Soy Phytoestrogens for Menopause Hot Flashes

Soy Phytoestrogens for Menopause Hot Flashes
4.82 (96.44%) 45 votes

Does soy food consumption explain why Japanese women appear so protected from hot flash symptoms?

Discuss
Republish

Below is an approximation of this video’s audio content. To see any graphs, charts, graphics, images, and quotes to which Dr. Greger may be referring, watch the above video.

When women hit menopause and their ovaries shut down, the estrogen level in their body drops 95%. This is good news for the endometrium—the lining of the uterus. Otherwise, the constant estrogen signaling could eventually result in endometrial cancer. In fact, maybe that’s why menopause evolved: to protect the uterus from cancer. Lower estrogen levels are also good for lowering breast cancer risk. “In postmenopausal women, relatively high [blood] levels of [estrogen] are associated with a more than [double] increase[d] risk for breast cancer.” Estrogen levels drop 95% at menopause, but not to zero, because other tissues can make estrogen—like our own fat cells. “[T]his probably explains the increase in [breast cancer] risk in obese postmenopausal women.” More fatty tissue means more estrogen production.

Now, we learned that soy phytoestrogens can block the production of estrogen, such that drinking a glass of soy milk with each meal can cut estrogen levels in half in premenopausal women. But levels in postmenopausal women are already down 95%, and because of that, many women suffer from hot flashes. Might lowering levels even further with soy make menopausal symptoms even worse?

Estrogen treatment is very effective in reducing menopausal symptoms. Unfortunately, the downside is not only the uterine cancer, but blood clots, strokes, “and cognitive impairment.” Taking progesterone-type compounds with the estrogen helps prevent the uterine cancer, but increases the risk of heart attacks; more stroke risk, breast cancer, more clots, and dementia.

So, what’s a woman to do? Well, the 80% hot flashes figure is not universal; maybe “80-85% in European and American women,” but it may be as low as just 15% in places like Japan. In fact, there’s not even a word for it in the Japanese language, which supports how relatively rare it is. Maybe the phytoestrogens in soy are helping?

“The association between soy product intake and the occurrence of hot flashes was examined” by following a thousand Japanese women before they started menopause, over time, to see who developed hot flashes and who didn’t. And, those women who were eating like four ounces of tofu a day appeared to cut their risk in half, compared to women who only ate like an ounce or two a day— suggesting soy products are “protective.” But, maybe soy intake is just a marker for a healthier diet overall?

A study in China found the consumption of “whole plant foods” in general seemed to be associated with decreased menopausal symptoms. So, to see if soy was something special, you’d have to put it to the test.

Studies like this, of soy phytoestrogens in pill form, showed extraordinary results—a significant drop in hot flash presence, number, and severity. From 100% of women suffering at the beginning, to only 31% suffering by the end of three months. The average number of hot flashes dropped from about 120 a month down to 12. But, the problem with studies like these is that there’s no control group to control for the placebo effect. If you look at all the hormone trials, even the women who got the placebo sugar pills had up to a 60% reduction in hot flashes over the years. That’s why any therapy “purported to reduce such symptoms must be assessed in blinded trials against a placebo…because of the large placebo effect…and also because…menopaus[al] symptoms often decline” on their own over time.

So, if you saw a study like this, where they gave women a soy protein powder, and saw a nice drop in hot flashes over the next 12 weeks, you’d think it looks pretty effective—but that’s the placebo powder group. Here’s the group that got the soy—significantly better than placebo. But, it’s important to recognize how powerful the placebo effect can be. Over the past 20 years, “more than 50 [clinical] trials have evaluated the effects of soy foods and [supplements] on the alleviation of hot flashes.” Compiling the best ones together, the placebo groups got about a 20% drop in hot flash severity. The soy groups achieved about a 45% drop. So, on average, the soy did about 25% better than control.

There have been two studies that compared soy phytoestrogens head-to-head against hormones. And, in one study, they actually seemed pretty comparable in terms of reducing hot flashes, muscle and joint pain, and vaginal dryness, compared to placebo—though in the other, soy did better than placebo. But estrogen and progesterone therapy did better than them both. But, the soy has the benefit of not increasing cancer, heart disease, and stroke risk.

