Doctor's Note

For the role of the animal protein, please see my previous video: Putrefying Protein and “Toxifying” Enzymes.

Those secondary bile acids are what I talk about in my video on Breast Cancer and Constipation. This could help explain why fiber may be so protective (Fiber vs. Breast Cancer).

I’ve got lots more videos on the microbiome coming up. Here are a few to keep you company:

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  • Veggie Eric

    I can’t imagine the damage going on inside the guts of those high-fat fad dieters. Oh hell no! I’ll take the cauliflower and carrots approach to keep my body running right… Another great Vid Dr G.

    • mbglife

      I can imagine it. That’s why I’m a vegan. ;-)

  • Julie

    Do plant fats produce just as many carcinogenic secondary bile acids as animal fats?

    • Joseph Gonzales R.D.

      I don’t think so. Plant fats do not seem to have the same destructive role as animal fats. Certainly if we start chugging bottles of oil and avoid adequate fiber problems are likely to arise. Maybe it’s fiber in plants (even from fattier sources) than helps remove bile acids in the stool? Bile acids are always reabsorbed to some degree thru the liver-bile circulatory pathway (aka: hepatobiliary pathway), but fiber becomes a huge player to help remove excess hormones and bile salts (cholesterol).

      Another theory why animal proteins and fats are so damaging could be due to bacterial endotoxins. Dr. Greger has a load of information on this “Exogenous Endotoxin Theory”

      • Julie

        Thanks! It makes sense that the fiber tagging along with the vegetable fat would help escort the bile acids out of the body before they can morph into damaging ones. Another reason to eat whole plant foods, rather than the extracted oil.

        • dogulas

          The problem is that there isn’t much fiber in most high-fat plant foods. Neither nuts nor avocado are good sources of fiber. And of course oil has none.

          • VegGuy

            dogulas, avocados are packed with fiber at 14g per avocado. While nuts have a few grams of fiber/oz, chia seeds (5g/TB) and flax seeds (3g/TB) are fiber rich.

          • fineartmarcella

            I’m not thinking that Fiber is going to save the SAD eater

      • Leslie

        Joseph,

        How many grams of total fat on average to you eat everyday, or a rough average amount of grams?
        And what percent of total daily calories does your fat intake often amount to?

        I may have asked before, but this sort of stuff can help a lot of us, we look up to your experience and
        choices, so thanks.

        • Joseph Gonzales R.D.

          Great question, but I’m not sure I never count. My diet varies from day to day. In Hockey season, I eat way more fat from nuts and seeds before games. I find that works for me. I also do plenty of dates, raisins, and chia. Everyone varies in their need for fat, but IOM recommendations are anywhere from 20%-35% fat. I am one to believe the lower end is better for most folks, especially if overweight or diabetic. We saw dramatic improvements in weight loss and insulin sensitivity when folks ate a lower fat diet in the GEICO study and other RCTs. In fact, Dr. Greger presents that study in this video. The fat intake was more like 10-20% in these studies I’ve linked.

          The exciting news is that soon we’ll have a recipe page where everyone can share their favorite meals by submitting a recipe! More on this to come so stay tuned…

          • Leslie

            Actually, it would help to know what might be typical during hokey season….what percentage of daily calories on that day, and how many (not looking for exact numbers) fat-grams on these days?

            And what about sedentary days?

            Do you ever exceed the RDA for total fat grams in any given day? By how much?
            Thanks.

          • Joseph Gonzales R.D.

            Hey Leslie. Again, it’s hard to say since I don’t count. Quality (whole food sources) matters, not quantity. If you’re looking for meal ideas or meal plans geared for athletes let me know I have many resources.

          • Tikiri

            Ooh. Looking forward to your recipe page! Great work as always and thank you.

        • fineartmarcella

          From most folks I’ve talked with that follow a healthy whole-food plant based diet, their intake is around the 80/10/10 mark without even trying. But, Add processed fats from vegan junk foods and that goes up fast, but junk food of any kind is not a healthy choice for any type eater

      • claudia

        Thank you so much for this video- I wish there were more informative websites like yours on the net- I wonder, could this advice also help people who suffer from bile reflux, or is it another issue entirely?

        • Joseph Gonzales R.D.

          I am not familiar with bile reflux. There are some alternative medicine strategies on the Mayo site that may help. Definitely different than GERD/acid reflux.

    • gp65

      Thank you for that question. Just what I was thinking.

