Preserving Athlete Immunity with Chlorella

Preserving Athlete Immunity with Chlorella
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The green algae, chlorella, may help attenuate the drop in immune function antibodies associated with over-strenuous exercise.

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Sedentary women who start briskly walking on a treadmill 45 minutes a day for a few months may cut their risk of upper respiratory tract infections in half. But how does exercise improve our immune system?

Approximately 95% of all infections are initiated at the mucosal surfaces: like our eyes, nose, and mouth, which are protected by antibodies like IgA, that provide an immunological barrier by neutralizing and preventing viral pathogens from penetrating the body. The IgA in our saliva, for example, is the first line of defense against respiratory tract infections such as pneumonia and influenza.

And moderate aerobic exercise, even just 30 minutes in the gym three times a week, may be all it takes to significantly boost IgA levels and significantly decrease the risk of coming down with flu-like symptoms.

But we’ve known for a long time that prolonged heavy exercise may reduce resistance to infectious disease, manifested by an apparent two to six fold increase in upper respiratory tract infection symptoms for several weeks following marathon running.

Even just a single bout of over strenuous exercise may drop IgA levels. Within one day of starting an international competition, for example, elite soccer players suffered a significant drop in IgA secretion. Yacht racing athletes training for America’s Cup who got upper respiratory tract infections during training had significantly lower IgA concentrations. Those with higher levels had fewer infections, and if you measure over time, you can see dropping levels precede the infection. Furthermore, a simple fatigue rating appears to reflect changes in salivary immunity. If you just ask them, “How rested do you feel?” those who reported feeling worse than normal had significantly lower IgA levels.

Sport coaches are advised to monitor immune function, since illness could ultimately lead to a decrease in performance. Therefore, it may be necessary to take protective actions to, for example, minimize contact with cold viruses. But the reason athletes can’t get away with just washing their hands or wearing a mask is because upper respiratory tract infections are often triggered by reactivations of latent viruses already inside our bodies like Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), and as soon as our immune function dips, the virus becomes reactivated. IgA levels drop the day before EBV comes out of hiding and causes a spike in symptoms. These results suggest that the appearance of upper respiratory symptoms is associated with reactivation of EBV and reduction of salivary IgA during training.

So, how about preserving immunity in athletes? Well, I talked about the efficacy of using a one-celled fungi—nutritional yeast—to boost the immune systems of athletes.  What about a one-celled plant?

Research out of Japan found that IgA concentrations in breast milk could be increased by giving mothers chlorella, a unicellular freshwater green algae sold as powder or compressed into tablets. What about other parts of the body? Thirty tablets of chlorella a day for a month increased IgA secretion in the mouth as well. But does that actually help in a clinically meaningful way? Researchers in Canada tried to see if they could boost the efficacy of flu shots, but a chlorella-derived dietary supplement did not appear to have any effect. They were using some purified extract of chlorella, though, not the real thing.

What about giving it to athletes during training camp? High-intensity physical activity, group living—ripe for infection, and indeed the training was so intense IgA levels significantly dropped, but not in those given chlorella each day. So, chlorella intake may attenuate the reduced IgA secretion during athletic training.

To see any graphs, charts, graphics, images, and quotes to which Dr. Greger may be referring, watch the above video. This is just an approximation of the audio contributed by Katie Schloer.

Please consider volunteering to help out on the site.

Images thanks to abolotnov and Christa via Flickr.

Sedentary women who start briskly walking on a treadmill 45 minutes a day for a few months may cut their risk of upper respiratory tract infections in half. But how does exercise improve our immune system?

Approximately 95% of all infections are initiated at the mucosal surfaces: like our eyes, nose, and mouth, which are protected by antibodies like IgA, that provide an immunological barrier by neutralizing and preventing viral pathogens from penetrating the body. The IgA in our saliva, for example, is the first line of defense against respiratory tract infections such as pneumonia and influenza.

And moderate aerobic exercise, even just 30 minutes in the gym three times a week, may be all it takes to significantly boost IgA levels and significantly decrease the risk of coming down with flu-like symptoms.

