Recipe: Easy Veggie Tacos

Recipe: Easy Veggie Tacos
4.08 (81.61%) 137 votes

This recipe for Veggie Tacos comes from staff member Ángela.

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Below is an approximation of this video’s audio content. To see any graphs, charts, graphics, images, and quotes to which Dr. Greger may be referring, watch the above video.

  1. Make the cashew cream: 

    1½ cups raw cashews (220g)

    ¾ cup water (180ml)

    2 tablespoons apple cider vinegar

    3 tablespoons lemon juice (1 small lemon)

    Blend until smooth, then set aside. Note: If you are not using a high-speed blender, boil water and soak the cashews for 15 minutes, then drain, rinse and proceed with recipe.

  2. Add a few tablespoons of water to a pan and turn heat to medium. Add the veggies and spices and sauté until soft:

    ½ cup corn kernels (100g)

    1 cup diced onion (1 small onion)

    1½ cups chopped mushrooms (100g)

    2 cups chopped bell peppers (2 bell peppers)

    ½ teaspoon smoked paprika

    ¼ teaspoon chili powder

    ¼ teaspoon garlic powder

    ¼ teaspoon ground turmeric

    Pinch of black pepper

  3. Assemble the ingredients (see below for homemade salsa, guacamole, and refried beans): 

    Corn tortillas

    Salt-free refried beans

    Shredded lettuce 

    Sautéed veggies

    Salt-free guacamole

    Salt-free salsa or pico de gallo

    Cashew cream

    Garnish with cilantro and fresh chili

Simple Salsa: 

Ingredients

9 vine tomatoes

1 serrano pepper

1 medium yellow bell pepper

1/2 red onion

1 garlic clove

juice of 1/2 lemon

pinch of black pepper

optional: 1 teaspoon date syrup and a handful of cilantro

Method

1. Chop all the ingredients roughly and transfer to a food processor. Process until mostly smooth, leaving some texture.

2. In a pot, cook on medium heat for 15 minutes. Let cool in the pot, then transfer to the refrigerator to chill and set before serving.

Guacamole:

Ingredients

3 Hass avocados

1/2 cup chopped cherry tomatoes

1/2 cup chopped red onion

1 garlic clove, chopped

5 tablespoons lemon juice

optional: handful of cilantro 

Method

1. Mash avocados with a fork until soft and creamy.

2. Add lemon juice and mix well.

3. Add remaining ingredients and mix again. 

Unfried Refried Beans:

Ingredients

3 cups cooked cannellini beans, drained and rinsed or 2 15.5 oz BPA-free cans or Tetra Paks

1 small red onion, chopped

1/2 teaspoon garlic powder

1 1/2 teaspoon smoked paprika

1/2 teaspoon turmeric powder

pinch of black pepper

Method

1. In a skillet, cook the onion with a splash of water for 7 minutes or until soft. You can keep adding water to stop the onion from burning or sticking to the pan.

2. Rinse the beans and transfer into a microwave-safe bowl. Heat in the microwave for 30 seconds. Use a potato masher or a fork to mash the beans until they become a paste.

3. Add spices and mix well. Then add the onion and mix again. 

Please consider volunteering to help out on the site.

Image: Kristina DeMuth

Below is an approximation of this video’s audio content. To see any graphs, charts, graphics, images, and quotes to which Dr. Greger may be referring, watch the above video.

  1. Make the cashew cream: 

    1½ cups raw cashews (220g)

    ¾ cup water (180ml)

    2 tablespoons apple cider vinegar

    3 tablespoons lemon juice (1 small lemon)

    Blend until smooth, then set aside. Note: If you are not using a high-speed blender, boil water and soak the cashews for 15 minutes, then drain, rinse and proceed with recipe.