    • fineartmarcella

      Saturated fat is of course worse cross the board, but a high fat diet of any source, including plant fats do create more bile, because bile is needed to emulsify fats, then colon bacteria create the secondary bile from the primary bile, so more fat means more bile.
      BUT and thats a BIG BUT (pun intended)… most folks who eat a Plant based diets, unless they are a junk food vegan, eat ALOT LESS Fat than the SAD or Standard American Diet, or the SSD, the Standard Saturated Fat diet as I call it :). A healthy Plant based eater usually has around 10-20% of calories at Fat, where as the SAD is around 30-40% of calories are Fat, making 66% of them Overweight, 33% Obese, that takes alot more bile to process.

  • Slim055 .

    http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2015/08/150824064916.htm

    “The finding, published in Nature Cell Biology, represents “an unexpected new biology that provides the code, the software for turning off cancer,” says the study’s senior investigator, Panos Anastasiadis, Ph.D., chair of the Department of Cancer Biology on Mayo Clinic’s Florida campus.That code was unraveled by the discovery that adhesion proteins — the glue that keeps cells together — interact with the microprocessor, a key player in the production of molecules called microRNAs (miRNAs). The miRNAs orchestrate whole cellular programs by simultaneously regulating expression of a group of genes. The investigators found that when normal cells come in contact with each other, a specific subset of miRNAs suppresses genes that promote cell growth. However, when adhesion is disrupted in cancer cells, these miRNAs are misregulated and cells grow out of control. The investigators showed, in laboratory experiments, that restoring the normal miRNA levels in cancer cells can reverse that aberrant cell growth. ”

    While were eating well there could be more progress for cancer sufferers.

    • Vivian Parker

      I wonder what role the misfolded proteins called prions found in gelatin and other animal by-products may have in this process. The latest news on prions suggests that they are involved in Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s, and other neurodegenerative diseases, and not only Creutzfeld-Jacob disease (mad cow disease)….just ruminating (no pun intended)!

  • Veganrunner

    With all the different data, on different health concerns, why would anyone even eat meat?

    • Taran

      Habit.

    • gp65

      1. Habit
      2. Lack of knowledge about effects of animal proteins
      3. Lifestyle – in many places in the world you can only be vegan if you cook at home. If your lifestyle is eating out frequently it maybe difficult to stay vegan
      4. Wanting to conform to social norms
      5. No access to delicious and affordable vegan recipes

      • SeedyCharacter

        6. Lack of awareness of the lifelong suffering of the vast majority of animals raised to be eaten. (e.g battery cages, gestational crates, unanesthetized castrations, beak severing, and on and on)
        7. Lack of knowledge of the ecological devastation wreaked by “livestock production.” e.g. rainforest decimation, manure lagoon pollution, huge amount of water to produce grain for livestock, and on and on.
        8. Meat can be cooked to be very flavorful (salty, fatty, sweet–the unholy trinity of making food irresistible). It takes more cooking savvy to make tofu, beans, legumes, grains, nuts & veggies just as tasty. I love the textures and flavors of these veggie foods when prepared well, but many friends and family members have only tried bland versions and are flat out repelled by the prospect of eating vegan. (Some will go vegetarian because they can slather cheese on everything to mask the underlying distastefulness.)

      • Mark Belk

        You vegans keep on eating only vegetables so the price of delicious grass fed beef doesn’t rise any higher than it already is. Being of type O blood my body craves and thrives on good high quality red meat and I enjoy it just like Jesus did over 2000 years ago and will again when he returns.

        • guest

          You are free to believe anything you like, doesn’t make it true. Meat only taste good because you cook and spice it. Try ripping into a dead animal raw with your teeth like a real carnivor and see how delicious it is then, you know, the way god intended carnivors to eat.

          Dr Greger debunked the blood type diet in this video, you might want to give it a look. Blood type diets are for suckers.
          http://nutritionfacts.org/video/blood-type-diet-debunked/

          As far as the diet advocated by Christians, I guess you haven’t heard about Daniels diet? http://www.danielsdiet.com/

          Like I said, you can convince yourself of anything and it sounds like you’ve done just that.

          • devonster10

            Ikr, Daniel’s diet! I hate when people use the compassionate creator to justify their lust for flesh.

      • Ong

        Because of added addictive opioid like substances added to the feed…

    • charles grashow

      Because I like the taste
      Because it provides nutrients you cannot get from plants

      • mbglife

        I thought B12 was the only nutrient not in plants. Which others are you thinking of?

      • Veganrunner

        You know Charles it’s a funny thing. When I used to eat meat I thought the same. But now something has changed–it all smells putrid. Like it’s off. I can smell the decaying flesh. Nasty.

        • charles grashow

          To each their own. In my case I love the taste – I buy it direct from various local farms

          • Veganrunner

            Yes I used to also. Now it just smells. Nasty.

