What the New Blood Pressure Range Guidelines Mean

What the New Blood Pressure Range Guidelines Mean
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Natural approaches to lowering high blood pressure can work better than drugs because you’re treating the underlying cause, and can end up having only good side effects.

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Below is an approximation of this video’s audio content. To see any graphs, charts, graphics, images, and quotes to which Dr. Greger may be referring, watch the above video.

The number one killer in the United States and on the planet Earth is a bad diet. (That is why I’ve dedicated my life to the study of nutrition.) Killer #2 is high blood pressure. The reason it’s so deadly is that it increases your risk of dying from so many different diseases: heart disease and stroke, to heart and kidney failure.

We’re talking an exponential increase in risk of dying from a stroke as our pressures go up, starting from around 110 over 70, an exponential increase in the risk of dying from heart disease, again starting at a blood pressure of about 110/70. We used to consider a blood pressure as high as 175 to be normal––normal if you wanted to die from the normal diseases, like heart attack and stroke. A “normal” of 175 over 110 could put you at over a thousand percent higher risk of having you croak from a stroke compared to the ideal—not the normal, but the ideal, which is down around 110/70.

The definition of high blood pressure, hypertension, dropped from as high as 190/110 down to 160/95, with treatment thresholds for high-risk groups starting at 150/90 down to 140/90, and then, most recently, 130/80. Now…instead of one in three Americans having hypertension, with the new definition, it’s closer to one in two, or more like two-thirds among those over the age of 45. Every time the threshold drops, labeling tens of millions more people as diseased, there’s this backlash. Same thing every time the cholesterol guidelines get more and more stringent; but don’t blame the guidelines. Americans are diseased. That’s the real problem. The American way of life is the problem, not the guidelines.

Maybe we should focus on that instead.

After all, the number one killer of American men and women is heart disease, a disease that can be prevented, arrested, and reversed with a healthy-enough diet.

So, even though a cholesterol of 200 may be normal, maybe we should tell people to strive for under 150. Even though a BMI of 24.9 is technically not overweight, an average height woman, for example, would be better off down around 120 pounds than 145. And, similarly, though a blood pressure of 120/80 may be normal, 110 would be a better top number, and 70 a better lower number, as even down in that range between 70 to 75, or 75 to 80, each 5-point increment is associated with a third more stroke, and at least a fifth more heart disease.

So, why are the new guidelines up at 130 over 80? With an average of three different blood-pressure drugs, you can force people’s blood pressures from 140 down to 120, compared to just giving them two blood-pressure drugs, and high-risk people live longer because of it. Significantly less death in the intensive treatment group, but, because of the higher doses and drugs, had more side effects. So, you have to weigh the risks versus benefits…

One to 2% of people on the drugs for five years will benefit, not having a cardiovascular event when they otherwise might have, and that has to be balanced against the higher risk of adverse side effects. So, you’ll hear commentators saying things like, yeah, the drugs decreased your risk of “events” by 25%, but increased your risk of a serious side effect by 88%. Okay, but those events can include things like death, whereas the side effects are more on the order of fainting.

“These adverse events [do] need to be weighed against the benefits with respect to cardiovascular events and death that are associated with intensive control of systolic blood pressure.” Like, if we use drugs to push high-risk people down to a top number of 120, we might prevent over 100,000 deaths and 46,000 cases of heart failure every year, but could cause “43,000 cases of electrolyte abnormalities and 88,000 cases of acute kidney injury.” Not great, but better than dying.

So, you can see the conundrum guidelines committees are in. On one hand, lowering blood pressure is good for your heart, kidneys, and brain, but at a certain point the side effects from the drugs could outweigh the benefits. Ideally, we want to get patients’ blood pressures as low as possible, but only want to use drugs to do it “when the effects of treatment are likely to be less destructive than the elevated blood pressure.”

The problem is that most people who die from heart disease, heart failure, and stroke may be in that borderline range not sufficiently elevated to warrant drug treatment.

If only there were some way to lower blood pressures without drugs to get the best of both worlds. Thankfully, there are. Regular aerobic exercise, weight loss, smoking cessation, increased dietary fiber intake, decreased alcoholic beverage intake, consumption of a more plant-based diet, and cutting down on salt. The advantage is, first of all, no bad side effects. Some lifestyle interventions can actually work better than drugs, because you’re treating the cause, and actually have instead good side effects. So, not 1 or 2% benefit over five years—everybody benefits.

We’ll explore one drug-free approach—water-only fasting, next.

Please consider volunteering to help out on the site.

Image credit: Gerald Oswald via pixabay. Image has been modified.

Video production by Glass Entertainment

Motion graphics by Avocado Video

Below is an approximation of this video’s audio content. To see any graphs, charts, graphics, images, and quotes to which Dr. Greger may be referring, watch the above video.

The number one killer in the United States and on the planet Earth is a bad diet. (That is why I’ve dedicated my life to the study of nutrition.) Killer #2 is high blood pressure. The reason it’s so deadly is that it increases your risk of dying from so many different diseases: heart disease and stroke, to heart and kidney failure.

We’re talking an exponential increase in risk of dying from a stroke as our pressures go up, starting from around 110 over 70, an exponential increase in the risk of dying from heart disease, again starting at a blood pressure of about 110/70. We used to consider a blood pressure as high as 175 to be normal––normal if you wanted to die from the normal diseases, like heart attack and stroke. A “normal” of 175 over 110 could put you at over a thousand percent higher risk of having you croak from a stroke compared to the ideal—not the normal, but the ideal, which is down around 110/70.

The definition of high blood pressure, hypertension, dropped from as high as 190/110 down to 160/95, with treatment thresholds for high-risk groups starting at 150/90 down to 140/90, and then, most recently, 130/80. Now…instead of one in three Americans having hypertension, with the new definition, it’s closer to one in two, or more like two-thirds among those over the age of 45. Every time the threshold drops, labeling tens of millions more people as diseased, there’s this backlash. Same thing every time the cholesterol guidelines get more and more stringent; but don’t blame the guidelines. Americans are diseased. That’s the real problem. The American way of life is the problem, not the guidelines.

Maybe we should focus on that instead.

After all, the number one killer of American men and women is heart disease, a disease that can be prevented, arrested, and reversed with a healthy-enough diet.

So, even though a cholesterol of 200 may be normal, maybe we should tell people to strive for under 150. Even though a BMI of 24.9 is technically not overweight, an average height woman, for example, would be better off down around 120 pounds than 145. And, similarly, though a blood pressure of 120/80 may be normal, 110 would be a better top number, and 70 a better lower number, as even down in that range between 70 to 75, or 75 to 80, each 5-point increment is associated with a third more stroke, and at least a fifth more heart disease.

So, why are the new guidelines up at 130 over 80? With an average of three different blood-pressure drugs, you can force people’s blood pressures from 140 down to 120, compared to just giving them two blood-pressure drugs, and high-risk people live longer because of it. Significantly less death in the intensive treatment group, but, because of the higher doses and drugs, had more side effects. So, you have to weigh the risks versus benefits…

One to 2% of people on the drugs for five years will benefit, not having a cardiovascular event when they otherwise might have, and that has to be balanced against the higher risk of adverse side effects. So, you’ll hear commentators saying things like, yeah, the drugs decreased your risk of “events” by 25%, but increased your risk of a serious side effect by 88%. Okay, but those events can include things like death, whereas the side effects are more on the order of fainting.

“These adverse events [do] need to be weighed against the benefits with respect to cardiovascular events and death that are associated with intensive control of systolic blood pressure.” Like, if we use drugs to push high-risk people down to a top number of 120, we might prevent over 100,000 deaths and 46,000 cases of heart failure every year, but could cause “43,000 cases of electrolyte abnormalities and 88,000 cases of acute kidney injury.” Not great, but better than dying.

So, you can see the conundrum guidelines committees are in. On one hand, lowering blood pressure is good for your heart, kidneys, and brain, but at a certain point the side effects from the drugs could outweigh the benefits. Ideally, we want to get patients’ blood pressures as low as possible, but only want to use drugs to do it “when the effects of treatment are likely to be less destructive than the elevated blood pressure.”

The problem is that most people who die from heart disease, heart failure, and stroke may be in that borderline range not sufficiently elevated to warrant drug treatment.