  2. Add a few tablespoons of water to a pan and turn heat to medium. Add the veggies and spices and sauté until soft:

    ½ cup corn kernels (100g)

    1 cup diced onion (1 small onion)

    1½ cups chopped mushrooms (100g)

    2 cups chopped bell peppers (2 bell peppers)

    ½ teaspoon smoked paprika

    ¼ teaspoon chili powder

    ¼ teaspoon garlic powder

    ¼ teaspoon ground turmeric

    Pinch of black pepper

  3. Assemble the ingredients (see below for homemade salsa, guacamole, and refried beans): 

    Corn tortillas

    Salt-free refried beans

    Shredded lettuce 

    Sautéed veggies

    Salt-free guacamole

    Salt-free salsa or pico de gallo

    Cashew cream

    Garnish with cilantro and fresh chili

Simple Salsa: 

Ingredients

9 vine tomatoes

1 serrano pepper

1 medium yellow bell pepper

1/2 red onion

1 garlic clove

juice of 1/2 lemon

pinch of black pepper

optional: 1 teaspoon date syrup and a handful of cilantro

Method

1. Chop all the ingredients roughly and transfer to a food processor. Process until mostly smooth, leaving some texture.

2. In a pot, cook on medium heat for 15 minutes. Let cool in the pot, then transfer to the refrigerator to chill and set before serving.

Guacamole:

Ingredients

3 Hass avocados

1/2 cup chopped cherry tomatoes

1/2 cup chopped red onion

1 garlic clove, chopped

5 tablespoons lemon juice

optional: handful of cilantro 

Method

1. Mash avocados with a fork until soft and creamy.

2. Add lemon juice and mix well.

3. Add remaining ingredients and mix again. 

Unfried Refried Beans:

Ingredients

3 cups cooked cannellini beans, drained and rinsed or 2 15.5 oz BPA-free cans or Tetra Paks

1 small red onion, chopped

1/2 teaspoon garlic powder

1 1/2 teaspoon smoked paprika

1/2 teaspoon turmeric powder

pinch of black pepper

Method

1. In a skillet, cook the onion with a splash of water for 7 minutes or until soft. You can keep adding water to stop the onion from burning or sticking to the pan.

2. Rinse the beans and transfer into a microwave-safe bowl. Heat in the microwave for 30 seconds. Use a potato masher or a fork to mash the beans until they become a paste.

3. Add spices and mix well. Then add the onion and mix again. 

Please consider volunteering to help out on the site.

Image: Kristina DeMuth

Doctor's Note

I’m excited to bring you another series of recipe videos, created with our team in-house. Today’s recipe is brought to you by Ángela, our Spanish Social Media and Program Coordinator.

Over the next couple of months, we will also have videos for Veggie Mac-n-Cheese and Soba Noodle Soup.

To see the other recipe videos we have so far, check out:

For the full recipe, click the transcript button or go to the recipe page: Easy Veggie Tacos.

If you haven’t yet, you can subscribe to my videos for free by clicking here.

121 responses to “Recipe: Easy Veggie Tacos

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    1. Trying to find the recipe! Surely it is in plain sight! I need the details on the ingredients. As a newbie I cannot identify them all! It looks wonderful for sure–would love to make it!

    2. not by a long way

      Zap cauli slices in microwave til half tender, stir in refried with seasoning.
      Zap til bubbly. (sub mushrooms)

      Shredded cabbage with onion better than the Gringo toppings.

      1. If I find out that fixing my thyroid helps me lose weight, then, I can come back, but I am not doing tortillas or guacamole or nuts right now.

        I haven’t done tortillas for a long time.

        I haven’t done guacamole in over a week and my ounce and a half of nuts in about 5 days.

        But they do look delicious.

  1. OK, that does not look easy to me. A lot of ingredients, a lot of steps.

    Also looks hard to eat; sort of sloppy.

    But it does look tasty.

    I prefer easier dishes, with left-overs to serve for one or two more meals. My mantra is Simple, Easy, Quick. (At least relatively quick.)

    1. I do agree with Dr. J. Too many ingredients, the simplest a recipe is (few ingredients), the better and for flavor, too many ingredients all mixed up does not necessarily means flavor. Yes, I also go for recipes that are easy and quick to make, easy few ingredients and full of flavor (also low in sodium). I, personally, for example, find useless all that heavy rich plant-based fat in the cashews, unnecessary in my humble opinion

      1. 2 easier versions here by me;

        It’s not hard but you can simplify further

        Everybody knows how to make guacamole and how to make spicy salsa. if you don’t feel like making salsa, just chop tomato and add tobasco or jarred jalapenos. Ignore the cashew cream or use a bought raw nut cream. Buy refried beans in a can if you don’t have the energy or time to heat some beans with spices and mash them.

