Do Natural and DIY Tea Tree Oil Cleaning Products Disinfect as Well as Bleach?

Do Natural and DIY Tea Tree Oil Cleaning Products Disinfect as Well as Bleach?
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What’s the best household cleaning product to use?

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Below is an approximation of this video’s audio content. To see any graphs, charts, graphics, images, and quotes to which Dr. Greger may be referring, watch the above video.

Household cleaning products can be hazardous, landing hundreds of thousands of children in U.S. emergency rooms. And, “[t]he product most-commonly associated with injury [is] bleach,” which can be toxic even if used as directed.

We’ve known that those with asthma who work with cleaning products day in and day out can suffer adverse respiratory effects, a worsening of symptoms, “decline in…lung function,” inflamed airways. But, even cleaning workers without asthma can be affected. Even below so-called acceptable exposure levels, cleaners with or without reactive airways can suffer a substantial decrease in lung function.

Okay, but that’s people who clean for a living. “Although [we’ve known] that occupational use of bleach may have adverse respiratory health effects, it [was] unknown whether common domestic use of bleach” in the household may put lungs at risk—until now.

“Bleach use was significantly associated with [nearly five times the odds of] non-allergic adult-onset asthma,” as well as ongoing lower respiratory symptoms, such as chronic cough. The way bleach works is as such a strong pro-oxidant that – the thought is that it can lead to leaky lungs, and allow allergens to penetrate.

This phenomenon of cleaning product-induced asthma has been known for decades. More than three-quarters of the dozens of population studies looking into it have found “increased risk of asthma” or nasal inflammation. Ideally,…safer [cleaning products] should be available.” Unfortunately, this body of evidence has been largely ignored by the manufacturers and commercial cleaning companies. And, most of the workers put at risk are women. In fact, that may help explain some of the “gender differences in asthma.” “The relatively high frequency of bleach use for home-cleaning by women…around the world, together with the strong association between bleach use and non-allergic asthma…, emphasize the need for (re)-considering the use of bleach for cleaning…”

There are natural, environmentally friendly cleaning products that may offer a safer alternative. Safer, perhaps, but are they as effective? We didn’t know—until now. “The effectiveness of three home products in cleaning and disinfection of Staphylococcus aureus [the bacteria that causes staph infections] and [E. coli ] on home environmental surfaces.” “The first report [ever] of [the] performance of purportedly safer alternatives.”

“In the home setting, some individuals will select conventional products, such as bleach, due to familiarity;” it’s a smell “some…associate with cleanliness.” “Others are seeking less hazardous and environmentally preferable…‘green,’ ‘organic,’ or ‘natural’” disinfectants, which you can buy or make yourself—so-called DIY (do-it-yourself) recipes, that typically involve ingredients like vinegar, club soda, and plant essential oils, such as tea tree oil, prized for its antimicrobial qualities.

So, researchers pitted head-to-head Clorox bleach versus a natural disinfectant based on thymol, which is from thyme essential oil, versus a DIY recipe of half club soda, half white vinegar, with a few drops of tea tree oil. You could probably buy the bleach for around $3, the natural stuff for more like $7, but the DIY mix for less than a dollar. Yeah, but does it work?

On the bottle, it says bleach can kill 99.9% of germs, which is the EPA standard for the disinfection of surfaces that don’t come into contact with food, like the bathroom sink or something. They claim 99.9% of germs, but when put to the test, the bleach actually killed 99.9999% of germs, completely wiping out the E. coli and staph germs, which even exceeds the EPA standard for food contact surfaces, like the kitchen counter. And, so did the expensive natural stuff—worked just as well as bleach. But, the club soda/vinegar/tea tree oil concoction… flopped, allowing as many as a few percent of the staph bugs to thrive.

Now, maybe they didn’t use enough of the tea tree oil, only adding about a drop per cup. But, from a performance perspective, “the [environmentally preferable] product is an effective alternative to…conventional bleach”—and, I would say, even better, since bleach is “well known as a respiratory irritant.” And, it’s “corrosive” too, and may end up damaging surfaces. What I would find interesting is to test how effective a cheap DIY thyme-oil solution would be.

Please consider volunteering to help out on the site.

Image credit: Shari Weinsheimer via Public Domain Pictures. Image has been modified.

Motion graphics by Avocado Video.

Below is an approximation of this video’s audio content. To see any graphs, charts, graphics, images, and quotes to which Dr. Greger may be referring, watch the above video.

Household cleaning products can be hazardous, landing hundreds of thousands of children in U.S. emergency rooms. And, “[t]he product most-commonly associated with injury [is] bleach,” which can be toxic even if used as directed.

We’ve known that those with asthma who work with cleaning products day in and day out can suffer adverse respiratory effects, a worsening of symptoms, “decline in…lung function,” inflamed airways. But, even cleaning workers without asthma can be affected. Even below so-called acceptable exposure levels, cleaners with or without reactive airways can suffer a substantial decrease in lung function.

Okay, but that’s people who clean for a living. “Although [we’ve known] that occupational use of bleach may have adverse respiratory health effects, it [was] unknown whether common domestic use of bleach” in the household may put lungs at risk—until now.

“Bleach use was significantly associated with [nearly five times the odds of] non-allergic adult-onset asthma,” as well as ongoing lower respiratory symptoms, such as chronic cough. The way bleach works is as such a strong pro-oxidant that – the thought is that it can lead to leaky lungs, and allow allergens to penetrate.

This phenomenon of cleaning product-induced asthma has been known for decades. More than three-quarters of the dozens of population studies looking into it have found “increased risk of asthma” or nasal inflammation. Ideally,…safer [cleaning products] should be available.” Unfortunately, this body of evidence has been largely ignored by the manufacturers and commercial cleaning companies. And, most of the workers put at risk are women. In fact, that may help explain some of the “gender differences in asthma.” “The relatively high frequency of bleach use for home-cleaning by women…around the world, together with the strong association between bleach use and non-allergic asthma…, emphasize the need for (re)-considering the use of bleach for cleaning…”

There are natural, environmentally friendly cleaning products that may offer a safer alternative. Safer, perhaps, but are they as effective? We didn’t know—until now. “The effectiveness of three home products in cleaning and disinfection of Staphylococcus aureus [the bacteria that causes staph infections] and [E. coli ] on home environmental surfaces.” “The first report [ever] of [the] performance of purportedly safer alternatives.”

