Benefits of Brewer’s Yeast for Diabetes

Benefits of Brewer’s Yeast for Diabetes
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A half-teaspoon a day of brewer’s yeast is put to the test in a randomized double-blind controlled clinical trial.

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Below is an approximation of this video’s audio content. To see any graphs, charts, graphics, images, and quotes to which Dr. Greger may be referring, watch the above video.

In 1854, a case report was published in the precursor of the British Medical Journal, suggesting two to three tablespoons of brewer’s yeast every day could cure diabetes within six weeks. But it took another hundred and fifty years before it was finally put to the test in a randomized double-blind controlled clinical trial of about a half of a teaspoon of brewer’s yeast a day for three months. What happened? A significant drop in fasting blood sugars and hemoglobin A1c, as well as an improvement in insulin sensitivity. What do these numbers mean, though?

Hemoglobin A1c is a measure of how high your blood sugars have been over time. Under six means you’ve been having normal blood sugars, between 6 and 6.5 means you have pre-diabetes, and anything over 6.5 means you have diabetes. Now, you can have well-controlled diabetes or way out-of-control diabetes, but anything over 6.5 is considered diabetic.

In the study, the placebo group started up at around 9, and stayed up around 9. But the brewer’s yeast group dropped from 9 to 8. So, the placebo group was stuck up at 9, and the yeast group dropped from 9 down to 8. So, they weren’t cured, but in three months’ time, they were able to achieve significantly better diabetic control just eating half a teaspoon of brewer’s yeast a day, which would cost about 4 pennies a day—4 cents a day.

What about for just seven weeks? Again, a total of about a half-teaspoon of brewer’s yeast a day. Started out with an A1c level of 8. The placebo appeared to help a bit, but the yeast, even more. From 8 down to an almost nondiabetic 6.6. That’s amazing; how could it be? Well, the drug industry has been trying for decades to discover the so-called Glucose Tolerance Factor in yeast; after all, no shareholder is going to be happy with a therapy you can buy for only 4 cents a day.

We know that whatever it is in yeast that’s doing it contains the trace mineral chromium. Well, can you just give chromium supplements alone? Just giving straight chromium does not appear to be particularly effective. Might the special fiber in yeast, the beta glucans, play a role?

Supplementation with the amount of beta glucan found in 2 to 3 teaspoons of brewer’s yeast a day did result in a slimmer waist and drop of blood pressure within 6 weeks. They trimmed about an inch off their waist, despite no significant change in caloric intake. Blood pressures were significantly reduced as well, an effect also seen with whole brewer’s yeast. Just a half-teaspoon of brewer’s yeast a day led to a significant drop in high blood pressure, which, incidentally, is a key contributor to the cardiovascular and kidney complications of diabetes.

Please consider volunteering to help out on the site.

Image credit: Alden Chadwick via flickr. Image has been modified.

Motion graphics by Avocado Video

Below is an approximation of this video’s audio content. To see any graphs, charts, graphics, images, and quotes to which Dr. Greger may be referring, watch the above video.

In 1854, a case report was published in the precursor of the British Medical Journal, suggesting two to three tablespoons of brewer’s yeast every day could cure diabetes within six weeks. But it took another hundred and fifty years before it was finally put to the test in a randomized double-blind controlled clinical trial of about a half of a teaspoon of brewer’s yeast a day for three months. What happened? A significant drop in fasting blood sugars and hemoglobin A1c, as well as an improvement in insulin sensitivity. What do these numbers mean, though?

Hemoglobin A1c is a measure of how high your blood sugars have been over time. Under six means you’ve been having normal blood sugars, between 6 and 6.5 means you have pre-diabetes, and anything over 6.5 means you have diabetes. Now, you can have well-controlled diabetes or way out-of-control diabetes, but anything over 6.5 is considered diabetic.

In the study, the placebo group started up at around 9, and stayed up around 9. But the brewer’s yeast group dropped from 9 to 8. So, the placebo group was stuck up at 9, and the yeast group dropped from 9 down to 8. So, they weren’t cured, but in three months’ time, they were able to achieve significantly better diabetic control just eating half a teaspoon of brewer’s yeast a day, which would cost about 4 pennies a day—4 cents a day.

What about for just seven weeks? Again, a total of about a half-teaspoon of brewer’s yeast a day. Started out with an A1c level of 8. The placebo appeared to help a bit, but the yeast, even more. From 8 down to an almost nondiabetic 6.6. That’s amazing; how could it be? Well, the drug industry has been trying for decades to discover the so-called Glucose Tolerance Factor in yeast; after all, no shareholder is going to be happy with a therapy you can buy for only 4 cents a day.

We know that whatever it is in yeast that’s doing it contains the trace mineral chromium. Well, can you just give chromium supplements alone? Just giving straight chromium does not appear to be particularly effective. Might the special fiber in yeast, the beta glucans, play a role?

Supplementation with the amount of beta glucan found in 2 to 3 teaspoons of brewer’s yeast a day did result in a slimmer waist and drop of blood pressure within 6 weeks. They trimmed about an inch off their waist, despite no significant change in caloric intake. Blood pressures were significantly reduced as well, an effect also seen with whole brewer’s yeast. Just a half-teaspoon of brewer’s yeast a day led to a significant drop in high blood pressure, which, incidentally, is a key contributor to the cardiovascular and kidney complications of diabetes.

Please consider volunteering to help out on the site.

Image credit: Alden Chadwick via flickr. Image has been modified.

Motion graphics by Avocado Video

153 responses to “Benefits of Brewer’s Yeast for Diabetes

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  1. My daughter has diabetes. Thank you for this video. Is nutritional yeast a benefit or just brewers yeast? Also, I would like to hear Dr. Greger’s input on Russell Blaylock study on the benefits of supplementing with ketones for diabetes.

    1. Dr. Greger has been advocating consumption of nutritional yeast for years. After this video, it looks like he’ll advocate for both now. He has a saying, “Remember to eat outside your kingdom” (animal kingdom), ie fungi, plants, etc.
      John S

      1. If anyone wonders whether or not Dr. Gregor has influence, I, for one think he has a lot!
        I was almost ready to order more LL brewers yeast. When I saw this article, I thought, uh oh, better order now.
        May be a run on it. Noted today checking on my order that the price for a 2-Pak has gone up $7 on Amazon in just the time since this video hit the internet.

    2. It’s important to remember that many yeast supplements are “fortified”. That is contain, added vitamins. According to Dr. Greger, not only is this not helpful, but it is actually harmful. With the exception of B12 and in some cases vitamin D, supplements are harmful. All the nutrients we need come from the garden. Is she eating a WFPB diet?