          • siriusfarm

            it is really interesting that you mention that. Even though I don’t eat meat and haven’t for several years, I used to always enjoy the smell of the neighbor’s BBQ. In the last year or so my sense of smell has really changed. Cooking meat is so awful smelling now and I can’t imagine wanting to eat it again.

        • Paul Gregory

          Agree 100%
          Smells disgusting now … Not to mention I all see rotting flesh ekkkk

        • Charzie

          Could be it’s the feces it’s steeped in at slaughter too! Yum!

          • Veganrunner

            Oh my! Now that is extra nasty!

      • Paul Gregory

        The fact is your wrong Charlie .. But I understand I used to think like you..
        Been off meat and dairy 5 years now and can’t stand the smell of it.. All I see now is rotting flesh.. So much great alternative food, it’s better for my health, the planet and the animals.

      • guest

        Charles, where do you think livestock get B12? They are injected with it. Just like people, livestock get it from the soil. The soil today is deficient in B12 so livestock is injected with it now-a-days. Have a look.
        http://eerainuh.com/supplementation-of-vitamin-b12-in-cattle-and-sheep-to-prevent-deficiency/

        Omnivores are actually more likely to have vitamin deficiencies than vegans as Dr Greger talks about in this video.
        http://nutritionfacts.org/video/omnivore-vs-vegan-nutrient-deficiencies-2/

        Just like Mark, you are uneducated about vitamin deficiencies in vegans and omnivorous.

    • Wade Patton

      Because that’s “normal” for our society (western), available at every corner, pushed on us through every possible means, and MOSTLY because their gut is “programmed” for it.

      Mine is no longer that way. Once I had gone 99% PB, my gut changed quickly and so did most all desires/craving to eat meat. I still have some-maybe 4 servings per month, but not enough to change my cravings. FEELS ODD, but I get LEAFY and Veggie cravings sometimes now.

      No i’m not PG (there’s an old term for ya!).

      Yes, understanding more about the way animal products tend to destroy our health from the inside out is how I was able to take the first steps. That knowledge let me to the first day, then two days…then well nearly 6 months now. NO going back.

      • Veganrunner

        Nice Wade!

  • mbglife

    Any thoughts on what affect, if any, losing ones gall-bladder might have in all this?

    • Joseph Gonzales R.D.

      I big one! With no gallbladder there’s no way to store bile. A lower-fat diet is often prescribed, or eating smaller amounts of fat in one sitting.

      • mbglife

        Right, but how does that affect the colon cancer risk and the process described from the study?

        • Darryl

          A meta-analysis of case control studies found increased colon cancer risk, particularly on the right/proximal/ascending colon, in patients who’ve had gallbladder removal. The increased risk was only seen in the first 5 years after cholecystectomy, there was no association in studies with 5-15 years followup. Greater colon cancer incidence in patients with a history of cholecystectomy has also been observed in the Nurses Health Study, British NHS patients. A further (and probably most important) study in the NHS cohort concluded:

          We found a short-term significant elevation of rates of cancers of the colon, pancreas, liver, and stomach after cholecystectomy, but no long-term elevation. Excluding colon cancers within 2 years of admission to hospital, the rate ratio for colon cancer after cholecystecomy, compared with the reference cohort, was 1.01 (95% CI 0.90–1.12) and after 10 years or more follow-up it was 0.94 (0.79–1.10). It is highly improbable that the short-term associations between cholecystectomy and gastrointestinal cancers are causal, and we conclude that cholecystectomy does not cause cancer.

          • mbglife

            Wow! Darryl, that’s a great citation. Thank you. If it’s not casual, I wonder how it’s correlated. Anyway, eating a low fat vegan diet I’ll continue to not be preoccupied by the sorry of cancer. Thanks again!

          • Helen

            A pacific islanders eating lots of coconuts (kitivans) dying of colon cancer at alarming rates?

          • Helen

            The first word should have been “are”, not “a”.

          • Darryl

            No one has published on this. Note that Kitavans are often described by the ancestral health bloggers as though they were drinking coconut oil, but in reality upwards of 70% of their calories are from carbs, mostly root tubers or fruit with a moderately high glycemic indices.

            In clinical trials coconut oil impairs endothelial function and interferes with anti-inflammatory effects of HDL, while increasing intestinal endotoxin transport in pigs, so I’ve serious reservations about advocates of coconut oil.

            It’s possible that the lower long-chain saturated fat content of coconuts would reduce harmful bile acid / microbiota reactions, when compared to animal fats. Coconut oil is only around 9% and 2% of the longer, more hydrophobic saturated fats palmitate and stearate. In an important animal study, butter fat (26 % palmitate, 11% stearate) in amounts comparable to the Western diet shifted bile production from glycocholate to taurocholate, and this bile salt provided a substrate for a bloom of the hydrogen sulfide producing Bilophila wadsworthia.The author fingered the high stearate content of butter fat as the culprit. Similar Bilophila blooms occur in in humans on high animal fat based diets.

