightly lower speeds are more conducive for me, but I do log a reasonable number of brisk walking miles a week including some good slopes re. cardio. But I realize that as a geezer I should probably do more resistance work just to retain muscle mass but as a result of this discussion I also realize that that might help with the blood work too.




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  12. New science?
    Check out this… https://www.sciencenews.org/article/treat-heart-start-gut
    a compound — which the researchers found occurs naturally in some olive oils and red wines
    and this
    “Choline is an essential nutrient. It helps keep the cells and nerves working normally. While choline is important for good health, most people seem to get enough from food. Vegans may have a higher risk of low choline levels.” http://www.webmd.com/vitamins-and-supplements/choline
    I eat WFPB for optimum health, not to save the planet. Am I at any deficiency risk? Please reply without a vegan bias. Thanks




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      1. Thanks Tom, I also found this which supports your point .. http://veganhealth.org/articles/choline

        I am thinking about switching from WFPB (for 3 years now) to the Mediterranean diet, after my annual physical, and see what kind of effect it has on my blood work. My thinking is the inclusion of small amounts of fish, red wine and olive oil, while the olive oil and wine having the compound DMB reduces the negative effect of a high choline intake. This is possibly one of the reason the Mediterranean diet scores so high on over all health results. I guess I have some of my own finding in the January after next.




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    1. Betaine (found in spinach, beets, and other vegetables) spares most requirements for choline. The actual choline requirement isn’t well understood, it lies somewhere between the 140 mg found inadequate in total parenteral nutrition (without betaine) and 500 mg (without betaine) found adequate in a metabolic ward study. Choline deficiency will be visible in standard blood panels from an elevation in alanine aminotransferase (ALT). My WFPB diet runs around 300-350 mg choline, not unusually low even among omnivores, and my ALT is low-normal.




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  13. In reply to Jean, who posed the question on hormone testing reliability last week: I initially didn’t answer because I really didn’t know :-) However, I did some research and learned that there is some effort underway to elevate saliva testing in its reliability over serum or urine testing. This may indeed be an effort by those who can profit from sales of saliva testing, so I was a bit suspicious. I then found this very interesting article on hormone testing hormone testing</a from Women's International Pharmacy, where I have purchased bio identicals over the past several years. I found this article helpful to understand the strengths and weaknesses of each method.
    You have come across a very interesting and useful consideration: just how accurate is blood testing for hormones? It makes me remember that lab testing is BIG BUSINESS and driven ultimately by profit motivation. It also reminds me that lab tests are typically ordered to support a physician's identification of a possible medical issue of a patient based on patient self report of troublesome symptoms. When female patients of a certain age come into their physician and report fatigue, loss of interest in sex, trouble sleeping, dry skin, and other symptoms, it is rare for a physician to drill down and inquire as follows: 1) What is your diet like, 2) are you taking care of aging parents and children at the same time? 3) do you work outside the home and are you primarily responsible for caregiving 4) what is your regular exercise routine like 5) do you have a regular stress management (meditation, yoga) practice 6) do you drink alcohol, etc, etc. I think you get my drift. It is appropriate for most women to FEEL TERRIBLE as they reach midlife dependent upon their answers to my top 6 questions. What is the cause of this? LOW HORMONES – and an MD will order a test to diagnose that condition.
    Out of respect to my physician colleagues and readers/commenters of this website, I offer apologies for my overly simplistic answer which minimizes the important role that the physician patient relationship plays in our own health. However, when we go to the MD and look for a quick fix to what might be a complex answer, what is a physician to do?
    As for you, Jean, I would check and see what "normal" progesterone levels should be for women of your age group, remembering that it is normal for estrogen, progesterone and testosterone levels to decline with aging. It's what happens. There is no fountain of youth, despite those who claim there is (and who make money off of our own desire to stay forever young). Good luck, thanks for your participation, and let me know what you decide to do!
    –Lisa




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  14. Hi Dr Greger, can you please explain what is Candidiasis and how to treat it? I suffer from intestinal Candidiasis and I need some info to tackle it as well as spread the awarness of this intestinal disorder.
    Thank you for everything you’re doing!