Please consider volunteering to help out on the site.

Image credit: Frank Farm via flickr. Image has been modified.

Motion graphics by Avocado Video

Below is an approximation of this video’s audio content. To see any graphs, charts, graphics, images, and quotes to which Dr. Greger may be referring, watch the above video.

When women hit menopause and their ovaries shut down, the estrogen level in their body drops 95%. This is good news for the endometrium—the lining of the uterus. Otherwise, the constant estrogen signaling could eventually result in endometrial cancer. In fact, maybe that’s why menopause evolved: to protect the uterus from cancer. Lower estrogen levels are also good for lowering breast cancer risk. “In postmenopausal women, relatively high [blood] levels of [estrogen] are associated with a more than [double] increase[d] risk for breast cancer.” Estrogen levels drop 95% at menopause, but not to zero, because other tissues can make estrogen—like our own fat cells. “[T]his probably explains the increase in [breast cancer] risk in obese postmenopausal women.” More fatty tissue means more estrogen production.

Now, we learned that soy phytoestrogens can block the production of estrogen, such that drinking a glass of soy milk with each meal can cut estrogen levels in half in premenopausal women. But levels in postmenopausal women are already down 95%, and because of that, many women suffer from hot flashes. Might lowering levels even further with soy make menopausal symptoms even worse?

Estrogen treatment is very effective in reducing menopausal symptoms. Unfortunately, the downside is not only the uterine cancer, but blood clots, strokes, “and cognitive impairment.” Taking progesterone-type compounds with the estrogen helps prevent the uterine cancer, but increases the risk of heart attacks; more stroke risk, breast cancer, more clots, and dementia.

So, what’s a woman to do? Well, the 80% hot flashes figure is not universal; maybe “80-85% in European and American women,” but it may be as low as just 15% in places like Japan. In fact, there’s not even a word for it in the Japanese language, which supports how relatively rare it is. Maybe the phytoestrogens in soy are helping?

“The association between soy product intake and the occurrence of hot flashes was examined” by following a thousand Japanese women before they started menopause, over time, to see who developed hot flashes and who didn’t. And, those women who were eating like four ounces of tofu a day appeared to cut their risk in half, compared to women who only ate like an ounce or two a day— suggesting soy products are “protective.” But, maybe soy intake is just a marker for a healthier diet overall?

A study in China found the consumption of “whole plant foods” in general seemed to be associated with decreased menopausal symptoms. So, to see if soy was something special, you’d have to put it to the test.

Studies like this, of soy phytoestrogens in pill form, showed extraordinary results—a significant drop in hot flash presence, number, and severity. From 100% of women suffering at the beginning, to only 31% suffering by the end of three months. The average number of hot flashes dropped from about 120 a month down to 12. But, the problem with studies like these is that there’s no control group to control for the placebo effect. If you look at all the hormone trials, even the women who got the placebo sugar pills had up to a 60% reduction in hot flashes over the years. That’s why any therapy “purported to reduce such symptoms must be assessed in blinded trials against a placebo…because of the large placebo effect…and also because…menopaus[al] symptoms often decline” on their own over time.

So, if you saw a study like this, where they gave women a soy protein powder, and saw a nice drop in hot flashes over the next 12 weeks, you’d think it looks pretty effective—but that’s the placebo powder group. Here’s the group that got the soy—significantly better than placebo. But, it’s important to recognize how powerful the placebo effect can be. Over the past 20 years, “more than 50 [clinical] trials have evaluated the effects of soy foods and [supplements] on the alleviation of hot flashes.” Compiling the best ones together, the placebo groups got about a 20% drop in hot flash severity. The soy groups achieved about a 45% drop. So, on average, the soy did about 25% better than control.

There have been two studies that compared soy phytoestrogens head-to-head against hormones. And, in one study, they actually seemed pretty comparable in terms of reducing hot flashes, muscle and joint pain, and vaginal dryness, compared to placebo—though in the other, soy did better than placebo. But estrogen and progesterone therapy did better than them both. But, the soy has the benefit of not increasing cancer, heart disease, and stroke risk.