But we’ve known for a long time that prolonged heavy exercise may reduce resistance to infectious disease, manifested by an apparent two to six fold increase in upper respiratory tract infection symptoms for several weeks following marathon running.

Even just a single bout of over strenuous exercise may drop IgA levels. Within one day of starting an international competition, for example, elite soccer players suffered a significant drop in IgA secretion. Yacht racing athletes training for America’s Cup who got upper respiratory tract infections during training had significantly lower IgA concentrations. Those with higher levels had fewer infections, and if you measure over time, you can see dropping levels precede the infection. Furthermore, a simple fatigue rating appears to reflect changes in salivary immunity. If you just ask them, “How rested do you feel?” those who reported feeling worse than normal had significantly lower IgA levels.

Sport coaches are advised to monitor immune function, since illness could ultimately lead to a decrease in performance. Therefore, it may be necessary to take protective actions to, for example, minimize contact with cold viruses. But the reason athletes can’t get away with just washing their hands or wearing a mask is because upper respiratory tract infections are often triggered by reactivations of latent viruses already inside our bodies like Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), and as soon as our immune function dips, the virus becomes reactivated. IgA levels drop the day before EBV comes out of hiding and causes a spike in symptoms. These results suggest that the appearance of upper respiratory symptoms is associated with reactivation of EBV and reduction of salivary IgA during training.

So, how about preserving immunity in athletes? Well, I talked about the efficacy of using a one-celled fungi—nutritional yeast—to boost the immune systems of athletes.  What about a one-celled plant?

Research out of Japan found that IgA concentrations in breast milk could be increased by giving mothers chlorella, a unicellular freshwater green algae sold as powder or compressed into tablets. What about other parts of the body? Thirty tablets of chlorella a day for a month increased IgA secretion in the mouth as well. But does that actually help in a clinically meaningful way? Researchers in Canada tried to see if they could boost the efficacy of flu shots, but a chlorella-derived dietary supplement did not appear to have any effect. They were using some purified extract of chlorella, though, not the real thing.

What about giving it to athletes during training camp? High-intensity physical activity, group living—ripe for infection, and indeed the training was so intense IgA levels significantly dropped, but not in those given chlorella each day. So, chlorella intake may attenuate the reduced IgA secretion during athletic training.

To see any graphs, charts, graphics, images, and quotes to which Dr. Greger may be referring, watch the above video. This is just an approximation of the audio contributed by Katie Schloer.

Please consider volunteering to help out on the site.

Images thanks to abolotnov and Christa via Flickr.

Doctor's Note

There is, however, a caveat to the use of chlorella. See my last chlorella video Treating Hepatitis C with Chlorella to make up your own mind if the benefits outweigh the risks.

Here’s the nutritional yeast study I mentioned: Preserving Immune Function in Athletes With Nutritional Yeast.

Here’s some other ways to decrease your risk of upper respiratory tract infections:

The cuddliest way to protect your immune function, though, may be found in this video: Are Cats or Dogs More Protective For Children’s Health?

What else can exercise do? See videos like Longer Life Within Walking Distance and Exercise vs. Drugs for Depression.

More on how to reap the wondrous benefits of exercise in:

If you haven’t yet, you can subscribe to my videos for free by clicking here.

87 responses to “Preserving Athlete Immunity with Chlorella

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  1. seems That for a normal person if train as a maximum of vo2max until 86 %(very intense exercise )… the IgA levels only drop for 1 hour and then came back so that may be mean that one (normal person) it is particular vulnerable during the hour after gym and then the body came back to a balance state. as it was before :) even after 10 weeks of running training(not as an athlete..) . so seems that athletes have to stress much more to drop their antibodies levels :)
    http://europepmc.org/abstract/med/1487340




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    1. I was thinking that may be to stress that athletes defence lower so Cortisol levels very high.. but i came across this study about Lavanda.. (and i remember the video for Lavanda headaches.. Lavanda sims that decrease cortisol leveles.. but at the same time create oxidative stress in the saliva.. i wonder how bad it is that. or it is just something to don’t worry about if we smell lavender for headache.
      http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0165178106000114




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      1. I thought exactly like you in this one! I am not sure if we can say that extraneous exercise is responsible for lower athletes inmune system. Specially if we focus on the examples given. International competitions have a lot more into them than just training. Other than that, I just find the videos fascinating! Just the fact that they open an educated debate is awesome!!!