          • HaltheVegan

            To Darryl – I just have to comment that I think you are such a valuable asset to this website! I always look forward to reading your most knowledgeable comments. Thanks for sharing your knowledge with us.

          • Fred

            Is there any research on the MCT (medium chain triglyc…60%?) part of coconut oil? Is it utilized as fuel in the cells like glucose…under what conditions…how does this relate to it’s possible use vs alzheimer’s? Purina has a dog food that contains MCT’s…specifically to “brighten up” older dogs.

            *answer these questions and you get a carrot. ;-)

          • Darryl

            First you’d have to find out what the authors mean by MCT. Some earlier studies mostly restricted the term to C 8:0-10:0 carbon saturated fats, but especially in the 90s more started extending the term to 8:0-12:0 C fats, and I’ve even seen 8:0-14:0 appear. This matters due to the different metabolic fates of the fats. Fatty acids shorter than 12 carbon atoms (~14% of coconut oil) solubilize in intestinal fluids and are absorbed directly into the portal system, where they are carried to the liver for oxidation: systemic circulation never sees them. Fatty acids with more than 12 carbon atoms have a more arduous route: requiring protein mediated absorption of free fatty acids and passive diffusion of sn-2 monoacylglycerols into enterocytes, reesterifcation into triglycerides, packaging into chylomicrons, release into intestinal lymphatics, thoracic duct, and finally general circulation, and finally chylomicron dissassembly by lipoprotein lipases at target tissues. So what about laurate (~44% of coconut oil), with exactly 12 carbon atoms? Most laurate takes the lymphatic route to systemic circulation, like the longer chain fatty acids, while the remainder takes the portal route to the liver, at least in rats. There are perhaps related issues with laurate – it elevates LDL cholesterol in humans, though less than longer saturated fats do.

            MCT oil is just coconut oil distilled to remove the longer C 14+ fats, originally a byproduct of food fat engineering (you don’t want these shorter fats in chocolate) and prescribed for patients with fat metabolism disorders. They still have the lauric acid that occupies a curious intermediate position between the shorter and generally benign fats and the longer ones that raise havoc in humans. Now for dogs, that may not matter a whit, dogs and other carnivores have much more effective cholesterol regulation than we mostly herbivorous primates, and don’t develop cardiovascular disease unless their thyroids are removed.

          • Fred

            Thanks for the reply. Do know that the whole MCT oil vs alzheimers derives from research by a drug company for an alzheimers drug. Purinas MCT containing dog food is similar in intention? Guess there is little info on how or even if MCTs work in the brain…or if they even get there…might a be a delayed metabolic effect? That said I use maybe 1-2 tsps per day of MCT oil…dog gets coconut oil. He was getting 600 mg NAC per day (based on a patent)…stopped this due to info that glucosamine extends life, but NAC retards this effect. He did seem to slow down a bit after stopping the NAC. Guess I’m repeating myself…gets tedious.

            http://www.anti-agingfirewalls.com/2014/06/09/glucosamine-for-longevity/

            This time the hazard ratio for mortality reduction is .82: 18% fewer deaths per unit of time for those consuming the supplement.

            Both of these papers were done on the same group of 77,719 people. We note that this is as great an effect as combining vegan diet and fish consumption! We find this quite surprising. Glucosamine appears to have a comparable or greater effect on mortality reduction and lifespan extension than Meformin, Rapamycin, 2DG, Veganism, and Resveratrol in nematodes and rodents.

        • Joseph Gonzales R.D.

          Darryl to the rescue :-) Thanks!

          • Veganrunner

            I think he is part of the Cochrane Collaboration!

      • Karen

        I have a question, I have changed my diet completely after I was diagnosed with gallstones 3 months ago, now I’m eating more fruits, vegetables and grains, no processed food, no sugar and less meat and I haven’t had another colic in almost 3 months and I have also lost a few kilos, my question is, is it possible to dissolve the stones or live with them without having secondary effects in the future if I keep my new food habits or will I still need the surgery? (Considering my stones were around 10 of 9mm and after 2 months they could only find 3 in an echography (they assumed there were others)). I would appreciate your opinion.

  • Cathy Katin-Grazzini

    Will bile acids stimulate the growth of Clostridia & production of secondary bile acids for meat-based fats as well as high-fats of plant origin?

    • Joseph Gonzales R.D.