      1. Folic acid is the main reason I avoid fortified nutritional yeast (I get Sari brand which is truly unfortified unlike Kal’s “unfortified” nutritional yeast). And while Dr. Greger has videos explaining the potential harm of folic acid, he never made a statement about fortified nutritional yeast. Since I like to use a lot more than a tsp in recipes, I definitely want to avoid all that folic acid.
        He also has a video showing the benefits of b complex vitamins in preventing brain shrinkage, but that’s then just to say that b vitamins are important to brain health, not necessarily to say supplementation is the best way to get them. There’s some people I know who don’t eat right who I think would be better off taking a good b complex or multi vitamin, but only to make up for a crap diet.

    3. Karen, here’s a list of helpful foods I give my diabetic patients.
      To lower glucose levels, bitter melon (get in Asian food stores), okra, apple cider vinegar.

      Spices that can be added to black tea, cinnamon 1/8-1/4 tsp., cloves 1/4 tsp. cardamom 1/4 tsp.

      1/2 tsp. Amla, good added to green or oolong tea.
      These in some people will lower post-prandial glucose levels quite a bit.

      If she drinks coffee, should be filtered, can be decaf, if decaf needs to be organic so no benzene.
      Can add 1 tablespoon cacao and 1/4 tsp turmeric to the coffee for more benefit.
      Also cinnamon and cardamom good in coffee also.

      Leafy greens, avocados, berries in moderation, 1 oz. nuts such as walnuts, almonds pecans.
      The latter usually don’t raise blood sugars in most people and are helpful when they just need to eat something.

      1. Marilyn Kay, curious…. why do you suggest your diabetic patients only eat leafy green and berries in moderation and what is your definition of moderation in this regard?

        1. Denise, ‘moderation only refers to the berries, and means no more than a cup. All fruits will raise blood sugar if they overdo it.
          Some diabetics can’t handle any fruits besides berries, 1/2 a grapefruit or orange without glucose level soaring above what their meds can bring down in a timely fashion.
          Greens are great as they are full of nutrients and very low in carbs.

          1. .i have the same question as one… Is brewer’s yeast more relevant than nutritional yeast? And, must it be in cake form or is the dried processed yeast just as good?

            1. Netgogate, “ supposed abnormal blood sugar spikes”? So these people are delusional when they take their blood sugar readings?
              “Evidence based medicine”? Whose evidence is more valuable than the individual person who has the disease?
              How many Real patients are You dealing with?
              Or are you just reading homogenized studies?

              1. The age of the doctor-God is over, we now follow evidence based medicine and this is not “anecdotal”. Likewise, it is not relevant wether I have patients, today, everyone can access the literature.

                As you made the claim that eating more then 1 cup of berries raises blood sugar too much, it is you who needs to provide the evidence not me.

                You emailed me about a study (without citation) that was centered around “a high carbohydrate diet”, I do not see how this is related to the consumption of berries. Like I said before, your claim is not based on any real scientific observations. And your response seems to confirm this.

        1. Lynn, yes the video refers to taking 2 teaspoons of cinnamon, not the much smaller 1/8-14 tsp. amount.
          A small amount of cinnamon in tea, coffee, or on other foods gives a sweet taste.
          Many tell me that small amount satisfies their craving for a sweet taste.
          Since all forms of soft drinks, fruit juices are not allowed, tea and coffee tend to be consumed more often.

            1. thanks for your comments Marilyn. I don’t think I did a good job of expressing my point. To clarify: Dr Greger tells us that there are 2 types of cinnamon, cassia cinnamon and true cinnamon known as ceylon cinnamon. The cassia cinnamon (the most commonly sold type) can lower blood sugar but he says it is not safe. As he says here in this article https://nutritionfacts.org/2013/10/29/cinnamon-for-diabetes/ 1/4 tsp 3 times per week can be the limit for small children, and that same 1/4 tsp ! per day in an adult can be unsafe. I purchase ceylon cinnamon at my local health food store which has a lovely taste, is regarded as safe and nontoxic, but does nothing to lower blood sugar levels.

              1. Lynne, regarding the chart Dr. Gregor shows in the video, he states that the bold numbers are possibly unsafe.
                Chart shows 1 whole teaspoon per day above limits, but that 1/4 to 1/2 per day is still ok.
                The old recommendation was for no -more- than 1 tsp. total per day for an adult.

                The diabetes association had some studies showing benefit with the Ceylon variety.
                But I know those studies were done in mice, so who knows?
                Have to check the latest research on this issue.
                Thank you again, will have to caution people about these limits.
                And will recommend the Ceylon variety as a sugar substitute.

      2. Hi Marylin, could you please elaborate on the coffee thing? Does coffee impact bgl? I’m type 1 and having a 4 year honey moon period and want to do everything I can to help keep it going! I’ve recently gone back to decaf as I didn’t want the jump in cortisol that can come from caffeine (if that’s true) to raise my bgl! Thanks!

        1. Hi H Moller, good for you trying to extend the ‘honeymoon’ period! I assume that you are watching your diet carefully.

          Note, I said “If she drinks coffee”. Type 2’s who habitually drink a moderate amount of coffee (2-3 cups), generally do not experience a blood sugar rise with it.
          Studies showed that after about 4 weeks of moderate coffee intake effect on blood glucose levels wasn’t any different than with no coffee. But those studies did not include type 1 diabetics.

          A 2009 study also found consumption of 3 cups of coffee a day lowered risk of type 2 diabetes by 40%.
          Of course as they say, the devil is in the details. Could be the polyphenols, magnesium and chromium in the coffee, or possibly they were drinking less soft drinks and fruit juices.

          But, I recommend all diabetics to test, test, test. As a biochemist I worked in labs, and know studies will usually throw out high and low numbers when reporting results.
          The median is what is reported. But YOU are not the median. You may be the high or low.
          So every diabetic has to find out what foods they can tolerate without raising blood sugars. This varies a great deal.

          Type 1’s, and some type 2’s, experience the dawn phenomenon. The liver starts pumping out glucose in response to hormonal change, and they don’t moderate that with insulin production.
          For some type 2’s, but not all, coffee will raise their insulin levels in response lowering their blood sugar.