Please consider volunteering to help out on the site.

Image credit: Frank Farm via flickr. Image has been modified.

Motion graphics by Avocado Video

Doctor's Note

Why does soy help some women, but not others, though? Stay tuned for my next video: How to Convert Into an Equol Producer.

More about the risks of hormone replacement therapy in How Did Doctors Not Know About the Risks of Hormone Therapy?

But what about Plant-Based Bioidentical Hormones? Check out the video!

More on soy in:

If you haven’t yet, you can subscribe to my videos for free by clicking here.

79 responses to “Soy Phytoestrogens for Menopause Hot Flashes

Comment Etiquette

On NutritionFacts.org, you'll find a vibrant community of nutrition enthusiasts, health professionals, and many knowledgeable users seeking to discover the healthiest diet to eat for themselves and their families. As always, our goal is to foster conversations that are insightful, engaging, and most of all, helpful – from the nutrition beginners to the experts in our community.

To do this we need your help, so here are some basic guidelines to get you started.

The Short List

To help maintain and foster a welcoming atmosphere in our comments, please refrain from rude comments, name-calling, and responding to posts that break the rules (see our full Community Guidelines for more details). We will remove any posts in violation of our rules when we see it, which will, unfortunately, include any nicer comments that may have been made in response.

Be respectful and help out our staff and volunteer health supporters by actively not replying to comments that are breaking the rules. Instead, please flag or report them by submitting a ticket to our help desk. NutritionFacts.org is made up of an incredible staff and many dedicated volunteers that work hard to ensure that the comments section runs smoothly and we spend a great deal of time reading comments from our community members.

Have a correction or suggestion for video or blog? Please contact us to let us know. Submitting a correction this way will result in a quicker fix than commenting on a thread with a suggestion or correction.

View the Full Community Guidelines

  1. Thanks so much! I wish you and your team a very Healthy and Peaceful New Year!
    An interesting side note: I fractured my pelvis and a few rods in a crazy Mountain Bike crash 4 weeks ago today. There has got to be something about eating plant based because with some aggressive rehab I have already been back on my bike and started work again yesterday. I hope whoever reads this is inspired to make this change for themselves! It is the best diet on the planet for overall health! Cheers!
    Kindest regards,
    Dr. Jim Bennie




    36
      1. HemodynamicDoc – Before switching to WFPB I’d taken a bone density test. (I was in my 50’s at the time, not having gone through menopause). It showed a beginning of a decline in my density. Not bad but it got my attention. A few years later, after going WFPB, I had another bone density test done. Completely normal. There is always variation in the testing of course, but I attribute my improvement to getting rid of my acidic meat-based diet and increasing my plant consumption. As I’m sure you’re aware, exercise – the pulling and pushing of muscle on our bones – is what stimulates the bone to increase its density (among other factors). But interestingly for me, my exercise level went down overall while my bone density improved on the WFPB diet. I attribute my bone improvement to my diet as well.
        Thanks for sharing your story as it corroborated my own.




        4
    1. I just broke my foot snowboarding and I hope the next few weeks show the same for me. Six years of plant-based eating will hopefully surprise my doctors.




      2
    2. That’s really interesting. I sprained my ankle, it was blue and swollen. I thought I wouldn’t be able to walk on it for weeks, but one good night of sleep and it was pretty good. I was walking with no limp. I’ve been plant based for a few years.




      2
  2. Good morning, Moderators! One of my comments didn’t get posted. It includes a link to a WSJ article titled, Dairies Are Awash in Organic Milk as Consumers Jump to Alternatives

    Everyone, please Google it. It’s good news for the start of 2018!




    5
    1. Unlikely you guys will agree, but maybe that’s a good thing, hopefully, for us yogurt consumers. Haven’t bought milk since the early 90’s, but I remain a regular yogurt consumer. In fact, although very diverse, its one of the busiest and largest places in my super market.




      1
      1. Interesting Joe. Here, the largest dairy supplying the region dropped its yogurt line – a surprise to me though I don’t buy it or any animal products. Apparently, the line was losing money for a few years.

