Highlights from the 2020 Dietary Guidelines Hearing

Highlights from the 2020 Dietary Guidelines Hearing
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I was honored to testify before the US government’s Dietary Guidelines Advisory Committee. Check out the video to see my speech and a few of my favorite excerpts.

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I was honored to speak before the 2020 Dietary Guidelines Committee, and I wanted to share some highlights. The produce people were there: “…Enjoy more fruits and vegetables in all forms for healthier, happier lives. Have a plant.”

This evidently inspired some of the audience members to put theory into practice. Of course, the meat industry was also out in full force. The Cattlemen’s Association complained that:

“Americans are getting fewer calories and less fat from nutrient-rich beef…” The Meat Institute appeared a bit threatened by plants… “It is inappropriate and a disservice to the public to consider beans or tofu as equivalent to meat and poultry products from a nutrition and health perspective, because they’re not.” 

I love the audience reaction there; check it out. “It is inappropriate and a disservice to the public to consider beans or tofu as equivalent to meat and poultry products from a nutrition and health perspective, because they’re not.”

The representative of the True Health Initiative probably said it best: “We do not have a protein-deficiency problem in the United States; we have a vegetable-deficiency problem.” 

There were some inspirational, impassioned appeals—for example Audrey Sanchez, speaking as a mother, and executive director of Balanced, a nonprofit organization that NutritionFacts.org was honored to have played a role in getting off the ground: “So, now is not the time to settle for the status quo, or to build a consensus around minimally ‘good enough.’ It’s certainly not the time to allow any part of the food industry to influence dietary guidelines. Now is the time for bold, evidence-based dietary guidelines that put the health of our children and our families first.” 

Of course, there’s always the low-carb keto-craze to keep things interesting: “You know, if laughter was the best medicine, then the nutritional guidelines are best practiced, because they’re a joke.”

Pam Popper jumped to the committee’s defense: “So there’s a lot of confusion about diet. Some of it’s been sowed here; people advocating high-fat diets. And I personally take offense to anybody who would come up here and say that the dietary guidelines are a joke.”

With Garth Davis poking fun at all the carbophobia. “They don’t know whether to go low-carb; they don’t know whether to go low-fat. They’re petrified of a banana. You could hold up a bank with a piece of bread, people are so scared of carbs.”

Milton Mills called out the committee for historically recommending a beverage that most communities of color can’t even properly digest. “So, I want to encourage you to get the racism out; get the dairy out. Please do your job. Thank you.”

Then, it was my turn… “My name is Dr. Michael Greger with Nutritionfacts.org. This month, a paper was published in the Journal of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. They found that essentially, there’s been no change in processed meat consumption over the last 20 years or so, which represents just an abject failure of all of us in the public health community to warn people about the very real risks of processed meat. Bacon, ham, hot dogs, lunch meat, sausage: these are known human carcinogens.

The official 2018 IARC report couldn’t have been clearer: “Consumption of processed meat causes cancer of the colorectum.” That’s our second leading cancer killer of men and women combined. We know these foods cause cancer. I mean, we try not to smoke around our kids; why would we send them to school with a baloney sandwich? That’s not hyperbole. According to the Surgeon General, living with a smoker increases the risk of lung cancer 15%. So, the cancer risk of secondhand smoke is comparable to the 16% or 18% increased risk of colorectal cancer eating the equivalent of a single sausage link a day.”

The 2015 Dietary Guidelines really appeared to drop the ball in this issue, saying processed meat could be “accommodated” as long as sodium and saturated fat limits were within limits. But that’s ignoring the cancer risk—which we’ve known at least back since 2007, when the first comprehensive analysis was published by the American Institute for Cancer Research. In fact, one of their top ten recommendations for cancer prevention: Avoid Processed Meat. Full stop.

The American Cancer Society also encourages people to minimize intake of processed meat. We cannot allow the billion-dollar meat industry to continue to subvert the science when so many million lives are at stake. The Global Burden of Disease Study, the largest study of disease risk factors in history—funded by the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation—found that the #1 cause of death in these United States is the American diet. Since bumping tobacco to #2, this committee now has control over our #1 killer.

You know, 1964 was the peak year of smoking in the U.S. before declining basically every year since. What happened in 1964? The science hadn’t changed; we have studies going back to the 30s linking lung cancer with smoking. What changed is the Surgeon General’s Report. Just this public acknowledgement by the powers-that-be of this link between smoking and cancer. You now have this mantle to make a difference by just informing the American public about the risk of cancer with processed meat. Godspeed.”

Let me end with my favorite diabetes educator, Dr. Caroline Trapp, who talked less about foods going in than foods coming out. “I’ve travelled here today from Michigan to speak to you about underconsumption of a nutrient of concern for public health: fiber. My number one concern is number two. Yes, I want to talk to you about constipation. Given the nutrient density of plant foods, the only source of dietary fiber, this committee could best improve the health of Americans in this way. Summarize your 800+ page report to the USDA/HHS with just one sentence: “All Americans are advised to consume a fiber-rich diet.” Let’s make America GO AGAIN.”

I was honored to speak before the 2020 Dietary Guidelines Committee, and I wanted to share some highlights. The produce people were there: “…Enjoy more fruits and vegetables in all forms for healthier, happier lives. Have a plant.”

This evidently inspired some of the audience members to put theory into practice. Of course, the meat industry was also out in full force. The Cattlemen’s Association complained that:

“Americans are getting fewer calories and less fat from nutrient-rich beef…” The Meat Institute appeared a bit threatened by plants… “It is inappropriate and a disservice to the public to consider beans or tofu as equivalent to meat and poultry products from a nutrition and health perspective, because they’re not.” 

I love the audience reaction there; check it out. “It is inappropriate and a disservice to the public to consider beans or tofu as equivalent to meat and poultry products from a nutrition and health perspective, because they’re not.”

The representative of the True Health Initiative probably said it best: “We do not have a protein-deficiency problem in the United States; we have a vegetable-deficiency problem.” 

There were some inspirational, impassioned appeals—for example Audrey Sanchez, speaking as a mother, and executive director of Balanced, a nonprofit organization that NutritionFacts.org was honored to have played a role in getting off the ground: “So, now is not the time to settle for the status quo, or to build a consensus around minimally ‘good enough.’ It’s certainly not the time to allow any part of the food industry to influence dietary guidelines. Now is the time for bold, evidence-based dietary guidelines that put the health of our children and our families first.” 

Of course, there’s always the low-carb keto-craze to keep things interesting: “You know, if laughter was the best medicine, then the nutritional guidelines are best practiced, because they’re a joke.”