          If you really like coffee, try an organic decaf. Most of the good polyphenols will be there. No one seems to know about the chromium content of decaf. Frankly testing for chromium content is difficult.
          Find out what works for you.
          Tea, which has a much lower, and different form of caffeine (theophylline), may work better for you. Lots of different teas to try.
          Best wishes to you! Sounds like you are doing a great job so far.

    4. Karen, not sure if you’ve already read it, but in Dr. Greger’s book “How Not To Die” there’s a chapter on diabetes. I haven’t read it in a while so I don’t remember what’s mentioned in it. It might be helpful though, if you haven’t already read it.

        1. Christine, nutritional yeast is different than brewers yeast. Nutritional yeast has lots of benefits but this study was using brewers yeast so nutritional yeast does not necessarily have any effect on diabetes.

    5. My question as well… So easy to find a clean, organic, nutritional yeast, but brewer’s yeasts, not so much. And to eat something that is condensed and concentrated pesticide and synthetic rich “feed,” like conventional molasses would be, yikes.

      Dr Greger…(?)

    1. Hi,

      I don’t have either, but I have it in my Marmite drink, or I just eat it off the spoon.
      If your body needs it you will probably love it, Marmite is stacked with B vitamins, only down side is that they added salt to it.
      So watch the salt intake and enjoy the beefy flavour of Marmite. Marmite is also perfect for vegans :)

    2. Dr. Greger has clear recommendations for supplements here: https://nutritionfacts.org/topics/supplements/ I did review the studies mentioned just to confirm that no subjects were included that did not have diabetes (to see if brewer’s yeast might help but only those with impaired glucose metabolism were included) Some studies do reference some side effects such as headache, stomach discomfort, and gas (flatulence).With that in mind and the focus on getting our nutrients from whole plant-based foods, at this point recommendations for brewer’s yeast for someone without diabetes or high blood pressure seems unwarranted.
      Hope that helps
      . .

  2. Many thanks for this one. I have a number of friends with Type 2 diabetes. Of course I will share this with them. Will try take action? Chances are slim but sharing this is a gentle way to try to help.

  3. Marmite. It is Brewers Yeast, tasty and can be made into a drink, put in a sandwich, or put on toast.
    Martime is either loved or hated. I find that according David Ike, that humans love it and alien reptilians hate it. So which one are you?
    Must be true, David Ike is on youtube haha

  4. What was kind[any brand] of brewers yeast used? de-bittered? Examined for heavy n]metals?
    Would Nutritional yeast [Bragg] is likely to do the same ??

  5. The only way they can be cured, is by change of diet, Paleo or similar diets, no carbs, no sugar , grains, just veggies and protein!
    Exercise and acupuncture can also help!

    1. Paleo is a fake diet. Whatever grows from a tree, bush, vine or the sweet earth and can be digested raw is the proper food for the human animal. Cooking may make it more delectable but the true test is whether it can be digested raw.
      Acceptable foods include fruits, vegetables, seeds, nuts and fungi. It DOES NOT include flesh, beans or grains, although grains and legumes can be sprouted and then emerge as proper food for the human animal. Flesh in never acceptable.

      1. Josefine, you too are wrong and are going by opinion-based beliefs. That is NOT what the science says. Beans are one of the most important foods to human health and one of the most profoundly impactful foods for longevity. They’re also one of the most impressive foods for blood sugar control, see his video on beans and the second meal effect.
        While sprouted beans and lentils are very healthy, they do not offer the same protection that cooked do – there’s a video on that here.

        Other foods that offer unique protection when cooked are turmeric and ginger.

        More examples:

        Beets are the best bile binding food, especially when they’re cooked.

        Certain nutrients become more bioavailable when cooked.

        Grains are also highly beneficial in multiple ways.

        Root vegetables like sweet potatoes are another example of a very healthy food that should be cooked (to my knowledge, I never heard of eating them raw).

        In one article or video on this website, Dr. Greger talks about findings that women on a 100% raw foods diet were shown to go into early stages of menopause. It was theorized that it was due to it taking more energy to digest raw foods but I suspect it’s due more to other factors (just a personal suspicion).

        Both cooked and raw foods (plant foods) are important for an optimal diet.

        Dr. Greger made a Daily Dozen check list based on the best available science.

        1. S, I’ve always eaten thinly sliced sweet potatoes raw. Most people seem to enjoy them when I add them to crudités trays.
          Only the orange ones though, the purple Okinawan type are too fibrous.
          Another root veggie I like raw is regular turnips, again thinly sliced.
          And I agree, having a variety of both cooked and raw veggies is good.

    2. Paz, the paleo diet is NOT a healthy or optimal diet. Dr. Greger has videos on here about it.
      The best diet for optimal human health is a whole foods plant based diet supplemented with B12 once a week or daily depending on dosage and preference.

      There’s a chapter in Dr. Greger’s book “How Not To Die” on diabetes.

    1. I just watched a video on YouTube and it said that it lessened how much medicine was needed for Type 1 Diabetes.

      Here is a girl who is Type 1 who as of this video was able to be off of insulin for 4 months.

      She followed Dr. Cousens program.

  6. I watched this video with great interest. Here is the problem. Where do I find brewers yeast (in Canada) that is not processed, and not debittered? My research shows that debittered brewers yeast destroys the chromium? I don’t want to start a regimen and find that it was a waste of time. On a side note, I find that we often run to anything that has the same name – Brewers Yeast – but don’t know if we are getting a pure or potent product at all.

  7. I see they sell Brewer’s Yeast in capsule form. Is there any benefit taking a capsule versus buying powder form? How long should you consume Brewer’s Yeast for, a lifetime? Do you mix it in water or can you add it to your meal of the day?

  8. Some years back Gayelord Hauser’s book LOOK YOUNGER, LIVE LONGER got me started on brewers yeast. He used to rave about it. I did take it for awhile there — not sure why I stopped. (Because of him, I also took — and continue to take –blackstrap molasses.)

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gayelord_Hauser

    In addition to the many yeast benefits, there are of course side effects. So what else is new! :-)

    https://www.healthline.com/health/brewers-yeast

      1. Believe it or not, I like the taste. As I’ve posted before, I put 1/2 – 1 teas. of the stuff on my hot whole-grain morning cereal. Alternating with honey, coconut sugar, or (maybe) maple syrup. Just a tiny bit is all you need because of the banana — which once it’s ripe is pretty darn sweet. Been doing this for years. Yummies for the tummy!

        I also pile on some blueberries (frozen), the aforementioned chopped banana, and a spoonful of walnuts. Plus, a little almond or soy –organic, of course –milk. It’s like a dessert — so decadent! Re the bananas: We know how quickly they get ripe. So when they do, I peel off the skins and stick ’em in a freezing bag, ready for their big moment.