“In the home setting, some individuals will select conventional products, such as bleach, due to familiarity;” it’s a smell “some…associate with cleanliness.” “Others are seeking less hazardous and environmentally preferable…‘green,’ ‘organic,’ or ‘natural’” disinfectants, which you can buy or make yourself—so-called DIY (do-it-yourself) recipes, that typically involve ingredients like vinegar, club soda, and plant essential oils, such as tea tree oil, prized for its antimicrobial qualities.

So, researchers pitted head-to-head Clorox bleach versus a natural disinfectant based on thymol, which is from thyme essential oil, versus a DIY recipe of half club soda, half white vinegar, with a few drops of tea tree oil. You could probably buy the bleach for around $3, the natural stuff for more like $7, but the DIY mix for less than a dollar. Yeah, but does it work?

On the bottle, it says bleach can kill 99.9% of germs, which is the EPA standard for the disinfection of surfaces that don’t come into contact with food, like the bathroom sink or something. They claim 99.9% of germs, but when put to the test, the bleach actually killed 99.9999% of germs, completely wiping out the E. coli and staph germs, which even exceeds the EPA standard for food contact surfaces, like the kitchen counter. And, so did the expensive natural stuff—worked just as well as bleach. But, the club soda/vinegar/tea tree oil concoction… flopped, allowing as many as a few percent of the staph bugs to thrive.

Now, maybe they didn’t use enough of the tea tree oil, only adding about a drop per cup. But, from a performance perspective, “the [environmentally preferable] product is an effective alternative to…conventional bleach”—and, I would say, even better, since bleach is “well known as a respiratory irritant.” And, it’s “corrosive” too, and may end up damaging surfaces. What I would find interesting is to test how effective a cheap DIY thyme-oil solution would be.

Please consider volunteering to help out on the site.

Image credit: Shari Weinsheimer via Public Domain Pictures. Image has been modified.

Motion graphics by Avocado Video.

Doctor's Note

Isn’t that neat? I ran across this body of work while I was studying tea tree oil. I don’t think any of the other tea tree oil videos are up yet, but stay tuned!

How else might we protect our airways? Check out:

If you haven’t yet, you can subscribe to my videos for free by clicking here.

119 responses to “Do Natural and DIY Tea Tree Oil Cleaning Products Disinfect as Well as Bleach?

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  1. Maybe people worry too much. First of all, don’t let your place start looking like a pigsty. I clean with just white vinegar and water. Also, baking soda for tubs and whatever. Aren’t we getting a little anal if we angst over killing all those damn germs or not? “99.9%” and such? As the saying goes, “There are lies, damn lies, and statistics.”




    12
    1. Well staph can be pretty serious so it’s nice to know that the natural stuff works just as well… I never doubted it buts it’s awesome that they put it to the test.
      I agree it’s better to just keep things clean so as to not allow filth to grow and build up in the first place. But I like to use natural disinfectants for some things.

      But if people prepare meat, eggs, etc. they definitely need to disinfect the kitchen thoroughly. Better option would be to NOT eat and prepare infectious disease spreading “foods.”




      4
  2. Off topic, but what do you make of the science showing that living at high elevations
    increases risk of depression/ending one’s life as well? People in Utah have higher
    rates of these issues, as well as other mountain states. Apparently this risk is not an
    issue for those who are born and raised at a high elevation, just those who move from
    lower elevations to high. The science is actually conclusive and scary, according to
    what I can gather.

    https://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/321219.php




    0
    1. It’s hard to calculate. Higher elevation often results in higher amounts of minerals in water and in soil and less rainfall. There was a famous scientist in Missouri who calculated this as favorable in the 1940’s-one of the early organic gurus.Positive. Also more sunshine due to less rain-more vitamin D. But harder to grow a variety of plants-fewer green leafies. Negative. Fewer garden pests-easier to grow organic-positive. Farther from bigger cities-cleaner air, but less access to inexpensive fruits and vegetables. Hard to calculate.
      John S




      0
      1. THanks.

        I read some of it. Yeah, but maybe depression rates are far higher, as the studies
        done in USA/Utah have, apparently, conclusively found. I think it does raise an interesting
        concern for those moving from lower to higher elevations. For those born and raised, apparently
        a non-issue.




        0
  3. What do we know about the health effects of ingredients of the Seventh Generation Mult-Surface Disinfecting Cleaner — both active (thymol) — and inactive?

    And why do we need to “disinfect” our houses, anyway? What’s wrong with plain old soap and water? Plus vinegar or baking soda as the situation suggests. I think our environments are already too “sterile” — since “germs” include “good” as well as “bad” bacteria. I thought a balanced ecosystem of microbes was desirable.

    Read “I Contain Multitudes: The Microbes Within Us and a Grander View of Life” by Ed Yong, for starters.




    14
    1. Dr J, today’s video explained that the natural organic cleaner with thymol did as well as bleach in the tests. Not sure what brand they used, but then maybe there isnt much difference in effectiveness, brand to brand. 7th Gen products are expensive imo




      2
  4. I’m concerned with mission creep in Nutritionfacts.org’s selection of topics for videos. While the health safety of household cleaners or even the value and risks of medical testing are useful, they are not nutrition. I trust Nutritionfacts has not run out of new, interesting, nutrition facts. I’d prefer Nutritionfacts to stick to its knitting.




    9
    1. I agree 100%. Seems like lately most of the videos are non-nutrition topics. Nutrition only, please. I preferably would like to see videos on the health consequences of a vegan diet, pro but con also, like whether soy products like soy milk cause a decrease in libido – or any other unintended results from a strict, healthy vegan diet.




      6
      1. In the old days, I watched every NF video, sometimes more than once. Now I watch probably 50%, because my interest is in nutrition. It’s not an academic interest but a practical one. I like ideas I can put to use immediately.




        3
      2. More coverage of supplements might be nice. Bridging the gap as some of our foodstuffs continue to lose some of their potency.

        The good doctor seems to prefer staying away from supplements, but they really do seem to be more and more important.




        0
        1. Richard, Dr. Greger has a video on here addressing the whole “soil lost its nutrients, buy supplements!” spiel. And yes, it did lose some of its nutrients, but Dr. Greger put it into perspective as to how much… in order to get the amount of nutrition we’d get from grapes grown in soil from years ago, we’d need to eat an extra grape. The video is here somewhere if anyone can link it. Meanwhile, there’s places out there selling supplements reciting horror stories.
          It’s important we take care of our soil and planet, though. Otherwise eventually things will get worse and worse.