If only there were some way to lower blood pressures without drugs to get the best of both worlds. Thankfully, there are. Regular aerobic exercise, weight loss, smoking cessation, increased dietary fiber intake, decreased alcoholic beverage intake, consumption of a more plant-based diet, and cutting down on salt. The advantage is, first of all, no bad side effects. Some lifestyle interventions can actually work better than drugs, because you’re treating the cause, and actually have instead good side effects. So, not 1 or 2% benefit over five years—everybody benefits.

We’ll explore one drug-free approach—water-only fasting, next.

Please consider volunteering to help out on the site.

Image credit: Gerald Oswald via pixabay. Image has been modified.

Video production by Glass Entertainment

Motion graphics by Avocado Video

Doctor's Note

Stay tuned for How to Lower Blood Pressure Naturally with Lifestyle Changes, which compares the effect of fasting to medications, cutting down on alcohol, meat, and salt, eating more fruits and vegetables, or eating completely plant-based. And then, finally, a review of all the fasting trials to date coming up in Fasting to Naturally Reverse High Blood Pressure.

Is salt really that bad? See, for example, Sprinkling Doubt: Taking Sodium Skeptics with a Pinch of Salt and The Evidence that Salt Raises Blood Pressure.

If you haven’t yet, you can subscribe to my videos for free by clicking here and to my audio podcast here (subscribe by clicking on your mobile device’s icon).

164 responses to “What the New Blood Pressure Range Guidelines Mean

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      1. Hello! Which water is healthier: boiled or raw from the tap?
        ——————————————————————————
        Distilled, actually… then used to make tea when used for drinking.

        But if you don’t have access to distilled but do have sunlight, a glass jug left in the sunlight for a period of time will settle out any impurities of the raw water and offer some measure of safe to drink.

        If you are really concerned, there is a straw that will render even dirty water safe to drink.

        If you are worried about running out of water and live in a place with a roof and gutters, a rain barrel should keep you in good shape for water for cleaning etc.

        There are also new inventions being developed that will take humidity out of the air in amounts that will supply you drinking water.

        https://pubs.acs.org/doi/abs/10.1021/acscentsci.9b00745
        https://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2019-08/uoc–whm082719.php

  1. Is natural peanut butter bad because of the saturated fat? Even the kind they grind up at the store in the self-serve machine with no salt or any additives? Concerned about saturated fat.

    1. Hello Connie,

      Similar to coconut, the saturated fat won’t have the same negative effect as fiber-less saturated fat in oils, meat, or dairy. While coconut oil can raise cholesterol, whole coconut does not because the fiber counteracts the saturated fat. I would expect the same from peanut butter, given that it’s just ground peanuts; however, be wary of peanut butter with added oils and sugar.

      I hope this helps,
      Dr. Matt

      1. Also Connie and Dr. Matt, the peanut butter in those self-grind machines is not recommended due to toxins that accumulate in the overhead bins. I’m pretty sure I read that on Ocean Robbins site, (Food Revolution Network), and then, looked up the source in the link. It seemed to be legit. I personally just get the PB that is organic and peanuts only.

    2. Connie,
      I ate natural peanut butter for years out of concern for the added sugar in the processed kind. I gave up on this because of dificulty with getting the natural peanut butter out of the jar when it hardened at the bottom. Some processed peanut butter has less sugar now, is much cheaper, can be removed from the jar easily and does not need to be refrigerated. I am not concerned about the fat since WFPB eating makes me slim. Not wanting to look like a scarecrow, I value the weight I think peanut butter (on whole grained bread) may give me.

      1. Dan C,

        We eat peanut butter made only from peanuts, no other added ingredients. We store it upside down; we turn it right side up, open it, and stir it a bit with a table knife just before first use, then store it upside a few more times. It seems to do the trick of keeping it stirred all the way through the jar. We also store it on a cupboard shelf; an opened jar doesn’t last too long.

        And Julot, taking your question at face value: I think calling a nut butter “natural” is short-hand for “made from all natural ingredients.” Whatever that means. As for occurring in nature, when I chew peanuts, I sometimes think: “Natural peanut butter!”

        1. Two things to keep in mind with peanut butter: AGEs (see Nutrition Facts videos on these) in roasted peanuts, and second, the often large difference in impact on the body of food that is chewed vs. machine ground.

  2. monitoring blood pressure is a trial. even if examined on a daily basis at the same time each day, the results can be varied depending on any activity leading up to putting on a blood pressure cuff…i.e. sleeping vs. running or even reading vs. walking up a few stairs. from 110/70 to 130/80 might be a variation even if one of the reading is consistent a variety of the time. is there a methodology of performing monitoring (other than 1/yr. at the doctor) that will present a useable number over time.

        1. Good graphic, Fumbles.

          I am wondering who has actually ever had measurement done correctly in a doctor’s office? Not me.

        1. gengo-gakusha,

          My husband has the opposite experience: a wrist monitor used at home seems to measure his BP as at least 10 mm Hg lower when compared to measurements in a doctor’s office. Maybe that’s because he’s never had his BP measured according to the guidelines in a doctor’s office; he even mentions it to the tech, as do I. The response is usually a shrug.

          We consider the results to be more relative than super accurate (like the bathroom scale): did it go up or down compared to yesterday? Is there a sudden big change? Or a gradual change over time?

          1. Dr. J, That’s very interesting. I was interested in a wrist monitor for measuring my BP during workouts, e.g. when lifting weights but was put off. by the Berkeley article.

            What you said about relative numbers made me think perhaps I should get one and determine if there’s a reliable difference between it and my arm monitor If so, it would be useful. I like to gather a lot of data points for various health markers under varying conditions over time and graph the results. Sometimes I even treat my doctors to the results :-).

            1. I took my home b/p to drs office and they were very close on measurements…my sr didnt believe that I suffered severely from white/coat syndrome til I showed him my home b/p readings vs the drs office readings ..now he is a believer

              1. Sharon-Ann,

                I have found consistency of the difference when a patient tells me it’s a different blood pressure in my office vs their home.

                I also found it helpful to have the patient bring in their readings taken both in the morning and evening as there are differences that would be lost with a single reading. This double take is easy and useful as it uncovers masked CV risk. “In addition, high nighttime BP on ambulatory BP monitoring is associated with increased cardiovascular disease risk.” (AHA)

                Not to make life too complicated there are 7 parts to consider to get an accurate bp reading that are often overlooked.
                The AMA produced several versions of a one-page graphic entitled, “7 Simple Tips To Ensure an Accurate Blood
                Pressure Measurement,” which has helped inform physicians, patients and the general public that:

                ▪ Putting the cuff over clothing, rather than a bare arm, can add 10-40 mm Hg to a measurement.
                ▪ Having a full bladder can tack on 10-15 mm Hg.
                ▪ Talking or having a conversation: an additional 10-15 mm Hg.
                ▪ Failing to support the arm at heart level can add 10 mm Hg.
                ▪ An unsupported back can increase a measurement by 5-10 mm Hg. That same range applies to feet left
                dangling from an exam table or high chair.
                ▪ Crossing legs means an extra 2-8 mm Hg.

                This journal article, in Hypertension, should be a quick read for everyone:https://www.ahajournals.org/doi/full/10.1161/HYP.0000000000000087 as it acknowledges the issue of white coat and more.

                Now to the automated over the counter monitors itself. There is a high rate of inaccuracy….and only some seem to read consistently. See these two article: https://www.health.harvard.edu/blog/home-blood-pressure-monitors-arent-accurate-201410297494 (mirrors my experience with some of the automated devices) https://journals.lww.com/md-journal/Fulltext/2018/06220/Comparison_of_the_accuracy_and_errors_of_blood.7.aspx Here two of the brands are tested arm to arm…..and to further the issue see: Blood Pressure Monitors: Wrist vs Arm https://www.berkeleywellness.com/self-care/preventive-care/article/blood-pressure-monitors-wrist-vs-arm

                The inaccuracy between the automated units is an ongoing issue. Couple that with the findings that taking a non-automated approach, the old-style bicep measurement with a stethoscope was more accurate, https://www.jems.com/2018/10/24/ditch-the-machine-to-improve-accuracy-in-blood-pressure-measurement-and-diagnostics/ (good story as well) can give you pause.

                With that said I have my patients bring in their device and we do a two-arm comparison (blind to the patient till after the test) to see what level of accuracy they actually are getting from their unit. Often times it’s so far off that the diagnosis is incorrect. Check don’t guess with your B/P.