        I know purists would say to eat the fruit all by itself, and not to combine it with starch, etc. Am obviously no purist. :-)

        https://www.healthdiaries.com/eatthis/15-health-benefits-of-blackstrap-molasses.html

        1. That sounds really good! As for the purists, Dr. Greger actually pointed out a while ago that food combingong (separating fruit from starches, protein, fat, etc.) was a myth. There’s actually benefits to combining! The raspberry and adzuki bean study in a video of his is a really cool example.

          I think blackstrap molasses actually has good antioxidant content, I was wondering if there was some other benefit I didn’t hear about but hey, taste is a benefit!

  9. Forgive me everyone for going off topic here, but has Dr Greger ever done an exclusive video about the herpes simplex virus? So far I haven´t been able to find any on the site, only a few mentions. It is my second outbreak this year, luckily this time it came out milder. I´ve read a lot of things, such as it’s incurable and only stays dormant for some time, also that stress and sun exposure might turn it on. Some websites claim that foods high in arginine like nuts and seeds play a role too, but others says that statement is false. I’ve been mostly WFPB for 3 years, funny thing is when I ate animal foods daily I rarely had an episode, they became more frequent after changing mi diet. This doesn´t mean I will go back to the standard diet, but I wish I could understand what’s going on in my body in order to make the necessary adjustments. Thanks a lot to anyone who can share some information (Sorry for my bad english)

    1. Frederick, many people with herpes find eating more foods high in lysine, and low in arginine helpful.
      Virus needs arginine to replicate. Lysine and arginine compete for absorption.
      You can find a chart with the amounts of each of these amino acids in various foods on the internet.

    2. My personal experience is that a lysinine supplement quickly stops an outbreak of cold sores (herpes simplex). It is extremely effective.

      As Marilyn says, arginine and lysine compete for uptake in the human body. If we eat diets high in arginine, our body’s lysine stores become depleted and the herpes simplex virus is enabled to replicate.

      As Marilyn says, eat a diet that constains foods containing adequate amounts of both lysine and arginine. However, I always keep a bottle of lysine supplements close to hand for those occasions when I do not eat well. These articles prvide a little more detail

      https://www.bioceuticals.com.au/education/article/arginine-and-its-effects-on-viral-replication
      https://www.karger.com/Article/Abstract/237979

      1. TG, thanks for the bioceutical link, and putting the info out there that lysine can be taken in a capsule.
        I have used that even in people with shingles, and they do seem to recover more rapidly.
        I know the studies say it isn’t effective but…

        1. Thanks, Marilyn. I have only ever used lysine for cold sores – sometimes it’s difficult to eat well when travelling – but in principle, it should be of benefit in any viral infection. Studie are mixed but some do show a relationship between plasma lysine levels and viral load though eg

          ‘Our data revealed that L-lysine amino acid and its derivative (TC) levels were negatively correlated with viral load and inversely with CD4 count lymphocytes in the total cohort.’
          https://openbiochemistryjournal.com/VOLUME/11/PAGE/119/FULLTEXT/

          This was in a non-vegatian population of males with HIV though.

          Beans, lentils etc do seem to be high in lysine. Perhaps that is one reason why their consumption appears to be associated with longevity.

      2. Thank you all for sharing such useful information, I think I will purchase a lysine supplement since most plant foods I consume seem to have a higher arginine to lysine ratio, if not equal amounts. As I said in my previous post, I eat a handfull of almonds and a few walnuts daily with my breakfast but they seem to have the highest concentration so I’ve stopped them for a while. On the other hand oats, potatoes, mushrooms, brown rice, legumes and spinach are high in arginine too but not that much to worry about I guess. Theres’s no way I’m giving up those since they are the base of mi diet.

    3. I had issues with shingles symptoms on the WFPB diet and so looked up lysine content of foods, the supplement calms my symptoms down. I added in low fat soy milk and it seemed to help.

  10. Maybe I misunderstood, but it looked like the studied dose of yeast was 1800 mg (6 x 300 mg capsules). Isn’t that closer to 2 teaspoons?

      1. Thanks for your reply. That clears it up. Brewer’s yeast must be much more dense than the nutritional yeast I’m familiar with.

  11. I have so many people with out of control Diabetes.

    My mother used to make us take this when we were young.

    Haven’t had it since I was a teenager.

    I will tell my friends and may try some out on my dog.

  12. Thanks for this video. A previous discussion of Brewers Yeast prompted me to purchase from Lewis Labs. I haven’t been faithful in the daily consumption of it, but this reminder will cause me to do it going forward. I have been pretty conscientious about sprinkling it on the food I feed my cats however, even to the point of doing so as I cook them whatever meat I have in my freezer.

    But I’ve also been taking a hiatus from consuming anti-inflammatories, which has long been my protectors against high a1c readings. Reason is I’ve recently undergone an infusion of 2CCs of cord blood stem cells. The stem cells double every 8 days up to 8 weeks (That’s a lot of exponential increase.)

    During this time they are seeking out areas of inflammation as targets for repair and I just feel I am better served giving up all the anti-inflammatory things that have kept me healthy, in hopes the stem cells work their supposed magic. After the 8 weeks I will go back to my anti-inflammatory regimen.

    1. Lonie, not totally on subject, but do you supplement your cats with taurine? Sounds like you make their own food which is cool, but I know taurine is destroyed by heat. Just wondering.

      1. do you supplement your cats with taurine?

        @ S

        No, the only thing I supplement them with is the Brewer’s Yeast. Reason I even do that is because back when the subject was brought up in the comments section, a lady (can’t remember her name) suggested she supplements her cats with Brewer’s Yeast to protect them from fleas.

        I personally cannot stand the idea of putting a poison collar on cats and dogs so I decided to try it. Don’t know if it the Brewer’s Yeast or the prolonged dryness here, but I’ve never seen a flea on her or any of the three or so litters Momma Cat has had.

          1. YeahRight said:

            Awwww…..anyone who likes cats can’t be ALL bad. :-)
            —————————————————————————-
            I don’t really like cats… I just find they are useful as soft, furry places to put your fingers when you want to give belly rubs. ‘-)

            Except for mister Snowshoes (5 digits on all 4 feet)… he wants to playfully bite the hand that rubs the belly.