      Seems this is on everyone’s mind! Excellent question, please scroll down to see my comment or click here.

      Hope that helps!

      Joseph

  • Ilana

    Do I need to avoid aluminum-containing baking powder and/or antiperspirant? Thanks

    • Thea

      Ilana: When it comes to that type of question, I like to refer to Dr. Neal Barnard’s book, “Power Foods For The Brain: An effective 3-step plan to protect your mind and strengthen your memory”

      Starting on page 40 it says, “As I have mentioned, research on toxic metals in Alzheimer’s disease is still very much in progress. But some things are clear: There is never any benefit from overdoing it with copper, iron or zinc, and there is no need to ingest aluminum at all. Here are some sensible steps you can put to work right now to protect yourself:

      Choose Aluminum-free baking powder

      Use a deodorant, not an antiperspirant. Common anti-antiperspirants contain aluminum, which passes through the skin and into your bloodstream. …”

      I highly recommend the book:
      http://www.amazon.com/Power-Foods-Brain-Effective-Strengthen/dp/1455512206/ref=sr_1_1_twi_pap_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1441055803&sr=8-1&keywords=power+foods+for+the+brain

      Note: you can make your own deodorant out of coconut oil, baking soda and a starch. It seems to work really well for a lot of people. You can research various recipes and variants on line.

      Does that help?

      • Ilana

        Sort of…I’m really looking for supporting science from actual clinical studies which support the avoidance of aluminum in baking powder and deodorant. I have yet to use a non-aluminum deodorant that works whatsoever. (Not looking for deodorant suggestions thanks.)

        • Thea

          Ilana: Gotcha. Thanks for the clarification.

          The book I mentioned above devotes several pages to reviewing the evidence for and against aluminum. It’s a really nicely balanced discussion I think. The content is too much for me to cover here though, and I don’t want to misrepresent what the studies say. All I can say here is that the bottom line was that Dr. Barnard suggests erring on the side of caution, [because there is enough evidence against aluminum to make it a legitimate concern]. (That “because” part being my words.) You would have to look at the book to see the specific studies that you are looking for.

          re: “I have yet to use a non-aluminum deodorant that works whatsoever.” Me too! — when it comes to commercial brands. That’s why I mentioned the coconut oil home-made one since it seems to actually work. But I understand that that wasn’t the point of your post.

          Good luck. I hope you find the information you are looking for.

          • Veganrunner

            And my endocrinologist added “don’t store food in foil.” And she is pretty mainstream.

          • Thea

            Veganrunner: Good to know!

            FYI: I normally don’t store food in foil. The most I tend to use for foil is as a cover in a hot oven when the recipe calls for a cover, and I don’t have a proper lid. In that case, the foil is not usually touching the food and so I’m not too concerned.

            There’s one treat I like to make every now and then, though, that I use foil for and I’m sure plenty of aluminum seeps into the food then: I LOVE the recipe for big stick peperoni in the book Vegan On The Cheap. I don’t make it very often, but it tastes so authentic to me and I really love the stuff. And the recipe calls for wrapping the logs of dough in foil like a tootsie roll. The dough then gets cooked in the foil. Yikes.

            I don’t worry too much since I don’t make that dish very often. But I would rather have an alternative cooking method. I’ve played with the idea of using cheese cloth, but that seems like it would affect the texture since the water would still touch the food. And also I think it would make a real mess. (Just guessing.)

            I think someone else mentioned banana leaf? I haven’t tried (or found) that. And another idea I have is using the wrapping that are used for tamales(?). But I haven’t tried that yet either.

            Just sharing. :-)

          • Veganrunner

            Oh yeah. Good ideas.

          • Charzie

            You mean corn-husks? Yeah buy some fresh corn on the cob and use the husks for wrapping stuff! You can dry it out for later too. The stuff you get at the market is treated and bleached. Another good sub is parchment paper, I just picked some up at the dollar store because I use the stuff like crazy for baking, wrapping, even steaming! And thanks for the reminder, I have a slew of banana leaves just flapping in the wind, I need to utilize them!

          • Thea

            Charzie: Corn husks? I guess so! I hadn’t known about the store-bought husks being bleached. Thanks for that tip.

            I don’t think the parchment paper would work in this case since I’m boiling the stuff. But I do use the partchment paper all the time for baking. Love It!

          • Charzie

            Yep, they sell them all over here in FL, just good ole corn husks! I dry mine in the sun.

            You can steam or bake it in the parchment first, if you want a firmer meat-like texture, THEN drop it into whatever you are cooking to flavor for a bit.