          2
      3. Pepe, you need to search the site! He already addresses your soy concerns. There are a plethora of videos on here and he already goes over the pros of a plant based diet and he’s already found the con… B12, but we need to supplement and incidentally those eating animals are supplementing without realizing it as the animals themselves are now supplemented.




        5
    2. The good doctor reviews studies on “health and nutrition”; I believe this falls within the health aspect of his mission.
      Shalom




      38
    3. I’ve enjoyed EVERY video posted. Every topic is something I was curious about at one time or another. Anything that can harm my health I want to know.




      15
    4. Steve, it’s about overall health, both preventative and curative. Unnatural household cleaners can cause health problems. Dr. Greger is doing a wonderful thing by both providing people with this awareness and awareness of safer alternatives.,. Nothing to scoff at! I am grateful and so glad he covers such a wide variety of real issues that concern us all.




      8
          1. Hi May

            I use either a non-fluoridated toothpaste (on the grounds that I drink a lot of tea which is naturally high in fluoride – and made with fluoridaated water) or baking soda.

            The attached article refers to baking soda toothpastes etc (“dentifrices”) but is I think also relevant to pure baking soda and consistent with other studies I have seen over the years.
            https://jada.ada.org/article/S0002-8177(17)30822-X/fulltext

            i tend to prefer baking soda because it is effectively a single ingredient as opposed to the witches’ brew of ingredients found in even ‘natural’ toothpastes – essential oils etc can be toxic if accidentally ingrested in quantity over a lengthy period.

            Brushing after every meal is the aim. but to be honest, most days I brush only twice. Very naughty of me but in my defence the American Dental Association apparently recommends brushing twice a day
            https://www.mouthhealthy.org/en/az-topics/b/brushing-your-teeth

            I also use a basic unpowered water flosser (most often called “dental spa”).




            1
            1. Tom, thanks a bunch. I am hoping simply swishing mouth with tea for several minutes will provide enough fluoride for me. i don’t mind the tooth stains, and i hope it will provide the same or even more fluoride to the teeth than a fluoride toothpaste and fluoride mouth rinse product.
              You think the tea rinse idea measures up to the products?

              Thanks.




              0
              1. Hi JJ

                To be honest I haven’t done the analysis – ie what is the concentration of fluoride in toothpaste versus the levels in tea and water? And how much over the course of a day attaches to our teeth?

                In any case, brushing teeth regularly with or without fluoridated toothpaste reduces dental caries risk, So that and a green tea (or fluoridated water with salt) mouthwash and/or gargle should provide good protection against dental caries and other infections, Consequently, I don’t see that fluoridated toothpaste is essential – and since 5%-7% of dentrifices are apparently swallowed, I’d prefer to do without toothpastes/toothpowders altogether given the wide range of chemicals they contain. Over a lifetime, who knows what the effects of those ingested chemicals might be?
                https://jada.ada.org/article/S0002-8177(17)30822-X/fulltext

                That’s why I generally prefer to brush with either baking soda or water – although I do occasionally fall prey to the hype about “natural” toothpastes without fluoride




                0
                1. Tom , I think it is perfectly rational for you to avoid fluoride in your toothpaste or anywhere else. The only reason I take issue with what you write is because of my respect and admiration for this website and its dedication to accurate nutrition information. Many people,and possibly you don’t need fluoride for decay prevention. But most do. Especially those bringing up children.
                  I write only because I fear that people will assume that those of us posting ideas are as accurate as Dr. Greger and his staff. If someone decided to stop using fluoridated toothpaste because of some misinformation they got here, the outcome could be disastrous; especially for high risk individuals and children. I will try to be clear and accurate.

                  The amount of fluoride in conventional toothpastes range from 1000 to 1500 parts per million(ppm)

                  The amount of fluoride in teas vary widely. Average measurements would range from roughly 2 to 25 ppm.
                  But you are mixing apples and oranges because of the administration route. Fluoride works topically on teeth. Ingestion of fluoride is virtually useless for decay prevention.

                  If you hope to prevent decay by swishing tea around topically, you are wasting your time. You are giving yourself perhaps a 4ppm dose instead of the 1000 ppm proven therapeutic dose.

                  On the other hand if your are drinking the 2 – 10 ppm tea for decay prevention, you are doing worse than wasting your time. You are dosing your entire body with the dreaded fluoride poison. The legal limit for fluoride in the water supply is 4 ppm incidentally. Many instant teas are way above that limit.

                  Swallowing fluoride to prevent decay is useless and at certain levels is poisonous. The research showing cognitive impairment in infants and children from ingested fluoride is convincing. That is why people should understand the difference and importance of the route of administration.

                  Bottom line – topical application of fluoride is an evidence based form of tooth decay. Brushing with fluoridated tooth paste twice a day is probably the best administration. Fluoride varnish topically applied has also been proven effective.

                  For reasons listed above, limit the amount of toothpaste for infants and babies to a smear of less volume than 1/2 a pea to limit ingestion.




                  0
                  1. Larry You may well be right but given the large amounts of fluoride in toothpastes and the fact that we swallow 5-7% of dentifices, I prefer to avoid fluoridated toothpastes. esecially since I am not aware that they are essential for reducing dental,caries risk.

                    I previously cited the study which stated that regularly brushing teeth, whether with or without fluoridated toothpaste, reduces dental caries. If you consider that statement from an article in a professional journal to be “misinformation”, then please cite the studies which show that only brushing with fluoridated toothpaste effectively reduces dental caries. I would be very interested to see them.




                    1
                    1. Greeting Tom, Sorry for the delay but I wanted time for a complete reply for the important points you raise.

                      First I want to thank you for your open minded attitude regarding the strong opinion you already had. This is what makes our diverging views valuable to readers of this dialogue. I find your comments always add value to this site.

                      There is a lot of top of the line scientific literature, but I offer the following to confirm the necessity of at least 1000 ppm ( parts per million) of fluoride for decay prevention and reversal. It is found as a Cochran review which is a known source of the highest levels of medical research studies. There are many which prove the point. I picked this one because of its clinical significance.


                      Conclusions This review confirms the benefits of using fluoride toothpaste in preventing caries in children and adolescents compared with placebo, but only statistically significantly at fluoride concentrations of 1000 ppm and above. The relative caries preventive effects of fluoride toothpastes of different concentrations increase with higher fluoride concentration. The decision of what fluoride levels to use for children aged under 6 years should be balanced with the risk of fluorosis. https://www.nature.com/articles/6400698

                      Thanks again for bringing this discussion forward.