            1. Okay, I’ll change the word like to “love.” You really LOVE cats!

              Dogs are okay, but if a cat seems to like you, you should feel honored. They don’t wag their tails and smell the crotches of just ANYbody! :-) They’re wise little critters….psychic too. *purr purr*

              1. Heh, I’ve had dogs and cats at times in my life. And I’ve never bought or adopted even one of them. The reverse is more accurate as they just come here and stick around until I give in and feed them.

                So I guess psychic is accurate as they figure I’m a pushover. ‘-)

                1. Forgot to mention: I’ve been able to give away kittens without any trouble. Momma Cat has beautiful kittens and I socialize them early so they are people friendly.

                  The last dog I had, I had to be away for a few days and when I returned home, she came back from the south east. She spent a little time with me and then headed off back to the south east.

                  I’ve learned to enjoy the time spent with them and give them leave to relocate, without prejudice.

                  1. Lonie said, “I’ve been able to give away kittens without any trouble. Momma Cat has beautiful kittens and I socialize them early so they are people friendly. ”

                    Our calico cat bombed in on us while we spent a few years in the mountains. (We were later told she was the neighborhood “tramp” — just looking for a home, poor thing.) A couple of months later she produced a litter of four adorables on the back porch. Yes, we too found homes for them. We kept the calico and one of her kittens and took them back to the city with us. We also had her spayed. (The grey and white one too, eventually.)

                    It’s good you were able to find homes for Mama Cat’s litters — so far. A lot of cruel entities would merely drown them. Do you think you’ll ever have her spayed?

                    1. It’s good you were able to find homes for Mama Cat’s litters — so far. A lot of cruel entities would merely drown them. Do you think you’ll ever have her spayed?
                      ——————————————————————————————————————————————–
                      No, I won’t have her spayed. You see, Momma Cat is a working member of the property. I don’t let her in the house… but I put a block under the garage door so she and the kittens can come and go as they please. Bigger animals can’t get in but there is still enough room for her to drag half a jack rabbit or quail or dove under it and into the garage to eat on as desired.

                      She doesn’t hunt mice and rats as often when she doesn’t have kittens to feed and I need her in that hunting mode to keep the property free of mice, especially. Haven’t had any of those in the house since she came here.

                      And she trains her hunter kittens well. That helps when it comes time to find them a new home.

                1. :-) Gee, thanks, S! The add-on to the username pretty much sums it up.

                  Am thinking of changing it to OftenRight……or RarelyWrong…..or (maybe more accurately) RarelyRight :-) …..or…..

                  Nah….I’ll just leave it alone.

        1. I know what you mean, Lonie. I don’t like those poison collars either, or the poison you’re supposed to put on the back of their neck. Brewers yeast is a much better option.

            1. Lonie,

              I am trying it right now for my dog, who has Cancer.

              I don’t have a good answer yet, but I am not adding any toxins to him.

              1. Deb said:
                I am trying it right now for my dog, who has Cancer.

                I don’t have a good answer yet, but I am not adding any toxins to him.
                ————————————————————————————————-
                Deb, let us know how things turn out. It’s hard to know what works since withholding something that might work would make you a scientist.

                I know you are anti-supplement, but if you can see your way, you may want to try this simple and inexpensive treatment against cancer. This one only looked for lung cancer, but there are other similar studies that have gotten the same results for other types of cancer, in lab animals, that is.

                http://www.coloradocancerblogs.org/milk-thistle-stops-lung-cancer-in-mice/

                  1. Thanks Lonie.

                    He is getting Milk Thistle.

                    He has cancer in his liver, so I am using some liver supportive things.

                    Triphala, Dandelion Root, Milk Thistle, SAMe, Modified Citrus Pectin and a few other lab tested herbs, which they say support liver health.

                    1. PEMF is the thing, which is going to fascinate me the most.

                      I was reading the mice studies and got up to melanoma and read:

                      “All mice exposed to PEMFs exhibited significant pyknosis, shrinkage of the tumor cell nuclei by 54% within a few minutes after PEMF therapy and by 68% within 3 h and reduction in the blood flow in about 15 min following PEMF therapy. These effects may be due to PEMF therapy that stimulates murine melanoma to self‐destruct by triggering rapid pyknosis of tumor cell nuclei and reducing blood flow 96, 97, 98, 99. A further study 100 optimized the PEMF therapy parameters pulse number, amplitude, and frequency to completely suppress melanoma with a single treatment.”

                      The concept that, in mice, it only takes one single treatment to completely suppress melanoma, because it destroys the tumor cell nuclei – shrinking it 54% within a few minutes.

                      Those results are so crazy!

                      My dog tolerates PEMF, but is not into it.

                      He looks at me with an expression of, “What are you doing to me?” and sometimes moves within 5 minutes, but the PEMF moves with him, so he puts up with it. To think that within those 5 minutes I might have shrunk some tumor nuclei, that is so cool!

          1. But WFPB Nancy, what is an effective alternative for tick control? My little dog has had Lyme disease twice — and he only goes into our backyard (landscaped and mowed) and on walks around the neighborhood. The toll of this disease is pretty heavy. In my mind, it’s a balancing of benefits vs risks. (I’ve also had a dog diagnosed with ehrlichiosis, another tick borne disease. Also awful.)

        2. Wow, if that works that would be awesome. It might be a good idea for the spade/neutered cat colony I care for. Question though, aren’t you worried they’re not getting enough taurine if they only eat unspplenented cooked meat?

          1. @ S

            Honestly I wasn’t aware of their supplemental needs, such as Taurine. If you have any general information of needs of these animals, please post them.

            After learning that caffeine is heart healthy, I have taken to adding a quarter tsp of 5-hour energy to my first morning mug of black tea.

            I know that black tea and even green tea has caffeine, but my anti-inflammatory instructions are to exclude green tea. I know that the taurine is included in the 5-hour and I read in the past that taurine is beneficial in getting the last chamber of the heart to increase output if that is a problem.

            I have an older brother who had that problem of very low blood pressure and he would ensure he had a 5-hour energy handy when hauling some of his goats to market, a 180 mile roundtrip.

            (side note: he also had COPD. He recently took the cord blood stem cell treatment I mentioned in another post, and within about a week was back breathing normally.)

            1. All I’m really aware of is that taurine is essential for cats’ health (and I believe dogs), but it’s heat sensitive so is easily destroyed which is why they add it back to all cat food (and I believe dog food as well). And I read from one vet that the reason it’s so hard to safely put a cat on a plant based diet (much safer and easier with dogs) is at least in part because it can over-alkalize them (unlike us their body needs a more acidic ph) which can be very dangerous to their kidneys.