Pam Popper jumped to the committee’s defense: “So there’s a lot of confusion about diet. Some of it’s been sowed here; people advocating high-fat diets. And I personally take offense to anybody who would come up here and say that the dietary guidelines are a joke.”

With Garth Davis poking fun at all the carbophobia. “They don’t know whether to go low-carb; they don’t know whether to go low-fat. They’re petrified of a banana. You could hold up a bank with a piece of bread, people are so scared of carbs.”

Milton Mills called out the committee for historically recommending a beverage that most communities of color can’t even properly digest. “So, I want to encourage you to get the racism out; get the dairy out. Please do your job. Thank you.”

Then, it was my turn… “My name is Dr. Michael Greger with Nutritionfacts.org. This month, a paper was published in the Journal of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. They found that essentially, there’s been no change in processed meat consumption over the last 20 years or so, which represents just an abject failure of all of us in the public health community to warn people about the very real risks of processed meat. Bacon, ham, hot dogs, lunch meat, sausage: these are known human carcinogens.

The official 2018 IARC report couldn’t have been clearer: “Consumption of processed meat causes cancer of the colorectum.” That’s our second leading cancer killer of men and women combined. We know these foods cause cancer. I mean, we try not to smoke around our kids; why would we send them to school with a baloney sandwich? That’s not hyperbole. According to the Surgeon General, living with a smoker increases the risk of lung cancer 15%. So, the cancer risk of secondhand smoke is comparable to the 16% or 18% increased risk of colorectal cancer eating the equivalent of a single sausage link a day.”

The 2015 Dietary Guidelines really appeared to drop the ball in this issue, saying processed meat could be “accommodated” as long as sodium and saturated fat limits were within limits. But that’s ignoring the cancer risk—which we’ve known at least back since 2007, when the first comprehensive analysis was published by the American Institute for Cancer Research. In fact, one of their top ten recommendations for cancer prevention: Avoid Processed Meat. Full stop.

The American Cancer Society also encourages people to minimize intake of processed meat. We cannot allow the billion-dollar meat industry to continue to subvert the science when so many million lives are at stake. The Global Burden of Disease Study, the largest study of disease risk factors in history—funded by the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation—found that the #1 cause of death in these United States is the American diet. Since bumping tobacco to #2, this committee now has control over our #1 killer.

You know, 1964 was the peak year of smoking in the U.S. before declining basically every year since. What happened in 1964? The science hadn’t changed; we have studies going back to the 30s linking lung cancer with smoking. What changed is the Surgeon General’s Report. Just this public acknowledgement by the powers-that-be of this link between smoking and cancer. You now have this mantle to make a difference by just informing the American public about the risk of cancer with processed meat. Godspeed.”

Let me end with my favorite diabetes educator, Dr. Caroline Trapp, who talked less about foods going in than foods coming out. “I’ve travelled here today from Michigan to speak to you about underconsumption of a nutrient of concern for public health: fiber. My number one concern is number two. Yes, I want to talk to you about constipation. Given the nutrient density of plant foods, the only source of dietary fiber, this committee could best improve the health of Americans in this way. Summarize your 800+ page report to the USDA/HHS with just one sentence: “All Americans are advised to consume a fiber-rich diet.” Let’s make America GO AGAIN.”

Doctor's Note

To watch the entire four-hour video, air-pop some popcorn and go to https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=y25aGM547Wk.

After this hearing, the USDA and Department of Health and Human Services announced they are limiting the scope of information that can be used to determine the new guidelines. This decision leaves out the health impacts of ultraprocessed foods, sodium, and meat. To learn more about this, our friends at Balanced.org have put together information and petition. Check it out here.

If you haven’t yet, you can subscribe to my videos for free by clicking here.

103 responses to “Highlights from the 2020 Dietary Guidelines Hearing

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    1. Agreed, very interesting. Thanks for putting in a word for those of us who cannot!

      It would have been nice to see more of the reactions from those up on the board, rather than just the speakers. Sometimes when you talk to a carnivore about cutting out meat, you might notice steam coming out their ears, or their eyes start to glaze or wander toward the door. We should do more to hold those on the board accountable. Who are they, and how are they voting? The health of our children and nation is greatly impacted by their decisions.

      The more government workers are allowed to hide in the background, the less accountability. Deeds of darkness, are done in the dark. Let’s open the doors, and let the sun shine. A good example would be the interview done in “What the Health”, with Robert Ratner, the Chief Officer of the ADA.

    2. If you want to know what to eat ask Dr. Fred Kummerow a 102 year old centenarian with a Ph.D in food chemistry. Let me know what you find out.

  1. Great speech, Dr G!

    Most of the speakers were reading scripts, but Dr G and the other plant food advocates all seemed to be so enthusiastic about their message.

  2. Off topic, does anybody know what is the very first video on nutrition facts, I would like to go back to the beginning and rewatch them all. Thanks

    1. Hi Mary, there are almost 2,000 videos on NutritionFacts, dating back to 2007. You might get a kick out of the old ones, and you’ll see we have come a very long way in style and production. You can start on this page and continue clicking “newer” to work your way forward: https://nutritionfacts.org/videos/page/143/ . Enjoy!

      1. Kate,

        Thanks for the link.

        I had been tempted to hit the previous video arrow a few thousand times, but I went topic by topic instead.

        I am not 100% sure that I have watched them all. I went topic by topic, but it is easy to get lost that way.

        I do know that I got close because of the wording of some of the early blogs.

        I appreciate this resource more than words can say.

  3. Vegan Energy Bar – Banana and Oat Recipe
    4 ripe bananas chopped to purée.
    2 cups old fashion thick oats with 2 heaping table spoons of ground flax seed mixed with oats before adding purée.
    Sprinkle of cinnamon then mix well.
    Preheat oven to 350 degrees, bake 35 minutes.
    Makes 16 to 20 Energy Bars.
    This recipe is very versatile, adding low sugar dry cranberries with some small chunks of walnuts topped with sliced dates are flavorful options.

    1. Larry, when you say ‘thick’ oats, does that mean they are cooked in water to a thick consistency? Or are you talking about dry oats? What does ‘thick’ mean? I have only ‘quick’ and ‘old-fashioned’ oats in my country – or oat groats (? the whole seed, maybe cut a bit into chunks).

      1. Nel,

        That is a good question.

        Nowadays, when I hear “thick” and “oats” together, I assume it is the cut of the oats, but that is based on McDougall oats are called “thick cut” versus “steel cut” and I have wondered about what the distinction is.

