Eczema Treatment with Coconut Oil, Mineral Oil, vs. Vaseline

Eczema Treatment with Coconut Oil, Mineral Oil, vs. Vaseline
4.38 (87.64%) 55 votes

Natural topical remedies for eczema are put to the test, including licorice root gel, St. John’s Wort cream, and emollients such as coconut oil, mineral oil, and petroleum jelly.

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Below is an approximation of this video’s audio content. To see any graphs, charts, graphics, images, and quotes to which Dr. Greger may be referring, watch the above video.

“Despite the availability of [drugs] with proven efficacy” for eczema, like topical steroids, many patients seek out natural alternatives. “Which plant [then, should be used] for which skin disease?” Well, in the case of eczema, two appeared to beat out placebo. One was licorice root. Smearing on a placebo gel didn’t appear to help much with clearing redness or itchiness after one week or two weeks, but a 1% licorice gel, and especially a 2% gel, did seem to clear the symptoms in most patients. They conclude that “licorice extract could be considered…an effective [eczema treatment] agent.”

The other successful trial was with St. John’s wort cream, showing a reduction in eczema severity scores week by week superior to that of placebo. So, it works better than nothing, but the question is: Does it work better than drugs, better than topical steroids? That we don’t know. Sometimes, the drugs don’t work, though: so-called “recalcitrant” atopic dermatitis. So, these researchers in Japan asked patients to try drinking four cups of oolong tea every day for a month, and most patients “showed marked [or at least] moderate improvement,” starting after one or two weeks, and then, most remained better even five months after they stopped. The problem is that there was no control group. So, we don’t know how many would have gotten better on their own. But, since drinking tea is healthy anyway, why not give it a try?

Back to topical treatments: a vitamin B12 cream beat out the same cream, without the B12. Most of the patients and doctors rated the results of the B12 cream as good; better than they rated the placebo cream.

Regardless of what topical agent you use, steroid or otherwise, “[f]irst and foremost, though, it is essential that the skin barrier [be] protected and maintained with the use of emollients,” meaning moisturizers, “ideally…once or twice” a day, especially right after showering, to lock in the moisture. Petroleum jelly, like Vaseline, is highly effective, but it’s kind of greasy and messy. What about something like coconut oil, which is less greasy? It was found to improve skin dryness, though no better than mineral oil, which is cheaper. Is mineral oil safe, though?

Exposure to mineral oil was found to be associated with rheumatoid arthritis, but that was occupational exposure to industrial mineral oils, like hydraulic fluid. The same group of researchers subsequently found that cosmetic-grade mineral oil did not seem to carry the same risk. In general, topically applied mineral oil shouldn’t present any health risk.

That doesn’t mean you can safely inject it into your penis, as that “may have devastating cosmetic and sexual function consequences.” There is, however, one good use for mineral oil on the penis, and that’s for “penile zipper entrapment.” “The skin of the [penis] is susceptible to entrapment in the zipper of careless young boys, particularly those who fail to wear undergarments. Understandably, this mishap provokes distress in the unfortunate victim, in his parents, and ultimately in the healthcare provider charged with the task of liberating the organ.” A recommended textbook approach is surgery, believe it or not, but just liberally dose with some mineral oil and you can just slip the zipper off, minimizing trauma for all involved parties.

But, just because it works as well as coconut oil for dry skin, doesn’t mean it works as well for eczema. Head-to-head, topical virgin coconut oil works better than topical mineral oil at decreasing eczema severity, with twice as many children experiencing an excellent response after two months’ treatment. “Thus, among pediatric patients with mild to moderate [eczema], topical application of [virgin coconut oil] was superior to that of mineral oil.”

But, what about compared to virgin olive oil? Olive oil worked, dropping eczema severity, but coconut oil worked better. What do these numbers mean? Like, what does it mean going from a severity score of 35 down to 20 look like? From this to that: before and after four weeks of topical coconut oil.

Now, we know coconut oil has a lot of saturated fat; so, we don’t want to eat it. But, the saturated fat isn’t absorbed into your skin unless you’re a baby, where your skin is so thin you can actually absorb saturated coconut fat into your bloodstream. But, in older children and adults, using coconut oil on your skin or hair is considered safe. Now, that still doesn’t mean you can inject it into your penis. “He…certainly achieved enlargement,” the medical student noted, “looking at the swollen, red, oozing mass before [her].”

Okay, but what about treating eczema with just plain Vaseline? Eczema can already be expensive to deal with. The average out-of-pocket cost can be $274 a month; that’s more than a third of a typical family’s disposable income. And, you can rub a kid head to toe with petroleum jelly for like four cents, whereas coconut oil or some of the fancier over-the-counter moisturizers can be many times more expensive—though not as bad as some prescription moisturizers that can cost over a hundred dollars per tube, and work no better than the over-the-counter stuff. Wait; I only see one line—exactly, they’re right on top of one another. No evidence of superiority over the traditional petroleum jelly-based over-the counter-products that can be 65 times cheaper.

Yeah, but doesn’t virgin coconut oil have like active ingredients, whereas petroleum jelly is just “inert”? Vaseline has been around since 1872, but it took the scientific community 144 years to put it to the test. And, it’s not inert at all, significantly upregulating genes that fight infection, and inducing the expression of genes that help with barrier function, increasing the thickness of the protective outer layer of skin, and actively reducing inflammation. Yeah, but is it safe? Not, if you inject it into your—. What is it with men injecting stuff into their penis? “In…less severe cases, the problem [can] be solved [with] basic surgery.” Otherwise, it may require major reconstruction. Evidently, done a lot by prisoners, giving a whole new meaning to the term Jailhouse Rock. An unbelievable one in six inmates at the largest prison in Hungary “admitted [to] Vaseline self-injection.” Or, how about actual rocks, the surgical implantation of stones in the penis?

Or injecting “industrial silicone.” I will never look at the term “silicone caulk” the same way, ever again. When men were asked why they were injecting fishy substances into their penises, most explained that it was because they felt under-endowed, but one guy said he just wanted to give it a try. But, why inject cod-liver oil into your penis when you can just inject the mercury directly, and cut out the middlefish.

Anyways, based on 77 studies of moisturizers for eczema, no reliable evidence that one moisturizer is any better than the other, though a consensus of experts concluded that petroleum jelly may be best for skin barrier function protection.

Please consider volunteering to help out on the site.

Image credit: saponifier. Image has been modified.

Motion graphics by Avocado Video

Below is an approximation of this video’s audio content. To see any graphs, charts, graphics, images, and quotes to which Dr. Greger may be referring, watch the above video.

“Despite the availability of [drugs] with proven efficacy” for eczema, like topical steroids, many patients seek out natural alternatives. “Which plant [then, should be used] for which skin disease?” Well, in the case of eczema, two appeared to beat out placebo. One was licorice root. Smearing on a placebo gel didn’t appear to help much with clearing redness or itchiness after one week or two weeks, but a 1% licorice gel, and especially a 2% gel, did seem to clear the symptoms in most patients. They conclude that “licorice extract could be considered…an effective [eczema treatment] agent.”