        Check out Psych MD’ s easy instructions for making soy kefir below in the comments Joe.
        Don’t know if you have tried kefir before, but if you are a fan of yogurt, you will probably really enjoy it. All the best in health to you.




        5
  3. So, the conclusion from this video is do not be afraid to eat soy.
    Also a WFPB diet will also help hot flashes.
    I am 57 & follow a WFPB diet.
    I do have hot flashes however, when I eat sugar my hot flashes increase ten-fold.
    I do eat/drink soy products & have had good health thus far.




    6
    1. That’s what I’m concluding too, but then I wonder why soy has gotten such a bad rap more recently. To the point where I find it hard to find soy products. Even our local Whole Foods no longer carries any soy ice cream! It’s all coconut based now! thoughts?




      2
      1. Sophie – I think I understand some of the “why does soy have such a bad rap” question. And I think it comes from a couple of different angles. I remember years ago when women were being diagnosed with breast cancer that was estrogen related the concern was that soy products, that contain phytoestrogens, might trigger more cancer or perhaps even be the cause of it. So Docs advised breast cancer (and prostate cancer) patients to stay away from soy. Since then sufficient research has been done to clear soy of that particular worry and it even may improve breast cancer outcomes.
        Secondarily, GMO soy is manufactured (and I use that word intentionally because it is genetically altered) to withstand huge amounts of the herbicide glycophosphate (Round UP and other similar broad leaf plant killers) being sprayed on it. Many people are hesitant (including me) to consume a food that is so severely altered without knowing if it is safe to eat biologically. But also, consuming the residual herbicide that remains on the soy plant is worrisome to many (including me). Much of this soy -GMO- is given to cattle as feed and we know that chemicals and “undesirables” bio-accumulate up the food chain into large animals. So consuming non-GMO and/or organic soy will alleviate those issues. So IMO that is where the negative press comes from. It takes a while for new information to bubble to the surface.
        As a child, my family owned a farm which grew soy beans for animal feed. Glyphosphate didn’t exist 50 years ago. We would play hide-n-seek in the bean fields lying down in the rows. While waiting to be found we would eat edamame. It was fresh and yummy!




        3
  4. Your wife is one of the lucky ones. After 6 years of menopause symptoms I look forward to any information you can put out in this topic Dr. Greger. At this point even a WFPB diet isn’t enough!!




    4
    1. Hi Lori, I am one of the volunteer moderators on the site. I am sorry to hear that you are having a bit of a challenge with menopause symptoms. I am glad that you use Dr Greger website as a point of reference since there are so much valuable guidance in this website as you are aware. I would encourage you to do more relaxation excercises and pay attention to what makes you feel good. Also it would be a good idea to keep a diary of the trigger foods and avoiding them for a while.
      I wish you good health for the new year.




      1
  5. Thank you, thank you, thank you! I suffer greatly with hot flashes night sweats etc, although I am a plant based vegan, but I don’t have soy often ( I make my own almond milk). I was getting desperate enough to visit my doctor to talk about HRT despite the risks and an appalling family history of cancers and heart disease. But I shall give soy a try.

    Off to buy soy milk, edamame, and tofu ( which I also don’t normally eat!)




    9
  6. Does this give us any indication on soy consumption for those with PCOS? I believe the condition causes/stems from elevated androgen levels…

    I am 27, exercise regularly, lean, and 100% vegan (probably about 80% WFPB)… any advice on PCOS gratefully received as I haven’t had a period in years! I follow the previous advice on here concerning AGEs and I also currently consume flaxseed and soy on a daily basis.

    Thanks again for the fantastic and informative video, as ever, Dr Greger!




    2
  7. I’m 57 and do not have hot flashes. What I got instead for menopause was crippling fatigue, horrible vaginal dryness, and a prolapsing vaginal canal. I’m down to the lowest patch that’s made, and I’m afraid NOT to use it because of the prolapse thing. (Yes I’m doing the Kegle (?) exercises, but they don’t seem to be making any difference).