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    2. It’s interesting that about the 1hour after the exercice, i always wonder the mecanism in geting a cold when the air dry your sweat, i think may be your toxins are going out while sweating and then you stop to sweat and some organisms take advantage of that to get in, what science say about it?




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      1. apparently by some studies suggest that when you sweet the salive get lees and that’s may be one of the reasons for less IgA
        the other is that we have the virus slipping already in our body (virus latentes) and as soon as the antibodies go down they go up ..
        but i’m sure there are more rasons and interaction in this maybe what you says or maybe have to do with the stress of running too? i don’t know ..
        Hemodynamic have replied this :
        Very interesting question. So here’s what I found:
        No they do not know the mechanism yet.
        “One of the next steps is to clarify the mechanisms responsible for the chlorella ingestion-induced increase in salivary SIgA secretion.” Salivary Secretory Immunoglobulin a secretion increases after 4-weeks ingestion of chlorella-derived multicomponent supplement in humans: a randomized cross over study.

        And it appears that the reduction in IgA secretion after heavy exercise is because of reduced Salivary secretion which tends to happen because the body is trying to conserve fluids because you are sweating them out: “In addition, the camp-related decease in salivary SIgA secretion and its attenuation due to chlorella intake were due to changes in saliva flow rates.” Chlorella intake attenuates reduced salivary SIgA secretion in kendo training camp participants.

        Furthermore, “A greater transpiration of saliva during kendo practice than during rest may be a reason for the marked decrease in saliva flow rates. However, these are only speculations. Additional studies will be needed to account for the mechanisms responsible for these discrepancies.”

        What they are trying to say above is when you sweat (transpire–this word is somewhat incorrect because plants Transpire people Perspire/sweat) your body water is reduced and your saliva will decrease because 1. You do not need to eat when working out intensely and 2. Saliva is used for early digestion, so your body will conserve the water used to make saliva, to instead make sweat to cool the body.

        Interestingly it appears that Chlorella signals the Autonomic Nervous system [specifically the Parasympathetic Nervous system (Rest and Digest)] to secrete more saliva. “In the present study, the saliva flow rate reductions during the training camps were greater than the decreases in salivary SIgA concentrations. Thus, it is possible that the effects of chlorella intake on salivary SIgA secretion during the training camp may be more closely related to autonomic nerve regulation than to T-cell function.”

        I can see myself now taking the 30 Chlorella tablets daily (that’s what they used in the study) and being on one of my intense mountain bike rides with my friends as my drool flies up and hits them in their faces. They would say, “Gross, why are you drooling so much?” And I would say, “I’m just protecting you guys.”




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    3. Not sure why this is linked with Flu Shots but my question is about them. Should anyone get them? Over 65 years of age any different answer? Pros cons? Alternatives?

      Surprised there isn’t any discussion on this topic that I saw at least.

      Thanks




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      1. Aaron: Following is a link to the Cochrane report on the flu vaccination effectiveness. The Cochrane institute is an independent organization that reviews studies across the world on various topics to try to draw some conclusions. To my knowledge, this is a well respected and truly independent group. This report may help you make a decision. http://www.cochrane.org/CD001269/ARI_vaccines-to-prevent-influenza-in-healthy-adults

        Some highlights:

        1) The preventive effect of parenteral inactivated influenza vaccine on healthy adults is small: at least 40 people would need vaccination to avoid one ILI (influenza-like illness) case (95% confidence interval (CI) 26 to 128) and 71 people would need vaccination to prevent one case of influenza (95% CI 64 to 80). Vaccination shows no appreciable effect on working days lost or hospitalization.

        2) On the other hand, they didn’t find any harm with it.