        Pre-WFPB, I would have assumed it was how much water was added.

        1. Nel,I am not Larry but am very proficient in the kitchen. First off ‘old fashioned’ and ‘thick’ are two different types of rolled oats. The best oats for most recipes tend to be the ‘old fashioned rolled oats’. Oats as you may know come in three levels of thickness, 1-instant-the thinnest that just turns gummy in most recipes, 2-old fashioned- the normal oatmeal thickness, and 3-thick rolled which is not recommended because they tend to remain too hard textually in recipes outside of oatmeal.

          All three are rolled oats just different thickness.

          Steel cut oats are not rolled but actually cut in half. Both steel cut and ‘thick’ oats are for more texture in oatmeal as the thinner the roll the more gummy the final product will be when cooked.

          1. Incorrect. Quick oats are just regular rolled oats, but chopped up. All rolled oats are steamed to soften and then rolled. Steel cut are oat groats (raw, uncooked oat berries) that are chopped.

    2. Thanks for this recipe–it looks yummy, simple, and healthy. It occurs to me that one could add, oh, I don’t know, raw cacao to the mix . . . just sayin’ . . . What, me, chocoholic? Heaven forfend . . .

  4. “…..an abject failure of all of us in the public health community to warn people about the very real risks of processed meat. Bacon, ham, hot dogs, lunch meat, sausage: these are known human carcinogens.”
    – – – – –

    Nothing said about Unprocessed meat, though?

    1. YR,

      I had watched several of the WFPB speakers and most of them chose a specific topic and stuck to that.

      As you saw here, Dr. Greger chose processed meat and Caroline Trapp chose fiber as a topic.

      She is a Diabetes educator, so I am sure she could have chosen many other topics, too, but the group of them together hit the main points.

    1. After watching Plant Pure Nation on Youtube, nothing would surprise me regarding public committees who do not actually have the public interests in mind as much as appeasing industry.

  5. It strikes me as pathetically ridiculous that instead of having an agency… whose sole expertise is nutrition… to come up with our dietary guidelines, instead we have a branch who is also in charge of promoting the unhealthy “products” that should be eliminated from our diets! Their hearings are then inundated by people and organizations pushing various, often opposing, agendas… thankfully not all of them financially motivated by the unhealthy industries whose existence relies on our ignorance and brainwashing, but by those who actually care about our health! In most scenarios this bias/dichotomy would be ridiculous, but not the good ole US government!

    1. Vegetater,

      An agency can’t serve two masters. Ever since I learned decades ago that the USDA both promotes agricultural products AND produces dietary guidelines, I have distrusted the guidelines. After all, what could more usefully promote agricultural products — than the guidelines? And who has the biggest and best paid lobbying organizations: Big Ag or those advocating for the health of the American people? Note that I didn’t say that medical professionals advocate for the health of the American people; their business depends on sick people. It’s a very sad state of affairs.

      But I don’t trust nutritionists, either. Their professional associations accept funding from Big Food, Big Food funds a lot of nutrition research, and a lot of nutrition graduates go to work in that industry. Others work for institutions — such as hospitals. Have you seen what is on the menu for hospital patients? My daughter who is a hospital nurse told me that she is shocked by what her cardiac patients — who have suffered a major cardiac event — are fed.

      1. One of my favorite stories about the USDA happened about 20 or more years ago (I think), when the US had a glut of cheese. The USDA got busy and worked with Big Food (including restaurants and fast foods and chefs) to produce products with even MORE cheese in them. That’s when we got 3 cheese pizzas, with cheese in the crust. And cheese in just about every other prepared food product to be served for a meal. I did wonder about the proliferation of cheese in prepared foods and everywhere else — before I learned about the behind the scenes shenanigans.

      2. Dr. J.,

        My diabetic friends and relatives have commented that hospitals and nursing homes do not know how to feed diabetics at all and they are being fed closer to SAD than WFPB or Keto or even the Diabetes official diet.

      3. Dr J,

        The first solid meal my father was served in the hospital following the removal of his esophagus was fried chicken with a side of processed, greasy potato thingies. Boy, did I have a few words for the nutritionist on staff.

  6. Vegetater – Nice to see you!
    You are right, our food-advisory system is filled with conflicts of interest. Years ago I remember hearing that (and someone may add to this or correct my information) the USDA began as a group of meat and dairymen who wanted to increase the use of their products by the public i.e., this was a business venture. They began marketing and lobbying our government in this direction. The USDA was never initially formed as an entity to protect or advise the public as to what was healthy for them. This helps to explain why they are so infiltrated with the meat and dairy perspective.
    Years ago Senator George McGovern convened a group to study and present what is healthy for people to eat. When the USDA and meat and dairymen got wind of what the panel was going to present and suggest, they got together and voted the Senator out of office. They demolished him.

    Interestingly, the Canadian Government just this year put out their Canadian Food Guide. To develop their guide, they went into private session with no industry representatives allowed. It was only health scientists allowed. There are many significant difference between the American food guide and the Canadian food guide. One is that the 3 glasses of milk daily that the American guide recommends is nowhere in sight. Dairy, in the Canadian guide, is one tiny portion as a portion of the protein section of the plate. Water is the drink of choice. Here is their guide. Something the American’s can use as a possible role model and aspire to:
    https://food-guide.canada.ca/en/food-guide-snapshot/
    Note that processed meats are nowhere on the plate.
    As usual, the Canadians are ahead of us Americans – consider they provide health care coverage for everyone. What a concept!! :-)

    1. Ruth, this link for the camadian dietary guidelines is good https://food-guide.canada.ca/en/guidelines/what-are-canadas-dietary-guidelines/
      It really tells the tale about what we should be eating, and what we SHOULDN’T be eating. What I liked about it is that they give the rationale for their decisions, and also explore our wider food culture. Tools and resources are offered, and they also mention some key obstacles to getting people to eat better ie knowledge and skills (nutrition, shopping/selection, cooking etc)

      1. Hey Barb – Thank you for that link. And yes, there is much more information on the Canadian details in your link. I used the plate icon link just to show a quick-N-dirty view for simplicity sake and also to show, visually, that the milk spot was “empty”. The Canadians do not require or suggest that copious amounts of dairy is a good thing. This shows the difference between the lobbying done in our country and the non-lobbying done in Canada. They did not allow the lobbyists into the planning sessions – only the scientists. A step in the right direction.
        Thanks for the help.