    I’ve been doing WFPB for 3 months, had to go from a .05 patch to the .025 patch, which is an improvement. I’d like to get off it entirely, but I’m afraid the fatigue will come back (couldn’t get out of bed for days), and I don’t want to have surgery for a prolapsed vaginal canal. I’ve tried the phyto-estrogen cream, but it doesn’t seem to do much.

    Any suggestions? How much soy would I need to eat in a day? I can eat a half a box of Silken tofu (love the stuff) in one sitting, but I’m worried about the saturated fat content. My LDL has already gone up 14 points since WFPB to 91 (my husband’s shot up to 163, but god only knows what he’s sneaking at work). And I don’t do oils, and raw nuts and seeds only in small amounts on my cereal in the morning. So that’s not the problem. Haven’t been doing much tofu either, maybe once every other week. And we do 1/2 a tsp of amla in our daily breakfast smoothie, with one amla berry in the mix.




    4
    1. Wow, Buster, you really are into spreading disinformation aren’t you? The lady clearly experienced menopause symptoms before going WFPB and stated that she improved by going from a 0.5 to a 0.25 patch after going WFPB 3 months ago.

      Still, since your job is to promote dairy products, this is what we might expect. Soy milk, soy yoghurt and soy cheeses are probably dairy’s biggest threat. No wonder you want to do a job on soy and people who refuse to consume dairy.

      You do realise that a WFPB diet is a vegetarian diet? It can be either completely or partly vegetarian. Or don’t you care since your objective is to sow doubt and confusion on nutrition?




      7
      1. Sorry, my replies seem to have ended up in a weird place. Meant to respond to Buster. If he’s so insistent on people eating dairy, I don’t understand why he is here.




        4
    2. My health is not “horrific”. I am having a couple of issues. Every other health issue I had, including some said to be incurable, have been fixed with WFPB. Go peddle your eggs and dairy elsewhere, if you don’t mind. I’m not interested.




      5
    3. Seems my reply got put in the wrong place. See below after TG. I am not interested in your “vegetarian” opinion, and I’m not even sure why you are on this site, as your “information” is not in sync with the advice given here.




      2
      1. Go in peace . You used the same word I used Horrible .
        I only used what I found on NFO.
        Apparently a WFPB diet does not make anyone in a good mood, show tolerance or kindness .




        0
        1. No, I am generally not in a good mood, which is due to PTSD, not my diet.
          And my mood is in no way improved by people trying to convince me that WFPB is not the way to go. And I used horrible, if I recall correctly, about ONE symptom, and you jumped to the conclusion that my health was horrible, and proceeded to try to get me to eat eggs and/or dairy, which have been shown conclusively to be injurious to your health. Furthermore, don’t try the guilt trip thing on me. My father was a past master at it, and your efforts are a mere shadow to his.




          5
    4. buster, I hope NutritionFacts team has a good look at your offensive comment. Here Mayavata shares her story, and you call her issues “horrific”. Recently, below another video 3 of us discussed allergies, and you judged all of us as having “horrendous” health problems. You seem to be skulking around here hoping to denigrate the information and/or participants for their dietary ways, but yet I have not seen you ONCE post a scientific article that supports your objections. People should be allowed to share their health and diet questions without fear of being judged, especially by unqualified paid repesentatives of the dairy industry.




      5
      1. *shrug* I may not be eating enough, period. The only time I’m really hungry is at breakfast, and it’s so filling that I forget to eat the rest of the day sometimes, especially when I’m busy. 5 grain hot cereal with a handful of raw nuts/seeds and soymilk, fruit smoothie with soaked ground flaxseed.

        The fatigue is only bad when I forget to replace my estrogen patch, or use too much progesterone cream at night. I’m going to toss all of it for a week and see what happens, and increase my tofu consumption a little bit.
        If I remember to eat it, LOL. I have phytoestrogen cream, in case it all goes to crap.




        2
        1. I used to add soy milk to my cereal and within a half an hour would feel great fatigue. When i lifted weights I felt just a slight weakness. Three weeks ago I replaced my Soy milk with hemp milk and almond milk and have noticed an increase on strength and no longer feel fatigued. One thing I learned about soy is that it has a high phytate content. PHYTATES inhibit the absorbtion of other nutrients eaten at the same time. Fermentation significantly reduces phytates so perhaps instead of your tofu perhaps tempeh will serve you better.