        3) And the studies were not all that good quality-wise: The real impact of biases could not be determined for about 70% of the included studies (e.g. insufficient reporting details, very different scores among the items evaluated). About 20% of the included studies (mainly cohorts) had a high risk of bias. Just under 10% had good methodological quality.

        My bottom line from this is that the data really isn’t there one way or the other. If I were around vulnerable people, I’d get the shot to error on the side of caution.

        Beyond that, it’s not clear to me whether getting the shot is a good idea or not. I suffer from major indecision and angst on this topic. In addition to the lack of good data, there are a several key ethical issues which pull me both ways. For example: a) Does paying for the flu shot support an industry which is preying on people’s fears and not really protecting them? b) From what I’ve read, most of the flu shots available are developed using eggs. I don’t want to contribute to an industry that causes a giant amount of suffering, especially when the chance of helping myself may be small. c) On the other hand, am I putting children and seniors at risk since they are more likely to experience significant harm (maybe even death) from getting the flu, and I could be a carrier?

        Then there are also competing “point of principles”: a) I should stand my ground on something I believe in and not succumb to peer/family/doctor pressures when I know the data is just not there. b) I should pick and choose my battles. Is this issue really worth bucking the trend for?

        For the record: I’m all for vaccinations in general. I am in no way encouraging people to worry about important vaccinations (such as the commonly recommended childhood vaccines) which have proven benefits. The issue I have is when the benefit is questionable and the harms real/known.

        What do you think?




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    1. Very interesting question. So here’s what I found:
      No they do not know the mechanism yet.
      “One of the next steps is to clarify the mechanisms responsible for the chlorella ingestion-induced increase in salivary SIgA secretion.” Salivary Secretory Immunoglobulin a secretion increases after 4-weeks ingestion of chlorella-derived multicomponent supplement in humans: a randomized cross over study.

      And it appears that the reduction in IgA secretion after heavy exercise is because of reduced Salivary secretion which tends to happen because the body is trying to conserve fluids because you are sweating them out: “In addition, the camp-related decease in salivary SIgA secretion and its attenuation due to chlorella intake were due to changes in saliva flow rates.” Chlorella intake attenuates reduced salivary SIgA secretion in kendo training camp participants.

      Furthermore, “A greater transpiration of saliva during kendo practice than during rest may be a reason for the marked decrease in saliva flow rates. However, these are only speculations. Additional studies will be needed to account for the mechanisms responsible for these discrepancies.”

      What they are trying to say above is when you sweat (transpire–this word is somewhat incorrect because plants Transpire people Perspire/sweat) your body water is reduced and your saliva will decrease because 1. You do not need to eat when working out intensely and 2. Saliva is used for early digestion, so your body will conserve the water used to make saliva, to instead make sweat to cool the body.

      Interestingly it appears that Chlorella signals the Autonomic Nervous system [specifically the Parasympathetic Nervous system (Rest and Digest)] to secrete more saliva. “In the present study, the saliva flow rate reductions during the training camps were greater than the decreases in salivary SIgA concentrations. Thus, it is possible that the effects of chlorella intake on salivary SIgA secretion during the training camp may be more closely related to autonomic nerve regulation than to T-cell function.”

      I can see myself now taking the 30 Chlorella tablets daily (that’s what they used in the study) and being on one of my intense mountain bike rides with my friends as my drool flies up and hits them in their faces. They would say, “Gross, why are you drooling so much?” And I would say, “I’m just protecting you guys.”




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      1. I recently picked up a product that contains cracked cell chlorella. I presume this makes it more bioavailable – hopefully more than a marketing gimmick…
        If so, that might explain the research differences in chlorella studies with different results, though one would have to comb through the methodology of every study to confirm or reject my little theory.




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  2. 5 Grams of glutamine during training, dissolved in hot water and added to drink bottle, seems to prevent infections.

    I’ve read that glutamine is burned up during exercise and as the immune system runs on the stuff if you don’t put it back in then you are going to get ill. I believe there was a study done where they gave a load of marathon finishers a dose of glutamine at the end of the marathon. The ones that got the glutamine had significantly lower URT infections in the following few weeks.