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  15. I’m one of those guys who reversed my disease. Just in case youre wondering. Took 3 weeks on Whole Foods/Plant Based type eating. no cheating fully motivated by Dr’s Esselstyn, Campell et al. 3 weeks and the dreaded angina was history and I have never looked back….except to think about how lucky i am to have understood the message. (this is all after my bypass mind you).

    FYI, my bro has 2 new knees, 3 stents, 12 pills and enjoys his daily feasting every day. The choice really is yours




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  16. You mention that high sodium intake,
    is one of the major risk to develop heart disease.

    But i also read about water poisoning ,
    and Sodium Deficiency,

    The diet you recommend is far
    Behind the minimal daily recommendation for sodium intake, which is 1500 gram a day.
    I monitors my daily nutrition with Cronometer website.
    Even though i consumes more than 3101kcal each day.
    I still don’t reach to even 500mg sodium a day.
    I don’t developed diagnosed water poisoning yet,
    But i often feel nausea and distress in my stomach ,
    Especially when i drink water.

    Is there any risk of very low sodium diet?
    I read about Sodium deficiency, it could lead to death.




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  17. Hello,
    I am a long-term vegan for mainly ethical reasons. So, while I’ve been following a plant-based diet it has also included hot chips, alcohol, processed foods, etc. For three weeks now I’ve been doing the ‘daily dozen’ and I feel really good. This week I’ve been hit by a cold that I know would once have had much more severe symptoms. I’ve even begun to cut back on my anti-depressants. Thank you.
    Meredith




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    1. I am also ethical plant eater. I immediately cut down on animal products after seeing some shocking videos inside animal concentration torture factories some 25 years ago and finally became vegan about 10 years ago when I saw proof that I am herbivore.




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  18. Weston Price did a study “proving” animal fats (Fat soluble vitamins) were very important for oral (teeth) health. I went vegan (no oils, fats, dairy) for 2 months and developed the need for a root canal. Coincidence?




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    1. Are you are seriously suggesting that you suddenly developed a cavity that went from non-existent to such a serious condition that it needed root canal treatment all within the two month period that you ate a “vegan” diet?




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        1. Ray Arjoma: Oreos and potato chips are vegan (no meat diary or eggs), but they are not whole foods. A Whole Food Plant Based (WFPB) diet would be based on whole plant foods. Many vegan diets (people who eat vegan) eat too much vegan junk food, including lots of oils and other highly processed foods to count as WFPB. Thus, it can be important to make the distinction between “WFPB” and “vegan” when discussing nutrition and health as vegan diets as eaten by many people are not best for setting the person up for optimum health.
          .
          Also: some people consider that tiny amounts of animal based products as part of an otherwise whole plant food diet also counts as a WPFB diet. (Though what some people define as WPFB diet has too much animal products to be counted at WPFB in my opinion. It would have to be a very small amount of animal products to count.)




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          1. How about a little crack cocein instead of meat, dairy & eggs !!! If just a little is good, why not a whole lot !! You are blurring definitions. It’s like vegetarians eating fish (it’s oxymoron). I understand vegan diet may be unhealthy, so you can have 2 vegan types of vegan foods. Mostly raw healthy & junk man-made crap (like french fries & coke).




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        2. Hi Ray. Somebody else asked this question also. This was my response:

          “Well, a whole food plant-based diet does not necessarily have to be exclusively plant, it just has to be based on plants. The Okinawan diet for example was based on plants – it consisted of about 95% plant foods (so it can be regarded as a plant-based diet).
          https://www.researchgate.net/p

          My understanding is that a completely vegetarian diet (often called a vegan diet) is an exclusively plant food diet – ie no animal foods at all so no meat, fish, eggs, dairy or animal products such as gelatin etc. A veget-arian diet is simply a diet of vegetables. And a vegetable is any edible plant or plant part
          http://www.dictionary.com/brow

          As an extreme example, an alcoholic living on whisky and cigarettes is consuming a “vegan” diet so is a college kid living on beer and chips. They are unhealthy diets. So are “vegan” diets consisting of white bread, pasta, chips/fries, vegetable oils and packaged and processed “vegan” foods.”