                Dr. Alan Kadish moderator for Dr. Greger http://www.Centerofhealth.com

              2. That’s great! In my case, bringing in data from other sources (home, blood donation center, another doctor) convinced my GP. Fortunately she is not arrogant or overbearing.

        2. I use a wrist monitor because I have always found arm cuffs very unpleasant. Even the thought of them makes my BP go up.

          Also I have never quite understood why when arm and wrist cuff measurements are different, it is automatically assumed that it is the wrist measurements that are wrong. Perhaps there is a good reason why BP may be different in locations 18 inches apart. Perhaps the wrist measurements are ‘correct’ and the arm cuff measurements are ‘wrong’. Then there ankle BP measurements………………

    1. I see you’ve already received some helpful advice. As a nurse, I’d recommend you look at those readings. It seems you’re already identified a consistent rise post certain activities which may just be your body’s response, esp if you are not having other symptoms (Although occasionally you may want to see check that BP post running is is not getting considerably and consistently higher) Because BP is generally checked at rest, you may want to choose a time when when you have been at rest esp if you are having symptoms. What we’re looking for is an average for general checks.
      Of course if you are having symptoms, then a check right then and closer monitoring is appropriate._
      Hope that helps.

  3. If I get my bp taken by the doctor it will show up as something like 138/ 72 or worse! If they wheel in the automatic bp machine to take several measures over time and leave me alone to ‘zen’ , then I can bring it down in 2 minutes to 106/ 64 every time.
    Does taking time to meditate daily have a lasting effect on our physiology even though pressures do wave up and down during the day?

    1. Barb,
      I wish I could be like you. Despite the mantras in my head and even snatches of happy songs, my anticipation of a high reading actually brings it about. All of Dr. Greger’s suggested methods except for exercise which I cannot do much of due to physical limitations have not worked for me.

      1. The plant based diet does not work for you?
        It took my 80 year old father to lower his blood pressure to 120/75 in 30 days on a plant based diet with zero exercise.
        And it was two months after the heart surgery!

      2. Barb,
        Exactly the same for me. I freak out just thinking about having my BP measured at the doctor. The strange thing is, I now have this same ‘fear’ when I measure it at home.

    2. Barb
      My experience has been similar, mid130s SBP, mid 70s DBP at my GP’s office. At home in a relaxed state and using proper technique (rare in a doctor’s office), it is normal. I also use breathing techniques to try to lower it or keep it from spiking, it tend not to keep up with them.

      Recently I have started isometric exercises as there are a number of studies showing they can significantly lower BP. One technique is hand grip training:

      https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3603230/
      Exercise Training for Blood Pressure: A Systematic Review and Meta‐analysis

      “By contrast, reductions in SBP and DBP were larger after isometric resistance training compared with endurance training, dynamic resistance training, or combined training, although they were significant only for SBP (P<0.001 for all)."

      "Data from a small number of isometric resistance training studies suggest this form of training has the potential for the largest reductions in SBP."

      https://www.ahajournals.org/doi/abs/10.1161/circ.136.suppl_1.17175
      Abstract 17175: Isometric Handgrip Exercise Reduces 24hr Ambulatory Blood Pressure

      https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5807761/

      "Overall, most isometric exercise training studies have followed somewhat the same exercise protocol with an intensity of 30% of maximum voluntary contraction (MVC) in intervals of 2 min per hand/foot (a total of 8 min per hand/foot per day). In addition, the training has been three times per week for an average of 7.5 weeks in duration with the longest reported study being 10 weeks [9]"

      I recently started using the above protocol but more frequently than 3 x per week. I use a product called Squegg and their iPhone app to measure the resistance (after determine my max).

      There are also studies showing positive results with other isometric exercises. I have not seen a list, so I went back to doing various planks almost every day and have added various resistance band isometrics. They are easy to devise and take very little time, and are, I think, a good complement to endurance and strength training routines.

      It's essential to keep breathing to help prevent BP spikes (just like with heavy weights).

      Caveat: People with high blood pressure should be cautious as iso exercises, like heavy weights, can cause drastic spikes in BP. It's recommended that those with high BP should consult with their doctor first.

      1. Gengo-gakusha, thank you for your helpful comments!
        The hand and foot contractions will be easy to add before my breathing exercises and meditations. Remembering to breathe deeply during the day is a little more challenging for me, but thats partly why I enjoy
        running… the air exchange is refreshing!
        I do use resistance bands too, though I should maybe consider adding to that series.

        Thanks again for your helpful suggestions.

        1. Yes, that’ll undoubtedly work just as well. I bought Squegg because I thought it might be more comfortable and was intrigued with the gadgetry.

  4. With my Omron home BP machine I’m always very low during the later in the evening hours, not long before I’m ready to hit the hay. It definitely goes up and down throughout the day. Around the middle of the day, soon after I get home from wherever. it might go up.

    Maybe too much of a big deal is made over our BP readings. Soon, Big Pharma will say we must get it down to a consistent 105/05.

    I know somebody who has low BP but whose “bad” cholesterol is always high. Humans are a strange breed!

    1. YR, Regarding your comment: “Humans are a strange breed!”.

      I just got back from grocery shopping and the store was filled with people buying bleach, sanitary wipes, hand sanitizer, bottled water, toilet paper, etc.
      I almost expected any minute a fight would break out over the last bottle of bleach!

      It’s amazing how the media has gotten the sheeple into such a freenzy. I’m beginning to suspect that this virus thing was not “accidental” :-(

      1. “It’s amazing how the media has gotten the sheeple into such a freenzy. I’m beginning to suspect that this virus thing was not “accidental” :-(

        – – – –

        Darwin, I’ve heard it was man-made (laboratory) that unintentionally “escaped.” Whatever that’s supposed to mean.

        1. it escaped allright, from a snake at a wildlife meat market in Wuhan. if this was ‘engineered’ it would be more like the Army’s rapid mutating flu in Stephen King’s “The Stand”

        2. There is a P4 (high-security) lab in Wuhan a few hundred metres from the seafood market. They do vaccine development there on very dangerous pathogens and this one could well have come from there. They have another one in Beijing and anthrax “escaped’ from there a few years back. “Escaped” in this context means that some deadhead did not follow procedures. In China nobody follows procedures if they are not being watched and I know because I am in China where I own a factory and employ dozens of locals. In a system where from childhood personal responsibility is discouraged, initiative is punished and obedience is commanded with a big stick, you cannot expect people to do what they are told when they are not being closely monitored. If people can cut corners without being seen, they will. There is not the slightest doubt in my mind that this came from that lab. I am no conspiracy theorist and this is no conspiracy, it is just about incompetence, but there has been a cover up. Now they are saying here that the virus came from the US. This is a ploy by the Communist Party to muddy the waters, especially in China, where those who still have a functioning brain are trying to get the truth out to the populace through social media, but that is an uphill battle when the Party controls everything and censors anything negative within minutes of it being posted.

          1. Verrrrrry interestng and quite plausible. For centuries, lots of things have been kept hidden from the public.

            Let’s hope the truth is revealed soon.

            1. Vegfest in Raleigh, NC on April 5 has been cancelled due to Covid-19. I was so excited to travel there and get to see Dr Greger there, a dream come true! Not going to happen.

            2. ‘For centuries, lots of things have been kept hidden from the public.’

              Like what and you know this because ……..?

              I and other sheeple want to know.

              1. Yes, this psychic-medium was certainly controversial, but it’s amazing how right on she was about our current virus fiasco:
                ——————————————————————————————————–
                I could say something flip like: “Even a blind squirrel finds a nut sometimes” ‘-)

                But coming to accept Einstein’s theory of “Spooky Quantum Entanglement” as fact, well… I guess it’s possible to sometimes get it right.

                But nevermind that… anybody know any stock market seers? ‘-)

                    1. The whole world is shutting down, including Broadway.

                      https://news.yahoo.com/broadway-shuts-doors-over-ongoing-184244504.html?ncid=twitter_yahoonewst_sjwumo1bpf4

                      Meanwhile, it’s true that there’s been a run on toilet paper. I was shopping at one of the branches of Stop&Sop this morning, and even boxes of tissues are starting to go. One of the clerks said that paper towels (which they still had) could clog up your toilets. Thank the Lawd we still have water!

                      What did they do back in the ancient days, other than use their fingers? (I guess I could google it if I really wanted to know.) *_^

                    2. What did they do back in the ancient days, other than use their fingers?
                      ————————————————————————————————
                      corn cobs. ‘-)

                    3. Wait, that sentence doesn’t make sense. Better to say:

                      “Too bad corn on the cob is not season, although there’d probably be a run on that too.”