    I’ve been dosing with glutamine during all extended exercise sessions and haven’t had any URT infections since i began doing so.

    Any thoughts on glutamine studies for this effect, Dr Greger?




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    1. I have not read much on glutamine and athletic performance nor has Dr. G. He tends to favor sharing research on foods (plants and fungi) like nutritional yeast. Only one video hits on glutamic acid. Perhaps for someone with uncontrollable IBS or crohns glutamine may help. I guess if it’s helping than you may be onto something. Maybe though foods rich in glutamine would also help?




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  3. “latent viral infections”, you mention. Interesting that when I take vitamin D pills my immune system gets suppressed and I get Epstein Barr type symptoms, as well as flu-like symptoms. VIT D suppresses immune system in some people, right? Differences between our innate immune system and the one we are evolving with.




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    1. i dont think tat vitamin D suppresses Immune system in place it regulate the Immune system in some cases of autoimmune diseases like Sclerosis multiple or Hashimoto’s thyroiditis. but not suppressing it :)




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  4. Did anyone read something about Parkinson’s being linked with chorella and/or spirulina consumption? I remember an article in the last couple years…




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    1. John is it possible that you are thinking about the video on ALS, Lou Gehrig’s disease and the connection to blue green algae initially found in Guam and then eventually associated with fish off of Miami?




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    2. I agree with VegCoach. The nonedible blue green algae that was first suggested as a supplement years ago produced a toxin that is NOT ‘a good thing’, caused all sorts of problems including liver damage




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      1. But the Chlorella used now as a supplement has many of the health benefits, it also is not the bluegreen algae, so it has never had the bad affects of the other bluegreen algae has, I think it was just confusing in the beginning as people thought all of the algaes were good, but, NOT….




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    3. Yes, I think you are referring to the videos about blue-green algae and BMAA toxins that VegCoach mentioned below.

      From today’s Doctor’s Note: “There is, however, a caveat to the use of chlorella. See my last chlorella video Treating Hepatitis C with Chlorella to make up your own mind if the benefits outweigh the risks.”

      There is also this post: Do algae-based omega-3 supplements contain beta-N-methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA) that has been found in blue-green algae? and everything you’d want to know about spirulina.




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  5. What’s the best source for Chlorella? Powder, tablet, or liquid? Are there brands that are especially high quality that you can recommend?




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    1. I understand it should be broken cell chlorella, because if the cells aren’t broken it cannot be absorbed. Perhaps all the chlorella on the market is broken cell, but I don’t know.




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    2. I have been using “Clean Chlorella” which publicizes their heavy metal testing results on their webpage, and the NaturalNews site (they do independent laboratory testing on all products they promote/sell) recommends this brand as the cleanest source. It comes in different forms and sizes, like powdered or tablet and has worked very well for me. I absorb it very quickly and I feel a small surge of energy when I take it. It is definitely worth the price to get a cleaner-sourced chlorella.




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    1. IgA is an antibody. When you have enough in your mucosa the IgA sticks to pathogens and marks them for destruction. If you do not have enough IgA then the bad bugs survive and can cause disease.




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      1. thank you! my girlfriend have hashimoto’s thyroiditis. and not all antibodies are good for her. but this one you say that in low quantity increase some autoimmune disease , you know some study about this?




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        1. nope, did not say that. association is not causation. you seem to be heals over head on this. Best wishes for your girl friend.