              That is very sad to hear about those goats… </3 I don’t want to get in a long thing about it or any kind of debate, I just wanted to say something for them.

              1. S said:

                That is very sad to hear about those goats… </3 I don’t want to get in a long thing about it or any kind of debate, I just wanted to say something for them.
                —————————————————————————————————————————

                Wasn't thinking when I referenced that on a WFPB/vegan site: Out of respect, I would edit it out if editing were possible.

                If it is any consolation, the were headed to a sale barn where mostly ranchers are buyers and they take them home and put them on pasture, just like my brother does. He lets them graze on pasture a few days, weeks, months (he's a trader) then sells them in hopes of making a profit.

                He doesn't butcher goats for eating. I personally haven't eaten goat meat since the Cabrito I ate in Mexico decades ago.

                1. Well it’s not really a vegan site but some people on it are vegan, in any case, while your posting it wasn’t being rude, it was nice of you to want to edit it out out of respect :) But I wasn’t trying to imply you were wrong for speaking openly.

                2. Lonie, people where I live keep goats also. A lot of land comes with the rule that if you don’t have any livestock on it, you lose the right to keep animals including horses. Then the land is difficult to sell.
                  Goats are low upkeep, they pretty much take care of themselves, and keep the pasture mowed.
                  I don’t see any problem with that as long as they are well cared for.
                  Do we want all domestic animals to be extinct?

                  1. Marilyn, I see nothing wrong with keeping animals as family (I don’t like the term pet), just not any exploitation of them e.g. selling them for profit, using them for dairy, etc.

                    “Do we want all domestic animals to be extinct?”

                    Well yes, to a degree. There’s no ecological need for their presence but moreover, the domestication of animals has resulted in exploitation, severe cruelty and harm. I advocate to stop all breeding of domesticated animals and to care for the ones who are here.
                    For example I care for a colony of feral cats who have been spayed/neutered and released and have adopted others. And if I had the means, I would LOVE to use land to care for rescued farm animals! I support farms (rather sanctuaries) that do. Some ex farmers have actually turned their farms into sanctuaries.

  13. I am diabetic, type 2. I live in Toronto, Canada. Please Dr. Greger I so much want to lower my glucose and A1C. What kind of brewers yeast are you recommending. I see so many labels for it but I have no idea what to look for and choose. Can you make a recommendation, I am set to do this I just need Dr. Greger to give me more direction on this brewers yeast. Thsnk you.

    1. Christine, in some of the comments above it was mentioned that debittered brewers yeast has the chromium stripped from it, since they wondered at one point in this study if the chromium a factor, I imagine they did not use debittered brewers yeast.

      1. Thanks for explaining that S.

        I bought some today and was looking at all the types and it really is overwhelming.

        My dog likes the one I bought and I mixed 2 teaspoons full and threw in some Nutritional yeast, because I like beta glucan.

        The beginning of the video gave an old study where they reversed it faster using more.

        My dog never tested for Diabetes, I am just doing what I can to make life harder for the Cancer.

    2. Can you make a recommendation

      @ Christine

      I am not bound as NF.o is so I will heartily recommend the Lewis Labs Brewer’s Yeast, based on my own personal experience.

  14. Okay, just watched the video again, after searching high and low for Brewer’s Yeast, which hasn’t been debittered and it is so hard to find brands which haven’t had the Chromium removed.

    Is it a conspiracy to make it ineffective? Find out that it controls Diabetes, so remove all of the Chromium possibly?

    Does debittered Brewer’s Yeast without Chromium do anything at all?

    If not, this video is a tease.

    I went to the flea study and there was a big difference with how many fleas the active yeast versus inactive yeast and I want the not debittered type.

    I found a debittered brand in England.

    But the ones I found in America were discontinued, so far.

    I am still looking.

    1. Nope, the Lewis Labs one said that it didn’t need to be debittered.

      It still has its Chromium.

      I have to contact my Diabetic friends tomorrow, because I told them about the video, but if the type with the Chromium removed doesn’t work, I will have wasted their money.

      One has a husband whose Diabetes is so out of control and he is having side effects to the two new meds the doctors just added to his insulin.

      1. Nope again.

        Lewis Labs got rid of their one with Chromium.

        All of them seem to have gotten rid of the ones with Chromium.

        One site said that there was a study where the Chromium versus Debittered versions were tested and it is the Chromium in it, which worked and you are already telling us that Chromium supplements don’t work, so who paid everybody to get rid of their Chromium?

        Even Lewis Labs, who advertised that theirs tasted great without being debittered.

        The ads are still up for Piping Rock and a few others, but they say, “This item has been discontinued.”

        Genuinely bummed.

        This video is officially a tease!

        Unless I buy from outside the country.

        It must have worked?

        1. Deb wth Dg,

          If I remember correctly, they isolated chromium and tested that and found it did not work. IITB, then the chromium is not needed in the Brewer’s Yeast. I personally took Chromium Picolinate years and years ago until I found out it could cause a problem… chromosome breakage or something like that.

          Anyway, I quit supplementing with that and would get my chromium by natural means. I’m not saying this is the same, but I think if you take a natural mineral supplement or possibly just from food, one gets all the chromium the body requires.

          But I think I saw this in the video… chromium doesn’t seem to work for the purpose of this video.

          May I suggest a little saffron or saffron tea to help allay your fears?

          1. Thanks Lonie,

            I will look up Saffron.

            I am not so worried about the Chromium for myself. I had people who I wanted to have try the Brewer’s Yeast for their out of control Diabetes. They are on multiple meds already.

            Brewer’s yeast, the old school way may genuinely have managed it for them, like it did in this video, but to get it prepared that way, you need to buy it from Malaysia or someplace in the UK or buy it from a brewery.

            Some of the newer studies, the people mention buying it from a brewery to get the version, which hasn’t been debittered.

            Does the debittered Brewer’s Yeast do ANY of things from ANY of the Brewer’s Yeast studies?

            Did it remove the Beta Glucan with the Chromium, just to make sure it wouldn’t accomplish as much?

        2. Deb, below is from the Walmart site which is also out of stock. It’s about $3.00 cheaper than Amazon which suggests to me it will soon be back in stock but $3.00 higher.
          ——————————————————————————————–
          Lewis Labs: Brewer’s Yeast is not blended or fortified. It was grown in northern Europe on sugar beet molasses without additives or preservatives. The 12.35 oz brewer’s yeast flakes are tasty as is. Or sprinkle it on salads, popcorn, soups or cereals. It is made to be vegan and has no trans fats. This vitamin is also kosher, non-GMO and gluten free. The 100 percent flakes contain no allergens. It comes in a container for quick storage.