              2. Make enough predictions and you are bound to get one or two of them right eventually.

                The Romans used sponges on sticks for doing their business I believe. Very ecological since they can be cleaned and reused multiple times and are a renewable resource. i wonder if some species are softer than others. Or get back to basics and use leaves.

                There’s always the bidet of course.

                1. And, indeed the bidet would be more hygienic than plain paper. I suspect yer average person can’t afford one of those contraptions, though.

                  In lieu of that, they could keep a large coffee cup in their loo, run water in it after they do their duty, and then ….well, you can guess what to do next. As things would be a bit wet down there, perhaps a hair dryer could take over from there. :-)

          2. I believe you very much so..if anyone interested read Bitten..tells all about biochemical warfare..I have lyme disease and truly believe that these diseases are man made and NOT conspiracy theories

    2. YR,
      It is the norm for BP to be lower in the evening, especially around bedtime (some people violate that norm). Yes, BP varies very significantly. The definition refers to sustained or continuously high BP.

      https://www.heart.org/en/health-topics/high-blood-pressure/the-facts-about-high-blood-pressure/what-is-high-blood-pressure

      “High blood pressure (HBP or hypertension) is when your blood pressure, the force of your blood pushing against the walls of your blood vessels, is consistently too high.”

    1. Vitaminwiki, created and ran by an electronics engineer. What could possible go wrong?

      What next asking Dr Gregor for computer advice?

      1. Reality Bites, I suggested to NF some time ago that Henry Lahore be banned from this site. He had lifted comments from comment sections without our consent to use at his website. He promotes his own website constantly.

  5. Hate the new video format. Would rather it be graphs, study highlights like before. Take out the person and just leave the science.
    Is Gregor trying to become more of a celebrity by doing this? I fear his presentation antics are going to drive people away from his videos.

    I’ve read his books several times and think has changed my and my family’s lives for the better, and I want these videos to succeed in doing that for others. I don’t think this is the way to do it. All the love.. just had to say something.

    1. Jonathan,

      No, I don’t think he is trying to become more of a celebrity.

      I think the fact that he never put himself in his videos is why having him there all of the sudden seems like he must be an egotist, but every single other doctor out there puts themselves in and people don’t accuse them of that.

      I suspect he had a book coming out and wanted to try new software to change things up, but people can’t follow the fast-moving science part so it backfired.

      He has already asked for feedback and people have already responded that they find it distracting, but there were already months worth of videos produced.

    2. He screwed up the videos months ago and people have been complaining ever since. The excuse given is that they were all prerecorded a while back.

      I feel it is for personal fame as he could always redo them.

      1. “I feel it is for personal fame as he could always redo them.”

        “I feel…” Your feelings tell you only one thing: your feelings. They don’t tell you facts, and they certainly don’t tell you the innermost motives of another human being.

        ‘He could always redo them…’

        This site is funded by donations and by the profits from Dr Greger’s books. Do you REALLY want him to waste money (not to mention TIME – this is a very busy man!) redoing a load of videos because the new format isn’t successful? We’re not talking about Coke taking ‘new Coke’ of the market (after selling a bazillion gallons of it). We’re talking about a non-profit organization wasting vast sums of donors’ dollars because a new format isn’t catching on with viewers.

        For all you know, any new ones he’s making are in the old format.

        Be grateful for the vast GIFTS that Dr Greger gives to us all by making his website free. And maybe consider the old truism that we tend to accuse other people of the fault we’re most guilty of ourselves. Just saying…

        1. Nel, re the website is free: actually, it is publicly funded by our donations…. Non-profits are one of the fastest growing sectors out there. Dr G draws a salary, as do the staff….

      2. We are keeping track of the feedback for the videos, and ask that everyone please be patient and understanding if we do not make immediately make changes. These videos are planned out and recorded in advance, yes, but we also have feedback coming from multiple outlets (YouTube, social platforms) and much of it is positive. Thank you for your support of Dr. Greger and NutritionFacts!

        1. Thanks Kate!
          I think you are all doing an amazing work and like I said, Dr. Gregor really has made a very positive impact on me personally. My desire to express my opinion is truly because I share these videos ALL THE TIME with people… and got better responses before.. I literally don’t shut up about Dr. Gregor and his books.
          Thanks for taking my feedback; I’ll keep watching/forwarding the videos regardless of whether you change them.
          I’m going to sign up for a donor account as soon as I post this. It’s about time I do.
          JB

        2. yes, but we also have feedback coming from multiple outlets (YouTube, social platforms) and much of it is positive.
          —————————————————————————————————
          That’s what concerns me… the fact there has been no word that he intends to go back to the old format. I can live with it if he continues this format… I rarely watch these new format videos anyway. Sometimes I try to listen to them while I read the comments.

          Frankly, I think I’ve been introduced to most everything that is new to me, here… so if I get caught up in what I read in the comments and don’t pay attention to what is being said in the video, I don’t feel I’m missing out. It’s the same if I try watching the new format videos… I get caught up in the gesticulations and lose track of what is being said.

          Maybe that is a good thing to happen. This site is like catnip to some cats… maybe it is a good thing if they get some of their information from other outlets?

          I do still watch the Flashback Friday videos though.

          1. I’ve often commented that DR should give us a solution to the dangers we face from food etc. Kinda hypocritical of me to point out what I consider as failings without offering a solution.

            To that end, I think he could still stay in the picture of the new format if 1. he were in more of a long shot rather than big in the screen. I think the gesticulations should be toned down to make points to what he is saying.

            That is, take note of the arm movements in the video below. Notice they punctuate the words being spoken.

            https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/1793222012/mission-inc?

        3. Thanks Kate, The format isn’t as important as the content. I’ve paused, and backed-up these videos in all the formats so I could better understand the content. I tend to read body language, so seeing the good doctor’s face and movements helps to understand what he emphasizing. That’s why I especially enjoy attending his public speaking events. Plus, at public events his great sense of humor is more abundant.

      3. Reality bites,

        I give the benefit of the doubt that his speaking schedules and interviewing schedules and book writing schedules and book translation schedules and video making schedules are so very over-filled that the concept of re-filming and editing (and paying for the video company to edit) would be a seriously big expenditure.

        He is not-for-profit and works to the point where he has trouble managing his schedule and doesn’t even take vacations as it is.

        This is a free site packed full of useful, free information and he has tried and succeeded in making it high quality mostly entertaining which most doctors don’t even try to do.

        I will agree that the software was a mistake, but the concept of having him in his own videos now and then wasn’t a mistake. I watched him in Chef AJ’s webinar and he was the most dynamic person who spoke. But he wasn’t being moved all around the screen in artificial lighting and he wasn’t blocking the science in a way that frustrated people.

        I don’t even know what to say that you would have had him re-do a whole quarter of a year’s worth of videos and that you think that means he has a weakness in character.

        And I will say that even if he did have a weakness in character, coming here and getting all of the free information that we can and not being grateful is another type of ego trip.

        1. And I have to apologize now because I didn’t mean to insult you either.

          I just don’t understand that we as an audience are so greedy and not grateful and what I already do know is that when I took a class in persuasion in college, they said that people who don’t pay a price are often the least satisfied people and they tend to be less happy.

          1. Dr. Greger,

            I will suggest thinking about your grandmother and not your opinionated audience.

            I always tend to read Mother Teresa’s quote at times like these. I will put part of it.

            People are often unreasonable, irrational and self-centered;
            Forgive them anyway.
            If you are kind, people may accuse you of selfish, ulterior motives;
            Be kind anyway.
            If you are successful, you will win some unfaithful friends and some genuine enemies;
            Succeed anyway.
            If you are honest and sincere, people may deceive you;
            Be honest and sincere anyway.
            What you spend years creating, others could destroy overnight;
            Create anyway.

      4. Constructive criticism is one thing, flights of fanciful ad hominem remarks are quite another. What’s the big deal? Basically, you are whining.

      5. Only some people complain. Others quite like the new format.

        Why must we always attribute changes we don’t personally like to the basest of personal motives in other people? For that matter, at least 50% of your comments here seem to involve criticising other people. Not just Dr Greger – you are obviously an equal opportunity grump. I am a noted grump myself but you make me look like I am just not trying hard enough. Have you considered becoming more mellow? After all, it might be an effective technique for lowering blood pressure.