          There is a wiki page on selective IgA deficiency and consequences (with refs)




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          1. Very interesting! thank you , because Celiac disease it is also related with Hashimoto´s so it is not prove or causation but may be a relation between the two thank you again! :)

            “Prognosis is excellent, although there is an association with autoimmune disease. Of note, selective IgA deficiency can complicate the diagnosis of one such condition, celiac disease, as the deficiency masks the high levels of certain IgA antibodies usually seen in celiac disease.[15] Selective IgA deficiency occurs in 1 of 39 to 57 patients with celiac disease. This is much higher than the prevalence of selective IgA deficiency in the general population, which is estimated to be approximately 1 in 400 to 18 500, depending on ethnic background. The prevalence of celiac disease in patients with selective IgA deficiency ranges from 10% to 30%, depending on the evaluated population.[16]”




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            1. Just a thought Noe, if a person has a disease (Celica, cancer, autoimmune or anything) then they are at war. The battles tend to make the person weaker and their defences can degrade. IgA is a kind of defence. So in my tiny mind it seems logical that people who are coping with Celiacs would have reduced IgA. Further, low IgA in general may be an indication of a previously unknown problem.




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        1. planto: I agree with you in theory, but I have major trust issues. My take is that this sentence from the blog post you linked to is key: “Spirulina is often grown and collected in open lakes and we have no idea what other algae are going to crop up.” When it comes to spirulina, I just don’t trust that it will be “clean”. I don’t see how we can feel confident that is “grown carefully”. Also, spirulina just doesn’t seem like a necessary food. It seems so easy to get the nutrition and enjoyment that we need is many other ways. So, why do people feel so strongly about pushing the spirulina when there it has some potential significant downsides?

          That’s just my 2 cents. I have no problem with people eating spirulina once they understand the practical risks. It’s green and sounds pretty powerful for a food…

          Thanks for including that link. I remember that article and think it is a good one for people to see in this conversation.




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          1. >his sentence from the blog post you linked to is key: “Spirulina is often grown and collected in open lakes and we have no idea what other algae are going to crop up.”

            It seems like growing Spirulina in an isolated GMP-certified laboratory environment with regular testing of each batch would provide a decent level of safety. In the comments thread from that blog post, there’s mention of a company “Nutrex” which does just this.

            http://www.nutrex-hawaii.com/blue-green-algae-and-microcystin-toxins

            In the past, I’ve thrown chlorella / spirulina into smoothies for the deep color it provides, viewing it like any other plant — perhaps it’s better removed from the diet.




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            1. planto: More great info.

              re: “perhaps these are better removed from the diet” I think you seem very aware of the risks and potential benefits. So, I don’t see a reason to leave those out of your smoothies if you enjoy them (or enjoy the color) and you feel you can trust the Nutrex or similar company. I agree that if they are following the protocol that they list, it seems like it would be pretty safe…

              One more thought: I checked that FAQ page for Nutrex. They do say that spirulina offers better nutrition, but they don’t post any data to back up that claim. It may be true, but it seems like they would want to back up that statement with some solid studies? If it’s not true, what else might they be fudging on?? (That’s my inner sceptic (or inner paranoid depending on your opinion) coming out.) Note: They may have that info elsewhere on their site. I didn’t check.




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    1. And to back up Thea. See Doctor’s Note above: “There is, however, a caveat to the use of chlorella. See my last chlorella video Treating Hepatitis C with Chlorella to make up your own mind if the benefits outweigh the risks.”




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    1. i brought the book version because the kindle version said it wouldn’t be available until february, i’ll get the book by 23 of december, i can’t wait shame on living in Spain




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  6. What about radiation from the Fukushima disaster? How can we know the source is not from the Pacific? Even then it won’t be long before all the oceans are tainted with it.




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    1. Interesting, but i doubt its of any relevance to dried (dead) chlorella. Ive been taking chlorella for 7 years and i still have a mensa level IQ. ;)




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    1. It’s not that an athlete trains so hard that it harms them, it’s that some don’t bother with, or correctly understand, correct nutrition and recovery. If i did my training without bothering to consider what nutrients by body requires and replace them accordingly then i would do more harm than good.

      The other thing to consider with athletics is that it is about pushing the boundaries. As a species we have never done some of things that some people are now doing and our bodies never evolved to do them. Tour de France is a prime example of this. So it’s important to bear in mind if you are an athlete and pushing the boundaries that you need to take nutrition very seriously indeed.




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      1. Would you like a little Edgar (as in erythropoetin) with that salad? cheap shot i know…I just read “The Secret Race”.