        Easiest version:
        Thinly slice an avocado,
        chop some fresh tomatoes
        Slice thin wafer slices of red onion,
        sliced washed dry lettuce.
        open a jar of corn kernels.
        Put all those in separate little piles or bowls.
        also some jalapenos from a jar, tabasco or other sauce.
        Cook or heat up some refried beans with spices & garlic.
        Fresh coriander if you have
        Assemble and eat. don’t overfill each corn tortilla unless you like eating a mess.
        the best traditional corn tortillas need a few seconds on a dry hot skillet immediately before eating

      2. Cashew cream does taste good. If I could afford the calories, I would like to try the cashews spiced the way I tasted cashews from Whole Foods done as a cashew cream sauce. I think it was ginger, cardamom, cinnamon, turmeric. Something like that.

        I think High Carb Hannah used white beans or potatoes to make a similar sauce.

        I think it was her.

      1. I agree… I often feel as though I have to fight with the website to get to the transcript, but it was worth it today! This recipe is awesome-sounding. Almost every ingredientstarts out as a hole food, except the corn tortillas, and it’s full of satisfying healthful fat, protiens from the beans and nuts, mushrooms, fiber/ complex carbs… perfect for diabetics too! (Perfect for anyone!)

    2. leftovers are great for tacos esp potato.

      reheated with canned salsa verde

      2Tbsp is enough filling per tortilla. 1 hand only or it’s too full

  2. I add to the cashew cream and make a vegan Alfredo sauce for other veg dishes. A bit of cauliflower and miso for salt makes a delish dish.
    I think in these taco’s you can add or subtract what ever you want to make it easy. Add some hummos? Baked falafel? Falafel made with broad beans/fava beans? I made falafel balls with my “what do I do with this now? antique george forman grill. Baked they come out great!
    YMMV, works for me!
    mitch

  3. Veggie Mexican is ultra easy, and a lot of what I eat. It made it very easy for me to transition to WFPB.

    Making your own tortillas–THAT’s special. Oh they taste so good.

    1. But my stuff is much simpler than what is shown above. Never liked sour cream, so I need no “substitute”. Sometimes I do make my own refried beans. I season the mushrooms or beans for the right flavors and the veggies/salsa/greens are just along for the ride.

    2. There’s a terrific Mexican restaurant just a couple of blocks from where I live. Their meals are worth shelling out a few bucks for — can do takeout too.

      It’s fun to eat out in any ethnic restaurant. Let them do the grunt work. I do enuf cookin’ at home.

    1. The recipe calls for corn tortillas, not taco shells, which are fried and thus less healthy. I have also bought 100% whole wheat tortillas.

    2. The meatballs look good, Barb — I’ll try them! Yesterday a neighbor gave me a huge bag of chickpeas (she claims she always buys too much of everything), and I was planning to make some hummus with it. All I need to do is buy a jar of tahini sauce.

      So now I have two yummy recipes to try. *_^

  4. I am finding the Nutrition Facts pages slow to complete loading. Just the last part with the comments section, the voting stars, and the green support button. This change occurred last week. Very annoying.

    1. Barb, you’ve mentioned this a few times before, and every time I’ve meant to say yes, I have the same problem.

      But then my whole (desktop) computer is wacky anyway. About 20 times a day I can expect to get the annoying message “Mozilla Firefox not responding.” Boy, do I curse at it! #$@*#$!&

      1. Thank you YR, I appreciate your feedback. For all these years I have had little to no problem with the NF site. I do not encounter any problems anywhere else. Maybe it is a tracking technology or something, IDK

  5. I make similar items during the week and stored in frig. What I want is the name and brand of the taco used. If anyone has suggestions, please let me know. I’m looking for one that meets wfpb and whole grain, of course. What’s your favorite, easily available. The ones I’ve tried are not tasty. Thanks friends and BE WELL

    1. Ruthie,
      Ezekial, the brand name, makes tortillas I believe exactly the same ingredients as their bread. It’s made from an assortment of sprouted grains.
      In fact Dr.Caldwell Esselstyn in his book “Prevent and Reverse Heart Disease: The Revolutionary, Scientifically Proven, Nutrition-Based Cure”
      along with his wife Ann Crile Esselstyn list Ezekial bread as one of the only store bought breads that is healthy.

      1. I can sympathize with your viewpoint, for some while I got annoyed by the lack of distinction between “healthy” and “healthful” (very common on this site) but eventually was forced to realize that semantic battle was lost years ago so I just gave up! In this case however, people might be appalled to realize that the dictionary definition of the 4-letter “version” of “refrigerator” meant that their usage was in fact referencing “unnatural acts”!