The other successful trial was with St. John’s wort cream, showing a reduction in eczema severity scores week by week superior to that of placebo. So, it works better than nothing, but the question is: Does it work better than drugs, better than topical steroids? That we don’t know. Sometimes, the drugs don’t work, though: so-called “recalcitrant” atopic dermatitis. So, these researchers in Japan asked patients to try drinking four cups of oolong tea every day for a month, and most patients “showed marked [or at least] moderate improvement,” starting after one or two weeks, and then, most remained better even five months after they stopped. The problem is that there was no control group. So, we don’t know how many would have gotten better on their own. But, since drinking tea is healthy anyway, why not give it a try?

Back to topical treatments: a vitamin B12 cream beat out the same cream, without the B12. Most of the patients and doctors rated the results of the B12 cream as good; better than they rated the placebo cream.

Regardless of what topical agent you use, steroid or otherwise, “[f]irst and foremost, though, it is essential that the skin barrier [be] protected and maintained with the use of emollients,” meaning moisturizers, “ideally…once or twice” a day, especially right after showering, to lock in the moisture. Petroleum jelly, like Vaseline, is highly effective, but it’s kind of greasy and messy. What about something like coconut oil, which is less greasy? It was found to improve skin dryness, though no better than mineral oil, which is cheaper. Is mineral oil safe, though?

Exposure to mineral oil was found to be associated with rheumatoid arthritis, but that was occupational exposure to industrial mineral oils, like hydraulic fluid. The same group of researchers subsequently found that cosmetic-grade mineral oil did not seem to carry the same risk. In general, topically applied mineral oil shouldn’t present any health risk.

That doesn’t mean you can safely inject it into your penis, as that “may have devastating cosmetic and sexual function consequences.” There is, however, one good use for mineral oil on the penis, and that’s for “penile zipper entrapment.” “The skin of the [penis] is susceptible to entrapment in the zipper of careless young boys, particularly those who fail to wear undergarments. Understandably, this mishap provokes distress in the unfortunate victim, in his parents, and ultimately in the healthcare provider charged with the task of liberating the organ.” A recommended textbook approach is surgery, believe it or not, but just liberally dose with some mineral oil and you can just slip the zipper off, minimizing trauma for all involved parties.

But, just because it works as well as coconut oil for dry skin, doesn’t mean it works as well for eczema. Head-to-head, topical virgin coconut oil works better than topical mineral oil at decreasing eczema severity, with twice as many children experiencing an excellent response after two months’ treatment. “Thus, among pediatric patients with mild to moderate [eczema], topical application of [virgin coconut oil] was superior to that of mineral oil.”

But, what about compared to virgin olive oil? Olive oil worked, dropping eczema severity, but coconut oil worked better. What do these numbers mean? Like, what does it mean going from a severity score of 35 down to 20 look like? From this to that: before and after four weeks of topical coconut oil.

Now, we know coconut oil has a lot of saturated fat; so, we don’t want to eat it. But, the saturated fat isn’t absorbed into your skin unless you’re a baby, where your skin is so thin you can actually absorb saturated coconut fat into your bloodstream. But, in older children and adults, using coconut oil on your skin or hair is considered safe. Now, that still doesn’t mean you can inject it into your penis. “He…certainly achieved enlargement,” the medical student noted, “looking at the swollen, red, oozing mass before [her].”

Okay, but what about treating eczema with just plain Vaseline? Eczema can already be expensive to deal with. The average out-of-pocket cost can be $274 a month; that’s more than a third of a typical family’s disposable income. And, you can rub a kid head to toe with petroleum jelly for like four cents, whereas coconut oil or some of the fancier over-the-counter moisturizers can be many times more expensive—though not as bad as some prescription moisturizers that can cost over a hundred dollars per tube, and work no better than the over-the-counter stuff. Wait; I only see one line—exactly, they’re right on top of one another. No evidence of superiority over the traditional petroleum jelly-based over-the counter-products that can be 65 times cheaper.

Yeah, but doesn’t virgin coconut oil have like active ingredients, whereas petroleum jelly is just “inert”? Vaseline has been around since 1872, but it took the scientific community 144 years to put it to the test. And, it’s not inert at all, significantly upregulating genes that fight infection, and inducing the expression of genes that help with barrier function, increasing the thickness of the protective outer layer of skin, and actively reducing inflammation. Yeah, but is it safe? Not, if you inject it into your—. What is it with men injecting stuff into their penis? “In…less severe cases, the problem [can] be solved [with] basic surgery.” Otherwise, it may require major reconstruction. Evidently, done a lot by prisoners, giving a whole new meaning to the term Jailhouse Rock. An unbelievable one in six inmates at the largest prison in Hungary “admitted [to] Vaseline self-injection.” Or, how about actual rocks, the surgical implantation of stones in the penis?

Or injecting “industrial silicone.” I will never look at the term “silicone caulk” the same way, ever again. When men were asked why they were injecting fishy substances into their penises, most explained that it was because they felt under-endowed, but one guy said he just wanted to give it a try. But, why inject cod-liver oil into your penis when you can just inject the mercury directly, and cut out the middlefish.

Anyways, based on 77 studies of moisturizers for eczema, no reliable evidence that one moisturizer is any better than the other, though a consensus of experts concluded that petroleum jelly may be best for skin barrier function protection.

Please consider volunteering to help out on the site.

Image credit: saponifier. Image has been modified.

Motion graphics by Avocado Video

Doctor's Note

What about eating coconut oil? See Coconut Oil & the Boost in HDL “Good” Cholesterol and What About Coconuts, Coconut Milk, & Coconut Oil MCTs?

What about swallowing the oil supplements? That was the topic of my last video, Eczema Treatment with Evening Primrose Oil, Borage Oil vs. Hempseed Oil.

More on eczema coming up in the coming months. Make sure you’re subscribed so you don’t miss it.

If you haven’t yet, you can subscribe to my videos for free by clicking here.

136 responses to “Eczema Treatment with Coconut Oil, Mineral Oil, vs. Vaseline

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  1. If this is your first video, or first week of Nutrition Facts exposure, please do read the doctor’s notes and note all the supporting/relevant videos he lists there. Also note that the archive is fully searchable and that all sources are listed for YOU to be able to read the reports yourself and answer many of your other questions.

    There is no prohibition against discussion of dissenting ideas and positions but please realize that this site is about the nutrition facts as found by the latest research, and OFTEN these things will be somewhat different from mainstream and popular belief and thoughts. Also that facts are subject to change depending upon findings, and that nutritional research is a difficult task for many reasons.

    Most common questions and conflicts on very many subjects have been previously addressed and can be found, along with the supporting studies and discussion if one will simply take a few minutes to look for them.

    We are glad to have you here with open mind and ready palate. WFPB works for so many of us, and works well! We hope to support your transition and create a tide of change. Thanks for stopping in.




    6
    1. Re: ‘There is no prohibition against discussion of dissenting ideas and positions but please realize that this site is about the nutrition facts as found by the latest research, and OFTEN these things will be somewhat different from mainstream and popular belief and thoughts’

      Not true Nancy. About 4 months ago Dr G. disconnected me from the comments section because I had a differing scientific view to his on dairy. Told that I should ‘find another’ website.

      pete.granger@gmail.com




      2
      1. That is simply not true (I don’t even know how to do that). You must be confusing me with a volunteer moderator, all of whom are under strict instructions to only remove people for violating our comment etiquette (click to see at top right of comment section–basically anything that’s racist, misogynist, homophobic, vulgar, etc.). If you feel you were wrongly accused and were indeed just presenting conflicting data or viewpoints please let me know who you dealt with so I can talk to them. Please forward me your exchange.