          0
  8. I noticed the Japanese women were eating fermented soy. This is quite different to soy milk etc. Many years ago I read that the Chinese – maybe the Japanese – only eat soy when it is fermented. Why??? It didn’t say. I found the herb Black Cohosh reduced hot flashes better than soy products. The Germans manufacture it under the name Remifemin and have done so for around 50 years.




    3
  9. I would be very curious if there’s any studies about plant-based eating and onset of menopause. For a while, I’ve believed it’s possible, and am nearly certain, to not get menopause until past 90% lifespan. Chimps, and perhaps other hominids can do it. Other mammals, who knows. There are certain antique medical texts that suggest it, and there are cases of people having babies at later than usual ages. I recently heard that one Hindu blessing during marriages is may you have 100 children. I also believe that may be possible.

    And people know there are likely other plant foods, or just plant foods in general, that can reduce or eliminate hot flashes. Recently at a local health food store, someone was in there getting some pill of rhubarb root extract for that. Seems there are studies, though I’m not sure if rhubarb is better than other phytoestrogens.




    0
    1. I was WFPB the last few years and am now in my early 70’s. I had my first child at 37 and my second at 42–a VBAC. Menopause started at 65 and was painless for me while others seemed to suffer, but I understand starting menopause later is a bad “omen….” I have always loved soy since going WFPB.




      0
  10. What about the phytogen Pueraria Candollei variant Mirifica and other herbs like black cohosh? Are they possible cancer- causing agents?




    0
  11. Here is something that may be of interest. Go to Pubmed and in the searchbox type in “soymilk + probiotic.” What you’ll find are 57 studies exploring the myriad benefits of fermenting soymilk, which essentially converts it into kefir. It is the ultimate in DIY simplicity. I start with a quart of Trader Joe’s organic soymilk into which I empty a single probiotic capsule. I have used Nature’s Bounty Probiotic 10 that I bought at Walmart as well as Swanson Epic Pro which contains a whopping 25 bacterial strains plus fructooligosaccharides. I then let it sit at room temperature for 18-24 hours. As if by magic the bland, watery soymilk is converted into a delicious, thick, creamy, tangy beverage.




    7
    1. PsycheMD – Hi – I do a little different take on the same concept. Although Dr. G doesn’t give kim chee a green light (I think he needs to re-visit that topic), I make my own kim chee at home. Ridiculously simple to do. Originally, salt is added to keep harmful/bad bacteria at bay while the vegg is creating its own bacteria. I add salt, let the vegg sit for 24 hrs (or longer), then rinse it off. The salt helps to pull moisture from the vegg and break down the structure to soften it. After the salt is rinsed out I proceed with the rest of the recipe adding a gel cap (opened) of probiotic of my choice to my ferment. Bottle it and let it sit at room temperature for a few days. Very Yummy!
      Thanks for your soy-yogurt tip!




      0
    2. HI Psych Med. May I know for how long does fermented soy milk keep in ref? How long after fermentation of the 18-24 hours, should I totally consume the batch if kept in the ref?

      Thanks,




      0
  12. When I went through menopause in my 50s, I tried so many alternative treatments to deal with my hot flashes. I was a vegetarian then, not yet vegan but ate very similar to now with the exception of some yogurt/cheese and oils back then. I regularly ate soy. I tried soy protein powder for a while. Nothing worked for me, no soy, no chinese herbs or other alternatives commonly suggested. Finally out of desperation not wanting to have intense sweats while I was teaching, I went on HRT. Immediately the hot flashes stopped. I went off HRT after a few years because of health concerns that Dr. Greger cites. Since then, and now, at age 65, I still have sweats and wonder when will they ever stop! I eat more soy than I did back then and am now WFPB. I wish I could give anecdotal evidence for soy’s help but hasn’t helped me yet. Now I just ate some tempeh for dinner; I’ll be curious to see what happens later…




    1
    1. Do let us know. I am not a fan of tempeh, but I was debating whether or not to get some. If it helps you I might just unbend and eat it anyway.