            And I HAVE to share this here, and may again if the right topic comes up…have you heard of “aquafaba’? Amazing stuff…but it is simply the liquid from canned or cooked beans (we usually pour down the drain), but it can be used to whip like egg-whites to make meringues, in cakes, cooking etc.! I haven’t tried it yet but I think it can be a huge asset and I’m having fun reading the recipes, tips and comments here:

            https://www.facebook.com/groups/VeganMeringue/
            Enjoy and spread the word to other vegans or whoever would rather not eat eggs!

          • Thea

            Charzie: Yes, I’m familiar with aquafaba and think that it is a really exciting idea that is going to bring us some great new food options going forward. I’ve whipped some up myself and gotten some beautiful white stiff peaks. Thanks for spreading the word.

          • Kim Churchman

            I don’t use foil anymore because I get great results with a silicone baking sheet liner. I unroll it, drop it in the pan, lay out what I’m baking (lately roasted peach slices, so yummy). They are good up to 450 degrees. It goes in my dishwasher. Easy to find at kitchen stores or online. One brand is Sil-Pat, another is Tovolo. I love it, so easy, nothing sticks to it.

          • Thea

            Kim: I also don’t use foil any more to line baking pans. I tend to use parchment paper, but I have one of those silicone baking sheets and sometimes use that instead. Thanks for reporting your successful experiences with the silicone sheets. That’s good to know.

            (Why don’t I personally use the silicone sheet more often? I understand that silicone is inert and safe, but I read somewhere that there is *MAYBE* some doubt as to the safety of the added materials used to make the flexible silicone used for baking pans and sheet liners. I don’t know if there is anything to such a concern at all. The idea, though made me a little cautious so that I try to balance out how much I’m using silicone in baking vs the parchment paper. I have no idea if this makes any sense or not. Just where I’m at now.)

          • AllVegan

            Whenever I have to wrap something to cook it I use parchment paper. I am not sure it would stand up to boiling though, but you could wrap the sausage in parchment then wrap that package in aluminum foil I am sure that would atleast help lessen if not eliminate the potential exposure.

          • Thea

            AllVegan: re: “… wrap the sausage in parchment then wrap that package in aluminum foil…” I thought of that some time ago. The problem is that I can’t get a water proof seal along the length of the roll. When I unwrap the sausage after it’s been cooked, there is usually some water inside. Then all I can think of is soggy paper against my yummy sausage.

            I still think it would be worth trying. I just haven’t gotten around to it yet. Thanks for reminding me of that idea.

          • Thea

            AllVegan:

            UPDATE: This conversation inspired me (read: gave me an excuse) to try making that the big stick peperoni again. So, last night I made it with these changes: 1) I first wrapped the dough in the parchment paper and then heavy duty foil on top of that, 2) I cooked it in a pressure cooker instead of following the cooking instructions in the book. Thus only one end of the roll was actually in the water. The rest was leaning against the side of the pan.

            It worked great!!! I was super happy with the results not only because the foil was not directly touching the food, but also because the cooking method was whole lot easier and faster.

            Now this time, I followed the recipe and included the oil. Next time I’ll try it without the oil, but wonder if the dough will be more likely to stick to the parchment paper in that case. I’ll see.

            Thanks for inspiring me to give this a shot. Lots of fun.

          • AllVegan

            In my experience parchment paper does not stick to anything. If you have problems perhaps spray some oil lightly on the parchment paper and leave it out of the sausage. I cook 99% oil free in everything I cook now. My life and health have gotten a lot better since I eliminated free oils from my diet. Now when I eat something fatty I can feel and taste the fat coating the inside of my mouth. It is just gross.

          • Thea

            re: ” Now when I eat something fatty I can feel and taste the fat coating the inside of my mouth.” I noticed that too when I tried the final result. I kept thinking, “ewww. Did I really like it like this before? Or had I removed the oil the last time I made it???”

          • Wade Patton

            I’ve been using 91% rubbing alcohol to kill the smell-generating bacteria of the pits for many years now-with no problems at all. It’s not anti-antiperspirant (which is what the Al content is for) it’s a method of slowing the production of any odor whatsoever. A second application is good for heavy-sweating very long days, but a single splash is good for a typical 10 hours of labor or sport.

            This is for anyone reading, I did see the bit about “not looking for suggestions”. Maybe some folks are.

          • Thea

            Wade: Actually, I continue to look for suggestions in this area myself, so I appreciate your post. Thanks for the great idea. I haven’t seen that one yet.

          • Wade Patton

            Actually think I got that one from Andrew Weil, too long to remember.