          Dr G though does favour an entirely vegetarian WFPB. But he recognises that if people eat an entirely vegetarian WFPB diet, it is advisable to supplement with B12, omega 3s, vitamin D etc. Some people here though prefer to include a small proportion of animal foods in their diet as a way to obtain the B12, omega 3s etc without needing to take supplements.
          http://nutritionfacts.org/2011/09/12/dr-gregers-2011-optimum-nutrition-recommendations/




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      1. I never said cavity. I said I needed a root canal. The root of the tooth started to die. I guess you aren’t familiar with Weston Price, the connection between diet and oral health and aren’t the person to comment. Thanks anyway.




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        1. I am no more a dentist than you are but my understanding is that you are talking about a root cavity which is why you need root canal treatment.
          http://www.toothwisdom.org/resources/entry/root-decay

          I am familiar with Weston Price’s book “Nutrition and Physical Degeneration” although I have never been able to finish it. It is almost unreadable by modern standards. Have you actually read it? His observations and hypotheses also probably wouldn’t be regarded as scientific by modern standards.

          I do however suspect that his belief that many modern health problems may be traced to the modern Western diet may be correct. As an aside, the modern Western diet is not deficient in animal fats so ascribing dental problems in Western societies to a lack of animal fats seems improbable.

          The question remains, do you really think that your dental problem requiring root canal treatment all started from absolutely nothing to a serious condition within two scant months?




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  19. dr. greger is constantly making the case AGAINST government coerced healthcare, which will only FORCE us to use irrational, unscientific, conventional medicine at great expense, consuming 16% of our GDP, or with single payer, maybe 8%.




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      1. enough to supply all necessary types of omega 3. In the presentation, Dr Greger talks specifically on a supplement from either algae or from yeast and obviously, the salvia sclarea is none of them




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          1. thank you.
            I now see that TEVA (an Israeli pharmaceutical company) is selling an algea based DHA supplement (called ForTwo (for pregnant women). What is the recommended dose? I’ve been a vegan in the past 5 years and prior to that I have been eating lots of fish




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  20. Have you ever treated, counseled or encountered anyone with non obstructive heart disease (small vessel disease/coronary microvascular disease)? It is possible to reverse, arrest or improve the condition by adopting a plant based, while food diet?




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    1. Hi B,
      It certainly can’t hurt.
      Since inflammation is a big culprit in vascular disease in general the anti-inflammatory effects of a WFPB diet can only be helpful.




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  21. I have been following a whole-foods, plant based diet for over a year. I am a 55 year old male, 5’10”, 160 lbs, and exercise 40 minutes aerobically, 3-5 times a week… my blood pressure bounces from 130/80 to 150/90… What am I doing wrong?




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    1. Hi Bart,
      Couple of questions…
      When are you checking your blood pressure?
      Did you have high blood pressure before you transitioned to the WFPB diet?




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      1. I am checking it generally when I wake in the morning…
        And Yes… it really hasn’t improved much.
        My two questions are why does it bounce and why isn’t it getting lower?




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        1. Hi Bart,
          Sorry to take so long to get back to you. I generally don’t have much time to comment on the site outside of my scheduled shift which is Monday evenings so hopefully you will see this reply.
          The reason I was asking is because I often hear the same scenario you’re describing when people are checking their BP several times a day and blood pressure does fluctuate depending on the time of day and many other factors in your life and environment (as Thea alluded to). It does seem however that you are doing it right. Checking first thing in the morning when you first wake up.
          The reason I asked if you had had high blood pressure prior to your change was to get a sense of whether or not there might have been something in the change that precipitated the increase in BP or if this was a problem you were already struggling with, and based on your answer it seems to be the later.
          Given that you’ve had the problem long before your diet change, I would think of other more rare causes for hypertension that are not as dependent on diet and lifestyle. The first that would come to mind would be renal artery stenosis. Sometime people can have a narrowing in one of the renal arteries (arteries that bring blood supply to the kidney) which can be structural in nature but can be the cause of hypertension. I’m certainly not saying that this is a likely cause in your case because you would typically see much higher pressures with renal artery stenosis (unless the narrowing was very slight) but since the screening test is relatively noninvasive and easy to do (a renal ultrasound) it might be worth exploring. I don’t know if you have ever been on blood pressure medication but if you have, and were still unable to get your blood pressure down to acceptable levels then that would strengthen the argument for ruling out renal artery stenosis in my opinion.
          Let me also warn you that the BP numbers you are averaging are at the upper limit of normal for most conventional docs (although I thoroughly recognize that the goal should be for optimal numbers not acceptable numbers) so they might not be as concerned as you are and may not feel its worth looking into further.
          There are a few other conditions that cause resistant high blood pressure like Pheochromocytoma (a pretty rare tumor of the adrenal gland) however in the absence of other symptoms and very high numbers or very wild swings in your pressure I doubt thats what you are dealing with.
          I would have a conversation with your doctor and let him or her know of your concerns and see if they have any other suggestions and perhaps see what they think of ordering a renal artery ultrasound.