        In my opinion it is not a bad thing to push against the so-called “evolution” of the English language which so often is actually “degradation” !

        ML

  6. What is the brand name of the taco shell? It may contain high sodium and corn. I would prefer romaine leave or collard. Too many ingredients and not needed to cook.

  7. My gosh, those look great! Pay no heed to ingrates complaining about number of ingredients and time. Cooking is an art and an act of love toward oneself and others. The result is what matters. If it tastes delicious, then the dish is a success! Thank you!

    1. You’re welcome to come to my place, Sarah. I’ll have the ingredients all ready for you. All you need to do is put the little darlings together.

      Later, I’ll even give you some. *_^

    2. the complaints are especially odd given that tacos or tortillas are child’s play to invent and add to or omit go substitute ingredients as you want.
      Above I wrote 2 easier versions for the people who truly don’t have energy or time to cook this

  8. What’s the difference between a blender and a “high speed blender”? Does the latter have, say, racing stripes?

    If my blender is not “high speed”, can I use a coffee/spice grinder instead to first powder the cashews? It does a great job on flax seed.

    1. I wouldn’t worry about your blender. At worst the cashew would be a bit chunky – or use cooked chick peas and reduce water

    2. PhillyBilly – I think this is one of those times that you simply have to try out your equipment and see what it does. Since no one on this site has any idea what you’ve actually got in your kitchen for tools it would be impossible for any of us to know. . . . donchathink?

      1. People usually either soak them about 8 hours or boil them and soak them for 1 hour.

        Also, food processors sometimes best regular speed blenders for things and sometimes even high-speed blenders.

        I watched someone who was making almond butter with their Vitamix and I watched someone else just throw raw almonds in a food processor and it did all of the work where the person with the Vitamix was tampering away.

        1. Same thing for a smoothie.

          I watched someone chopping up frozen fruit into a smoothie using an immersion blender and the smoothie looked quite good at the end and clean up was very quick.

          There tend to be multi-ways to do everything and there are generally YouTube videos comparing versions.

          I invested in a Vitamix, but I probably wouldn’t do it again, if this one goes.

          I don’t use the Vitamix for making my own flour or nut butter or soup, even though I fantasized I might as why I spent the money.

          And, honestly, it wasn’t much better than my other blender for smoothies. If I use frozen fruit, I have to take it off and turn it upsidedown a few times during the process to unclog the area near the blade. No different than what I used to do.

          Someday I am going to have to make soup so I can justify the purchase.

          There are blenders which are almost as good for 1/3 of the price.

          Yes, if it breaks quickly, you get better customer service if you go Vitamix, but unless you really are a foodie who does very special things, a regular blender and food processor and a coffee grinder usually covers most of it.

  9. This recipe is a good prod to come up with something for tacos. My immediate thought was: cooked chick peas or hummus instead of cashews, chopped raw tomato, onion, romaine or whatever you like for toppings – investigate to find a good soft shell.

    1. Because it was presented first, I mistakenly thought the cashew stuff was the filling, when actually it is refried beans. I’m suggesting chick peas as a sub for the filling – the cashew topping you can simply omit. Recipes rarely need to be treated as gospel! If you use a substitution or short cut that doesnt work well, that’s experience for next time :)

          1. What’s wrong with “refried” beans. They are fat free. Just smash the beans you cooked.
            ——————————————————————————————————————–
            My area grocery chain, HEB, sells a store-branded can of fat free re-fried beans. There appears to be no lining in the cans so I buy them in multiples. ‘-)

    1. See if you can find organic blue corn shells in your farmers market. I get mine from Sprouts.

      Made from blue corn masa flour, oil and lime.
      No saturated fat, no cholesterol. Zero grams sodium.

      And they meet Dr. G’s Total Carb to Dietary Fiber ratio of 5:1 (15:3),

      1. Dr. Cobalt,

        I love the blue corn ones.

        I tried those and after that, one time they were out of those and I ate the yellow corn ones and they were not anywhere near as good.

        I am not eating them at all right now, but I am a fan of blue corn.

        1. I store my opened package in a gallon sized zip lock bag so they stay fresh longer. Just throw the entire box inside a bag and zip it up.

          I don’t know where blue corn is grown. Down in the Blue Bayou maybe?