          • mbglife

            Just 1/8 teaspoon or less of baking soda keeps me odor-free. I sprinkle a tiny amount in my hand, add a touch of water and mix and apply. It should feel smooth and silky and slippery. If it feels grainy, it’s too much baking soda. If it feels like just water, it’s not enough doesn’t. If it makes your underarms itch, it’s too much baking soda. If you start to have a smell, it’s not enough. It only takes a couple times to figure out the right amount for you.

            I used “natural salt stones for 25 years because they claim not to have aluminum in them. But if you look up the main ingredient (potassium alum) it’s obvious they do.

          • Wade Patton

            Interesting. Also interesting is how some chemical compounds are not broken down by the body and some are. Like water. We don’t get hydrogen and oxygen from it, but other things do break down. Sometimes I use alum on my face as a traditional skin “toner” after a shave. As a straight razor shaver, sometimes a little TLC is needed when all things don’t come together properly. I have researched alum enough to no be afraid to apply it in such manner-it is rinsed off with cool water after a few minutes. It’s a food item in some cuisines.

          • Wade Patton

            I don’t know if this is credible or not, but here’s what one group of folks say. The closing quote in the article is obviously tainted because the guy works in the cosmetic industry. This one may require more digging.

            “The aluminum salts do not work as antiperspirants by being absorbed in
            the body. They work by forming a chemical reaction with the water in the
            sweat to form a physical plug… which is deposited in the sweat duct,
            producing a blockage in the areas that it’s applied,” says David
            Pariser, MD, professor of dermatology at Eastern Virginia Medical School
            and past president of the American Academy of Dermatology. “Even [with]
            nicks from shaving, the amount is so negligible that it doesn’t make a
            whole lot of scientific sense.”

            source: http://www.webmd.com/skin-problems-and-treatments/features/antiperspirant-facts-safety?page=3

          • Charzie

            Cool, I kind of use a hybrid between your method and Wade’s…I add some baking soda to alcohol and witch hazel, (I like to steep some herbs and spices in it known for their deodorizing effect) and just dab it on. It works for me and costs next to nothing!

          • mbglife

            That sounds appealing but the carcinogenic risk of alcohol keeps me basic with just the water & baking soda.

          • Ilana

            Would it be possible for someone to check out the most recent literature review at http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25233067 ? I don’t have access. :-(

        • Veganrunner

          Ilana have you ever used Pubmed? If you can’t find your health topic above put those words into that search engine. Relavent articles will pop up.

      • Leslie

        And avoid green and black tea, both high in aluminum, from what I’ve read.

  • Jerry Howe

    I am always overwhelmed by the odor of my stools when I spend a few weeks in France consuming the typical French diet. I consume a plant based diet along with my wife 90-95 percent of the time at home and we are very comfortable and in own skin when doing so. I notice after consuming butter, cheese, chicken, beef, pork and foie gras after a week or so, my trips to the toilet impart a very strong sulphur order that certainly does not smell healthy. After a few weeks of this, it is always a relief to get back to out green, fruits, legumes, grains and nuts that sustain us back home. There is no way that anyone could persuade me to believe that rich animal proteins and fats consumed on the level that typical Americans consume them, are good for you. The same is true with the typical European diet

    • Charzie

      Apparently, though society would mostly like to ignore the fact, the diet of royalty since records were kept were very similar and they suffered the same fate and illnesses we see today with the typical S.A.D. Here is just one example:

      https://www.drmcdougall.com/misc/2011nl/may/egyptian.htm

  • Jeslan

    So was the end of this video a cliff hanger? What was meant by …attempting to colonize the colons of high risk patients with genetically engineered, antioxidant producing bacterial.

    • Jeslan

      And does coconut oil have the same affect?

      • Joe Caner

        Coconut oil is to coconuts as sugar is to sugar beets. Coconut oil and table sugar are highly refined and processed products derived from whole foods. From a nutritional perspective, they are deneutered, denatured and devalued pale remnant of their whole food precursors. If one is interested in optimal health, they will make every calorie count instead of count calories.

    • Charzie

      Um, that it’s kinda insane and overkill when just eating better will eliminate it.

    • Dommy

      Jeslan, I don’t think it was a cliffhanger but rather Dr G. humorously offering an undesirable alternative theoretical way to achieve the same result.
      Someone correct me if I’m wrong…

    • Joseph Gonzales R.D.

      He was being sarcastic. Hard to tell if unfamiliar with his tone. Thanks for double checking. To help answer your question, no, coconut oil would not have the same effect. Dr. Greger points out the differences between saturated fat from coconut and animal fat in this video. From the transcript: “Unlike saturated animal fats, coconut oil doesn’t cause that spike inflammation immediately after consumption of animal foods, which makes sense because as you’ll remember it may be the dead bacterial endotoxins in animal products ferried into the body by saturated fat that are to blame.”