    2. Health care for everyone… if you live long enough to get any. I know Canadians and British subjects who routinely leave their countries and go abroad for health care because they simply cannot get health care in reasonable time in their countries. Imagine your newborn baby has a tongue-tie and can’t nurse properly, can’t get enough milk from breast or bottle to keep him satiatied for more than about 20-30 minutes. So he’s constantly nursing, sleeping briefly, waking up and crying. First-time mother goes to the national health service in Canada and asks what’s wrong with the baby? Told it’s a tongue-tie – just a tiny bit of flesh under the tongue that need to be clipped so that his tongue can move freely and he can then use his tongue properly in nursing. ‘When can we get this done?’ Answer under the Canadian health-care system? ‘Two to three weeks, at a totally different clinic from this one where your doctor is.’ The family moved to Poland, had another baby with the same problem. It was diagnosed immediately in the hospital after birth. The baby was taken down the hall and had the quick tongue-tie operation and nursed normally from the start.

      When POLAND has better national health than a rich country like Canada, something is wrong. And that’s just one example. How about the friends in the UK who have to leave the UK and go to Poland for health care because… a woman suffering from life-threatening arrhythmia is told it’s ‘all in your head’ and sent home, despite the doctors seeing a pulse of about 200BPM. It took a Polish specialist to find the problem with her heart (the NHS person said nothing whatever was wrong) and prescribe her an appropriate medicine, which is unavailable in the UK and has to be shipped to her by a friend in Poland. Or the same person’s mother going to the NHS for stomach pain and being sent home with no diagnosis and no help. Then a few days later, she gets a letter saying she was recently released from hospital after an appendectomy (which she most certainly did not have in 3 hours in hospital) and giving her a follow-up appointment and recommendations for self-care after an operation. Then a few days after that, getting another letter saying she was recently in hospital and had no treatment at all because nothing was wrong with her.

      I have a friend in the UK who is pretty clearly suffering from a variety of conditions brought on by being over-prescribed antibiotics by her NHS doctor. Candida, stomach problems, inability to digest a wide variety of foods, IBS, steadily losing weight to the point of getting dangerously underweight. One NHS doctor tapped her on the forehead and told her, ‘it’s all in your head’ and sent her home. The other prescribed anti-biotics and refused to give her a recommendation to see a specialist until she had faithfully taken all the antibiotics. She is currently teaching herself as much as she can about her microbiome and working with a science-based nutritionist who knows how the gut influences health and is working to heal and restore her health. It’s costing her a fortune, but she gets absolutely no help from the NHS because they’ve simply put on her chart that she’s a nut-case and making up all her symptoms, despite the visible loss of weight, chronic fatigue, independent lab results she paid for out of pocket (because the NHS wouldn’t order them because health has nothing to do with nutrition…).

      My friend has resigned herself to two fates: death – which she is resigned to, almost – or bankrupting herself going to private doctors who specialize in nutrition-based medicine.

      I could tell you so many stories from Canadians and British citizens I’ve known over the years of people waiting weeks and months for life-saving operations. One thing that Americans forget about when they think about government-organized health care: there is no suing the government for malpractice. If they delay or screw up – you die or are disabled and that’s that. The health-care systems in both countries are so poorly funded and so bloated with bureaucracy and stymied by regulations that they simply do not have enough beds to admit someone for an operation when the person needs it.

      My own experience in the UK of having acute gall-bladder attacks was that an operation was ordered for me and I was sent home to wait for an opening to have the surgery. That was in October. In November, they sent a message saying ‘no beds yet; do you still want the surgery.’ I wrote back that I did, but that as a student, certain times would not be possible. They wrote back in December: ‘no beds now; what about January?’ January was between university terms, so OK, I agreed. In January they wrote to me that there was a flu epidemic among old people, so no beds available. And furthermore, since I had delayed the surgery so many times (‘since this is our third time trying to arrange the surgery with you’) they were basically taking me off the list for non-cooperation. And that was at the highly regarded Radcliffe Hospital in Oxford – a teaching hospital.

      I returned to the US in late summer – almost a year after my diagnosis in Oxford. I went to my Kaiser hospital, where I’d been insured all my life and had kept up my insurance payments. The diagnosis was made and the operation scheduled for two days later. And everything I had to do was in one hospital – none of this getting a referral from one doctor and going to a different location for test and another location for x-rays and another place for the surgery… All one-stop medical care and immediately done.

      I simply advise advocates of the government taking over health-care to go and live in a country where it is actually practiced. Or ask someone who has had a serious health crisis in such a country what exactly they went through, and compare it to your own self-paid or employer-paid health care program. If that’s not possible, just ask yourself this question: Would you trust the government to organize and carry out the manufacture of all cars in your country? If not, why would you trust them with your health and the health of your loved ones?

      1. Nel – I’m not arguing the pros and cons of any or all systems. For me, having access to care – any care at all – is better than none.
        My brother, at 28, was diagnosed with astrocytoma brain tumor (way before Obamacare). His grand mal seizure is what tipped off the doctors. He could not afford health care coverage, at the time, at 28 as he was working towards growing his very small business. So he had none. And guess how much he could get after that first seizure? Exactly none.
        I agree that not all health care systems are perfect and continue to need improvement. But, had my brother been in Canada or the UK he would have at least received treatment.
        I, personally, try not to let perfection be the enemy of the good.

        1. I would also like to make the additional point that we have government-run health care in this country. It is Medicare and Medicaid. And if you ask seniors, they, overall, love it. I, personally, love mine along with the Silver Sneakers health program that comes with it. My parents, both gone now, both received excellent care and there was never a wait for my Mother’s lung cancer surgery and treatment, nor the rehabilitation she required, not the in-home nursing care she needed when she became home bound. With the exception of her yearly deductible (and her premiums which we all pay to be in the insurance system – all systems), all her bills were paid. We couldn’t have asked for more and better treatment and support.
          Love Medicare – a government run health care program.

          1. Ruth,

            The problem is that they expect Medicare and Medicaid to go bankrupt. Dr. Kim Williams (I believe) said that if the people don’t lower their blood pressures and get off blood pressure meds, it will go bankrupt in something like 4 years just from that one medication.

            Insurance has become fairly useless for most of the people around me already. It does help if you spend a week in the hospital, but the deductibles go up every year and I have watched both of my brothers and a few friends go through surgeries this past year and they do get medical care even with no insurance at all. Medical care is not withheld, as long as you go to a hospital. Unemployed, homeless people can go to the hospital and get treated. And they get put on Medicare if they don’t make too much money. If they make too much, it is just that they have to go bankrupt after and can only do that process once.