    2. Wanda – Hi! – Here’s what I do . . . I find plain corn & water tortillas at the grocery (sometimes I grab the organic ones). They are soft and pliable. Fold them over anything that you’ve got in your kitchen that will give them the taco shape and bake them for a few minutes in a hot oven. I use my little counter top oven. If I don’t have something to drape them over, I just hang them in the taco shape from the oven rack itself and bake until crisp.
      As an alternative, you can just take the soft tacos and toast them softly on the stove top and use them that way without forming them into the traditional hard taco shape so you end up with a soft-sided taco.
      Best! –

  10. I think it looks great. I don’t think it’s too difficult, just time consuming, which, I don’t mind at all. Looks delicious.
    Have reformatted the transcript and printed it out. Will made later this week.

  11. It looks to me like the first photo (containing the video link) has a taco on the left that contains shrimp! I must be feeling seafood-deprived LOL

  12. Okay, these tacos look marvellous. However, one must always use the Greger approach to research and ask, ” has the good doctor put it to the test?”

  13. I prefer a different recipe for my vegan taco filling

    Cauliflower Walnut Taco Meat
    Prep Time: 5 minutes Cook Time: 30 minutes Yield: 6 servings (about 1/2 cup each)
    This vegetarian taco meat is made with cauliflower, walnuts, and chipotle peppers. It’s so easy: just mix and bake. Meatless miracle!
    The Vegetarian Taco Meat Basics:
    3 cups cauliflower florets
    2 cups whole walnuts
    2 individual chipotles in adobo sauce
    1 tablespoon chili powder
    1 teaspoon cumin
    1 teaspoon salt
    Optional Add-Ins:
    2 tablespoons lime juice
    1/2 teaspoon garlic or onion powder
    a pinch of cayenne for more heat
    Instructions
    Preheat the oven to 375 degrees. Pulse all ingredients in a food processor until the mixture is evenly ground.
    Transfer to a greased baking sheet. Bake for 30 minutes, stirring halfway through to prevent over-browning.
    Serve in tacos, burritos, quesadillas, bowls, and the like!

    (credit to Pinch of Yum blog https://pinchofyum.com/cauliflower-walnut-vegetarian-taco-meat)

  14. Great, as I watched again, Doctor Greger’s video on “Maximum Nutrition How to transition”, where he wears a cuisine chef white floppy…

    I enjoy very mych cooking recipes videos, which would even be fantastically better with a few medical information or nutrition comments andadvices, to complete the HOW (vegetarian recipes) with the WHY (scientific research)

    Blessings from France
    Patrick

  15. I just came back from the store. All the tacos I viewed had added oil in the ingredients. I thought that it was not an acceptable item due to the included oil. This is why I have avoided them for years.

    1. You might be able to make your own oil-free version in an air fryer or Ninja Foodi.

      They have a gadget which shapes tortillas into taco shells them, which I think would fit in the taller Foodi.

  16. Hello,
    I noticed this veggie taco recipe includes the item “smoked paprika.” Based on Dr. Greger’s prior comments about the carcinogenic effects of barbequing foods, it seems that smoking paprika could add carcinogens to this paprika and any other spices/foods that are smoked. Please advise me at your earliest convenience. Thank you!

    1. If you’re really in a rush and nobody gets back to you, why not just substitute regular paprika for the smoked paprika? Others are playing around with the original recipe….being creative. So can you!

      1. Thank you, Liisa, you are always such a big help to people!

        By the way, High Carb Hannah posted a few days worth of meals for maximum weight loss and I think I have been only maybe 200 calories over her weight loss ones. That part is good because I am not as far off as it feels. Now, I am below all of her daily meal plans.

        On the even better note, I saw a drop on the scale. That is so much better than an 8th of a pound increase.

        I will wait a whole week to see if I really do lose weight after a whole week, but when I looked back at my Sparkpeople, I was losing weight and I stopped and gained some back as I was cleaning up my diet and it has to be low iodine affecting my thyroid.

        I feel like I will be finding out soon, but I feel so good either way. I am eating so close to 100% Whole Food Plant-Based now. Yes, I have my plant-milk bottle and I do have some Curry Tiger’s up in the freezer, but no matter what happens, I have decided to be happy about my accomplishment.

        I have been an almost vegan for over a year and a half with a few pieces of cake at birthdays per year and one creamer at a baby shower being the main areas I haven’t solved for. I have been eating vegetables for the whole year and a half and I started eating berries this year.