        Aren’t you assuming that the athletes in the studies, the ones with low IgA, were not taking nutrition seriously? The one who are serious have normal immune function? I hang with some serious cyclists. When i pushed the subject they told me that many (sounded more like most) use epo to boost hematocrit. (This is not USA btw/ but I think it is the same amongst athletes around the world). What would you say about that? How much doping goes on?




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        1. Yes i do say that they aren’t taking nutrition seriously. You just have to see what pro cycling team riders are being fed by their dieticians to realise that they’re not taking it very seriously. Fish, meat and eggs are not healthy foods. And all those gels, pure maltodextrin and fructose and other chemicals and shit that they take while riding isn’t exactly taking nutrition seriously either – it’s making the best of a bad world. The teams don’t give a fuck about the later life health problems of their riders, they’re just out to make as much money as possible winning races right now, tomorrow be damned. And let’s face it, most athletes don’t care about future health problems, they just want to win now and to hell with the future as well.

          I suppose it’s two schools of thought. Those who train to win and will do whatever it takes to win, and those who train to stay fit and healthy. The former do not do nutrition for health and fitness for life, they do it for the momentary gains now, and that’s not taking nutrition seriously in my book, that’s abusing nutrition.

          I have no idea how much doping goes on. I don’t, never have and never will use PED’s. But i do realise that when websites like Strava running KOM and QOM competitions on every sector being heavily fought over by all and sundry the temptation to cheat and take PED’s must be incredibly tempting for those kinds of peoples who only care about beating others whatever the cost to their later health.

          I think the problem is that in amateur athletics there is no ban on doping, so inevitably it will be rife. But i don’t give a toss about winning anything and i’m not competing against anyone but myself so i have no desire or need to cheat.

          Ergo, don’t paint all athletes with the same brush. There are some who are in it purely for the health and fitness benefits, not just to win at any cost.




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          1. so how are your IgA levels after you push these evolutionary boundaries? Do you wear that collar when you do the pushing? heh who is that?




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  7. So how much chlorella should I take to get immunity benefits? 30 tablets per day (as one of the studies in the video did) seems obnoxious to me.




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    1. On seller on Amazon sells them for $0.10 cents per tablet … so 30 would be $3.00 a day. They probably taste nasty too, so maybe have to get the chocolate covered ones … I hope! ;-)




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  8. The IgA charts seem to correlate highly with blood O2 levels which tend to drop similarly after strenuous exercise and other stressful events? What’s the connection?




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    1. Thanks for your question Stefan!

      To get similar benefits as the one reported on this study mentioned by Dr Greger, take 30 chlorella tablets per day (15 tablets × twice, after breakfast and dinner). The mass of each tablet described in the study was 200mg.

      Hope this answer helps!




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      1. Thanks Darchite. I was wondering that too. I bought some chorella tablets after seeing this video. But I was sort of taking 5 a day. And I don’t even know if they have 200 mg or not. Obviously I might have to up my intake to see much benefit.




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  9. A lot of innuendo here … OK, what are we supposed to take, and how much of it do we need … and what is the cost of all of this stuff. And how would we know if we are getting good chlorella or bad chlorella … that is what all the supplement makers claim, organic, screened for heavy metals, ours is the special chlorella from the special part of the unpolluted world that if you do not take you will get worse instead of better. Just curious, as usual?




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  10. Wikipedia says that – “Chlorella, too, was found by scientists in the 1960s to be impossible for humans and other animals to digest in its natural state due to the tough cell walls encapsulating the nutrients, which presented further problems for its use in American food production.[3]”

    What does that really mean. Are chlorella pills or edible chlorella processed in some way to be digestible?




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  11. Hi: I’ve been searching about Epstein-Barr Virus and this is the unique post. I know this goes about nutrition, but I was searching information about fighting EBV with food… Chrorella could be a good option? Thank you for your commendable work. Best regards.




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  12. It would be great if you could cook for Team Sky for the Tour the France, or something like that. That would be a great boost for healthy eating and the website.




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