            1. Before Obamacare, poor people always could still go to the hospital and get treated at the ER and they still can. People would go to the ER for headaches.

              Back when my uncle had cancer, there was a sign that if you couldn’t afford your care, they would forgive it and people still can get their meds for free. That is for the truly poor.

              Small business people get screwed left and right.

              1. Honestly, my poor friends still can’t afford insurance under Obamacare and couldn’t afford it before. They have all had hospital stays and just never pay their medical bills because they also don’t have the money to pay bankruptcy lawyers without going homeless. So they get fined on their taxes for not maintaining insurance and get calls from creditors, but they don’t always have money for a phone and it is when their employer gets called that things can go either way. Most of them are minimum wage and the employer knows they can’t afford their rent. Plus, they are working 3 jobs, so they are hard to find that way, but the callers get really nasty on purpose.

                As far as my brother, who is on insurance, he had surgery and spent 3 or 4 days in the hospital and didn’t meet his deductible and probably never will unless he has to go on dialysis. But it is better than my friend, who lost her job and lost her insurance and her husband works automotive and doesn’t get insurance, so when he needed 2 surgeries and an extended hospital stay the week before her unemployment ran out, it really did add stress, but I will tell you that they allowed the 2nd surgery to be covered by Medicare and they have gone and gotten every single medical and dental and vision thing done possible during these few weeks, which they are covered. He still may have to go bankrupt for the other surgery, but they can’t think that far in advance yet. They still both need jobs because he can’t do his job anymore. She just did find a part-time minimum wage job, which might take the Medicare away, but they need to pay mortgage and car insurance, etc.

                1. With small businesses, the insurance companies raise the rates so high from year to year that we are constantly changing companies to avoid a $10,000 rate hike, but they have also been raising deductibles and percentage for co-pays. I am working on that right now and the deductibles have been above $10,000 for a few years, but now they are trying to change the co-pays to 30%. It makes it so hard to hire full-time workers and the workers get in trouble when they need surgery. We help them, but most small businesses can’t. My friends who work for smaller companies get their insurance deducted from the paycheck every week and still have deductibles and co-pays. My occupational therapy friend had a $12,000 co-pay a few years ago, so I know it isn’t just small business. But my teacher friend just gasped at her deductible going up and hers is only $2000 or $3000. That was so many years ago for us that I don’t even remember when that was.

                  What I know is that people share insulin and don’t take their diabetes meds and don’t go to the doctors ever, even if they have insurance, because of how high the co-pays and deductibles and meds and test supplies are. The only ones who use it freely are the ones who work for insurance companies and educators (and the doctor-oriented poor people because they are already in such debt that it doesn’t matter.)

                  The poor people and lower middle class who are not doctor-oriented are usually “home or rent” and “not being in debt” oriented.

                  I fall in that category, but I do have friend much poorer than I am and they are at the doctors all of the time.

                  1. I have a friend who owns a business in Paris and it is horrible owning a business in Paris because workers can cheat you and do every horrible thing and he went to jail for what workers did while he was out of the country, but still had a hard time firing them, but he would hire Americans and other country people who wanted to live in Paris and they were better, except one of them got cancer and wasn’t insured in their system and he paid for the medical treatment for the person and said that he was shocked at how cheap medical care was there.

                    When everybody wants to be a millionaire, medical care gets expensive and the USA is everybody feels entitled to 6 figures versus the have nots who feel entitled to not be homeless but they can’t always manage it.

            2. Neither Medicare nor Social Security is on the verge of bankruptcy. The truth is that both programs can continue providing benefits far into the future. Thanks to changes made by ACA, Medicare will be able to provide full benefits through the year 2024, and even if no changes are made, would after that provide 88% of current benefits through the year 2085. That doesn’t sound to me like a program on the verge of bankruptcy.

              Do some changes need to be made to insure full benefits far into the future? Yes. But the program certainly doesn’t need to be abolished. Controlling the rise in the cost of medical care, allowing the program to negotiate drug prices with pharmaceutical companies, strengthening ACA, and other reasonable measures can provide the fix that is needed.

              And Social Security is in even better shape. It can provide full benefits for another twenty years, and 75% of benefits after that. And it could be fixed easily and simply to provide full benefits far into the future. Raising the cap on income subject to FICA taxes (payroll taxes) would extend full benefits for at least another 70 years, and removing the cap altogether would make the program fully viable for generations to come. And this would not raise taxes for the working or middle classes, but would only require the rich to pay the same percentage of their income in FICA taxes that are currently paid by all other workers.

              1. Jimbo,

                I am not sure those figures will be accurate and not pie-in-the-sky. As obesity soars and people live longer and diseases soar and the number of elderly soars and the young people who can’t find a living wage soars and everybody lives in credit card debt.

                Forbes said about Social Security that if productivity falls short in America, then supporting a class of retirees is impossible, regardless of how much cash we have on hand.

                I am seeing the bottom fall out of the economy and what I will tell you is that as small businesses close and retail establishments can’t compete with internet establishments and so many of the blue collar jobs are gone. We just hired another elderly person and he talked about it, he couldn’t get the types of jobs, which used to be there for the elderly. If you go to stores, robots go up and down the supermarket and there are more and more self-check-outs and fewer and fewer workers. My workers talked about all of the jobs which used to be there, which aren’t any more. One mentioned that every single check-out person at the grocery store near us is older – over 65. So is the manager at McDonald’s. I have friends who have wanted their children to start working at 15, like they had, but they live in places where the businesses won’t hire young people, because the older people are better workers (and they are) but there are more and more college graduated never finding careers in their major and they are deeply in debt and can’t afford to buy a house or buy a car or have children. They were talking yesterday that more and more kids are moving back home after college and living with their parents because you can’t afford rent even on 3 part-time jobs and so many of the low-income housing apartments have been upgraded and replaced by nicer, more expensive units.

                Anyway, you are doing their view as if the young people are going to succeed at the heavy lifting and they may for a while, but only because they are raising the age of benefits to 70 and 75 and these kids who are growing up now will pay double and never life to use it and then it will stay solvent. Maybe.

                1. I am watching insurance workers losing their jobs left and right and my occupational therapy friend speaks in terms like, “I am hoping to finish paying off my car before I lose my job.” And my education friends are saying, “I really think they are trying to get rid of us because we make too much money.” Manufacturers went out of business decades ago. Retailers are struggling. And yet I live in a wealthy state.

                  I watch television commercials and it is, “I own a car, but I walk to work because I can’t afford insurance” and I would add and I can’t afford car repairs is the next commercial and I can’t afford gas or oil changes and they are threatening to cancel my registration because I didn’t pay my property taxes on it. Makes it more real. When my auto mechanic friend lost his friend, he had so many abandoned cars, because people can’t afford to have them repaired.