        UPDATE: Given the seriousness of the charge I had staff go back and investigate, and indeed you are mistaken. You were never “disconnected.” It looks like you got in some argument over dairy with some other user and that’s it. I presume you then had trouble logging in or something and blamed it was something we did? Regardless, you were always free to keep commenting. In fact you’re using the same account you were using before. The fact that you were able to make this comment shows that you weren’t banned.




        36
  2. Geez Louise! When does sticking a needle and injecting junk into one’s junk get fun. I reminds me of the horrific practice of penile subincision and the more commonly practice circumcision. What’s wrong with just leaving one’s Johnson au naturale?




    7
  3. I found the discussion of penile injections GROSS, borderline offensive, and completely disconnected from the topic of eczema. Sure, do a video on penile injections, but title it that so we can avoid it if we choose. It not only felt like Dr. Greger giggling with his friends in the school yard, but it devalued the importance of the intended eczema topic covered, in my opinion. I’m going to forward that to my daughter-in-law? Your work is too important to take it to this level. I remain deeply grateful to your dedication and work and credit you with the current state of my health. So, thanks for that.




    60
    1. I am a long time enthusiastic admirer of Dr. Greger; I recommend him to everyone I talk with when the subject comes up. I also consider myself extremely broad minded and irreverent when it comes to humor. However, I must reluctantly admit that I agree with this comment. Once would have been enough, and nonce would also have been enough, since it really has nothing to do with the topic. Instead, we have it again and again, becoming the dominant them of the video. Dr. Greger’s wry sense of humor is usually one of his most charming qualities. But I encourage him to focus on laughing at absurdities related to nutritional information. For me, his on-topic humorous remarks range from amusing to hilarious. This is, well, eeooww.




      29
    2. Your comment was respectful and responsibly written, Carol; I appreciate that. I think we have to be careful about overdoing the earthy humor, even though it continues to be a best-seller in our (devolving) culture. On the other hand, I enjoy Dr. G’s more sophisticated style of humor. I wouldn’t want him to retreat from that altogether.




      18
    3. Carol, . . I agree with your comments. For me, mostly, I couldn’t figure out if I was watching a video whose topic was penile injections of various sorts or eczema. The two subjects don’t even remotely go together in my mind and I found this confusing.
      And while there was certainly some giggle-factor to the many penile situations presented in this video, I have to say that, if this situation is yours, it may not feel so funny. And it might not hurt to do a serious video on the topic of penile safety and health. Or the larger topic of injecting foreign bodies into our own bodies and what harms we can do if we choose to do that.
      For me, personally, I would love to see some research and commentary on the injection of tattoo inks into the body. I’ve often wondered if that is a safe practice and if there are long-term impacts from the ink. Like most, I see some folks with major portions of their bodies tattooed . .. and it just makes me wonder . . .




      13
    4. I didn’t realize that men’s members were causing them so much trouble–on this scale, I think it is appropriate to make it it’s own topic–even though the bottom line might be something that many people might assume anyway. “how to stay out of surgery for…….” Thanks Carol, I agree with your statement (though I laughed a little, and then felt a little depressed and bewildered).




      2
      1. .
        HALLOWEEN “TRICK OR TREAT” ? THIS WAS NO TREAT

        On choosing the view this video, my mother and I believed we were about to learn a great deal about eczema.

        Our dismay at the rapid seque into a kinky discussion of how some men do weird things to themselves was exceeded by only our disappointment at Dr. Greger’s indiscretion, itself.

        The good doctor certainly has his redeeming qualities, and we value this website and all it represents as an alternative to “corporate medicine” in the service of profit– too often, at the expense of the patient.

        But we draw the line at something like this “eczema” video debacle.

        May we suggest the good doctor needs a vacation?




        8
        1. alphaa10, I watched it with my octogenarian mother as well, and we both laughed. Sorry you didn’t have the same experience. Again, I think the only reason he brought up the topic was because it was in the studies.




          5
      1. “please realize that this site is about the nutrition facts as found by the latest research”

        I’ve begun watching these videos because of what NutritionFacts stands for at its core. I love science. And I love Dr Greger’s apparent scientific integrity. But watching this video was a most unpleasant experience. I understand that your team stumbled across countless papers about penile injection. Blah, blah, blah. Listen, that’s what you guys do. You filter through the junk and direct our attention to the relative, reliable materials that pertain to the subject at hand. This video made a mockery of the matter being discussed.

        The premise that Dr Greger is appealing to a devolving culture indicates a lack of integrity. This ultimately spirals into a lack of trust from the viewers. Don’t sell out man. Have some standards and exercise some restraint. I should know exactly what I’m in for when I sit down to watch one of your videos. This stuff was uncalled for.




        8
  4. I agree with Carol T, the subject matter is Eczema not the penis. What is the correlation between a trapped penis in a zipper, etc. and Eczema treatment? Informative but irrelevant.

    Dawn




    10
  5. Hahah! Thanks for the much needed chuckles today Dr G! This is also perfect timing for this information as we here in NYC prepare for the dry months ahead.




    10
  6. Vaseline is made by Unilever, a dirty organisation which happily tortures, mutilates and vivisects animals. An alternative brand of petroleum jelly is likely to be a more ethically sound option and cheaper too.




    19
    1. Agree! I use the generic store brand of 100% petroleum jelly. There’s literally no difference in the formula and you’re not supporting a company that tests on animals. Works really well for my eczema!




      8
  7. I appreciated the humor – even while cringing in horror. Thanks Dr. Greger for pointing out how destructive we humans can be on ourselves in the pursuit of…what…vanity or self value?

    I occassionally have bouts of exzema and will try the coconut oil or vaseline. I would like to know if it will help Rosacae outbreaks. Metronidazole or steroids make mine worse.




    9
    1. “Thanks Dr. Greger for pointing out how destructive we humans can be on ourselves in the pursuit of…what…vanity or self value?”

      Gayle, that’s exactly what I was thinking. I’ll bet these same guys who wouldn’t hesitate to inject their johnson, would whinge at the sight of a green smoothie. SMH




      5
  8. I thought that the once great doctor had either been hacked or irresponsibly run away with himself. I did not appreciate it. I will not forward this as I have done with countless other transcripts.




    6
    1. That’s right. I used to be his fan a decade ago but lately he has moved toward biased and cherry picked theories to advance his agenda.




      1
      1. @Jerry Lewis–
        Insofar as I know, this is the only video of more than 1,500 (actually, far more than 1,500) in which Dr. Greger does not make his exposition with authority and style. That is an excellent record, so my comments are reserved for what might be considered inappropriate material, only, and in one video, only.

        My suggestion about a vacation was not entirely in jest– Dr. Greger is heavily involved in management and in speaking engagements, not to mention his weekly production schedule. Greger would be the last to complain, so we must recognize the symptom complex of a workaholic before it gets the better of him.




        2
    2. Get over yourself. Dr. Greger provides information that truly helps people instead of the common medical approach that drugs are the only medicine of value. The fact you don’t have a sense of humor or didn’t like a video doesn’t discredit him as a doctor.