        I suspect that media professionals (perhaps NF staff) simply advised him to trial a variety of different video formats and styles to see which gained most traction with viewers. After all, until you put it to the test, you don’t know . Given the type of videos he did when NutritionFacts was a one-man effort, there’s a good chance that he personally prefers the simple voiceover method for videos rather than the current front-and-centre approach

  6. I am meeting more people who are starting to eat more plant foods.

    Just yesterday, I spoke with a contractor (kitchen remodel) who told us that several years ago, he cut back on the amounts he was eating (portion control), and on the amount of meat he was eating, and started eating more produce (including salads and fruit, especially apples — because “they’re easy and convenient”), and some beans (I didn’t hear about whole grains) — and he lost about 70 lbs, and felt much better. Needless to say, he was very happy about this change in his lifestyle and life. And he says that he doesn’t miss his old ways of eating (well, for the most part; apparently, rarely, temptation does rear its ugly head).

    So, I hope you keep up your excellent work, Dr. Greger and your like-minded colleagues! You are making headway.

    And oh, btw, the contractor was impressed by the way we eat. Perhaps food for thought for him.

    1. Do not credit Gregor for the work many people are doing. See Forks over Knives, Plantpure, Engine 2, for the people behind multiple fronts educating the public. They have made movies (see Plantpure Nation), put out foods available at supermarkets (Plantpure, Engine 2), and all have several cookbooks that are New York Times best sellers.

        1. Thank you Dr. Greger and NF team for a fantastic work you are doing for so many years! We are very much appreciate your effort!

      1. Reality Bites,

        I consider the folks at the other sources you mentioned to be colleagues of Dr. Greger; if I were commenting on their sites, I would post a similar comment praising them and their colleagues. They are all working concomitantly and often together to get the word out about healthy eating and lifestyles.

        Other sources you could mention are the Physicians’ Committee for Responsible Medicine, Joel Fuhrman, and many others. But this is the site I visit most often.

        And I tend not to eat foods “put out” by any food processor (such as Plantpure or Engine 2 — actually, I’ve only seed products under the second brand), for the simple reason that I’m trying to avoid processed and prepared food. That’s what the “whole” of “whole plant food eating” means in my mind: whole plant foods, not commercially processed or prepared.

  7. Dr. Gregor, I would love to hear what you might have to say about information that people like Ivor Cummins are putting out. Here is an example that is pretty compelling, but has many elements that are the exact opposite of what the WFPB doctors advocate. This sort of contradiction can be very frustrating for people like me who cannot seem to get blood pressure down even on a WFPBNO diet. If you would weigh in on these claims about a healthy keto diet being superior because it addresses insulin resistance, I would love your thoughts on the matter (or anyone else who has looked carefully and critically at this seeming contradiction!)
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YWtQheAsI1U&feature=youtu.be

    1. A vegan YouTuber has pointed out that Ivor Cummins is in fact funded by one of the largest suppliers to fast food industry giants like McDonald’s etc. His defence of high fat and high cholesterol diets is no doubt music to their ears.
      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FCiF4CG8Jes&t=337s

      He has also done another short video critiquing Cummins’ claims generally
      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RIISN8ndm4Y&t=148s

      Cummins is a plausible speaker much loved by low carbers, cholesterol and saturated fat denialists. He tells a wonderful story and makes big claims but offers no convincing evidence. His claims about cholesterol and saturated fat are nonsense at best and lies at worst.

      To add to Realty bites’ suggestion, this video might also help

      https://nutritionfacts.org/video/what-causes-insulin-resistance/

  8. Agree 100% that the changes to the website and the presentation of information has not been an improvement. I once visited the website quite frequently, but now I don’t find it as useful as before and it is also harder to glean useful information when I do try to use the website.

    1. Hello Kim,

      Himalayan pink salt is still salt! It’s still added sodium, which is bad for blood pressure, even though it is considered “natural.” It can even be considered worse than table salt in some cases because it does not contain added iodine! For anyone with high blood pressure, it is definitely worth ditching the sea salt.

      I hope this helps,
      Dr. Matt

  9. I’m a fan of Dr. Gregor. I listen to his recordings, and I have had the privilege of hearing him speak in person.
    But I find his video presence distracting. I like hearing the inflections in his voice, but his animated speaking style
    visible on the video makes it difficult for me to concentrate on the packed content in the video. Just offering this for your future consideration.

  10. Someone told me ashwaganda root helps him deal with stress. A google search told me it can be bad for pregnancy but otherwise is it safe? Or effective?

    1. The book, The Upside of Stress, is on my 21st century short list of best books for life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness. It will flip your bit about “stress”.

  11. Do not let a slight irritation dissuade you from hearing the truth. Your monkey minds are distracting you. When your ego rules
    it always wants to keep you distracted. I love the animated Dr. G. in person live, and in any format he so generously provides.
    It is his format, and his to do with as he wishes. We should be grateful recipients of his time. If you have ever researched something
    on Pub Med, you would realize the mounds of information out there and how time consuming it is to comb through.He is a reliable source.
    Grateful, hugs and kudos Dr. G.

  12. Great video! I found this information very interesting…..what are your thoughts?

    One of the new studies, which analyzed the medical records of more than 11,000 adults over a period of three decades, found that people who had low diastolic blood pressure (60 to 69 mm Hg) were twice as likely to have subtle evidence of heart damage compared with people whose diastolic blood pressure was 80 to 89 mm Hg. Low diastolic values were also linked to a higher risk of heart disease and death from any cause. The findings appeared in the Aug. 30, 2016, Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

    people with heart disease may want to check that their diastolic blood pressure values don’t fall too far below 70 mm Hg, which can happen when you try to reach a low systolic number, says Dr. Conlin. “For a systolic blood pressure goal, I tend to be comfortable with a value of around 130,” he says. Going lower than that can be a double-edged sword in terms of side effects and other adverse events.

    ……..he encourages discussion about such decisions with his patients. Everyone is unique, not only with regard to medical history, but also in willingness to take additional medication and accept certain risks. So talk to your doctor about what blood pressure goal makes sense for you, he advises.

    Source: https://www.health.harvard.edu/heart-health/blood-pressure-can-it-be-too-low

    1. One of the problems with observational studies like these is that they are notoriously subject to confounding by uncontrolled variables. Also, simply finding an association between isn’t proof of causation. Still less does it prove that variable A causes variable B. It is also possible that if there is a causal connection between A and B, then B could cause A.

      In thus case, the link between low blood pressure (relatively rare in the US) and heart disease could equally well be because some types of heart disease cause blood pressure to fall. ‘Some heart conditions that can lead to low blood pressure include extremely low heart rate (bradycardia), heart valve problems, heart attack and heart failure.’

      The association found could therefore possibly be a consequence of undiagnosed/preclinical heart disease.And if we look at randomised controlled trials like SPRINT we find that treating people with high blood pressure to a ‘lower target (less than 120 mm Hg) reduced cardiovascular events by 25 percent and reduced the overall risk of death by 27 percent’
      https://www.nhlbi.nih.gov/science/systolic-blood-pressure-intervention-trial-sprint-study

      This is quite contrary to Dr Conlin’s opinion which appears to be based on simple associations that appear to take no account of the fact that a number of heart problems can cause low blood pressure.

      1. Hey Tom, you should send your comments to Harvard… they probably don’t know all this stuff. You might even get a chair named after you. ‘-)

        1. Lonie

          Even associational studies done by guys at Harvard don’t prove causation.

          And assumptions made by guys at Harvard are still just assumptions.

          Dr Corbin might be quite comfortable with levels about 130 but I am with Dr Greger on this. Not least because bringing levels down to below 120 …. ‘reduced cardiovascular events by 25 percent and reduced the overall risk of death by 27 percent’

          How do you square the results from RCTs such as SPRINT and observations from that Harvard study then?

          1. Dr Corbin might be quite comfortable with levels about 130 but I am with Dr Greger on this. Not least because bringing levels down to below 120 …. ‘reduced cardiovascular events by 25 percent and reduced the overall risk of death by 27 percent’
            ———————————————————————————————————————————-
            Tom, I don’t spend much time on studies so I often am found wandering around out-of-the-box as I think.