          Lewis Labs Brewer’s Yeast

          High quality 100% pure yeast flakes.
          New.
          No trans fat.
          Non-GMO.
          Gluten free.
          Not blended or fortified – nothing added.
          Exceptional nutritional content.
          Dried, inactive yeast.
          Allergens – None.
          Contents are sold by weight and may settle during shipment.
          The nutritional content and vitamin values are subject to natural fluctuation.
          This premium yeast is a primary strain of saccharomyces cerevisiae. It is a vegan food made from dried, inactive yeast grown in Northern Europe on sugar beet molasses without any additives or preservatives. Sugar beets are known to absorb more nutrients from the soil than almost any other crop. It provides one of the richest natural sources of vitamins and trace elements.
          Contains approx. 6-8% natural RNA/DNA from nucleotides (1.25 g or more per 25 g).
          Also Contains: Trace amounts of inositol, choline and PABA.

        3. Good research Deb. That is so irritating! My takeaway from the video was that they don’t know exactly what it was, so maybe debittered works as well but maybe not at all? In any case, seems the only way to ensure the same outcome is to use the same kind (with chromium/not debittered) as they did.
          If they sell brewer’s yeast supplements, maybe the supplements are at least not debittered.

          This is a scenario where a mention of brands and types might be warranted. Unforunately I think one of the volunteers here said that they did not state what brand they used in the study. Personally I think those details should always be mentioned.

    2. I have also found a brand in the UK that is available through Amazon that is NOT debittered and I have ordered. I ordered enough for at least a 4 month supply and will put in the calendar to reorder 2 months into this supply as the shipping time through Amazon from this seller is 4-6 weeks.

  15. I hate being a conspiracy theorist, but I know the fact that the same people selling the pharmaceuticals are the ones seling the supplements.

    I get that it could just be that people didn’t like the taste, but I also get that the numbers in these studies threaten some very wealthy people who can buy and sell companies without blinking an eye.

    I will have to start writing to the doctors ho have supplement lines and see if one f them can fill in the gap.

  16. Yeast is high in purines so it will affect those with gout, kidney disease or arthritis. I’m not sure if I recall correctly, I think I saw somewhere on YouTube or tv that a tuberculosis vaccine treated people with type 1 diabetes. They didn’t need insulin for a few months or years. The human body is very confusing and complicated. Are the surface proteins of yeast or tuberculosis bacteria changing the immune cells behaviour, and they change the gut or the pancreas or something else? Is diabetes an autoimmune disease? What role does the gut play in controlling blood sugar?

    1. Hi, Arthur. Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune disease, but type 2 diabetes is caused by saturated fat, as you can see in the video link in my response to your question below. Here is a possible explanation for what you saw:
      https://nutritionfacts.org/video/does-paratuberculosis-in-meat-trigger-type-1-diabetes/
      The role of the gut in controlling blood sugar is not well understood, but is being studied. I am sure that, as research becomes available, you will see it here, so stay tuned!
      I hope that helps!

      1. Christine Kestner, I think the jury is still out on the cause(s) of type 2 diabetes.
        Since saturated fat was linked to high cholesterol levels, and heart disease, saturated fat intake has gone down in the population, at least in the US. However type 2 diabetes incidence in this same population has risen! Why is that?

        Could it be that people substituted simple carb calories, and more calories in general, for those calories in the saturated fat?
        What about the role of fake ‘foods’ such as high fructose corn sugar?

        What about the change from eating ‘3 squares’ to eating all day long? Never giving the body time to lower insulin levels and go into fat burning mode. The change from people doing manual labor on farms to sitting at a desk all day, then coming home and sitting in front of the TV.
        It is known that consistent high glucose levels can by themselves cause insulin resistance.

        1. I have seen this argument before in various forms, most usually in the claims of saturated apologists. It is misleading even factually incorrect

          For one thing, the apologists usually compare the time when animal fat consumption in the US was at an all time high, to later periods when it was merely high. The McGovern report, issued when US animal food consumption was peaking, was bitterly attacked by the meat and dairy industries at the time and is usually considered ground zero by the saturated fat apologists. Even today, the saturated fat crowd continue to attack it (for the same reason as industry did – it stated inconvenient scientific facts). However, it is simply not true that US saturated fat consumption steadily declined from that time. The US food supply series shows that saturated fat per head actually peaked in 2003-04!

          So the claim “Since saturated fat was linked to high cholesterol levels, and heart disease, saturated fat intake has gone down in the population, at least in the US. However type 2 diabetes incidence in this same population has risen!” may be all over the internet but it’s almost certainly not true.

          In the video that Christine links to,Dr Greger says that saturated fat consumption IN THE CONTEXT OF A HYPERCALORIC DIET and genetic susceptibility will cause T2D.

          Lo and behold, we note that the same food supply series indicate that total calories per head per day in the US rose almost 15% from the time of the McGovern report to the first 10 years of the 21st Century. In other words, there was continued high saturated fat consumption but it was now occurring in the contect of an even more hypercaloric diet. Little wonder then that diabetes rates increased at the same time.

          https://www.cnpp.usda.gov/USfoodsupply

      2. So the brewer’s yeast is lowering hb1ac in both type 1 and type 2 diabetics? Is it affecting the gut flora in a similar way that blueberries do? Or maybe it changes gut immune response to change the gut flora? Maybe both, and it has a synergy effect? Perhaps I’d give it to my father if it didn’t have the high level of purines. He’s susceptible to gout.

  17. This is a pretty remarkable video. The diabetes “management” industry is of course a huge business getting rich off the continued sickness of others. What’s the chance your caring doctor will ever mention this to you? I’d say about ZERO. As the warden at Shawshank State Prison says … “Salvation lies within”. Do your own homework and cure yourself. There are already several good books out there about curing (Yes, the “C” word!) diabetes.

    1. Dr. Greger or moderators, I would love if Dr. Greger would address the question of whether dibittered brewer’s yeast (apparently stripped of chromium) might possibly be ineffective since they don’t know what exactly it is having the effect and they appeared to use brewer’s yeast with chromium making me believe they did not use debittered yeast.