                      0
          2. Reading some of the comments and concerns, I thought sharing my personal experience might be somewhat helpful… I got off fluoridated tooth paste and actually switched to using simple bentonite clay and water. My teeth are in very good health and I have no issues with cavities, etc. I did however have a mild cavity that I was always meant to go back for once I had insurance prior to going vegan then WFPB vegan and during this journey, taking the natural route in things including oral health.
            What happened for me was a huge improvement actually.
            So after doing things all natural and eating a WFPB diet, I was back on insurance and finally went back on for my teeth but the X-rays confirmed that my cavity had gone away. The dentist explained to me that our teeth have the ability to heal themselves.
            I attribute the healed cavity and greater oral health along with overall health, to my healthy diet providing my body with everything it needed to remineralize and heal. And I also wonder if the fact that there are minerals in the clay, makes it beneficial for reminerilzation… just something I wonder.




            1
              1. Interesting stuff, YeahRight. He was a very cool guy, for sure. So his honesty doesn’t surprise me. He told me that drilling should be a last resort because not damaging the tooth is ideal.




                0
    1. Modern scientific literature suggests toothbrushing does not prevent tooth decay. It is definitely the fluoride in the toothpaste that prevents tooth decay. As we entered the 21st Century we discovered that fluoride can also reverse early decay before it penetrates the enamel of the tooth. This happens to be the most important dental discovery of the last hundred years, but is being ignored by many dentists. This is why your infant should be examined for early decay at the age of one. This is established and recommended by pediatricians and dentists.

      Larry Burnett DDS




      2
      1. yes, but is it safe, in your opinion? Is there a downside as well,
        as flouride does not need to be swallowed to cause harm, it can be absorbed
        in the gums, mouth tissue.




        1
        1. Yes, fluoride can be harmful if used improperly. But I have never seen evidence of harm caused by absorption of the small amounts that might be absorbed through skin or mucous membranes.

          Harm can come from swallowing to much fluoride from the toothpaste. This potential problem problem is eliminated by using only a very small smear of fluoridated toothpaste for infants and babies. If too much is swallowed it can at least cause nausea and vomiting. Most but not all of the harms described by anti-fluoridationalists is wildly exaggerated hype. But the simple fact is that fluoride stops and reverses tooth decay by its topical activities directly contacting the teeth and very little if any anti-decay activity from systemic effect of swallowing fluoride. This why I’m not in favor of fluoridating our drinking water.

          The topical ant-decay activities of topical fluoride in our toothpastes, which started in the late 50’s, is responsible for the world wide reduction in incidence of tooth decay ever since. But the conventional wisdom of the dental profession mistakenly credits fluoridation of our water supplies with the long term reduction in incidence of decay.

          There is good reason to resist addition of fluoride to the water supply.

          I am so thankful to Dr. Greger and his staff for this unique source of information which has truly saved my life and moved me from a triple bypass invalid to a 78 year old picture of perfect health. And my cardiology team has NO appreciation of the nutrition alone, which among other things has brought my high cholesterol and and LDL to 112 and 52 respectively.




          11
          1. thank you.
            how about gargling with green tea as an alternative?
            as effective as toothpaste, as far as fluoride from tea?
            thanks for any thoughts.




            0
            1. Yes John, I am familiar with the work of Dr. Price. He happens to have been a dentist who was very much opposed to systemic ingestion of fluoride. I agree with his opposition to forced ingestion through our water supply.

              In regards to indigenous people; People who are naturally resistant to tooth decay are people who are eating non- cariogenic diets. They don’t need fluoride in their toothpaste to prevent decay.

              But the incidence of decay would be much higher eating the typical western diet than it is now if we didn’t have fluoridated toothpaste. The incidence of decay in the US has dropped steadily and dramatically since the introduction of fluoridated toothpaste in the late 50’s

              This information is right up my alley and I hope it is helpful for some. Most things I write have been “put to the test”.




              2
      2. I am laughing, because toothbrushes is what came to mind after I said I only worry about the door handles and I switched away from a fluoride toothpaste and sometimes switch back and switch away again, depending on whether I am worried about fluoride versus dental bills.

        What made me laugh even harder is that I am that way about B12 and it all links back to this cleaning topic, via the toothbrush, which in my house is stored inside my new medicine cabinet in a cup container with my toothpaste.

        That started because I watched Dr. Oz’s toothbrush and toothbrush holder test where toilet contents spray was all over everything in the bathroom.

        And some of us don’t want to get our B-12 that way.

        Yes, the right answer is close the lid before flushing and not wanting potty mouth ends the seat up or down male versus female debate forever.




        3
      3. “In this meta-analysis, we could not separate the contribution of fluoride in toothpaste as none of the studies provided data to make this possible. We have established, however, that frequent brushers are at less risk for the incidence of carious lesions independent of fluoride in toothpaste based on the findings from few studies. Three studies (Grindefjord et al. 1995; Leroy et al. 2005; Wong et al. 2012) considered toothbrushing frequency and fluoride in toothpaste as separate variables and found that the effect of the type of toothpaste was insignificant while infrequent toothbrushing frequency was associated with the incidence of carious lesions. Two studies (Wendt et al. 1994; Winter et al. 2015) found both frequent brushing and the presence of fluoride in toothpaste to be associated with decreased incidence of carious lesions.”

        http://journals.sagepub.com/doi/full/10.1177/0022034516655315




        4
        1. Tom, I’m not sure why you posted the part of the paragraph from a study. In didn’t in any way refute the importance of fluoride in toothpaste. I’ll post the entire paragraph from which you cut your piece. I think it clears up the writer’s opinion on the necessity of fluoride in the toothpaste.

          “It is widely believed that effective removal of dental biofilm by toothbrushing can reduce the development of new carious lesions, but the evidence base is weak—especially when it comes to frequency of brushing. It is recognized that most of the population cannot achieve optimal control of biofilm with toothbrushing alone, and fluoride in the toothpaste is considered of major importance in caries prevention (Choo et al. 2001). In this meta-analysis, we could not separate the contribution of fluoride in toothpaste as none of the studies provided data to make this possible. We have established, however, that frequent brushers are at less risk for the incidence of carious lesions independent of fluoride in toothpaste based on the findings from few studies. Three studies (Grindefjord et al. 1995; Leroy et al. 2005; Wong et al. 2012) considered toothbrushing frequency and fluoride in toothpaste as separate variables and found that the effect of the type of toothpaste was insignificant while infrequent toothbrushing frequency was associated with the incidence of carious lesions. Two studies (Wendt et al. 1994; Winter et al. 2015) found both frequent brushing and the presence of fluoride in toothpaste to be associated with decreased incidence of carious lesions.”