                  The health costs would have even bigger stories, so I guess we shall see.

                  What you won’t here is that the government takes your money and has been saving it for you.

                  1. Maybe I should humble myself and say that, Jimbo, I am not a math person and you could be right.

                    I am seeing fewer people get married and fewer people have children and more things like tent cities. I see disease rates going up and medical costs going up and fewer jobs and, to me, the next in debt generation of young people may never have children because they are waiting and there is an epidemic of infertility and people are getting diseases younger and are going bankrupt over medical care. Is the government more responsible with money than the citizens, I don’t see that they are at all. People with diseases like Down syndrome from having children older and autism and MS and blindness from Diabetes all end up on disability.

                    I am hearing young people who don’t make career wages who are somehow going to fund what I will call the greedy-six figure generation.

                    I am hearing the overpaid workers-whose social security will be based on 5 years of those overpaid wages talking about how the new state workers don’t get the same wages or benefits or pensions.

                    The young people will suffer.

                    1. Maybe millions of people will go WFPB and maybe there will be so many job openings in cleaning up the environment that Time will prove me wrong, but I see obese people not having children or having children who are disabled and without a healthy society, we won’t be protective over the elderly or the youth. Mental illness going up drives salaries down. Debt going up may even eventually affect Amazon if people can’t afford things. Companies like Uber who have the Press pimping them as constant free advertising deal in this whole magic money of being worth billions while they lose billions might eventually crash society. I will tell you that something like the Depression would suddenly expose that we didn’t save enough money for it. I know governments get to keep going into debt, until suddenly they go bankrupt. Whole governments have gone bankrupt. Are we wiser? As long as we keep everybody spending every penny on their mass addictions, social security and Medicare and Medicaid will probably be funded,

              2. Jimbo – Thank you for your points. The current Social Security wages cap is $132,900. There are puh-lenty of people who make much more than that. This means that those people do not have 100% of their wages considered for their input into SS. I’ve never made that much so 100% of my lifetime wages were SS taxed. I’m fine with that – SS is an insurance program that we all pay into in return for a payout in retirement. If the powers that be would remove the cap, i.e, 100% of everyone’s wages paid into the system, then the SS system would be eternally solvent. It’s a simple fix. Imagine if Jeff Bazos paid in 100% like I have all my life. Social security has some very easy fixes.

                Medicare is a little bit more complex to fix. However the administration fees for Medicare are about 3%. The administration fees for insurance companies are somewhere around 20%. That alone is a huge monetary difference that would make the financial outcome different and better. And also, other changes to Medicare can be offering physicians payment for health instead of disease. Docs currently cannot get paid for counseling patients on how to change their diets to help them with all the dietary problems that we talk about on this site. Reward for health is discussed often. In fact, the Cleveland Clinic took all of its Doc’s off of the fee for service (FFS) model and put them all on salary precisely so they could focus on patient care – health care instead of disease care – and not worry about doing procedures to pay their salary. The incentives are 180 degree opposite.

                There ARE solutions to SS and Medicare and they are doable. Indonesia, Japan, UK, Canada, Germany, Switzerland, Singapore, Denmark, Bahrain, Brunei, – I won’t list ALL 33 WHO COVER ALL OF THEIR CITIZENS here – but here is the link to the list: https://truecostblog.com/2009/08/09/countries-with-universal-healthcare-by-date/

                If they can do it I see no reason why we in the US can’t pull it off. After all, if Indonesia can do it I don’t see why we can’t offer everyone SOMETHING in this country of “Yes we can!”.

          2. Ruth,

            There is third governmental health agency you left out—The Veterans Administration. It is a huge system with hospitals and medical clinics in every area of this country.

            1. Thank you Roger. And, yes, the Veterans Administration has its share of problems and challenges I will admit at the get-go. Improvements definitely need to be made. But I will reiterate that, from my perspective, I’d rather take what exists and work to improve it rather than throw up my hands and say that just because a system needs improvement we should throw out the baby with the bathwater and say “no” to giving everyone some basic coverage.
              The current Fee For Service payment model rewards procedures rather than rewarding health. That should be the first to go. Our payment reward system is completely convoluted.
              Remember the comment by Caldwell Esselstyne, M.D., in his Prevent and Reverse Heart Disease book? When he asked a cardiologist colleague why he didn’t counsel his patients on diet and lifestyle (since this Doc knew what caused heart disease), the reply that appalled Dr. Esselstyne was, “Have you seen my billables?”. Meaning this “Doc” was making much more money doing procedures than reversing his patients heart disease. Appalling. This is the kind of thing that can be dealt with if the current system is tweaked and we can get the meat and dairy and pharmaceutical industries to let loose of the stranglehold they’ve got on our system.
              This site is one small part of the solution. I am so glad to be here.

  7. This video is priceless !!! Eat right America, and skip the chemicals in your food, and that alone will tend to keep you healthy. I often tell people that read the back of the package that you are purchasing, and if there is anything in there that you do not understand, that is a chemical that you should not digest, period !!! Listen to Dr Greger, and be healthy.

  8. Meat institute lady: “beans and tofu are not equivalent to beef and poultry in health and nutrition”

    Us: “yes you are correct; beans and tofu are far superior”

  9. Only slightly off topic — and it may well apply to processed meats.

    And yet another reason to eat whole foods and to cook at home — to avoid all those UNLISTED ingredients in processed foods.

    “People who eat home-cooked meals have lower levels of potentially harmful chemicals in their blood. Tools used to package and prepare restaurant and takeaway meals may be to blame.” (One study measured PFAS, short for perfluoroalkyl and polyfluoroalkyl substances)

    Read more: https://www.newscientist.com/article/2219361-takeaway-food-packaging-may-be-source-of-synthetic-chemicals-in-blood/#ixzz61s93FpAW

    1. “Eat foods that will eventually rot, have been cooked by humans, contain fewer than five ingredients, and are not advertised on TV. ”

      Michael Pollan

  10. Some of the best comments are always about the reactions that people have when they hear something.

    I have recently submitted, pursuant to a request, my recommendations for the upcoming meeting re: Dietary Recommendations.

  11. Thank you so much dr. Greger for standing up for us. Your speech was effective and succinct. You kind of make me think of Hillel, if you don’t stand for up for us who will? May you be blessed for your dedication. Thank you so much for creating Nutrition Facts and the Daily Dozen. It’s helping me change my life and how I feel and I’m deeply grateful.