      27
      1. Actually by promoting the fake saturated fat and cholesterol theories, Dr G is helping Big Pharma to sell more statin drug and Big Foods to sell more vegetable oil and Big Doctors to treat patient who got all inflamed because they consume vegetable oil.




        1
        1. Whaa? Dr Greger promotes fake oils? Be real, he is anti all oils, they being not a whole food and causing inflammation of the endothelial cells of the arteries. His agenda is to inform us through research what is healthy and what isn’t. Since you insist on eating foods that Dr. G has given evidence that shows is not healthy he must be cherry picking the research? Preposterous.




          23
        2. Jerry Are you still plugging these obviously false claims about cholesterol and saturated fat?

          Why? It is totally incomprehensible that you would continue to make such unscientific claims because the evidence on these matters is overwhelmingly clear that these are serious risk factors for chronic diseases. The evidence has been brought to your attention time and time again but you simply ignore

          .




          9
          1. A so called “scientific” theory can be totally fake because of the false assumption. Let say if multiple “scientific” studies said that diesel car engine is unsafe compared to gas engine because there are more accidents and the statistics show this, would you believe it? Of course not because it makes no sense and you know that in Europe, most cars are diesel and billions of people are driving it. There are more accidents in the U.S. from diesel engine cars simply because they are mostly trucks and trucks drivers have bad driving records due to fatigue, lack of sleep, etc.

            By the same logic, the “saturated” fat theory makes absolutely no sense. Billions of people in the world ate “saturated fat” for thousand of years without any problems and get a lot of benefits. And by definition, because it is “saturated”, this fat cannot transform into transfat. That’s it, it is done, stable, fini.

            Look at how this half a century old fake saturated fat theory had not only hurt the U.S. but also the WORLD and as far as Africa. So why do you keep spreading this lie and fake theory that was created by Big Pharma and Big Foods to profit? How many more people have to be hurt? If you don’t to eat meat then it’s fine but leave out the saturated fat and coconut fat alone.

            Don’t you have any conscience to continue to spread this false theory or are you just stubborn and refuse to learn new things?

            https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5044790/

            “Furthermore, in the developing world, this adverse publicity is characterized by pressure from all fronts including governmental agencies and health professionals (including nutritionists) to reduce consumption of oils such as palm and coconut oils. It is true that the phenomenon of the ‘double burden of disease’ is assuming unprecedented proportions in the developing world and the incidence of chronic disease is increasing steadily and even catching up with figures from the developed world. However, this increase in chronic disease has been attributed more to the ‘westernization’ of diets rather than the consumption of tropical oils, since these fats have been the mainstay (of edible oils) in many developing countries (especially in West Africa) for centuries. This, dating back even to the period when chronic disease prevalence was extremely low. Rather, the vilification of coconut and palm oils may be contributing to a situation where there is increased food insecurity (because individuals feel pressured to switch to less affordable and so called ‘healthier’ oils) and decreased quality of the food supply. This has resulted subsequently in hunger in areas of the developing world where there is shortage of energy and nutrients.”

            “Saturated fatty acids, or saturated fats, consist of fatty acids whose carbon chain is “saturated” with hydrogen.”




            1
  9. After a lifetime of eczema, the one thing to finally free me from it was to stop eating wheat. I’ve tried everything else and it’s the only time it comes back. UGH! Anyway, I appreciate the humour, Dr. G.. it helps the medicine go down! You being you is what sets you apart from the rest.




    15
  10. I’ve tried the oils discussed in this video for my eczema, and they either did not make much of a positive difference or made it worse. On the other hand, 100% petroleum jelly really, really helped! It’s helped me stay eczema free (without using prescriptions) for almost a year now, and helped my eczema go away when I first started using it. It’s good to see this information about petroleum jelly getting out there!




    7
    1. LMS – I am curious if you’ve tried coconut oil? I don’t have eczema, fortunately, but do have very dry scaley, plaquey, patches and have used coconut oil which seems to help. I’ve not tried the petroleum and may give it a go. Just curious if you have had a comparison experience.




      2
      1. I have tried coconut oil, but it really didn’t do much for me unfortunately. I felt that the coconut oil made it a bit worse for me and at the very least wasn’t moisturizing enough. The great thing about petroleum jelly is it moisturizes my skin for a long time. I’ll put it on at night before bed when I need it, and it stays on all night until I wash it off in the morning. Something like coconut oil (at least for me) would absorb and leave my skin not moisturized for hours as I was sleeping. I sometimes put on other products and then over top of those I put on petroleum jelly so I get moisture through the night (as petroleum jelly is very occlusive). Another good thing is that petroleum jelly is non-comedogenic so I didn’t have to worry about giving myself clogged pores (my area of concern is usually my face). If you’ve found something that works for you (coconut oil) maybe put it on and let it absorb a little bit and then put on a layer of petroleum jelly.




        1
      2. I did actually try coconut oil and broke out in a rash from head to toe. I have tried everything out there. I have found a little relief using magnesium spray. And I use a petroleum based lotion – but still haven’t found much to make a huge difference. I was born with eczema over my entire body and still struggle with it. After study on the filligrin information a few years ago, I switched to a plant based diet (2.5 years ago), but still haven’t found complete relief. I mainly just manage the symptoms and sometimes turn to steroid cream.

        I also was really looking forward to hearing what Dr. Greger had to say about eczema. But was disappointed with the video.




        0
    2. It’s really weird after not having eczema for 20 years, 13 months into a vegan, whole food, plant based diet, it has returned. I tried coconut oil (organic extra virgin) it made my rash even worse and painful. I haven’t tried vaseline, I have some. I will give it a shot along with St. John’s word.

      Thank you for the info.




      0
    1. Clinton, I too would avoid petroleum products on my skin. Maybe a bit of bees wax in the coconut oil (the two need to be gently melted together) would keep the area sealed better than coconut oil by itself, since the skin readily absorbs coconut oil. I also add essential oils specific to the specific need. I don’t like to put anything on my skin that I wouldn’t eat.




      6
  11. Of course coconut oil is always good to be used topically (externally) or internally.

    When can this half a century old saturated fat theory be put in the museum? Probably never as long as big pharma still exists so that they can sell statin drug and vegans can use to scare meat eaters.

    Billions of people in the world have used coconut oil for thousand of years with a lot of benefits and it is the West that pollute them with the saturated fat and cholesterol fake theory so that they can poison them with statin drug and make billions of dollars in the so called “research”.

    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5044790/

    As for the penis health (and women’s sexual health as well) then it is best to ingest coconut oil through the mouth.

    https://hybridrastamama.com/can-coconut-oil-help-with-erectile-dysfunction/




    1
    1. Jerry Your claims about cholesterol are equally false and equally clearly refuted by the evidence. Repeating nonsense over and over again won’t make the evidence go away. Give it a rest ……………

      “Consistent evidence from numerous and multiple different types of clinical and genetic studies unequivocally establishes that LDL causes ASCVD”
      https://academic.oup.com/eurheartj/article/doi/10.1093/eurheartj/ehx144/3745109/Low-density-lipoproteins-cause-atherosclerotic




      13
    2. Jerry Lewis, I can totally appreciate your enthusiasm. If you chose to divert it towards something other than supporting conspiracy theories, fairy tales and superstition, you could actually contribute to a positive change, rather than mislead innocent people. Please give it a thought.