          1
          1. Larry

            I can only repeat the sentence (which you yourself also quote)

            “We have established, however, that frequent brushers are at less risk for the incidence of carious lesions independent of fluoride in toothpaste based on the findings from few studies.”

            That seems pretty clear to me. Only a few studies have actually looked at this particular point but the ones that did, showed that frequent brushing alone reduced the incidence of dental caries.

            Yes, fluoride appears to be of major importance but frequent brushing in and of itself also appears to reduce dental caries – which appears to contradict your position. Or am I missing something?




            2
          2. Larry, I’m quoting from one of your posts: “There is good reason to resist addition of fluoride to the water supply.”

            Alas, most of us are stuck with it nevertheless. May I ask what you do to “resist” the fluoride in your water? Do you have a distilled water machine set up in your house or what?




            1
      4. “Modern scientific literature suggests toothbrushing does not prevent tooth decay.” An endodontist or periodontist was on the comments board under one of these videos not too long ago, saying the exact opposite. “It is definitely the fluoride in the toothpaste that prevents tooth decay.” I guess we’ll all just take your word for it. I used to use fluoridated toothpastes and mouth wash back when I drank diet coke and ate like crap and I got cavities… I changed my diet, went vegan then WFPB vegan and stopped using fluoride toothpaste and even switched to simply brushing with clay and I haven’t had a cavity since, but I did have an old one heal itself.




        2
    2. I don’t use it for a few reasons.,. It’s not actually the real mineral fluoride like found in tea, it’s synthetic lab produced stuff. It’s my understanding that fluoride can interfere with thyroid function and I’m not sure how true it is or exactly why but I’ve gotten myself off thyroid drugs and healed my body naturally so I avoid things like fluoridated water/toothpaste – I don’t worry about naturally occurring stuff in plants such as tea.
      I also read a long time ago that in concentration camps they purposefully added fluoride to the water in an attempt to make people more docile. It’s been said that it can lower IQ levels at least in children.
      Then I’ve read how fluoride works for teeth, that while it does harden them, it also makes them more brittle and prone to breaking… don’t know how true it is.
      I personally choose not to use it. I actually use pure bentonite clay, sometimes with added mint.




      1
      1. ^I meant to add that I’m not sure whether the Nazi thing is a myth or not. I read it so long ago and hadn’t looked into since.




        1
        1. jj, I’ve been using it for about 3 years now I would guess. When switching from toothpaste to the bentonite clay, I noticed how thoroughly clean it made my mouth feel and it also seems to do a really good job at cleaning off stains. I’ve used toothpastes here and there but they don’t make my mouth feel as clean. I was attracted to bentonite clay due to how it pulls toxins when mixed with water (metal interferes so don’t use metal when mixing), but people with metal fillings are warned not to use it because it may pull out metals.
          My experience has been great and I even had a mild cavity (from before making the switch and prior to going vegan then WFPB) heal itself which I attribute to diet but I theorize the clay helped… apart form cleaning well, it has so many minerals that I wonder if brushing with it helps with remineralization.
          I use Redmonds clay and they actually sell a toothpaste made of their clay with only a few other ingredients. The clay is cheaper and goes a long way plus I’d like to know more about xylitol before I’d be comfortable regularly using a product with it.




          1
        2. I’ve had severe gum disease for decades and lost many teeth to it. Most of my mouth is now implants. And I used to have to get cleanings once every two months. But after Dr Greger’s video on using amla and erythritol as a mouthwash, I gave up toothpaste and started brushing with 1/2 teaspoon of erythritol. Since that point my problems have gone away. In fact, My last cleaning was more than a year and a half ago, at my doctor’s suggestion. And when I recently in, thinking it might be bad after that long. My dentist looked at my mouth and couldn’t believe there was no plaque or inflammation, just pink healthy tissue, even around the implants, He told me that he could do a cleaning, but that it would just be wasting my our time and my money. So he didn’t charge me and off I went for at least another 6 months to a year.




          1
          1. Mark, do you think that it was the erythritol that provided the benefit, and maybe alma would not have been even necessary? DO you actually brush your teeth with the erythritol, or do you use it as a rinse?

            Also, were you using fluoride when you were experiencing all your dental woes?

            Thanks.




            0
            1. I stopped using the amla during that 18 months, so it had to be the erythritol. I do brush my teeth with it and actually, I said I use a teaspoon but it’s more like 1/4 to 1/2 tsp. I buy the cheapest brand at the time. All seem to work. Also, I keep some in my car and if I have a meal away from home I put a little in my mouth, wait for it to melt, swish it around and swallow it. Helps as a breath freshener too. And, I used to use fluoride toothpaste nectar I have so much recession that my root (which are soft) needed protection. But with the erythritol that seems to no longer be a problem for me. I haven’t used the fluoride toothpaste in years.

              Ok a different use, I had read that erythritol can be used to treat a sore throat. You let it melt in your mouth and swallow it slowly, it makes the walls of your throat slippery so the sore throat bacteria can’t colonize and grow. Every time I feel like I’m getting a cold I do this and it stops it in its tracks.
              Good luck with it.




              1
              1. awesome. thanks.
                do you brush with the erythritol after eating? if so, how long do you personally wait?

                lastly, have you had any bad or good experiences in using it as a sweetener for beverages or added to recipes?

                i was concerned that it could disrupt the microbiome, but maybe it even helps that.




                0
                1. Sometimes I brush right away, sometimes I’m lazy and wit a little while. If I wait to brush I’ll swish some around my mouth to counter the food, especially fruit or sweet stuff.

                  I went really slowly with actually swallowing it to make sure I had no I’ll affects and I’ve had none. I think in one of Dr Greger’s videos he says that it’s being studied as an antioxidant. So it might be helpful. I’ve tried it a few times as sweetener, but it seems like you have to add tons to have an affect on food. So I don’t do it. Also, I found one brand that had a mint taste. I don’t remember which one. For a tooth powder the mint flavor is fine, but not as a general sweetener. So if you get one with a mint taste, you can also try a different brand.