      I just chucked my patch I had on, because my fibroids were complaining, and I’m going to try again to just deal with what nature is going to shovel my way. I’m sick and tired of all the patches, creams and pills. WFPB has helped a lot, but I really need to get back on my cardio and yoga. It always helped too, but I get lazy.




      2
      1. NutritionFacts.org | Mayavata replied to your comment on Soy Phytoestrogens for Menopause Hot Flashes.Well Mayavata, it’s about an hour after my dinner of a tempeh stirfry and here I am sweating… But unlike you, I do enjoy tempeh and would like to share a recipe with you in case you might like to try it this way. We make a Thai coconut curry and use tempeh in it. We have a cooking video of this on our YouTube page under the name Happy Vegan Couple. We made this video quite a while ago so won’t be at the top of the list in case you try to check it out. We also have a video, I think, of tacos with tempeh. Regarding the sweating, maybe it’ll stop by the time I’m 70. Something to hope for… Best to you. –Denise




        3
  13. I stopped eating soy when all the reporting was that it was bad for women who were menopausal (which includes me!). I suffer terrible hot flashes & so decided to start eating soy again (plus Genistein supplement) & it has helped. But, I really wonder why soy has gotten such a bad rap more recently. To the point where I find it hard to find soy products. It’s hard to find tofu and even our local Whole Foods no longer carries any soy ice cream! I was encouraged by this video as I was worried that maybe I shouldn’t eat soy. Why does it have a bad rap these days?




    2
    1. This is just a personal opinion but I suspect that it is because that soy is the main vegetarian protein alternative to meat and the main milk/cheese/yoghurt alternative to dairy.

      There are a lot of people out there who want a justification to continue consuming meat and dairy – and a lot of people who are only too happy to oblige. Trashing the main healthy alternative to meat and dairy is an obvious tactic. No doubt this makes the meat and dairy industries happy also because soy is their competitor. Ironically, it is also an important source of food for livestock.




      6
    2. No doubt that soy milk and products have taken a hit by “pack Journalist ” that are to lazy to ferret out their own facts . Even looking at transcript today and checking other sites on google I found word for word articles that read exactly the same as NFO . So either NFO used a study and copied or other sites used the same copy perhaps or they just copied off each other .
      In any case in the town I live in with a population of 25000 we have 7 major grocery stores and this week 3 of them took out soy milk and the other 4 reduced the display to two carton widths . Soy can not compete against almond . Oat milk is now making an appearance also . Rice milk has been gone for some time and can only be found in tetra paks in the non refrigerated section .




      0
      1. I have had thyroid problems for years. And I have to avoid soy. I find that it makes me feel sick because of what it does to my thyroid. My hair falls out. And the Doc. Can’t get my level to balance. So I am not going to worry about soy for me. But I have learned that we are all different. In what our bodies like. If soy helps others that is great. I have been cold most of my life. So to feel warm is a good thing now. Thank for the thyroid link. Doc can you tell the thyroid people if there is something else that will help with hot flashes?




        0
        1. T,

          There are a number of sources of phytoestrogens, other than soy, from both foods and herbs that may be an option.

          Foods: Nine common phytoestrogens in a Western diet, foods with the highest relative phytoestrogen content were nuts and oilseeds, followed by soy products, cereals and breads, legumes, meat products, and other processed foods that may contain soy, vegetables, fruits, alcoholic, and nonalcoholic beverages. Flax seed and other oilseeds contained the highest total phytoestrogen content, followed by soy bean and tofu. The highest concentrations of Isoflavones are found in soy bean and soy bean products followed by legumes, whereas lignans are the primary source of phytoestrogen found in nuts and oilseeds (e.g. flax) and also found in cereals, legumes, fruits and vegetables.

          Phytoestrogen content varies in different foods, and may vary significantly within the same group of foods (e.g. soy beverages, tofu) depending on processing mechanisms and type of soy bean used. Legumes (in particular soybeans), whole grain cereals, and some seeds are high in phytoestrogen. A more comprehensive list of foods known to contain phytoestrogens includes: soy beans, tofu, tempeh, soy beverages, linseed (flax), sesame seeds, wheat, berries, oats, barley, dried beans, lentils, yams, rice, alfalfa, mung beans, apples, carrots, pomegranates, wheat germ, rice bran, soy linseed bread, ginseng, bourbon and beer fennel and anise.