      12
  12. Hilarious video today, Dr. Greger!
    Yes, because of the humor, the type of it and the fact that it didn’t seem exactly related to the treatment of eczema with nutrition, I will remember every single word of the serious discussion that took place. I believe this to be true for everybody.
    Needless to say I disagree with those who thought it was “eeew”.
    Thank you for allowing us a glimpse of what one could find in the medical literature. Who could even think?
    As always, looking forward to the next great video. Thanks.




    21
  13. Ah, no, the penile injection information did not strike me as funny. Complete ewww reaction for me, and a bit of an increase in the creep factor for the good Dr. Please, leave your bathroom humor somewhere else. Gawd.




    5
      1. Real quick: Coconut oil IS NOT healthy!!

        There is no such thing as a “healthy” oil with coconut oil probably being the most damaging to our body.

        Please watch these 2 eduVideos on the peer reviewed science:
        https://nutritionfacts.org/video/what-about-coconuts-coconut-milk-and-coconut-oil-mcts/
        https://nutritionfacts.org/video/does-coconut-oil-clog-arteries/

        Regarding “healthy” fats, that is an incorrect statement. When we say “healthy” it tends to make people want to eat that food, so as a physicain I have to be very careful about what I teach my patients. So let me explain, there are only essential (not made by the body) and non essential (made in adequate amounts by the body) fats.

        ALL the essential fats needed by the body are easily obtained through eating plant foods with ground Flax seed and walnuts having the highest concentration of essential fats; however, recent research is suggesting that to reach optimal levels of DHA in humans (an essential fat synthesized in small amounts in the body but made in large quantities in algae) we should consider adding a non-toxic vegan algae DHA supplement. Why? Supplemental DHA has been shown to reduce brain volume loss as we age (a good thing), was the least in those who were given a DHA supplement. It’s also beneficial in pregnant women and their children increasing their IQ. See the below videos.

        https://nutritionfacts.org/video/should-we-take-dha-supplements-to-boost-brain-function/
        https://nutritionfacts.org/video/is-fish-oil-just-snake-oil/
        https://nutritionfacts.org/video/Omega-3s-and-the-eskimo-fish-tale/
        https://nutritionfacts.org/video/should-vegans-take-dha-to-preserve-brain-function/
        https://nutritionfacts.org/video/algae-based-dha-vs-flax-2/

        I hope this helps.
        J. Bennie, MD




        19
          1. Actually, I hope that people don’t just watch the videos but actually peruse the citations under the Resources tab. The preponderance of evidence supporting the science and conclusions is there for the readings. I hope you have taken the time to read them.




            9
          2. What a silly response, Jerry. None of the research presented on this website was conducted by Nutritionfacts.org or by Dr. Greger. The real problem is that you seem to fail to understand even the studies that you link to. It’s fine to be ignorant in a certain subject, but the first step is to admit that you don’t know.




            9
        1. I understand that some oils are bad and some are good, but coconut oil? Pacific Islanders have been eating coconuts for thousands of years, I don’t think they would die young because of it? But honestly, flax seed is the way to go, and I have eczema, and I found that one of the best things you can do for it is quitting dairy. Best to cure everything from the inside out, after all, your skin is your largest organ, however healthy you are on the inside is reflected through your skin. I hold to this :)




          1
      2. Jerry Axe is an internet marketer who happens to be a chiropractor hence the “Dr”. He is not a reliable source of information on health matters. Neither are you for that matter.

        The US National Institutes of Health is probably a good place to start researching rosacea while Dr G has a number of videos on acne in general
        https://medlineplus.gov/rosacea.html
        https://nutritionfacts.org/?fwp_search=acne&fwp_content_type=video

        It may also be worth considering this article “There are a variety of foods that aggravate rosacea, including spicy foods, alcoholic beverages, and hot, caffeinated drinks. Patients are advised to avoid these triggers. Interestingly, omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids may be beneficial in the treatment of rosacea, although further investigation is necessary. ”
        https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3013591/




        11
      3. When I see his entries, I just hear that teacher’s voice in the Charlie Brown cartoons and smile. Makes it all go away with a chuckle. ;)




        1
  14. Who knew? Ha Ha, what a funny video today! learned so much about these products with surprising facts I did not know.

    And it so nice to see that you can spice up the education with a little humor and fascination by what people will do these products. “Don’t try this at home, folks!”.

    A great chuckle to get my day going!

    A proud monthly supporter of Nutritionfacts.org.




    10
  15. Also, one day, I would like to see some information on FODMAP foods as I am challenged on my WFPBD with IBS symptoms.

    Specifically, I want to know if FODMAP food symptoms limit my protein absorption while on a WFPBD. It could be just a dose or preparation issue, but some facts would be great as more and more people are talking about and using the FODMAP diet for IBS symptoms and I don’t want to give up my WFPBD diet.

    J. Lewis, with respect, I am not asking for your input- just Dr. Greger’s. Thank you.

    A proud monthly supporter of Nutritionfacts.org




    9
  16. But I thought vaseline is unsafe…after all, it’s a petroleum product right? I also wasn’t clear on the conclusion concerning coconut oil. It seemed the video was leaning towards the coconut oil being the winner, but then suddenly it took a different turn towards the vaseline. Did I miss something?




    3
    1. As I reviewed the video I see that both cost and safety of both coconut and petroleum jelly were reviewed. I think the source Dr. Greger cited is relevant in answering your question: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/8606037 Of course you may prefer to use coconut oil, but it appears the research cited indicates that petrolleum jelly as a topical moisturizer can be used safely and even has some health benefits. This is the way I’m interpreting the video. Hope that helps.




      6
  17. It surprises me to see anything resembling a recommendation for a petroleum-derived product. Oil industry products are unsustainable in the long run, even though they may cost pennies compared to high-quality coconut oil. I get that you’re mostly about health Dr. Greger, but our health depends on the health of the planet too.




    2
  18. With the humor, the eczema pictures passed by quickly enough for me get too grossed out. So, I was able to stay engaged to get the real message.

    Thanks Dr. Greger. Good trick to get us to swallow the bitter pill!




    6
    1. Coconut oil is high in lauric acid, which helps kill the bacteria that cause acne. Applying coconut oil to the skin can kill acne-causing bacteria and increase moisture, which may also reduce acne scarring.

      But just like everything, everybody is different and so it’s likely to work but it is not 100% sure.




      4
    2. Victor, as a NutritionFacts moderator, I wanted to address your question and consulted PubMed, finding two articles that indicate topical coconut oil has promise for treatment of acne https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19665786/ The antimicrobial activity of liposomal lauric acids against Propionibacterium acnes.
      https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19134433 Novel antibacterial and emollient effects of coconut and virgin olive oils in adult atopic dermatitis.
      However, these articles were clear use of topical coconut oil for acne treatment needs further research. Feel free to review the studies, but I’d also encourage you to explore known research on treatment of acne as in these videos.
      https://nutritionfacts.org/video/natural-treatment-for-acne-and-fungal-infections/
      https://nutritionfacts.org/video/treating-acne-barberries/
      https://nutritionfacts.org/video/saving-lives-by-treating-acne-with-diet/ Hope that’s helpful
      .