    2. I get what you are saying that Doctors should provide referral to these kinds of supplements and treatments. I have had many discussions with my Doctors about this and in Canada, Doctors are reluctant to suggest any supplement or treatment that does not have published and recognized clinical trials that prove the effectiveness. If they recommend or prescribe and your health worsens or there is some negative reaction you could sue them… I recently talked to my doctor about Fenugreek and his words were – almost exactly – “I have never seen a clinical trial on Fenugreek and I can only recommend treatment where I can see the science behind the treatment.”

  18. A huge shout out to your tech video guys/gals. Getting that pointer to remain in giggle-motion while it moved down the blood sugar level dashboard was awesome. It’s nice to have this valuable information dished up in such a stunningly highclasss-tech way. Kudos to your team!

  19. The two studies confuse me a bit. The first one is reported as follows:

    In the study, the placebo group started up at around 9, and stayed up around 9. But the brewer’s yeast group dropped from 9 to 8. So, the placebo group was stuck up at 9, and the yeast group dropped from 9 down to 8. So, they weren’t cured, but in three months’ time, they were able to achieve significantly better diabetic control just eating half a teaspoon of brewer’s yeast a day, which would cost about 4 pennies a day—4 cents a day.

    And the second one is reported as “What about for just seven weeks? Again, a total of about a half-teaspoon of brewer’s yeast a day. Started out with an A1c level of 8. The placebo appeared to help a bit, but the yeast, even more. From 8 down to an almost nondiabetic 6.6. That’s amazing; how could it be? Well, the drug industry has been trying for decades to discover the so-called Glucose Tolerance Factor in yeast; after all, no shareholder is going to be happy with a therapy you can buy for only 4 cents a day.”

    So, the first study had a duration of 3 months, and lowered the A1C from 9 to 8, but the second study lasted only 7 weeks and lowered it from 8 to non-diabetic? If I”m reading this correctly, why is the shorter duration study more effective in lowering A1C? This doesn’t make sense to me.

    1. Tom Hoffman, I doubt it’s the shorter time of the second study. The likely reason is because the higher blood sugars are, the harder it is to get them down. 9 is really high! Actually 6.6 is not great either.
      Totally normal is between 4.6 and 5.5. Studies show that heart disease, neuropathy, eye disease etc. risk goes up sharply when A1c is 6 or over.

    2. Hi Tom! I looked over the studies, and it seems as though the second study you mentioned included additional dietary changes. For example, the placebo group went from 8 to a 7.5, which they attributed to “improved dietary compliance”.

      Here are the studies incase you would like to read more of the details:

      https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3843299/
      https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2385872/?page=1

  20. This evening while chopping some celery, I missed the celery stalk and nicked my index finger instead. Drew a bit of blood. My first thought was, “Why does this picture look familiar?” Then it dawned on me I’d been seeing a bloody finger at the top of this brewers yeast video every time I’d check a new post.

    That damn bloody finger. :-(

    1. LOL!

      Not laughing at your injury.

      But, yes, this is one of the primal, graphic images.

      Wondering whose finger was sacrificed to make this video.

  21. I have a general comment for the whole website – may we please have a forum to discuss random topics? I’d like somewhere to share comments/tips and tricks on the How Not to Die Cookbook. And also maybe we can have topics for each chronic disease to share what recipes we liked and such.

    1. Hello, thank you for your suggestion. We have considered adding a forum like this, but at this time we do not have plans to. If you are on Facebook, there are a few *independent* (not associated with NutritionFacts.org) fan-run groups for followers of How Not to Die which I believe may offer the type of discussion you are looking for :)

  22. Me and my mother switched to wfpb diet from the start of 2018. Mother is diabetic and I did as a preventive measure.After 6 months she has improved remarkably.

    My father has switched to a plant based diet 2 monthsback. He was also on insulin and medications. Now I suggested him to stop all oral medication and reduce insulin from 14-0-0( novomix 30) to 8-0-4. Now his blood sugar readings on 19/7/18 is fasting 235 after breakfast 248 after lunch 343 and after dinner 395. He is also suspecting UTI and itching all over. How to adjust medication. He is having diet free of oil and sugar .Only pinch of salt for lunch else salt , sugar free , low fat vegan diet. Please help.

    1. Tpr, diabetics on that much medication cannot just change it. If he’s on both oral, and that much insulin, his body isn’t making much of its own.
      Those numbers are not good, and the itching is a serious symptom.
      Get him to a doctor immediately.

    2. Hi I’m a RN health support volunteer. Congratulations on all the healthy changes you and your family have made. But, your father’s medications have to be adjusted by a physician as the blood sugars and A1c come down which may happen slowly. This is very dangerous to self adjust diabetic medications.

      If he is eating a whole food plant based diet, the sugar will come down and the medications can be titrated down as needed. Type 2 diabetes is due to the buildup of fat in mainly the muscle cells. It essentially clogs them up and blocking insulin from doing its job. This is what we call insulin resistance. This is going to take time for that fat buildup to break down and for the diabetes to reverse. Give it time, but please do not adjust medication without a physician. Your father could end up in a diabetic coma if those sugars get too high. Please consult his physician immediately about this.

      Reversing type 2 diabetes with a plant based diet is some Dr. Neal Barnard of Physicians Committee for Responsible Medicine has written about in depth. I would look into that if you are looking for more information about this specifically:
      http://www.pcrm.org/reversingdiabetes

      But again, medication needs to be adjusted by a physician based on what the blood sugars and A1c are reading, not just because dietary changes have been made. Please call his physician right away. This is very dangerous.

  23. Yes. I had a word with his regular diabatologist. He is back to oral medications. Sugar level came down. Now seems to be
    fine. May be should give time to reduce the medications in future with Dr’s advise.

    1. Netgogate, a Swiss study tracking normal healthy people with continuous glucose monitors found that 85 was the predominant normal blood sugar. The range was 70-92.
      The median blood sugar of the group did not go higher than 125 after a high carb meal, and returned to about 85 within less than 2 hours.
      Statistically people whose a.m. fasting sugars were higher than 92 tended to go on to develop diabetes.

  24. Thanks. Are there any health benefits for someone with a resting blood sugar of around 70 compared to the normal average of 85?

  25. To find non-debittered brewers yeast, search Google for “where can I buy brewers yeast with chromium” then actually read the ingredients, and make sure chromium is there. This worked for me. Debittered (chromium removed) brewer’s yeast will not be effective.

  26. Dr. Greger’s analysis of the research results related to various key nutritional topics is extremely valuable. There seems to be quite a number of recommendations these days about restricted daily eating hours–like 8am to 6pm or even 8am to 2pm. Has Dr. Greger reviewed the evidence supporting these types of recommendations?

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