          Herbs: “highest amounts of these beneficial phytonutrients. The list includes black cohosh (Cimicifuga racemosa), dong quai (Angelica sinensis), red clover (Trifolium pratense), alfalfa (Medicago sativa), licorice (Glycyrrhiza glabra), Korean ginseng (Panax ginseng), wild American ginseng (Panax quinquefolius), Kudzu root (Puerariae lobata), “. (FYI this info is from: http://www.womenlivingnaturally.com/articlepage.php?id=107).

          Dr. Alan Kadish moderator for Dr. Greger http://www.CenterofHealth.com




          0
  14. Dear NF team,

    Nutritionist here. In a recent video on avocados and LDL, I commented this to raise serious funding/design concerns over the main study you relied on.

    We’re talking industry funding, undisclosed conflict of interest, and about as dishonest (or bad) as a study design can get. Rather serious issues.

    Would you please have a look at it and reply?

    Thanks




    3
  15. It seems that the majority of the soy grown in the United States is genetically modified and treated with glyphosate herbicide. Probably is best to consume organic soy.




    0
    1. Yes but I understood that GMO soy is fed to livestock while the soy sold for human consumption is organic. Are things different in the US?




      2
        1. Yes, if you do soy at all, always use organic. I put 1/2 cup of WestSoy soy milk on my cooked whole grain breakfast every morning. Along with several other healthy goodies, but I won’t list them.




          0
        2. Tom – thanks for posting that soybean info. I’ve always used organic tofu and other soy products am now glad for it. Also, since glyphosphate is now starting to lose its effectiveness, the chemical companies (Monsanto I think?) are developing even more potent chemical plant killers to spray on our food. It’s a chemical similar to agent orange so heavily sprayed in Viet Nam decades ago and cause so many health problems.
          When will it stop?




          0
  16. Until last year, I had a menstrual cycle that was very easy each month, short in it’s duration, hardly any cramps, and always like clockwork. Starting about 8 months ago, it was no longer clockwork — got it, then 15 days later got it. Lasted double the time, but still easy hardly any cramps. Then it went away for about 2 months, then did the same thing — came, lasted a week, then got it again only a couple of weeks later. And so far, I HAVE NEVER HAD A HOT FLASH! I attribute this to my soy consumption for over 30 years — tofu almost every day, and since they really improved soy milk over the last 2 decades, a bit of soy milk every day. I’m proof that long-term soy consumption is extremely beneficial, and now that I’m going through menopause (at 56), it’s absolutely no big deal. I wish more teenage girls were introduced to the benefit of soy consumption, while teaching them that dairy is only good for baby cows…I feel so fortunate to have embarked on this path as a teenager.




    3
  17. Dr Greger does not make a difference between progestins (synthetic )and progesteron ( bio-identical) although there is a substantial difference on health ( breast cancer risk, cognitive function, …)




    0
  18. I have had horrible, debilitating hot flashes for the last five years, occurring about every 45 minutes day and night. I can’t take any HRT because I had breast cancer but I have tried every remedy recommended from black cohosh to prescription medications. I’ve been WFPB for about five years also (right after my breast cancer diagnosis) and probably have soy milk every day. Can anyone tell me how much soy they consume daily to alleviate their flashes?




    0
  19. I am a DES daughter. No one knows how many DES Exposed men and women there are since DES was added to prenatal vitamins. As a group, we generally have a problem with soy or flax. It is disheartening to read/watch all the information on how good they are for the human body and realize that if we do use it, we will have pecan-size lumps in our breasts or some other strange thing. How can these be so good for the general population and so bad for us? What is the mechanism? Does anyone care about our issues? We are not a small group!




    0
  20. Thank you! Now to figure out how much tofu to eat each week to try this out….sounds like it’s not the baddie food that I’ve been told.




    0

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Pin It on Pinterest

Share This