    Thank you Ruth for that Canadian link. Their model is far superior to ours, despite the fact that they still have meat on their plate!

  12. Dr. Greger: Brilliant!
    The video highly entertaining, sometimes SAD & but overall hilarious.
    (another expression of the self-destructive US (pseudo liberal/antiscientific) main stream narrative

    Michael Greger at his best!
    No wonder, why Dr. Greger has dedicated his life (& career) to promote healthy eating & saving peoples lives.

    1. ArgentineanDoc, I so agree with your comments! This is the first video (NF) in the last 10 years that I recall playing over and over because It was just brilliant. lol yes, send the kid to school with a baloney sandwhich, the risk is greater than with ciggarettes! I didn’t know wether to laugh or cry.
      Thank you Dr Greger for all that you are doing, every day for all of us

  13. Let us hope that the recommended Dietary Guidelines Hearing board will reflect what is best for the public and not big buck industry.
    Job well done Dr. Greger!

  14. Video requests:
    1. A video on phospholipids and lecithin. How much do we need? Do we get enough? Is lecithin safe? What about TMAO production in gut in response to lecithin? Is there any point in taking expensive purified PC over cheap lecithin? What do clinical trials say about the benefits of PC and lecithin? Patricia Kane may be a source of literature on phospholipids.
    2. A video on natural versus synthetic long-chain Omega-3’s and 6’s. Fish oil supplements are esterified which is not the nature-identical triglyceride form.This could be part of why fish oil studies flop. I have noticed that TG fish oil appears to treat dry eyes effectively in one trial, whereas esterified fish oil does not in other trials. And importantly, can you determine what form algae oil is in? Has it been made synthetic in any way like fish oil has? Mercola did a decent article on the issue of synthetic fish oil recently, which would be a good place for your team to start:
    https://articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2019/08/19/synthetic-omega-3-fish-oil.aspx

    1. David,

      Dr. Greger recommends against Lecithin because of choline.

      I have looked the topic up myself and it becomes a mystery because it is tagged on the TMAO videos and is never mentioned in them, and then, there is a blog saying, “avoid Lecithin supplements” and I thought, “Hooray, I found it!” and it wasn’t mentioned in the body of that blog either. I think the rule for the blog is that you can only use the words of the videos, but someone sneaky person snuck it into the title and tags.

      I would love the PS topic to come up even in a title.

      1. As far as the algae oil, it has already come up as an issue.

        Some of them are natural and some newer ones are synthetic. You have to read carefully.

        Dr. Greger still does recommend Algae oil based on this study:

        https://nutritionfacts.org/video/should-vegans-take-dha-to-preserve-brain-function/

        There is a big disagreement within the WFPB community about that area, but people like Dr. Greger and Dr. Fuhrman haven’t backed up.

        Dr. Fuhrman said that he started thinking about DHA when his mentors who were people who ate very clean developed Parkinson’s and he tested them and their level of DHA didn’t register on the lab tests.

        The body can convert from things like flaxseed, but the enzyme isn’t always efficient, particularly as you get older, and it is worse if you eat things like nuts (which are good for longevity, but which do throw off the Omega 6/3 ratio.)

        You probably know all of that because you are looking at many sources.

        There is a very powerful anti-omega 3 supplement video, which I thought I could go straight back to, but I couldn’t find it. I say that because I believe in understanding the arguments from both sides, but I am taking Algae oil and will try to make sure mine is natural. I had brain problems for about 7 years and they have been improving and I believe the DHA is helping. I can’t prove what is helping, but I do know that the MRI study where the brain was examined was all I needed for me to keep doing it. Also, it lowers Homocysteine and that is a mechanism which could explain my brain problems.

        For my fantasy video list, I would eventually like one on Lysine and Alzheimer’s. Tonight, I was watching the Amoeba Sisters’ video on denaturing proteins and I ended up going to PubMed to see if Homocysteine denatures proteins and there was a sentence about what Homocysteine does to Lysine. I already have it in the increasing Glutamate, so it is on my Glutamate storm list, but Lysine is a newer concept for me. I liked that I wondered about Lysine and searched PubMed for Lysine and Alzheimer’s and there was an article which mentioned that thinking about Lysine was thinking “Outside the box” and with my brain problems, I love that I am succeeding at thinking outside any box at all.

        1. I read another article about Lysine and the theory is that elderly people eat less food and that when that happens, they get less Lysine, while their body still produces arginine and I think they said that the Herpes Simplex Virus 1 needs arginine, so shifting that ratio could theoretically cause the increase in HSV-1.

          That is all new to me, but I guess it is like the whole copper/zinc ratio thing.

          I am just grateful that I am learning more about the mechanisms so that maybe I will find things.

          1. What a coincidence that Mercola published an article just right now on inadequate choline intake on a plant-based diet:
            https://articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2019/10/10/vegetarian-choline-deficiency.aspx
            It would be interesting to compare the level low intake of choline associated with memory issues in the studies Mercola cites to the level of intake of choline that is associated with cancer in the studies Gregor cites. Maybe there is a happy ground in the middle where you eat an egg once a week or something. And such a mostly WFPB diet may not have a microbiome that makes any TMAO from that single egg a week. I’m too lazy to do calculations now, but I am putting it on my projects list.

  15. If they are going to ignore the science, at the very least they could call it ‘Dietary MARKETING Guidelines’ and stop calling it a name that implies the committee thinks of human health, science, or reality as its primary concern.

  16. I live in Thailand where government committee members are usually “assisted” by corporations, lobbyists, and by various vested-interest people / groups. I would imagine that it is the same with the US government’s Dietary Guidelines Advisory Committee. Do the assets of US government committee members ever get checked?

    1. Peter – There are many conflicts of interest in the people who sit on our US nutritional boards. The Physicians Committee for Responsible Medicine (PCRM) has brought numerous suits to expose these conflicts and hold people accountable. PCRM is a great organization and, if not for them, I don’t know who would hold these people accountable. They’re a wonderful organization.
      https://www.pcrm.org/

  17. Great video, Dr. Greger! I passed the link on to ~520 online contacts. It led me to get connected with a knowledgable dietitian at our local Hancock Community College. She takes this education into her nutrition classes. I did try to post earlier, but putting in a link to my TinyURL.com/HealthiestNutritionCourse-2019 file probably caused the comment to not be accepted. Lets see if this gets posted since I did not use the https://

  18. I would like to see that the recommendations will be based on science and will focus on people’s health instead of on money coming from big cooperations, still, the limiting to 80 questions excluding (highly processes) meat is rather frustrating. Like reading who is working in this committee:

    “Thirteen of the 20 have ties to industry. Several committee members were nominated by four or more food industry groups, including the National Potato Council to National Cattlemen’s Beef Association and the trade association of the snack food industry. The majority were nominated by institutes backed by food industry lobby groups, and nine were put forward by the Academy of Nutrition and Dietitians, which has received funding from McDonald’s, Coca-Cola and Mars.”

    https://www.washingtonpost.com/business/2019/08/30/how-trump-administration-limited-scope-usdas-dietary-guidelines/

    1. Medley,

      WOW!! JUST WOW!!