        I watched High Carb Hannah’s videos and she had berries and they still look like things I don’t like, but I was watching the video eating berries with the golden milk and unsweetened yogurt and cacao and 2 teaspoons of honey and I paused and said, “Nope, I like blueberries now. It just feels like I don’t like them.” And, tonight, I bought strawberries to try.

        I got so sick on strawberries as a child, so this might be another process, but that process is so much happier than monitoring weight which doesn’t come off.

  17. NOT READY FOR PRIME TIME

    Interesting recipe, but as a video, is not yet ready for prime time. At first, we trustingly clicked the “Play” button on the screen, expecting to hear the tiny little voice of Dr. Greger, only to be blown across the room by “music” which is much too loud (audio/video production is a skill to be mastered, clearly).

    After a few attempts at reading the screen captions, we revert to the transcript, leaving the video playing pointlessly in the background. Having read the transcript, we replay the video (without the sound) with a general idea of what is intended to happen.

    On re-reading the transcript, it becomes clear a great deal of substitution of ingredients is possible on the basic corn tortilla theme. In fact, substitution probably makes more sense for many viewers who are not inclined to rush to the grocery to find every little thing the recipe demands.

    Roger Ebert would not give a thumbs-up, or any thumb at all, for that matter. However, our biggest regret is having wasted a good opportunity to discuss more dietary/nutritional research. Recipes come and go, but research is forever.

    Please do not throw any more recipes at us, but keep the recipes in a corral of their own for those who absolutely must watch vegetables being chopped, pulverized in a blender, and stuffed in a taco shell. These people need to find a cooking channel, if they do not already have one. This website has plenty of room for a cooking library, but most of us are not here for a cooking lesson.

    1. Interesting take on this, alphaa. Can’t say I disagree with it.

      I’m thinking those connected to the recipe were “testing the waters.” *_^

      1. I see this video style as a probably much needed way to lighten Dr. G’s content production workload. I think the readership here is capable of sorting recipes in whatever manner they see fit, if they don’t want any, they can just skip that day’s message. After all, a lot of the medical concerns that Dr. G addresses are rather specific so if they don’t hit close to home for us, I assume that people just delete them ? If you need them later, they are in the archives on site.

  18. Can you post a written recipe of the taco? I can’t get the ingredients and amounts written down while watching the video. I couldn’t find the recipe in the book I bought from you either.

    1. I agree, too complicated. I use tempeh or black beans, red onions, tomatoes, greens, or red cabbage, and some type of hot sauce.
      For our family it’s a quick, hearty meal for a busy day.

  19. Angela,

    It looks delicious.

    I think some of us at this site are older and simpler and trying to use less money and trying to watch our weight with fewer calories – lower fat.

  20. Food for Life brand makes sprouted corn tortillas. Ingredients, organic sprouted corn, water. sea salt, lime. They do not have much salt though, only 10 mg. of sodium for 2 tacos.

  21. I am enjoying looking at recipes right now very much.

    I feel like it is harder to succeed at this process until you figure out recipes and learn how to cook the food.

    Today I heard a woman that I know has Parkinson’s. She’s about 65 and I was able to give her a video of treating Parkinson’s with the whole food plant-based diet and I want to give a big hug to all of you people working behind the scenes here. Thank you for bringing your recipes for your time. I know that us old folks want things simple and inexpensive but I know for a fact That there is a great big audience up there beyond us. I think about the 2 million views of the oatmeal video And I think I understand it now. Science is what drew me to this website. But it is being able to prepare the food which helps people succeed.

    When I looked at Forks Over Knives recipes near the beginning of my time here, I hated all of their recipes. Now, I would probably like more of them.

    It is the recipes which make this easier as a diet.

    1. Most brilliant part of whole food plant-based other than not having to count calories and not being hungry is that there are so many doctors with so many variations on this that when I get bored with one way of eating I can move to another and still stay home from plant-based. That is different from every other diet I’ve ever done in my entire life. I don’t feel like I’m going to back away from it because I can keep moving side to side with in it and never get bored.

    2. Some recipes suit a person’s cooking skills and inclination, some don’t – so as you say, we use now the ones that fit but should also look back as our individual situations change. Also we need to remember that recipes are guidelines only, some, like tacos, are very highly variable and we should not hesitate to do so. It just struck me – I wonder if there is a relationship between a recipe being simple (quick, minimal prep, minimal ingredients, minimal cook time) and its flexibility?