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        2. Payoung, below, has added a lot to possibilities for you. Lots of info there. But I just had this idea while reading your frustration and will offer this up. Dr. Esselstyn, who reversed heart disease (along with D.Ornish, M.D.) really focuses on getting the entire cardiovascular system healthy. Hope you’ve already read his book. But I caught a presentation he did where he elaborates more on the role of nitric oxide which relaxes the vasculature which allows blood pressure to drop. You can increase your NO in your system by chewing the 6 NO producers which makes NO in the stomach available for the rest of the system. They are kale, spinach, beets, beet greens, arugula (I’ve forgotten teh 6th, maybe someone knows). Anyway, I was thinking that if I had your situation I would try adding a whole bunch of those 6 veggies to my diet and see if that did anything for you.
          I’m still trying to get my cholesterol to go down despite 9 years now of WFPB, no oil, from 200. Won’t budge. I understand the frustration. Good luck and please let us know if you find anything that helps. Best –




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          1. I have been strict no oil WFPB on and off several times in my life and every time I get really healthy my cholesterol goes UP! From high – over 5 (whatever that translates to be) to over 7 – enough that the doctors want to send me off for tests and dieticians and talk about medications. My blood pressure has always been 110/70 or lower, and I am fit and only about 10kg fatter than I should be (and I haven’t been able to budge that either!). It can be frustrating! However, sometimes it is all relative! At my age (58) my mother was about 160kg, very ill, in a wheelchair because she needed hip replacements but couldn’t have them due to her health and size. Her mother died at 52 to obesity related issues. Unfortunately I am my mother’s daughter. While having something like cholesterol levels or blood pressure levels or even a waist line that remain not so good no matter what we do or how compliant, perhaps if we weren’t doing everything that we could we would be much much worse off! When I get frustrated because I am not a little twig and my cholesterol levels refuse to play nicely, I think of an image of my mother at my age. That could be me so easily. It’s not, and I thank all of my years of sport and I thank the friend of the family who suggested strict dietary changes when I was a baby that saved my life and made me mostly whole food, mostly plants, for nearly all of my life!




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      2. I am checking it generally when I wake in the morning…
        And yes… I have had the same readings for several years… it hasn’t improved much.
        My two questions are why does it bounce and why isn’t it getting lower?




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        1. Bart McKnight: I’m not the expert. I’m sure payoung will be getting back to you. I just thought if you answered one more question, it might help payoung with her answer: How much sodium do you eat each day? (if you know) Are you keeping an eye on your salt intake both from any processed foods you might be eating and what you add yourself? NutritionFacts covers salt and blood pressure quite in depth: http://nutritionfacts.org/?fwp_search=sodium&fwp_content_type=video
          .
          Again, I’m not an expert, but I thought I would share my experience: I went to the doctor’s once and was told that my blood pressure was high. I usually hear that my blood pressure is normal, so I wondered what was going on. I shared this story on this site and got back some really interesting replies. I was told that blood pressure readouts can change dramatically based on body position. Even just sitting up straight instead of leaning against a seat with a back can make a difference. How consistent are you in body position when you do the measurements? Are you sitting in the same seat with a comfortable back? Is your arm resting lightly on a table? Or whatever the proper protocol is…
          .
          Good luck.




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          1. I have all but done away with salt/sodium. Bare steamed vegetables… very little processed foods, if any.
            WFPB Diet…
            I take my blood pressure when I wake in the morning. I lay quietly in bed, thinking happy thoughts… and still, the readings come in higher than I would like.
            I am fit, trim, athletic, active… I eat right, sleep well, and do everything I can to live a good life.
            I do not smoke, drink, or do drugs…
            My goal is 110/70… but can not get below 130/80… with episodes of 140/90.
            Very frustrating!