      6
  19. I have been using coconut oil in my baby’s skin and now I’m worried. I don’t want to use petrol jelly nor olive oil so…what should I use? ThAnks




    0
    1. I would continue to use the coconut oil in small amounts. Once or twice a day should be fine to keep your babies skin moist. But remember almost anything put on our skin is absorbed into our bodies, but especially fats. So yes coconut oil on our skin can raise our saturated fat and triglyceride levels but if you are otherwise healthy and eating a Whole food, low fat plant based diet (or breast feeding from a plant based mother) then you should be fine.

      Important to know that the study Dr. G is referring to was a study done is very sick pre-term and term infants in a neonatal ICU. They were also massaging the oil 4 times a day, 10 minutes each time, into the infants skin.

      Here’s an excerpt:
      “Oil application: Five mL of the study oil was
      massaged on all available surfaces of the baby
      four times a day. The massage took place for
      approximately 10 minutes each time by a
      trained massager. Rubber gloves were used
      and the baby was placed on a bubble wrap
      plastic sheet (to avoid absorption of the oil by
      the sheets). ”

      Here’s a link to the original study: http://www.indianpediatrics.net/oct2005/998.pdf
      I hope this helps.
      J. Bennie, MD.




      4
    2. Agree that a tiny amount of coconut oil daily is probably fine. But you could also use Cetaphil Baby or similar product. Ask your pediatrician for additional ideas.

      -Dr Anderson, volunteer




      0
      1. Funny because I have cetaphil baby and I haven’t using it in order to avoid harmful chemicals so I have been using coconut oil, rosehip oil or nothing (just plain water)
        Thanks




        0
  20. Hi Dr. Greger,
    My wife is age 58, menopausal, and has a combination of sebborheic dermatitis combined with rosacea on her face. All topicals, over the counter and prescriptions, have caused intense irritation. She is taking 100mg of doxycycline 1 time per day, and it also does not provide any relief. Do you have any suggestions that she might try? Thank you!




    0
    1. My advice would be to educate yourself in how to use PUBMED through Dr. G Research Webinar May 6th and Research Webinar follow-up June 17th 2017. However I can’t provide any links, because I simply can’t find any. But maybe a moderator can provide some solution?
      Or if that is not possible, then I could provide it to you through google drive or dropbox if there is no complaints from any nutritionfacts staff????
      That is if you are interested of course…




      0
    2. Thank you for your question and sorry to hear about your wife’s troubles. I assume your wife is already on a whole food plant based diet, which is the best diet for most skin conditions. In addition, avoiding added, processed oils in cooking and refined sugar will also help skin the skin. It may be worth incorporating some minimally processed soy foods in the diet as they seem to be beneficial in the menopausal period.




      0
    3. Steve, I want to interject on behalf of your wife in regards to suggestions on rosacea, which I experienced along with ocular rosacea in my 50’s. I rejected the use of daily antibiotics, but did use sulfur washes that were largely ineffective. Back then I was an omnivore eating some chicken and red meat every day. I did notice that certain foods triggered it, including coffee and alcohol, especially red wine that my PP recommended. Even though I curtailed my trigger foods, my facial skin often felt like it was burning from pin pricks. A few years later, I came across Dr. Greger’s NF website, finding it helpful, especially the links to the research papers. After a few months, I was eating even more raw vegetable with more fruit. At the end of January of this year, I decided to go vegan along with a little healthy fish (sardines, herring..) from once to 3 times/wk, which I call pescevegan. After about a month or two of this, I becan to notice that my skin was clearer, including the whites of my eyes that now have little visible red vessels. I highly recommend whole foods that are raw or lightly steamed. My favorites are Brussel sprouts, broccoli, kale, onions, garlic, ginger and turmeric. I eat a lot of pulses to get my protein along with ground flaxseed to get more omega-3 as the good doctor recommends. Best of health…




      0
  21. Hilarious! Loved it. You make science fun Dr Greger!
    And thanks for the unbiased report on what the science shows. This proves you AREN’T cherry picking, otherwise you might have left out any mention of petroleum jelly being so good for eczema.




    7
  22. Noting that I love the data in almost all of your videos, I’d rather have had you stick to eczema, rather than wandering off into the unrelated-to-eczema reproductive arena.




    1
  23. Yes! Thank you for this video, Dr. Greger. I only developed eczema in my early 30s as an allergic reaction to coconut oil though, believe it or not. It started with that Eos lip balm brand, which is coconut oil based. My lips would peel like crazy, and the more I put on, the worst they got. Then I realized that coconut-based ice cream would make my throat feel a bit scratchy. I finally made the connection when I got a hot spot on my chin after applying straight coconut oil to my lips, and that little patch of skin just exploded. I found, however, that since I added flax seed powder to my water and increased zinc intake (as my bloodwork showed low levels), my episodes are much more mild and don’t last nearly as long. Maybe there’s a connection there as well?




    2
  24. As an eczema sufferer, I was looking forward to some advice from you on the topic. I was dismayed, however, by your gratuitous and frequent medical penis jokes. I consider them inappropriate.




    2
  25. I know this is just one case–but I think it should be worth noting:

    My girlfriend and I are heavy tea drinkers. Her favorite kind? Oolong. We drink a lot of it and order it in bulk. Sometimes we even eat the leaves in smoothies or salads. One of the reasons she and I are so excited about the recent videos is because her eczema has been the worse it has ever been. She is suffering, and while the drugs are helping, it is slow and unpleasant.

    I know the whole Oolong tea is “why not try it” sort of comment, but, perhaps needless to say, my hypothesis is that Oolong likely has no effect on eczema. Otherwise, my girlfriend, who otherwise has a tea-filled happy and healthy 95 percent plant based diet would not be suffering.




    4
    1. My dad had eczema and some of my relatives too , the one thing that really seemed to help was drinking and applying burdock tea , i was hoping dr. Greger was going to investigate burdock tea , but instead went in another direction , which might have been a bit of a boner.




      5
  26. I hope that a lot more videos on eczema are coming. I would really like to get rid of it once and for all, although a WFPB lifestyle has helped a lot! Also flax and peanuts baked in the oven at 100 degrees Celsius(not higher because of AGEs) to get rid of any remaining Aspergillus flavus.




    1
  27. Hello Dr Greger, I’m a 47 year old woman who has just been diagnosed with palindromic rheumatism. I have searched your YouTube page for any information on natural treatment of same to no avail. Please help!




    0
    1. Hi Fatima: I couldn’t find anything in our archives regarding palindromic rheumatism, but I can have this topic added to our suggestion list. In the meantime, maybe exploring our general arthritis page would be of interest to you?




      0
  28. I am a longtime supporter and fan of Dr. Greger, his work and this site and I agree with the many other comments that the penis remarks were off-topic and not appropriate in the context of this report. I am sure that Dr. Greger will take this feedback to heart and bear this in mind for future videos. I suggest that this video should be retracted and re-done so that new people coming to this site will not be turned off by this content. If a new user came to the site and viewed this as their first video they would be grossed out and/or offended and probably not return. We want people to benefit from returning here again and again.