      Thanks for the info, and sharing the link. I would say “unbelievable” — except that it’s not.

      I LOVE the suggestion posted above by Jimbo to call these “Dietary MARKETING guidelines.” That’s how I will think of and refer to them from now on.

  19. Is there somewhere I can watch a full version of the 2020 Dietary Guidelines Hearing? Was is recorded and released to the public?

  20. I’m in awe of Dr. Greger’s consistent and tireless work.
    I would have given up on the baloney-eaters long ago. And he’s SO SHARP! Anybody watching this can see that he’s got a healthy brain.
    Since there is a horrid bias against vegans nowadays (“Want to know if someone is vegan? Wait a minute; they’ll tell you.”) if anyone asks me about my diet,
    I don’t announce that, I direct them to nutritionfacts.org

  21. Brilliant job, Dr. Greger… it would have inspired a standing ovation on my part had I been there, though I may have been the only weirdo in the room standing and clapping… I don’t know, I wasn’t there. Anyways, this was thoroughly entertaining and very cool to get a sneak behind the curtain, glad you posted here!

  22. Clarification regarding the oats I recommend for the Energy Bars. Use any rolled oats not quick oats. Don’t cook or soak before adding the banana puree. Let the moisture from the bananas absorb into the oats for one half hour before baking.
    Thicker oats will make a drier bar than thin rolled oats. Experiment with the oats you have on hand changing the banana oat radio slightly for your preference. I prefer the dry cranberries chopped fine, try your favorite dry fruit. Dry prunes!#2
    Diabetics close your eyes and don’t read this, around the Holidays some stores sell the fruit cake cherries and pineapple sugar saturated chunks that make excellent toppers. Put the toppers on before baking. Happy to answer any other questions.
    Larry

    Vegan Energy Bar – Banana and Oat Recipe
    4 ripe bananas chopped to purée.
    2 cups old fashion thick oats with 2 heaping table spoons of ground flax seed mixed with oats before adding purée.
    Sprinkle of cinnamon then mix well.
    Preheat oven to 350 degrees, bake 35 minutes.
    Makes 16 to 20 Energy Bars.
    This recipe is very versatile, adding low sugar dry cranberries with some small chunks of walnuts topped with sliced dates are flavorful options.

    1. Sounds good, but I make myself a yummy breakfast every morning, similar to that.

      I cut up one previously frozen (thawed a little), ripe banana and add it to my hot cereal: either steel cut oats, buckwheat groats (kasha), millet, quinoa, brown rice, occasional bit of rolled oats, etc….(frozen, thawed) wild blueberries, cinnamon and ginger powder — along with various other goodies, like a teaspoon or so of cut-up dried fruit. Delicious! Yes, I’d say it’s definitely energizing. Don’t need any other sweetening, as the banana, etc. does the job.

      Oh, and a half-teas.organic miso in lieu of other salt.

  23. Has anybody tried any of the Whole Food Plant-Based meal delivery services?

    I was looking at them because of how much my sister-in-law likes her delivery service. She doesn’t want to cook and I would like to try some of them to see if I could swap them off of Freshly.

    I saw this Chef AJ bundle. I am not sure my fridge/freezer can handle 28 servings of food delivered all at once, and I am not sure if I bought it all at once if I would end up eating 2 servings per meal. Sometimes having more backfires if it tastes good. I have done that when I wanted to cook more to have it in the future. I end up eating more instead. I guess I can figure out a way around it. I am just wondering if anyone has tried any.

    https://www.mamasezz.com/collections/sos-free/products/chef-aj-sos-free-bundle

    $169 for about 20 meals is not bad.

    Their 2-week WFPB challenge is almost $300, which is probably out of my range for 2 weeks’ worth of meals, but it is not out of my sister-in-law’s range and I am wondering if I bought it if they would try it. It looks good. I just don’t know anyone who does WFPB meal plans.

    https://www.mamasezz.com/collections/mama-sezz-plant-based-eating-challenge/products/2weekchallenge

    They have one which says “guaranteed weight loss” but they don’t give a food list for that one and that makes it more like Forrest Gump’s box of chocolates. I don’t like spending money without knowing what I will get.

    https://www.mamasezz.com/collections/mamasezz-bundles/products/weight-loss

    1. Heilpraktiker_Ju, this link may help https://health.gov/dietaryguidelines/ You can download a current copy of the Dietary Guidelines from that page also.

      There is a committee that meets to discuss/update the USA Dietary Guidelines every 5 years. The problem is that the committee is made up of people with various food or agriculture industry ties!

  24. My wife develops breast cancer 5 yrs ago. Following diagnosis she researched it and we have been on a rigorous WFPB lifestyle for 5 yrs and both feel the benefits.
    Unlike the USA our NHS is less driven by commercial factors and it should therefore be easier to look at the scientific facts.
    As a British surgeon I would say that most of my colleagues are unaware of or are unwilling to recommend changes.
    Change has to be supported by medics and it isn’t as medics enjoy their bad diets.
    Of course, doctors used to enjoy smoking until the profession got involved in showing how awful it was and began to support habit change.
    Changing eating habits is much harder and meets with a lot of opposition
    Bill Merriam

    1. Glad to read of your wife’s progress with breast cancer and both your improved health status now that you’ve adopted a whole food plant based diet. I’m glad you discovered this website to give you the support you need as you face some of the stubborn denial of your medical colleagues.
      Best of health to both of you

  25. Processed meat from CAFOs (concentrated animal feeding operations) are extremely unhealthy and cancer causing because they are fed an all grain/unnatural diet and the grains fed are are chock full of Glyphosate. Basically, the grains cause the omega 6:omega 3 ratio to skew dramatically from 1:1 to over 16:1 to omega 6. Additionally, the fats in arteries are fats from “vegetable oils” which have never been in the food chain until the 1900s.

    I’ll say this though, if I got cancer I would immediately change to a all vegetable diet.

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