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            1. Bart McKnight: I would be frustrated too! Sorry to hear about this. I hope some people will have some good ideas for you as it sounds to me like you are doing everything right. Good luck.




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  22. Which populations is he talking about?
    “When researchers took people with heart disease, and put them on the kind of plant-based diet followed by populations that did not get epidemic heart disease […] “




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    1. The study Dr. G is referring to in that particular moment of the video doesn’t list (as far as I could find) a specific population on which the diet was based. I believe that Dr. G is referring more generally to those populations that eat a WFPB diet, such as those in the Blue Zones (the traditional diet on Okinawa is a common example), who don’t have heart disease as a frequent cause of death.




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  23. Hello, I have a question and will be very thankful if there is anyone around who can provide valuable information on the subject.
    My mom has just been diagnosed with aortic stenosis, they say it is due to calcification of the aortic valve, because it is a bipartite instead of tripartite valve, as I understand this is a congenital condition, but the doctor wouldn´t explain if the real problem is the calcification and how it can be reversed. They are suggesting a surgery that consists in replacing with a prosthetic valve, this to me seems very dangerous and invasive. I am searching for less invasive and and more consistent solutions including her adopting a plant based diet which me myself have followed for 10 years now, that go to the source of the problem. I´ve been very worried about this and any information shared here will be highly appreciated. Thanks in advance and best wishes for everybody.




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    1. Hi Declan, I am one of the board’s moderators. So sorry to hear about your mom. I’m sure you are very concerned for her health and want her to do what is best. The vast majority of aortic stenosis patients have this problem due to a congenital bicuspid valve vs. the normal tricuspid valve. Because it has been abnormal since birth she has had damage accumulating her entire life until it got to the point of being either noticeable on physical exam or worse yet, symptomatic. The calcification that has accumulated is due to lifelong damage to the valve. The body heals itself using calcification as a type of armour. Eating right helps us to stop the injury and over time some calcification may be reabsorbed when the damaging agent is removed – like an inflammatory diet causing heart disease. In her case the damaging agent won’t go away because the problem is the valve itself. Typically, for a healthy individual the valve replacement is the best option. For people that cannot handle a large surgery they may do less definitive procedures but it’s because they are not good surgical candidates. Not because it’s less invasive. Getting multiple opinions from excellent Cardiothoracic surgeons with an excellent track record who do lots and lots of these procedures is her best bet to continue living a long life.




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      1. Oh I see. we´ve been working on her diet before we make a decision, hoping it will help, but this has been very insightful, thank you so much for the advice.




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    2. Hi Declan
      Sorry about your mom. My husband also had a bicuspid valve. He had both a valve and aorta replacement. The biggest issue can be the thinning of the aorta that can be problematic (aneurism) as the blood is pumped at such a high pressure. Interesting information about that aorta, they once thought the bicuspid valve and the turbulence associated caused the issues but are now rethinking that–the issues with aorta go along with a bicuspid valve. (Congenital) Because it is congenital you may want to have yourself checked out for peace of mind. Thankfully both is my children do not have the condition.

      Either way diet is not going to fix your mom’s issues. They are now starting to do value replacements that do not require open heart surgery. Your mom may be able to have this procedure.

      My husband is a competitive cyclist and rides his bike hundreds of miles a week. It’s just scary stuff so obviously get a second opinion and find the best doctor.




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      1. After reading my comment about the thinning of the aorta does not make sense so here is a second attempt.

        It was once thought that the bicuspid valve created a turbulence that caused the thinning of the aorta. They are now considering the idea that the aorta issues are also congenital and aside from the turbulence.

        Anyhow that is what my husbands most amazing surgeon from USC was explaining to us.

        And one last thing. Because my husband often had his heart rate at 180 and above while training/racing the thought of having an aorta issue was a bit scary so he opted to have the surgery sooner then later.




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        1. I understand, thanks a lot for the insight, i will look up the procedure without open heart surgery, hopefully they are doing it here in Mexico also. thanks so much and im happy to hear that your children and husband are alright.