    4
    1. I vote for a remake of this video, please. I found it very informative and I laughed out loud a few times. I’d like to send it to a few people who might benefit greatly from the info on treating eczema but I fear they will find the penis references too weird or creepy to take the science seriously. Personally, I was both fascinated and saddened by the men who injure their penis in a misguided attempt to address some sense of inadequacy. I appreciate Dr. Greger sharing what he uncovers in the literature, including the zanny stuff. After nearly five years of devoted viewing and reading and financially supporting NF I have a context for holding these weird medical reports that a new viewer might not have. As always, I am grateful to Dr. Greger, NF staff and volunteers, and all the thoughtful people who comment on this site. My life has been enhanced by all of you.




      1
  29. I really Dr. Gregor’s tireless and selfless efforts to create this website and its mostly wonderful content. However I would like to point out on this particular video I was somewhat dismayed to see the tone of the video lowered by irrelevant content that only detracted from the subject at hand. Some people say they enjoyed the humor, I also appreciate the efforts that Dr. Gregor makes to make the videos entertaining however surely in order for people to take the content seriously the wit needs to be connected with the content and undertaken in a professional manner? I felt that parts of this video were not professional and in fact detracts from the content that was important to help people improve their health if they are suffering from this condition. Due to the tone lowering, off topic humor sections on a subject that is not appropriate I would not send this video as a referral to others that could have benefited from it. The reason I would not is because someone who does not know Dr Gregor and saw this video as the first video experience of Dr Gregor they would get the wrong impression. Perhaps it is a good idea to ask therefore what is the primary reason for creating these videos? Is it primarily to entertain or is it primarily to educate? Listening to Dr Gregor’s intro videos it seems his missing is to educate – to help people that are suffering. I don’t believe that a person suffering from a medical condition needs to be entertained. What they want is the quality content to alleviate their condition. They also need to have confidence in the source in order to take the action necessary to benefit from the content. In this case if I referred this video to someone I know who has this condition they would not take this seriously – even if I was to back Dr Gregor and explain he is genuinely a wonderful Dr with extensive knowledge that should be trusted.

    I saw a youtube interview with Dr Gregor where he states the criteria for choosing content for this site. One of the factors was that he would exclude studies where it cannot be made to be interesting or entertaining in someone way. Dr Gregor has also stated in other areas his disapproval when medical authorities take a patronizing viewpoint and state things like “we do recommend what people should actually do because we don’t think they would be able to do it” e.g. eating WFPBD and excluding meat. Dr Gregor’s view is perhaps the Dr should present the facts and let the viewer decide. Personally I would like to see the very best information presented – whether it is entertaining or not. I need that information. I don’t want to have valuable information censored because “it is not entertaining”. If someone is suffering from a serious medical condition what we need is the best quality information. Try telling a patient “I’m sorry I’m not going to give you the best quality information because we think you would not want to hear it because it’s not entertaining enough.

    What is the primary goal of Nutritionfacts? Is it entertainment or is it educational to empower people to take charge of their health. Personally I don’t want to be entertained at the expense of information being left out or at the expense of not being able to share the content due to inappropriate humor.

    I would like to conclude by saying I am deeply grateful to Dr Gregor for creating this site. I hope that these comments would be seen as a constructive criticism for a truly great, generous and wonderful human being that is Dr Gregor. Thank you sir.




    4
    1. Hi JBAwareness,

      I happen to agree with several parts of your comment and hope that your constructive feedback is honored and heard. I also posted a comment closer towards the bottom of this thread that has some similar feedback.

      Take care.




      1
  30. Hi!

    I so appreciate Dr. G devolving into arguably inappropriate humor, as it grants me mercy to make mistakes in my own life.

    I work as a Spiritual Healer-helping people define their own spiritual path- and as such have been the victim of a witch hunt by the State licensing board who accused me of “impostering a marriage counselor”. During the expensive year it took to prove my innocence, my humor flew way out of the range of appropriate and offended people. Sorry to all those people!

    And thanks to Dr. G for fighting the big money behind brainwashing people to eat the wrong food. Humor keeps us sane.

    rR
    rosalind Radiyya




    1
  31. My advise to people with skin problems would be to stop using soap, I’ve been doing it for two years with great results. Soap is full of chemicals that can damage the skin barrier and its good bacteria, as well as it’s natural oils. I only use it on my hands for sanitizing, never on my body when I’m taking a bath. In addition, I believe it’s better to take a shower every 2 days, unless it’s summer time of after doing exercise. A low fat diet without animal products is a must too for optimal skin health.




    2
  32. I have been battling eczema for 8+ years and have turned to a plant based vegan diet since February 2017 (8 months). The tops of my fingers are still slightly dry but it seems to have improved since the change in my diet.

    Besides consistent moisturizing, are there any Foods I should be eating more to eliminate the dry skin on the top of my index middle and ring fingers?

    Are there Foods I should be staying away from, and or alcohol? I occasionally have fried foods and was wondering if oils are working against me?

    Thanks!!




    0
    1. Hi, Skyler. Congratulations on taking control of your health and wellness! I am glad you have seen some improvement with a plant-based diet. You can find more on Dr. Greger’s recommendations for eczema here. I would think that focusing on anti-inflammatory foods such as berries, dark green leafy vegetables, flax seeds, and turmeric would be good. I hope that helps!




      0
  33. I laughed out loud for about 20 sec (which I’ve never done before in watching Dr. G’s videos, ok, just a few chuckles in the past). His comment, “I’ll never look at Silicone Caulk the same again,” was priceless. Great play on words and very funny but amazing what people will do to themselves in that area. Obviously, don’t try it at home or anywhere else, for that matter. Stick to windows and bathtubs-not literally, of course!

    Having been a subscriber for several years, enjoyed his blogs and videos very much, recommended them to many others and taken his advice on many issues, I’m sure Dr. G’s primary focus in his videos and blogs is to provide us with useful information. This time his great sense of humour got the best of him which shows only that he’s human and fallible like the rest of us.




    1
  34. Dear Dr. Greger,

    I posted this comment on a recent video, and I’m copying it again here because it is highly relevant.

    “Dr. G,

    As always, thank you for your tireless work and commitment to a more informed and healthier public. Perhaps I’m reading into this too much, but recently there has been a trend away from the nutritional themes of your content. The catchy title of this video surely grabs the attention of newcomers and followers alike, but I have fond memories of a site and a mission devoted to preventing and arresting the top 15 killers, which you’ve spoken so passionately of, through dietary interventions. I don’t discredit the discussion on these important topics recently, but I just wonder what it means for this website. From lectins [which I thought were great evidence-based and highly relevant, nutritional videos) a few weeks ago, now to toothpaste and cell phone radiation more recently. Perhaps there is a place for these, but I just hope the focus stays on evidence-based nutrition, as you’ve always been an outspoken advocate. So many lives can be improved by the dietary changes you’ve recommended, as long as we don’t get lost in the minutiae of smaller, more tangential contributors to disease.

    Thank you,”

    In recent months, videos on NF.org have strayed away from the most pressing nutritional topics. (See here: https://nutritionfacts.org/videos/). Also, as you can see from comments on this post alone, most people outside of the “NutritionFacts.org” or plant-based diet bubble are still confused about nutrition (including even research on topics that some would consider well-established, such as saturated fat). I also worry that too much attention on unrelated, tangential topics will distract from the most important nutritional topics, and I also am concerned that these may impact the credibility of this site. I strongly believe we need to focus on strengthening the evidence behind the most critical (and easily confused due to media and industry influence) areas of nutrition that are affecting the health of our nation, AS WELL AS on translating this into people-friendly, understandable terms. I know this is a passion of yours, because I have watched hundreds of your videos from years past, and I constantly reference your book (which I think is a perfect model for what this website should be). As you quote, NutritionFacts.org “is a “science-based, non-commercial website to provide free daily videos and articles on the latest discoveries in nutrition.”