            If memory serves, DR Gregor posted a video or blog that stated they are finding the beginnings of heart disease in children due to diet. Just sayin’ given those beginnings, the new normal for BP may very well be a higher number than in the past. Maybe the higher BP is what the body needs to get oxygen pushed throughout the body.

            Personally, if I had children I would be feeding them beet juice daily in order to keep the blood vessels used to dilation and contraction, ensuring they stay supple. Probably would feed them White Willow Bark as well in order to keep excessive platelet action down, and thus stopping cholesterol buildup.

            1. ‘If memory serves, DR Gregor posted a video or blog that stated they are finding the beginnings of heart disease in children due to diet. Just sayin’ given those beginnings, the new normal for BP may very well be a higher number than in the past. Maybe the higher BP is what the body needs to get oxygen pushed throughout the body.’

              Possibly Lonie but I find it very difficult to ignore those 25% and 27% reduction resulting from lowering BP levels below previous normal levels.

        2. Lonie,

          Surely you are aware that even Harvard professors can have feet made of clay. Or worse.

          Here’s but one example:

          “ Major Study of Drinking Will Be Shut Down
          An investigation at the National Institutes of Health concluded that the $100 million trial had been tainted by funding appeals to the alcohol industry…
          As it turned out, much of the money for the study came from the alcohol industry. Earlier this year, The New York Times reported that officials at the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, part of the N.I.H., had solicited that funding from alcohol manufacturers, a violation of federal policy….
          The lead investigator, Dr. Kenneth J. Mukamal, an associate professor of medicine at Harvard Medical School, discussed the methods with alcohol groups by email in August 2014, responding to questions raised by Diageo, Anheuser Busch InBev, and trade groups like the Distilled Spirits Council.
          In December 2014, he participated in a conference call discussing the research with a dozen representatives of alcohol companies, the investigators said.” https://www.nytimes.com/2018/06/15/health/alcohol-nih-drinking.html (read the article for more details)

          I’ve read that Dr. Mukamal asked for funding to “prove” that moderate drinking is beneficial for heart health, to further bolster his earlier research results which supported the same conclusion, which were, I believe, based on observations. (btw, as I’m sure you know, that’s not how research is done; experiments are undertaken to answer questions, not to “prove” a pet hypothesis. In fact, the effort is to try disprove the hypothesis.)

          What say you now?

          My reaction is to distrust even studies funded by agencies such as the NIH, as I’d had no idea that funding could be solicited by investigators, who would then allow the outside funding sources to have input into the study design and analysis. We should all be skeptics. Of even the most apparently “exalted” institutions and their staffs.

          1. Surely you are aware that even Harvard professors can have feet made of clay. Or worse.

            What say you now?
            ————————————————–
            Heh, Actually I was just poking Tom with a stick, suggesting that what he posted has been addressed here so many times that it has become common knowledge to the point that even I get it… and thus, since Harvard with their huge endowment can certainly afford the creme de la creme of the research world.

            This suggests to me that their researchers are certainly cognizant of the differences in types of studies. In my mind, at least… this also suggests that if these premium grade researchers choose to submit an observational study, they must believe it is relevant.

            What say I? I say we miss a great deal of useful knowledge if we discount observational studies from the discussion.

    2. Interesting article. I did not read the original studies but I have the suspicion that most if not all of the cases found with subtle heart changes/damage were those of unhealthy people and in particular, those on BP medication. I suspect so given one of the experts said:

      “The findings about low diastolic blood pressure are intriguing, and they make sense intuitively, Dr. Conlin says. Diastolic pressure is measured during the point in the heart cycle where blood flows into the coronary arteries that feed the heart.
      **** If those arteries are clogged with fatty deposits (as in a person with heart disease)****, blood pressure beyond the narrowed areas will drop as blood flows through that narrow channel. As a result, part of the heart muscle may not get enough blood. Starved for oxygen and nutrients, the heart may become weak and prone to damage.”

      Although I have no doubt very low DBP (<50-55) might be generally a risk, for healthy, athletic or at least very physically active people with no demonstrable CV issues, on no BP meds, low cholesterol, etc. and on a sound WFPB diet, I see no reason to think 60-70 DB is not perfectly healthy.

      Any contrary evidence would be welcome.

  13. I love Dr. G. Have recommended him to my newsletter audience of 9,000. Have donated money to his work.

    BUT, the new format, of the good doctor actually presenting to us, deters from the information itself.
    Don’t mis-understand. I love watching Dr. G. but he is so expressive that I can’t help watching his hand and body expressions along with his facial inflections.
    It ends up that i didn’t hear and understand the lesson and the info. he’s been sharing. Maybe I’m just a little A.D.D.
    I know Dr. G. will say it’s about the clinical message and not about him but he’s so amazing that it becomes about him by default. Dr. G. is becoming bigger than the data he presents. He’s that good…nah…he’s that great.

  14. Tom Hanks and an NBA player tested positive for coronavirus.

    Can we have that webinar soon?

    I am not afraid for myself. I officially have my Vitamin D and C and my Whole Food Plant Based diet. I have my air purifiers and my UV lamps and Wabi Baby and my steamer and my Silvertize cloths and my nasal irrigator and I also do have plenty of hand sanitizer if I need to go someplace and I have been following Dr Campbell’s coverage every day and have pretty much self-isolated, but elderly people are going to be dying at high levels.

    And young people might not even get any symptoms and might accidentally cause their loved ones to get sick.

    I just want the people who have it to have resources soon.

    Dr Fuhrman did a video that I didn’t like and I like 99.9% of his videos but he did a “You are safe because of your nutritarian diet” type of message and I am hoping you will be more helpful than that to Tom Hanks.

    1. Tom Hanks and an NBA player tested positive for coronavirus.
      —————————————————————————————-
      Hadn’t heard about Tom Hanks but I’m somewhat familiar with the Utah Jazz NBA Player, Rudy Gompert. From what I’ve read, they thought he just had the normal flu and he was quickly getting over it. They decided to do a CoVid-19 test any way and it came back positive.

      Funny story about Tom Hanks… I had an occasion to fly out to Monterry CA a few years ago and hailed a cab that took me to my motel which was only a short ride from the airport. I apologized to the cabbie for giving him a small tip explaining that I wasn’t carrying much cash and didn’t want to run out before getting back home. He said I actually gave him a bigger tip than Tom Hanks had given him when he rode in his cab.

      Learning that TH is CoVid-19 positive, I wondered if that cabbie sees the novel strain of the flu as Karma-Corona? ‘-)

      Probably not though as the cabbie seemed like a happy and truly nice guy.

      Oh Deb, somewhere I read (Weather Underground I think) that during times of higher humidity (summer time) often these viruses are less communicable here in the northern hemisphere. Also heard the recommendation to open your windows as a helpful preventative.

      1. That is interesting about humidity. I will look it up.

        I have been looking at Omega 3 supplementation.

        https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4312405/

        That is an interesting Tom Hanks story.

        I have been in a bowling alley with Michelle Pfeiffer and a Bateaux in Paris with Rob Lowe and Disney World with Telly Savalas and Canada, I think it was Canada, with Harrison Ford. Maybe a few others. We had the Cirque Du Soleil fleuns at our house in CA and a few other people more from the writer, director, camera, editing end. And a few sports people. But it was all because I was the shy gal Friday of other people who were charismatic extroverted just as shy people.

        1. I have been in a bowling alley with Michelle Pfeiffer and a Bateaux in Paris with Rob Lowe and Disney World with Telly Savalas and Canada, I think it was Canada, with Harrison Ford. Maybe a few others. We had the Cirque Du Soleil fleuns at our house in CA and a few other people more from the writer, director, camera, editing end. And a few sports people. But it was all because I was the shy gal Friday of other people who were charismatic extroverted just as shy people.
          ——————————————–
          Impressive Deb… Im PRESS ive!

        1. I am going to be using my steamer on the air.
          —————————————————————–
          Thanks for the confirmation. Where I live, depending on the Nino or the Nina cycle, the air can be humid or sear. I do fine in the winter because my distiller puts some humidity in the air. But in the summer, it heats up the house too much to operate.

          I think there is a cool (and kool as well ‘-) way to humidify. I’ll be looking for something like that.

    2. Here’s the link if anyone wants it https://www.drfuhrman.com/elearning/eat-to-live-blog/183/coronavirus-and-the-flu-five-ways-to-protect-yourself

      Why are you isolating yourself now Deb? Did you come into contact with people that tested positive? The reason why I ask is that I am thinking it could be a very long haul we are looking at. Like, a year or two. Lonie might be right in that there may be some seasonal let-up, (here’s hoping) but it won’t just go away.