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    1. eli: I think the devil is in the details here. I don’t know how accurate those percentages are, but let’s say that they are right in some way. What the numbers are hiding is that it is certain foods that you eat that spurs your liver to make that cholesterol. So, for example, if you eat a lot of saturated fat, your body is going to start making lots of cholesterol – more than is healthy. That’s why I think those numbers are misleading. That 90% may come from the liver, but it is the food that you eat that gets that liver going when it goes in excess. For evidence to back up my claims, you might start with this summary topic page on NutritionFacts for saturated fat: http://nutritionfacts.org/topics/saturated-fat/
      .
      Does that help?




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      1. Thank you so much for the response. I agree to a point. I do not eat meat, rarely, organic eggs or chicken. I do eat some fish, maybe twice a week. Tons of veggies. Where did LDL come from?




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        1. eli: In terms of spurring your body to produce excess LDL, your description of your diet includes a fair amount of animal products, all known to increase your cholesterol, including LDL levels. I’m guessing that your diet feels pretty healthy to you, but it does not sound like an ideal diet to me. We have lots of examples of people who were not able to get their cholesterol levels under control until they fully committed to a healthy diet. I’m talking about a whole plant food based diet such as following Dr. Greger’s Daily Dozen. Or PCRM’s (Physician’s Committee for Responsible Medicine) free 21 Day Kickstart Program. (available on-line).
          .
          Following is the topic page for cholesterol if you would like a list of foods that help cholesterol levels and a list of foods which hurt. If you click through to the videos, you will be able to find the science to back up the claims. http://nutritionfacts.org/topics/cholesterol
          .
          Another thought for you: After a lifetime of unhealthy eating, it can be hard for the body to stop producing excess cholesterol. It can take some time. I have a friend who was so excited the other day. She said she finally got her cholesterol levels down to a point where her doctor stopped pushing the statins. Here’s the thing: It took 3 years (of eating like I describe above) before she got to that point. It won’t happen over night. The good news is that lots of people start to see little ways in which their health improves within just a few weeks. So, it’s never to late to get started!
          .
          Let us know if you would like any advice on transitioning your diet.




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          1. Thank You again.
            My diet had been extreme for the last 40 years. I did not go into to much detail, but with the exception of the occasional wild salmon or organic egg and low sugar 70% chocolate and no dairy, I doubt you could find anything else to omit; and of course it includes the different types of fiber.
            I’ve been looking into this for years. This info. is not new to me by any means. Nevertheless, I will try the links. Hopefully I can learn something new, because at this moment, I do believe the liver may need to be addressed in an additional way.




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            1. eli: Do you need to lose weight? Losing weight causes the body to drop cholesterol production. If so and you would like some tips for healthy weight loss, let me know.
              .
              PS: I’m a little confused. You mentioned eating fish 2 times a week above. That plus the eggs and chicken sounded like a lot of animal protein to me. 70% chocolate (my favorite!) is very high in fat, including saturated fat… You don’t have to explain to me. I’m not trying to get you to change. For all I know, you eat healthier than I do. I’m just trying to help. Also, I’m explaining why I responded the way I did above.
              .
              Best of luck to you.




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              1. I will not keep you longer. I am pretty slim and have kept my weight the same throughout my life. 8-11% body fat. I always like to learn new things. I like change, it does not scare me. I do not mean to defend my ways, just looking for good new ideas.
                Thanks again.




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    2. hi Eli , a few years ago i saw this on the Dr Oz show , this is very good for good liver health since it cleanses toxins in the liver, if you feel sluggish fatigued often thats a sign of having too many toxins in your liver that neeeds to be cleansed . this was Dr Oz’s remedy get a small ammount of warm water like 1/4 cup get a piece of lemon about the size of a grape squeeze it well into cup scrape out the pulp well and some of the white stuff under pulp that white stuff under is actualy the healthyest part of a lemon then get some tobasco sauce add 5 ” shakes ” of it into your water / lemon mixture and drink this . apple cidar vineagar is also very good to reduce cholesterol in your blood




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  24. ” how not to die from heart disease”
    I exercise everyday and activate alot thruout day im small only 5 ‘ tall 100 pounds. iim medication free the past 2 + years . im a smoker tho i usually smoke 3/4 – 1 pack a day :( i think chanses are smoking can cause death from heart problems before death from lung cancer :(




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  25. In doctor Greger’s book he says that if you stop using processed foods, meats, eggs and dairy products like milk and you use vegetables, fruits, whole grains and nuts its better for your body. The question is does the fruits and vegetables and nuts give you everything thing health-wise that a person needs to replace the loss of the non-based plant foods?