    Thank you again.




    1
    1. On a positive note, we should be proud that NutritionFacts.org has been referenced on the American Physical Therapy Association’s website regarding nutrition, see here. (The APTA is a prestigious, well-established professional body that emphasizes evidence-based practice.) So again, we should consider our image to viewers and professionals alike.




      2
  35. II was watching this video because I have skin problems. My 8 year old daughter came into the room and asked me why men are injecting those things into their penis? What should I have told her? Thanks. I just didn’t know how to reply.




    0
    1. Dear Erica, since you asked, here is one idea. As a parent myself, I can image the initial panic I would feel if my young son (who is now a young man) saw what your daughter saw. After a deep breath, you might think what a great entre this is into a conversation about body image, and the sense of inadequacy and shame our popular culture and media generate for boys and girls about their bodies. As these messages are internalized girls and boys begin to take action to address their false beliefs that they are somehow deficient, not beautiful enough, not strong enough, not attractive enough. These beliefs lead to shame, hiding, covering, and withdrawing from life. And in too many men, violence. They also lead to damaging practices such as injecting substances into their bodies to somehow become enough, to be worthy of receiving love and attention. Teenage boys and men might experiment with anabolic steroids to make their muscles bigger and penile injections to make their penis larger.
      For an eight year old I think it is enough to simply say men often believe they need to be bigger than they are in order to be respected by other men and attractive to women (or say attractive to others if you don’t want to impose a heterosexual bias in your conversation). You might ask her if she notices the way boys tease (shame) each other for not being big enough or strong enough. Depending on where you are with educating her about her sexuality you might add that genitalia are very special parts of our bodies that when we are grown-ups we sometimes choose to share privately with someone who we love and trust, so we naturally want to be proud of all aspects of our bodies including our genitalia.
      And for girls and women, my goodness, how their insecurities about their bodies are exploited by industry, media, and male predators. What does she notice about how girls tease each other about their bodies currently? Some boys and girls will soon become obsessed with breast size and this will be another opportunity to talk about what’s going on with body image and to explore how is she feeling and reacting to that. Once you start this conversation (and perhaps you already have) almost any movie or TV show will have opportunities to continue to reflect on both positive and negative body messages. You have an opportunity to build her awareness and critical thinking about these messages.
      My hope for you is to continue a healthy and honest dialogue with your daughter about body image as she matures into a woman. And if it’s possible her father should be part of the conversation too. There are many good books and websites to help you with conversation starters, knowing what is age appropriate, and reinforcing positive self-image as well as learning how to accept others, and rejecting the popular media images presented to us. Hope this helps you see some creative responses.




      0
  36. I’ve been a religious follower of Nutrition Facts for years, and it’s my number one source of information on eating a healthy diet.

    My comment is related to today’s topic in that it is also about a skin condition. As a sufferer of psoriasis, I also keep hoping that Dr. Greger will have helpful advice on this common and discouraging ailment, since he seems to have something to say about just about every other conceivable topic. So far I have found him to be strangely and disappointingly silent on the topic. Is there no research out there to share? Is there no food of remedy that anyone has put to the test?




    0
    1. hi Don, using the ‘search’ feature from the NF menu yields this result which might be helpful https://nutritionfacts.org/2013/05/30/plant-based-diets-for-psoriasis/

      To learn more about the trials regarding psoriasis, simply google for diet, psoriasis, pubmed https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24641585/

      Also, I did try the Paddison program in the spring (for other reasons) but noticed during mylearning about it that people reported success with aleviating symptoms of psoriasis. https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=VQ_jYAqHwwU
      It might be worth your while to look into further. Dr Klaper has a page on his website about Clint Paddison and the elimination diet . Hope this is in some way helpful Don




      1
      1. Thanks Susan,

        I have searched NF with very limited results on the topic of psoriasis.

        I will look at the other resources you suggest.

        Thank you.




        0
        1. I found the page at Dr Klaper’s website Don, https://doctorklaper.com/answers/answers07
          As you see, it refers to diet , arthritis and the broad category of autoimmune disease. Reading this page was a life-changer for me, and I simply followed the program outlined further down on the page. All plant based, no oil, and I have used the program successfully , though I am back to enjoying a full range of wfpb foods now.




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          1. Thanks again for your help Susan.

            It’s funny but when I searched with keyword “psoriasis” I didn’t get a hit for the link you mentioned in your previous post. I wonder if the search engine is faulty. Anyway, I will watch that one and I will check out that Dr. Klaper video as well. Thanks again for your insight!




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          2. Oh, I see why I didn’t get any video hits. The link you mentioned for nutrition facts was just a tiny blog post, not a video, mentioning the benefits of potassium. Definitely useful stuff, but I was hoping for something more. Surely there must be some more research than this Dr. Greger!




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    2. Hello there. Dr. Greger may not have any videos specifically about psoriasis, but it is mentioned in this video about autoimmune disease”
      https://nutritionfacts.org/video/sodium-and-autoimmune-disease-rubbing-salt-in-the-wound/

      If you watch some of the videos about inflammation and autoimmune disease, you may find a lot of it applicable to psoriasis. Here are a few you might like:
      https://nutritionfacts.org/video/which-spices-fight-inflammation/
      https://nutritionfacts.org/video/potassium-and-autoimmune-disease/

      Kelly
      Moderator




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  37. Good information–I have twin toddlers and one has eczema. We’ve been through countless remedies, and avoided prescription medications. Agree that petroleum based (with oatmeal…whether that has added benefit or not) remedies work best. Also as a mother of twin boys and young-men-to-be, I appreciated the warning about the getting stuck in the zipper thingie :-)




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  38. I’ve had huge success with the treatment recommended at solveeczema.org for treating by little boy, who until recently had quite severe eczema (even with the use of steroids). Disclaimer — although the author of the site has followed a quite rational approach in trying to root out the cause of her son’s eczema, this treatment has not been subject to peer reviewed study yet, as far as I know. But the author provides a great deal of related research to back up her hypothesis, which is that modern detergents are stronger and much more damaging to the skin barrier compared to traditional lye and fat based detergents, and that these detergents are actually very clingy and difficult to get off of clothes and other surfaces — so it’s not a matter of just switching the soap used for bathing, you may
    have to stop using them entirely in your house if you want to really avoid them.

    You touched upon this with your video about SLS and aphthous ulcers — these detergents are known to be irritants. Surfactants are actually used with the intention of weakening the skin barrier for drug delivery: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3283952/

    Anecdotally, my little boy has gone from having unbearably itchy, constantly irritated skin even with the use of topical steroids and emollient, to sleeping peacefully through the night and not needing ANYTHING on his skin, except a tiny bit of aquaphor once in a while. Of course the plural of anecdote is not data, and so an anecdote is not a datum :) But based on the drastic improvement over about a course of a month after we stopped using any products with modern surfactants, I’m a believer, and I think this deserves a lot more study.




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