      I won’t stop living (unless i get sick and die lol) so I plan to keep running if they disband the run club for the season, and keep on exercising as usual. Libraries, restaurants and church may be put on hold for a while.

      1. Barb,

        Social distancing and self-isolating are ways to delay transmission of the disease; I don’t think that they are anticipated to avoid it forever. But it flattens out the steep curve of new infections, thus reducing the daily burden on our already over-burdened health care system, and to allow time to develop better treatments of the disease, acquire more protective supplies for health care workers and patients, and ultimately, hopefully, to develop an effective vaccine.

        1. Yes Dr J, ty. To my mind there is a difference between carrying on with life (job, necessary errands, some limited interaction) while conscienciously applying all good cautions and hygenic measures, and isolation ( locking oneself in the house for a couple of weeks totally bringing life to a standstill).

          I was asking Deb if she was strictly isolating herself.
          I have had 3 major illnesses in the last year. A year ago I was bed ridden for a month, and 3 weeks this past Christmas, and the flu again this Feb. I stayed home, only took the dogs out briefly, avoided everyone I could etc. We don’t have any reports of coronavirus in our location so far, so I don’t feel that total isolation at this point is necessary or helpful, but idk. I will avoid crowds, keep my appointments, for now.

  15. * I don’t mean to sound flippant about the virus… not at all. Under normal circumstances we live very quiet lives here, and take handwashing seriously, staying home if sick, avoid public gatherings, keep a clean house, if only because we are very conscious of our older and more vulnerable neighbours. We will be more vigilant than ever now.

    1. I don’t mean to sound flippant about the virus…
      ——————————————————————
      Don’t worry about it… the children will show us how to deal with it without continual hand-wringing.

      Old children’s jump-rope nursery rhyme from the *Spanish* flu days… “I had a little bird, her name was Enza, I opened up the window, and in-flew-Enza…”

  16. I have a weird blood pressure issue that nobody seems to be able to help with. I am not overweight, I eat mostly plant based and get plenty of fibre, I avoid salt, fat and sugar and do not have high cholesterol. All my blood test results are normal. I am busy and move a fair bit at work, clocking up about 7500 steps on an average day and over 10,000 if I am away on business or have a day off. I do a few exercises, but don’t have time for the gym like I used to. My blood pressure used to be fine until about 5 years ago, but now it sits around 130/90 in the early evening, but it can be a lot higher in the morning. One difference is my heart rate, which can drop to about 38 to 42 overnight and is normally only about 55. I am surmising that when the heart pumps slow and strong it must increase the pressure on the walls of the blood vessels. If I exercise, have a hot shower and and then sit quietly and breath easy until my pulse drops to 60bpm, then I can get a reading of about 115/70.

    A few doctors have advised me to go onto medication and I did for a while, but I think it is bad to be on medication when I don’t have any identifiable illness. If I were obese, or diabetic or had any other illness I would accept that medication is a good idea, but apart from variable blood pressure I am fit and healthy. I am 65 years old and run a full-on business and so stress is a factor, but I consider this to by itself should not kill me when everything else is normal.

    I am curious whether there are other people in the same boat?

    1. TJ,
      This may be helpful: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ymi8GQnSSYM At around 58 Dr. Rangan Chatterjee talks about people doing the right things, like eating well, but still having problems. He suggests poor sleep as something to consider. Also, stress, like you mentioned and being over stimulated with electronics, something that was focused on in a recent Dr. Greger video. The video I linked is a Rich Roll podcast.

  17. “…On one hand, lowering blood pressure is good for your heart, kidneys, and brain, but…” NO, NO, NO, lowering blood pressure during by drugs is the last what you should do – because, if the arteries are damaged, especially the endothelium, then there is not a balanced supply of the organs possible – this is why the body tries to compensate it by increasing the blood pressure. If you lower the blood pressure without healing the underlying disease, the results will be symptomes like dementia, alzheimer etc. because the brain is undersupplied with oxygen and other needed stuff. If you have a old, stiffen and on some parts pitted garden host, with inside a lot if calcifications – of course you would trie to open the tap further to get the right amount of ater to watering your garden (brain and organs)… and yes, the garden host can burst. But no to open the tap more would stand for less water in the garden and less harvest…
    Conclusion:
    If the higher blood presure based on damaged arteries try first to heal your arteries and venes, of course, with a better choice of food, exercise and stress management! Drugs should be always the ultimo ratio, not the first step!

  18. Breaking News: Farts lower blood pressure in mice: https://blood-pressure-monitoring.org/blowing-off-farts-lower-blood-pressure/

    Dr. Greger has said that fart gas has a health benefit. I could not produce the reference though.

    And, ahem, this is a fine opportunity to share with you some of my fart prose :-)

    Life of the Party

    It’s my party
    And I can fart when I want to
    Fart when I want to
    You would fart to
    If you have as much gas as I do!

    There was no need to build the XL pipeline.
    They could have just hooked up to me.
    I would consider it my patriotic duty.

    1. It’s my party
      And I can fart when I want to
      Fart when I want to
      You would fart to
      If you have as much gas as I do!
      —————————————————–
      When you imagine it sung in the voice of Leslie Gore, it works. ‘-)

    2. Dan C,

      Ah, THAT might explain my husband’s very low BP. ;-)

      And there’s a reason that some of us are referred to as Old Farts, or OFs for short.

      1. This may be more helpful to meat eaters than us though.

        It appears to be hydrogen sulphide that affects blood pressure
        https://www.cbc.ca/news/technology/flatulence-s-stink-may-be-linked-to-lower-blood-pressure-1.767986

        There’s more sulphur in meat etc than in vegetables, which is why meat eaters/omnivores have smellier outputs, so to speak, than we do.

        ‘In “Contribution of Dietary Protein to Sulfide Production in the Large Intestine” researchers found that meat-eaters generated as much as 15 times the sulfides as those eating vegetarian.’
        https://nutritionfacts.org/2011/12/05/beans-and-gas-clearing-the-air/

  19. Hi. I became a vegan two weeks ago, but now I feel sluggish, headache and hard to concentrate, so what is the reason for that?

    1. 1) You are likely still in the detox phase. Stick with the whole plant foods and the symptoms should clear up.

      If they don’t, you may be carnitine deficient. Carnitine isn’t an essential amino acid, but if you’ve been having animal products day in and day out all your life and you suddenly given them up, then you likely aren’t producing it. Dr. Klaper gives a great discussion about it and how you can effectively transition to a plant-based diet, it’s called Why Some Vegans Fail To Thrive-Dr Michael Klaper at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6mTs6KC8sqE

    2. Without a detailed food log, we have no idea what the reason is. Please keep in mind that Dr. Greger does not recommend a “vegan” lifestyle. He recommends a “whole food plant based” lifestyle. They are not necessarily the same. I know plenty of vegans that are sick all the time. I don’t know any whole food plant based eater that are sick very often.

  20. Manufacturers typically get away with using the unsightly/borderline moldy peanuts that cannot pass off and be sold as the raw whole nuts. These are loaded with aflatoxins (carcinogens). Check out Dr. Campbell’s book The China Study. This is where I read up on it.

  21. I was very interested in watching this. However, Dr. Greger never seems to address low BP. Some of the comments have, and they concern me!

    I have never had any problems with BP, except for it being high during my first pregnancy, 20 years ago. Recently, because of some medical problems and several surgeries, I have had lots of BP readings and so have become aware of it again. Back in October, it was perfectly normal. (usually from 100-110 over 70 to 80) Then I started a WFPB diet, and it’s become what some of my doctors consider a bit too low. (low 90s over low 60s) No one is overly concerned, but I have been told to add salt to my diet so that it doesn’t get too low. I have (gladly, I must admit!), but my BP has stayed just as low. So I definitely see it as an effect of the WFPB way of eating.

    When Dr. Greger talks about the ideal BP, I’m surprised he doesn’t mention the possibility of healthy eating taking it way below that. And I’m especially wondering if he thinks it can get too low. I hope he will address this at some point!

    1. When my wife went to a Pritikin Longevity Center 10 years ago, they advised to be careful about staying on BP meds after starting the week, as some would start fainting after several meals without the SAD amount of salt. I’m thinking your vessels are not clogged or rigid and the blood pressure is right for you. Diet matters. If you can stand, jump, and run without lightheadedness or fainting, I’d quit asking the SAD/big pharma establishment for their opinion. You’ve transcended their understanding of this issue.