                  Also, I buy a pack of four, bamboo toothbrushes on Amazon. It’s a good price and the bristles are really soft and gentle on the gums.




                  1
          2. forgot to ask ya, but did you have a cavity-issue or was it just a gum/inflammation issue? I do wonder if the benefits of erthyol are more so far gums, than preventing and healing cavities and hardening the teeth.

            thanks.




            0
            1. I did not have cavities in this period. You can google: dental caries erythritol, to see lots of results about this. From what I’ve read in the past, fluoride works by hardening dental enamel and erythritol works by killing bad oral bacteria. So they are working on different mechanisms. If my understanding is correct, then it seems that one’s benefit would depend on what their risk is from. Plus, the products are not mutually exclusive.
              That is, it might help to use both.

              I wanted to get away from fluoride long before I found erythritol because of it’s link to cancer and because the sodium laurel sulphate (SLS) in toothpaste (the same stuff as in soap) has also been linked to cancer by some groups and it’s known to dry out and irritate the gums. And I love that there’s no need for a warning label on erythritol. You brush anywhere, don’t rinse and then just enjoy the sweet fresh flavor. BTW, sometimes if I am going to eat something sticky, like dried or fresh fruit I will first let some erythritol melt in my mouth, swish it around and spit it out and then eat the sticky food. It seems to reduce the ability of the food to stick to my teeth above and below the gum line. And it doesn’t change the taste of what I’m eating. Then I brush as soon as I can.

              Just fyi, the brand of erythritol that I usually get is ‘Wholesome’. I prefer it because it’s much finer granules than other brands. I get it from Whole Foods Market. I think Amazon has it too. The toothbrushes I get are ‘La-Boos’ from Amazon.




              0
    3. I’ve had severe gum disease for decades and lost many teeth to it. Most of my mouth is now implants. And I used to have to get cleanings once every two months. But after Dr Greger’s video on using amla and erythritol as a mouthwash, I gave up toothpaste and started brushing with 1/2 teaspoon of erythritol. Since that point my problems have gone away. In fact, My last cleaning was more than a year and a half ago, at my doctor’s suggestion. And when I recently in, thinking it might be bad after that long. My dentist looked at my mouth and couldn’t believe there was no plaque or inflammation, just pink healthy tissue, even around the implants, He told me that he could do a cleaning, but that it would just be wasting my our time and my money. So he didn’t charge me and off I went for at least another 6 months to a year.




      0
  5. On the other hand, I was very much interested in this topic, even though it veers away from nutrition. If Dr. Greger comes across research that affects health and safety, even though it might not be nutrition, I hope he continues to share his findings.




    24
    1. Well I don’t consider Dr. Greger’s role as a nutritionist in the least, I consider him a true doctor actually working to help people and a brilliant researcher. Considering many factors affect our health and longevity, he’s doing exactly what needs to be done. To focus solely on one subject instead of all things vital to our health, would not only be short changing his capability, but also all of us.




      1
  6. Can the expensive natural cleaning product be duplicated into a DIY product? What ingredient in the expensive natural cleaning product is responsible for killing the ecoli and staphylococcus virus?
    Have you tested Onguard oil from DoTERRA? Claims to kill bacteria as effectively as any commercial cleaning product.




    2
    1. I glanced at them, saw a comment that their first ingredient’s sugar, and said no thanks.
      They’re also a mix of herbs, making it hard to know whether they all belong.




      1
      1. I am not sure why sugar is a no-no for you.

        It is a well-known preservative and bactericide. It has a long history of use in wound dressings to combat infection. I don’t see any obvious why it can’t or shouldn’t be used effectively as a domestic cleaner




        2
  7. The end of modern antibiotic-based medicine is now here and rapidly evolving thanks to the greedy ignorant agribusinesses that exploited those wonderful life savers in the name of last year’s profits and bigger fatter animals that can live in deplorably filthy cramped factory farm environments. But didn’t Your US President the ‘Honorable’ Donald (I’m the greatest – just ask me, I’ll tell you how much) Tromp just bomb the living crap out of some areas in (yes it’s so close to the US borders) Syrian places because some rather dodgy reports or accusations of using CHLORINE as a chemical weapon? That would give one pause wouldn’t it in using bleach and swimming pool chlorine and chlorinators wouldn’t it? Apparently not.. We are Big Fans here Dr. Greggor, we all watch your daily videos and there are a LOT of people in the world very grateful of your fabulous work!




    4
  8. Some people use a teaspoon of bleach in water to rinse veggies and fruit befor re-rinsing and placing in frigerator. They say it keeps produce fresher for a longer period of time. (My produce doesn’t hang around long enough to try this, but thought it worth a mention. )




    0
    1. I know a Dallas-based Nutrition Guru. He says to use a pool strength (35%) Hydrogen Peroxide bath (2-3 T to large bowl of water for the 20-min. soak) and not the chlorine on your veggies. Does the same without injuring your body. Same for pool cleanliness. I would NEVER use chlorine in my pool!!




      0
      1. I would be wary about using hydrogen peroxide for the purpose of sanitizing. It kills some bacteria but the bacteria with the catalase enzyme can break HO down and resist it. Of course, I never bother rinsing or sanitizing my fruits and veggies- why kill all the free probiotics??

        It’s not even worth the water to rinse the pesticides off IMHO. There is a video somewhere on the site showing how eating plants prevents an order of magnitude more cancer than the pesticides cause. The majority of the average person’s pesticide exposure is from meat and dairy anyway…




        5
        1. Ryan, one of the moderators on here recently explained that we can’t wash off the probiotics on the surface of plants, so rinsing or normal washing wouldn’t hurt. But bleaching, I’m not so sure…




          1
  9. I use two small spray bottles, one filled with Hydrogen Peroxide and the other with White Vinegar to be used one after the other. Sorry, I forget where I read this however it is claimed that the two used sequentially (not mixed together) disinfect as well as bleach but are none toxic.




    0
  10. For me, it is disinfect all the handles in the house during flu seasons, or after large gatherings when sick people come into the house, but don’t worry in the off seasons. I actually bought a hospital grade air purifier and feel like that, plus the handles are all I need anything heavy duty for.

    Or that is how I used to feel…

    But…. lately…. when all my Keto family and friends come over and pet my dog and use my bathroom, I want the highest potency cleaner as possible and want a Vegan cleaning service to come in and do the cleaning for me.