  22. I am back to not sleeping at night. But my dog is improving and symptoms. The vet believes that his tumors have spread to his lungs. But he thought that they were in the line this 14 months ago so I have extended the water fast for another week and his symptoms are improving slightly each day. He had been having on most spasms in his stomach and abdomen area and those were intense a week ago but last night they only happened a few times. He is hungry all the time still or wants to eat anyway. The fasting community says they aren’t supposed to be hungry but my dog doesn’t listen to that.

    1. Good luck to your dog. With no other people in my place I am unashamedly dog-dependent! She’s not a dachshund, though , so I don’t dress her up as a taco :)

      1. There is no way I could have my dog endure a fast without me fasting too. Actually, I would feed her really well what she enjoys and allow her to “go” when she had enough of this life.

        1. Barb,

          I am not eating at home at all because I agree, I could not possibly eat in front of him.

          Well, with my dog, he was diagnosed with Hemangiosarcoma 14 months or so ago and he was given 2 weeks to a month at the most to live. He had a melon-sized tumor in his spleen and had a severe infection in his lungs and had secondary tumors and had collapsed and had to be carried into the vet and he was hungry, but would ask for food and then not eat it. Then, ask again. I tried every food there was. I tried vegan and meat and raw and freeze-dried and canned and dry and Wendy’s double burger was the last food he would eat and that was when I water fasted him and within two weeks, all of the bad symptoms went away entirely and not a single symptom came back until a few weeks ago.

          So, two weeks water fasting bought 8 amazing months.

          This time, he still wants to eat and that part is good. He still is in good spirits and still wants food.

          But he has an infection again and the tumors may be back and may have spread into his lungs.

          Water fasting is one of the best ways of getting rid of infections and can shrink back or totally get rid of cancer.

          My vet is on notice because I know the owner who got rid of his dog’s Hemangiosarcoma, who inspired me, had done 3 weeks of water fasting and I only did 2 weeks last time and it may not have been long enough.

          I am still not sure whether I will do 3 weeks this time or not. That, I will take day by day.

          I only do know that he was spasming with his stomach contracting in violent ways and that is almost entirely gone.

          He looks pretty good, but that is just yesterday and today so I feel like I need to finish this week and figure out whether I am going to just feed him normally or go another week and see if I can have him with me for another 8 months.

          I feel like if I stop now it may not extend his life.

          If I can do another week, I might get 8 more months.

          1. It is actually more complicated choosing between fasting and feeding for infections because it depends on which type the animal has, but I mentally did the math because water fasting would shrink back cancer and possibly the infection.

            https://www.popsci.com/feed-or-starve-sickness-it-depends-on-infection/

            I have been taking it day-to-day and have been watching for improvement or worsening of symptoms.

            There is improvement but I feel like I haven’t done it long enough to shrink back the tumors again.

            He is generally in good spirits and doesn’t seem to be in pain. He doesn’t even seem all that bothered by what he is going through, but he has an infection and these great big spasms and other small things.

            It is so challenging to make decisions about pets but the vet has remarked that he has continued to seem happy and he is still looking for affection and still searches for food.

            A few times this week, he has gone into the kitchen and just plopped down in front of his water and food dishes and just waited for food to manifest for a very long time and it has been tempting to feed him but I would like him around for another year.

          2. Sorry to drag things off the taco topic, but I’m wondering what the vet’s reaction to the water fasting was? Up here we seem to get told to see the vet for every wheeze and sneeze, and mine leans very heavily to the pill for this, shot for that school so I wondered…

            1. Yes, it is send your dog to the vet for every wheeze and sneeze here, too.

              For my dog’s cancer, it was put him on ever-increasing doses of steroids for the rest of his life, plus very expensive antibiotics, plus something to keep his appetite up. It was supposed to last 2 weeks, but I told the vet that I was going to try to keep him alive and that I would be using alternative methods.

              He told me that in all of the decades he has been a vet that he has never met a single person who ever did alternative methods. Not one.