  22. I have chromebook . your videos do not run .
    Also I do not have G Suite, and sometimes on Youtube , I get a message that I need G suite .

    I have been using Garlic powder and Louisiana Hot Sauce and mix that with mild medium strong

    coffee and that seems to have knock bad viruses and bad bacterias out of my lungs and digestive

    system …

    Luke

    1. Hi Luke, the videos on the site run through YouTube, so if you have trouble with YT, that would explain why they don’t work on here either. Sorry to hear that. Hopefully you can figure out a way to watch them, but it sounds like the transcript is serving you well.

  23. Question about LOW blood pressure. My usually low blood pressure, 85/60-ish, has plummeted. My partner was checking his bp to see if it is lowered from our WPB diet, so I put on the cuff. My several readings were 68/42, 52/39, 52/32, 60/35. We adjusted the cuff, to make sure it was fitted properly. (His readings were what they usually are: @125/ 85, so it seems the machine is accurate, with fresh batteries.)
    I walk around like a normal person, hike at least an hour every day and am reasonably fit. I can feel slightly dizzy coming up to standing from a squat – but only occasionally. I have felt tired some days, but figure that’s somewhat common. My limited research doesn’t sound good …
    :-/
    I’ll try adding some salt, extra B12 and folate, and licorice tea. I would check with my doctor but it’s phone appointments unless critical. (I will go in when the pandemic subsides.) Any thoughts or experience with this?

    1. Further note: I realized that I have had no added salt outside what naturally occurs in plants for quite some time, so I found chips in my pantry and after eating salt, my bp was 93//63. This morning it was 85/59. Better! But… salt? Is there another better way?

      1. Mary, I am wondering if you happen to know whether your sodium level is normal?

        When I went on a no added salt 100% WF plant diet, I experienced hyponatremia (low sodium). My sports medicine doctor discovered this after I complained of fatigue and failure to recover from exercise. Since then I have upped the added salt so that my sodium intake falls between about 800-1000 mg per day. I was also perhaps overhydrating. I got hyponatremia once before from over hydrating before a fasting blood test. Those on a WFP diet do not need to drink as much liquid.

        Glad to hear the chips helped!

        1. Thanks gengo-gakusha. Your experience reflects mine. I was feeling great on my hikes, but more than normally fatigued afterwards. Plus we’ve been drinking lots of hibiscus tea, on top of other beverages. Fits your description. Really, thanks for your reply.

        2. Gengo-Gakusha,

          My blood pressure is now around (my) normal, 90/60, all day. I can’t go to my doctor at this time as it is not an emergency. I’ve continued lightly salting food and drinking less fluids.

          I am wondering what your treatment was for hyponatremia. I feel slightly thick headed today, and will buy some electrolytes tomorrow. Can you suggest anything else from your experience?

          1. Mary, Both times, I was told to simply increase my daily intake of salt a bit but was given no specific advice. I did read that it is risky jn **serious** cases to imcrease salt intake rapidly (can cause brain swelling). I was also drinking quite a bit of fluids in short periods of time and stopped that as the kidney can process only so much liquid per hour.

            https://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/318619#how-much-is-too-much?-

            “Your *kidneys can* eliminate about 5.3-7.4 gallons (20-28 liters) of *water* a day, but they *can*’t get rid of more than 27-33 ounces (0.8-1.0 liters) *per hour* (14, 15). Therefore, in order to avoid hyponatremia symptoms, you should not drink more than 27-33 ounces (0.8-1.0 liters) of *water per hour*, on average”

            Now I sip fluids. Besides the advice to drink at least 8 8 oz glasses of water per day is a myth.
            https://www.drmirkin.com/nutrition/9942.html

            I did not take electrolytes either time. However, I am confident I get plenty of potassium in my diet. After the first occurrence I was retested in a week and was fine. I was not retested the second time but felt no need for it since I had recovered.

            1. Thanks so much for your help.

              Most everyone I know has the opposite issue if at all. Hypertension and taking too much salt. I feel lucky to have you respond and in such a clear and concise way. Your experience is invaluable to me.

              Today I feel like myself.

    2. It looks like you are resolving your low blood pressure issue, although I applaud you on your intention to continue monitoring and discussing readings with your doctor once you can be seen. Pay attention to that dizziness and any other symptoms that might be related. As to what other than salt you could use to increase blood pressure. Some relatively healthy foods are naturally high in sodium so rather than just using the salt shaker or unhealthy fried chips, you might consider eating more of these: pickled foods, dry roasted nuts and seeds, esp. sunflower seeds, canned navy (or other) beans, stewed tomatoes, soy/,tamari sauce or misu paste, nut based cheese. Again for most these foods should be eaten in moderation and for those with high blood pressure, they should be avoided, but these may work for you instead of simply adding salt.

      1. Hi Joan,

        Thank you for your response.

        I agree about the potato chips. :-) I’ve been eating a 100% whole plant-based diet, with no processed food or added sodium, so I can’t picture myself adding potato chips to that on an ongoing basis.

        Today my diastolic is down again, not quite as low, but around 45. I don’t know if adding salt is a singular solution. I will experiment.

        I’m adding licorice tea to see if that helps. I got a little freaked out reading the medical data on low blood pressure, namely the risk of heart failure… Very scary.

        I am a little unclear about your advice on salt. Aren’t canned foods such as beans with added salt, as well as roasted nuts with added salt, the exact same as salt from my saltshaker? Or worse, since I have Himalayan salt in my saltshaker? Not to mention Dr. Greger’s advice about not eating roasted nuts due to the fat and protein producing AGEs when heated. I do use Nama Shoyu, and will add more in.

        I really appreciate Dr. Greger, and all of you, and the support for us trying to eat healthy a whole food plant-based diet. If you or any of your colleagues can add anything to my hypotension issue, I would love to hear it.

  24. I am so glad I found Dr Greger’s website and books. I started eating more plant based meals by slowly removing meat. I hope to see lower bp in a few weeks because I do not want to be on bp medication. I do not trust the pharmaceutical companies. I am 49 male, 5’9″, 165 lbs with 6 kids. When the Dr takes my blood pressure it is 146/84, but at home its around 135/82. I use a manual blood pressure cuff instead of the digital machine. I do have anxiety and sometimes when I get a good reading, I think I have taken the reading incorrectly. I hope the plant based meals will help with my anxiety as well.

  25. Hi All,
    I have a question. I wonder if Dr Gregor’s researchers have ever come across research that looks at the effect of plant based diet on Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (AKPD) my son and both my grandchildren have this dreadful disease which causes many complications and results in the need for a kidney transplant. My 38 year old son has high blood pressure because of his failing kidneys. My grandson also has autism.There diet is not the best, and I would love to show my son research that shows that a change of diet would help slow the progress of his disease. I have only been plant based for 3 months so it is too early for him to see the effect on my health (although I have lost 7 kgs and my blood pressure is now 107 over 71).

    If anyone has seen any research on this topic cited I would really be appreciative. I am also searching the literature myself as well.

  26. You are to be commended for searching proactive approaches for your son and grandchildren (as well as yourself) As a nurse here’s the approach I’d take to encourage the healthier nutrition to improve their health. Review this article with them, especially the advice about diet;
    Polycystic Kidney Disease, Autosomal Dominant https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK1246/
    “Prevention of secondary manifestations (lifestyle and therapeutic factors that may modulate disease): Maintain appropriate blood pressure and urine osmolarity; low osmolar intake (e.g., moderate sodium and protein); increase hydration by moderate water intake; maintain sodium bicarbonate ≥22 mEq/L; moderate dietary phosphorus intake; moderate caloric intake to maintain normal BMI; low-impact exercise; lipid control; tolvaptan therapy.”
    Carefully show how blood pressure. avoidance of too much (animal) protein and maintaining normal weight are all crucial for their condition the show them NFO videos on how successfully WFPB diets as so clearly outlined on this website can achieve that so well. Use your own example and challenge thenm with the daily dozen perhaps . Keep being a positive example. Hope that helps.

    1. Dear Joan Thank you for your reply. I am reading the article. The more I learn about this disease the worse it seems.

      This will give me a point to start talking to my son about the ways he can be proactive in managing and perhaps slowing the progress down.

      I really appreciate your response.

      Kind regards

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