    I wish they had done Tea Tree at a higher level.

    Though I read about someone who tested homemade laundry detergents and they tested it by soaking the clean laundry after a few weeks of washing it in homemade detergent and the tub of laundry looked like mud after the “soak” and it made me not trust homemade cleaning products at all.

    Though cheap Vodka sounds like it might work. Not sure if my house would pass the breathalyzer test after. Are there VOC’s in vodka?




    2
    1. I used to use cheap vodka and cheap gin to clean. Seems like I would have the same voc level as vinegar, but I don’t know. I don’t know if it disinfected well, but it’s what I used and it worked fine. But then I just changed to Seventh Generation brand cleaners and other similar ones. If you shop at Whole Foods they have an little color coded danger-meter (red-orange-yellow-green) on each price label for the shelf. It’s interesting that Seventh Generation is yellow (so not too bad) but that Method is orange. That was a surprise. Anyway, sometimes my friends would look under my sink for the garbage bin and see the big jug of booze and joke that I had been lying about being a non-drinking and accuse me of parting with out them.




      0
  11. I am wondering about Chlorine Dioxide.

    Years ago, my vet’s dog and groomer’s dog both had ring worm and both didn’t tell me until after my dog had it.

    My vet had spent month after month after month trying to get rid of all of the spores and doing ridiculous baths and washing the pet beds and people on-line were saying to throw out your vacuum.

    I put my dog through a little bit of it, but had the thought that my vet’s dogs have been going through this for months and I ended up researching and someone was talking about swimming in chlorine for days and having it go away, but that it lasts even in swimming pool water and they said a sentence, but if there was chlorine dioxide, that might work.

    So, I found a pet place, which sold a chlorine dioxide pet product, and they showed petri dishes treated with their product versus not and nothing grew on their treated petri dishes. They said that I could use it on my pet, and that it would kill the spores and that I could fog my house with it. I did it and the ring worm was gone within a week and never came back.




    2
    1. I do animal rescue and I brought in a batch of kittens with ringworm. I used bleach and water (I think 1:10) to clean everything. I gave the infected cats an internal medication that I picked up at an animal compounding pharmacy. Interestingly, the stuff that the first vet had them on was dangerous old school, what used to be used, but the new vet shifted the meds immediately and the kittens only had a dose or two of the old stuff. It is important to have a vet that pays attention to the research in the field, just as it is important to have a doc that does.




      4
  12. I would be interested in what adding rubbing alcohol to the mix of DYI cleaning products does. That is what I use for surfaces that I want extra cleaning power for. Water, rubbing alcohol (4:1 ratio) and a little tea tree oil is the hard core cleaner and straight vinegar for the less concerning surfaces. I started using rubbing alcohol because I assumed that vinegar would not be as much of a disinfectant as I would want in some instances, like cleaning cat boxes, for example.




    2
    1. I like rubbing alcohol too when I really need to disinfect something, and it’s cheap. Some of my family members told me they used to clean hospitals with rubbing alcohol.




      1
  13. I don’t like the idea of using bleach for cleaning (or even disinfecting), and this video was quite the eye-opener. But even so, I’m leery of DIY cleaning solutions– not because of they wouldn’t work, but because they’re only as good as their ingredients. If I buy bleach (or vinegar, even), there’s a very high probability that I’m getting bleach (and/or vinegar), with the concentration (by percentage) listed and required by law.

    But with ingredients like thymol, or tea tree oil? That’s a very different story. The laws that allow for “dietary supplements” (it can be anything, and claim anything, as long as it says it hasn’t been evaluated by the FDA) have eroded the standards, and currently even the laws that are in place aren’t being enforced. That’s because it’s pretty easy to test is something is “bleach”, but a lot harder with essential oils or dietary supplements. And because of this, people (including a nice botanist in Canada) are indeed confirming that certain herb supplements, when tested in a lab environment, actually contain little (or in some cases none) of what they are supposed to contain.

    Unfortunately, this can sometimes include standardized supplements (listed as containing at least X% of a lab-testable active ingredient), and even vitamins. I have personal experience with this, when I was working with a doctor who was concerned at my low vitamin D levels (via blood test, a “little low”). I was put on an OTC D3 supplement, but we had to keep upping the dosage over the course of a year with no change. A few months later, I was on a different brand (same dose), and suddenly my results are coming back _much_ higher. I did some research, and it turns out other folks have seen this problem with OTC vitamins.

    My point we should be vigilant on the source of ingredients, especially if the measures and enforcement may be lax. And maybe we should consider scrapping the FDA-circumventing ‘dietary supplement’ laws, as well as upping the number of FDA inspectors and their offices (instead of reducing them).




    6
  14. What about more teatree oil and a few drops of bleach in the homemade brew? Or a very diluted bleach mix in food and toilet areas only after main cleaning?

    Does anyone know an inexpensive source of thymol ?




    0
  15. Interesting. I was also wondering if there is an increase in asthma in the people who are around the chlorine in pools or is that a different type of bleach ? When I walk into our Community Center the smell of chorine is overwhelming. I can’t imagine working as a life guard in those pools isn’t detrimental. Exercising and deeply inhaling those fumes can’t be healthy. Do you know of any studies on that subject out there ?




    0
    1. Hell Lynn, many thanks for your comment!

      As a matter of fact, there’re several studies that have been published regarding this issue. Researchers linked chlorine inhalation (not only coming from pools) with several respiratory problems. Here are listed the most interest ones I could find:

      Persistent effects of chlorine inhalation on respiratory health

      The pool chlorine hypothesis and asthma among boys

      Respiratory and Ocular Symptoms Among Employees of an Indoor Waterpark Resort – Ohio, 2016.

      Is there a potential link between indoor chlorinated pool environment and airway remodeling/inflammation in swimmers?

      Hope that helps!




      0
    2. I grew up practically living in swimming pools when I was little along with my sibling, cousins, and friends. None of us developed asthma or had any respiratory problems. I’ve always had exceptionally good lungs. So I take comfort in this when I’m now worried about the pool. But I imagine public pools contain a lot more and a steady amount. At home, you put the chlorine in at night and wait a certain amount of hours before going in. There’s a way of using salt now, but you have to buy a special filter.




      1
  16. I spray coloidal silver for cleaning?

    But also the regular baking soda,vinegar lemon etc.
    We are on a septic tank so wouldnt use bleach anyway.