              We went through a process where at the beginning, he said that he would be impressed if my dog lived a month. Then, at a month, he said, “Well, technically, that happens, it would be impressive if he was still alive after 3 months.” at three months, it became that some dogs who have an earlier stage of the condition live for 3 months, and 6 months would be where he would be impressed. At 5 months, I thought I was going to have to put my dog down or watch him die and that is when I switched from everything else to water fasting. Luckily, I got his machine at that point and 2 weeks later my dog looked so wonderful that I canceled the monthly vet visits, but he came for his yearly physical, and still wasn’t impressed at all. Nor was he impressed when my dog was still alive after a year. He said that he was an outlier and that some dogs do live a year. (There is a Turkey Tail mushroom study and they can live up to that long, which amazed researchers because it never happens.)

              I was giving him Turkey Tail mushrooms up at the beginning, but at 5 months, my dog started refusing all of the supplements and he still doesn’t want them.

              He doesn’t really want to water fast either, but it is easier getting him to cooperate with water fasting than it is to get him to eat a mushroom or mushroom powder or take a pill. He does not like mushrooms.

              I was fascinated by that. Dogs will often eat their own poop if they aren’t trained out of it, but my dog won’t eat mushrooms and if I give a pill pocket, he spits the pill out and tries to get the pocket.

              1. Thanks for all the detail. Sounds like your vet has spent too long in Egypt, in denial! I wonder when they will start saying you are passing off a new, look-alike dog ! Good for you to push past all that malarkey, I don’t envy you one bit and sure hope I never have a similar experience.

            2. Deb, I wish the very best for you and your dog! No matter what path you choose, I will keep you both in my prayers for sure. You know your dog best, and I think you will know if you can go another week or so.

              I am in a similar situation here Deb, though facing a different disease. I decided to change tracks a bit. Instead of doing everything I can to “fight” the disease, I focus on all that’s right. So, she gets her walks in with some lazy time with her pals at the dog park, she gets veggie meals with some meat, and lots of brushing etc. She is doing wayyy better now if only because my anxiety levels have subsided. For the time being we both feel better (though I admit sleep is hard to come by for me too. ) All the best Deb, we are rooting for you!

      2. mlarsne,

        I know what you mean. The people who I was in closest relationship with passed away one at a time and I still have my brothers and some dear friends, but my dog is so devoted to me and he is such a sweetheart. He was being trained to be a service dog and has the best personality of any dog I have ever seen. Happy all the time. Sweet all the time. When my relative had brain cancer, he had an infection and ended up throwing the dog down the stairs and we got the relative on antibiotics and that night, the dog was sitting at the side of his bed knowing exactly which person was the most vulnerable. He is an empath and I am not kidding. He interacts differently with every human being – as if he is studying each and every person looking for clues of what they need. It was devastating to him when he stopped being able to come to work with me after his cancer diagnosis and some of us know that he is taking care of me, not vice versa. Service dogs can be like that.

  23. I think that I’m moving toward Dr. Greger’s stated preference for “one bowl meals.”

    Last night, we ate out at a vegan restaurant, and had the burrito bowl — and it was delicious! I could see making a “taco bowl;” easier to prepare (no flat bread to roll up, and I can put more into a bowl) and eat (I could use a fork! Or spoon!), and perhaps slightly healthier.

    1. Agreed Dr J and Lonie. It lends itself well to refridgerator scavenging, and keeps meals interesting. Thick vegie soups with beans or lentils also are good to have on hand. I get more food variety eating this way rather than a traditional plate.

  24. Looking to purchase a certain shirt doesn’t seem to be on the website I’m looking for the English version

  25. Lol, NOT easy! Everything’s already chopped, prepared, measured. And has LOTS of ingredients. Tasty? Yes. Cleanup is also quite a chore.

    1. It’s only “easy” in the sense that it does not require advanced culinary skills or equipment! You’ve no doubt seen how many previous commenters agree with you. – and thinking of equipment, that ” *high speed* blender” may not be a common kitchen item/

  26. I can’t cook quinoa without it sticking together. I would eat it regularly if I could make it more like a pilaf. The web advice I’ve tried doesn’t work for me. I would like a video about that.

    1. This is a real “long shot” but I would suggest double checking that you are actually buying quinoa and not some refined flour pasta-based imitation, unfortunately I have seen the latter more than once.

      1. Buckwheat groats and millet do stick together but toasting fixes that i think. I think you may be referring to trahana or perhaps coarse semolina.
        Cous-cous or bulgur doesn’t seem to stick together. Quinoa tastes fine even if it looks like a burger patty. I would rather have it as a pilaf though so others in the family have less to complain about.

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