    For example we know that Milk and cheese provides calcium for strong bones. So do all these plant-based foods have calcium and other vitamins that will replace what the dairy products, eggs, meats and processed foods will provide?




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    1. Hi Lyndon, I’m one of the site moderators. It is great that you are putting in the effort to make sure you get all the nutrients you need from the food that you eat. Fortunately there are some good websites to help with that. A simple method is looking up the ANDI score of each food which is an aggregate score of all the nutrients included in that particular food. Here’s a website with more info: https://nutrientrich.com/1/aggregate-nutrient-density-index-andi-score.html If you are more interested in the amount of each particular nutrient in each food item you might like to peruse the Cron-o-meter website and use it to tally things up. https://cronometer.com/ Hope this helps.




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  26. Even celebrities can’t get the truth:
    Bob Harper, famous trainer, best known for his work on The Biggest Loser, had a massive heart attack last month and his doctors recommended that he go on the Mediterranean Diet…”which has been shown to reduce the risk that one might die from a heart attack by 30%”.

    Why aren’t they recommending the only diet ever shown to reverse heart disease? Are the cardiologists to the stars -folks that can afford to see the best of the best- unaware of Dr. Dean Ornish’s landmark research? Do they just assume that Bob wouldn’t be willing to give up meat and dairy in the interest of saving his own life? Could it be possible that no one has given him that option?




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  27. NY Times piece on Dr. Piombino-Mascali (The Vilnius Mummies Crypts).
    If anyone has the time, I would really appreciate, some feed back, How Not To Die/ content on the modern diet causes of Heart related diseases (dis-ease) and the latest NY Times piece on Dr. Piombino-Mascali (The Vilnius Mummies Crypts) findings reference: They Found that Heart disease is older than Moses namely …. the disease was present and not hard to find all over the world covering a wide swath of human History ?? The Affected Mummies, came from various geographical regions and lived over a span of more than 4,000 years – a reminder that Heart troubles have long been prevalent and are not simply the result of modern diets ??




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  28. I am writing to you with an enquiry as to whether or not you think that the right diet could help strengthen the elastic tissue of the aorta or whether you think this is a purely genetic problem to be waited out and treated with care….

    My husband was recently diagnosed ( as a professional rugby player ) and you can imagine to have to stop all intensive exercise immediately is a bit of a shock to his system and rather unnerving ( regarding limits and expectations) His aorta has grown 10 mm in the last two years ( Medically meant to be 2mm max per year ) and the specialists say he will need open heart surgery in the next 5 mm. He also has a bicuspid valve which is apparently healthy and not a problem for the moment.As you can understand we want to avoid surgery at all costs, yet sustain a healthy active lifestyle and our knowledge of how to manage this is quite under advised. I have always strongly believed in nutrition uses and effects being stronger and more important than medicine. So I am just trying to gain as much knowledge as possible regarding how to maintain his health as much as possible using food …. We know that the problem is in the elastic fibers of the aorta ( and probably all arteries and vessels ), so all I am asking is if anyone knows of anything that has shown any effect on these fibers in a positive and strengthening manner.

    Thank you




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  29. Dear anonymus,

    I am a nutritionist volunteer moderator in NF team. I also strongly believe in the power of food. Does your husband is eating a vegan diet? If so, make sure he includes the following foods, almonds, oatmeal, flaxseeds, kiwi, all type if vegetables, lots of leafy greens and some avocado.
    this video could help you to understand better the disease https://nutritionfacts.org/video/abdominal-aortic-aneurysms-ticking-time-balloons/
    I hope your husband gets better. Let us know how he’s doing.




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  30. Thank you so much nutriyared…. Is there any particular food ‘group’ that we should be working with? He is not vegan ( We are from South Africa so red meat is a big part of our culture although I have asked him to cut down on that as much as possible) I stopped drinking dairy a few years back which has swayed him towards nut milks at the same time. Is there anything that we are definitely better off avoiding altogether? This is all new to us so we have no advice other than what you have just sent through…. Thank you so much for your time and help!




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