    0
  17. A hand-held steam cleaner such as the Bissell steam shot would disinfect surfaces with high temperature.

    Maybe public health units that demand bleach be used to sterilize dishes (there is a law here that a poster be in all church kitchens that bleach must be used in the sink when washing dishes. And few men are exposed to this danger.




    1
  18. What about cheap vodka-really cheap? I’ve used it straight for mildew and mold. Works very fast, any aroma evaporates very quickly. Also deodorizes in place of something like a commercial spray fabric refresher. So for kitchen/bath surfaces maybe using a DIY with maybe 1/3 cheap vodka, 2/3 water, maybe a few drops of a tea tree (don’t use if you have cats) or an essential oil you like the smell of-lemon, or thyme as suggested, or eucalyptus, etc. Then use baking soda if the surface requires scrubbing too. Alcohol is used to sterilize things, right? And I’ve not heard of respiratory irritation due to inhaling whilst sipping a cocktail or glass of wine. Could one alternatively use rubbing alcohol?




    0
      1. Dr J

        Not sure to be honest – I use Chrome and that works fine.

        It’s possible that new users may have to register first – I can’t remember now – but if so registration would be free (I am too much of a cheapskate to pay for website access).




        0
  19. Who cares about staph or e-coli? What I want to know is does thyme oil kill norovirus? Norovirus is the primary reason I keep bleach based cleansers in my house.




    0
  20. Thank you for the valuable information
    I have a request to make
    I have been suffering from palpitations for over 10 years
    Frequent PVCs
    No medication was helpful ( the doctors tried many, including beta blockers, anti arrhythmia drug such as amiodaron), the medicine only gave me side effects
    3 catheter ablation was unsuccessful
    I’ve been following plant based diet for about 2 months
    I still have symptoms
    Any suggestions?
    Please help




    0
    1. Hello Esther. Thanks for your comment!

      I think this video can be really useful for your case: Boosting Heart Nerve Control; it addresses a type of food that can improve heart rate variability.

      If you’re interested, you can read the cited article here: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/pmid/19158214/

      And here’s another study which mention other type of foods and nutrients that might influence HRV.

      Hope that helps!




      2
  21. Although I have never used club soda at all, much less as a cleanser, I would like to try your natural recipe. Chlorine has made me short of breath so I avoid it. Dingy white socks are OK with me!
    Is flat club soda as effective as fresh for this use?




    0
  22. I believe we know that bleach can “kill” viruses (influenza, hepatitis, common cold, etc.) and the TB bacillus that can persist on counter and sink surfaces. How about these other products?




    0
      1. Reading the back of Seventh Generation right now, their disinfectant cleaner reads: “Kills over 99.99% of household germs, specifically: Influenza A virus, H1N1, Rhinovirus type 37, Methicillin Ressostent S. aureus (MRSA), Staphylococcus aureus, Salmonella enterica, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa”




        1
  23. I am grateful for this video! We get mold buildup in the shower and I can’t think of any soap and water solution that will kill it. I also have RAD (Reactive Airway Disease) from exposure to something in the office so using bleach is a poor option. Thanks for the good info!




    1
    1. Hey Penny, I was having an issue with mold on the faucet in my last place, my roommate kept using bleach on it and it would slightly go away from like 2 seconds and come back sometimes even worse. So I used apple cider vinegar to clean it off one day and didn’t expect it to work, but it never came back! I do t know if this works on all mold but it worked for me well that time.




      1
      1. I remember reading somewhere that vinegar kills 82% of mold species and that’s why it is a good idea to use eg baking soda as well.




        1
    2. I regularly use white vinegar around the bathtub facet and where the tile wall meets the tub. I just spray it on every couple weeks and leave it to evaporate. It completely controls the mold.




      1
  24. It would be very cool to see more research done with essential oils beyond just their disinfecting capabilities, but that alone would be awesome. Sorry I’m not a trillionaire Dr. Greger! I would fund so much cool research!

    Another benefit to cleaning with essential oils is the aromatherapy that comes along with it! And I actually briefly read something about a study showing breathing lavender showed a boost in glutathione… something like that, no idea if it was true. But it made me wonder if we can’t get antioxidant effects from breathing in these things.




    1
  25. I like Alice’s Wonder Spray but usually use less dish soap than the recipe calls for:
    3/4 cup white vinegar
    1 1/2 teaspoon borax
    24 oz hot water
    1/6 cup liquid dish soap
    24 oz spray bottle
    Mix vinegar & borax, fill rest of bottle with very hot water. Shake until borax is dissolved. Add dish soap.
    Note: Borax is an eye irritant and can be harmful if swallowed. Keep out of reach of children.




    1
  26. Years ago I had read that if you use peroxide and vinegar one after the other, that it cleans better than bleach. It said that this was confirmed by the Mayo Clinic (if I remember right) and I looked up the citation and found it was correct. However, in looking for both the citation and article now I can’t find either on the net. But here is what it said. Use either one first, applying as a spray from a spray bottle and wait for 10 seconds before wiping. Then spray on the other and wait 10 seconds before wiping. It doesn’t matter which one you use first but DO NOT combine them because it will dilute them for cleaning, and make them so acidic that it could hurt you or your counter top. I still use this combination if I really want the nuclear option to clean something, which is rare, Now I mostly just use a good green cleaner from Seventh Generation or similar that is rated as green or yellow for ingredient safety, based on the red/orange/yellow/green scale that Whole Foods Market applies to all the cleaning products they sell.




    1
    1. Living in the developing world for close to 37 years has given us plenty of reasons to bleach our gully … errr veggies! Amoeba are not fun! I nearly lost my husband to them and a son had them get to his liver. This may, however, be part of my resurgence of asthma ( life- long, but mild.)
      When I had a Formica counter, I cleaned with one spray bottle of vinegar and another of hydrogen peroxide. Now that I am stuck with marble in the kitchen and bathrooms, vinegar is not allowed. It dissolves stone. Be very careful!




      0
  27. Stock your medicine cabinets with various sorts of essential oils, particularly oil of oregano, grapefruit oil, lavender oil, tea tree oil, and thymol oil, and you’ll get all the pathogenic killing properties needed for almost every type of bacteria, fungus, mold, mildew, and disease. Not only will your home be clean but it’ll smell incredibly good.

    Find more about essential oils at https://naturalrevolution.org/essential-oils-guide-therapeutic-uses-recipes-safety/




    1

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