      That still does not mean coconut oil is healthful, it’s pure fat! Added oils are not needed in the diet.

  • Joe Caner

    Alright! We not only have GMO’s coming out of bum. Now we can have GMO’s going up our bum too!

    • Wade Patton

      Here GMO = Grow My Own!

    • Fred

      Speaking of GMOs:

      Have you noticed that when the government wants to pass a bill that is
      unpopular, they come up with a name for it that actually describes the
      exact opposite of what the bill will do? The House of Representatives
      has just passed a bill called the “Safe and Accurate Food Labeling Act
      of 2015.” No matter how you look at this bill, it is anything but that.

      Does this bill help the FDA keep us “safe”? This bill
      has nothing to do with safety. In fact, it does everything possible to
      prevent the FDA from doing its job. I asked an attorney to look at the
      wording in the bill because, of course, who can understand anything the
      government comes up with these days? According to his evaluation, the
      bill would require an “unrealistic burden of proof to be satisfied in
      order to obligate the FDA to require that products containing GMO foods
      be labeled as such.” This basically stops them from doing their job
      when it comes to GMO foods. So no, this bill is not about safety. It’s
      about money. How about “Accurate”?

      The bill would make it federal law that there is no
      difference between a genetically engineered food and its comparable
      non-GMO food. So now, except for the simple fact that GMO foods
      incorporate non-food genetic material, such as bacteria and insect
      genes, we are expected to believe that there is absolutely no
      difference at all. There’s no accuracy in that statement. But the “Safe
      and Accurate Food Labeling Act of 2015” does not stop there.

      The law specifically states that GMO foods and
      products containing GMO do not have to be labeled as to what they
      really are. In other words, according to these legislators, you don’t
      have the right to know what you’re eating. Why? Because obviously you
      aren’t smart enough to decide whether or not you want to feed yourself
      and your kids genetically altered food. So they don’t have to tell you
      if the food you’re buying has been genetically altered. That’s bad. But
      the bill gets even worse.

      This bill makes it virtually impossible for natural
      food producers to label their foods non-GMO. It does this through
      extensive and mandatory regulations. Very few farmers will have the
      money, ability, and time to jump through all the regulatory hoops needed
      to let you know that their food is natural. So if this law passes, say
      goodbye to all those little labels on the foods you buy indicating
      they are not GMO creations. This is the upshot of this law – it
      guarantees that you will never know if you and your children are eating
      GMO food or not. This is also true for infant foods and baby formulas!

      But you think: My state has already enacted
      legislation to force GMO foods to be properly labeled. Think again! Our
      legislators are smart. The bill removes the rights of the states to
      regulate any of the matters proposed in the bill. According to my
      attorney friend, “The bill has multiple preemption provisions which
      prevent the states from any contrary legislation.”

      So who does this law protect anyway? It’s doing
      absolutely nothing to protect us or our children. If we don’t want to
      eat genetically altered food, how is it unsafe for us to make that
      decision? Has natural food somehow become unsafe and only the synthetic
      stuff is healthy? Of course not! This law is designed for one and only
      one purpose, to make sure that the Big Agri companies that have created
      these GMO concoctions make as much money as possible. The people who
      make these monstrosities say they are safe. But what would you expect
      them to say? Since when does Big Anything hesitate at deception in
      order to get what they want?

      I have reported to you in the past about several well
      conducted studies published in peer reviewed journals showing
      significant toxicity from GMO foods. Every First World country in the
      world except the good old USA has outlawed GMO foods. Now why would a
      country outlaw a food that has been proven to be safe? The answer is
      clear. After reading the studies, they did the right thing to protect
      their people.

      The bill is HR 1599. It was introduced by Mike Pompeo,
      a Republican representative from the 4th district in Kansas. And it
      was passed by the Republican house after an estimated $29 million from
      Big Agri lobbyists. Thanks a lot Mike and the rest of you for looking
      out for Big Business instead of little children. You can find out how
      your representatives voted by going to: http://www.govtrack.us/congress/votes/114-2015/h462.

      Frank Shallenberger, MD

      * And we thought it was a democracy?

      Yes, the House passed it a few weeks ago, but it still
      has to go through the Senate. But this could be very close! The money
      is pouring into the Senate faster than you can say “please don’t make
      me eat that.”

      • HaltheVegan

        Reminds me of the “Affordable” Healthcare Act ;-) George Orwell warned us about governments like this in his book 1984 … but no one listened. Smart man, he was.

        • 2tsaybow

          The Affordable Care Act removed the lifetime limitations on children’s surgeries set up my my health insurance company just before my son had to have two surgeries. The second would not have been possible without the ACA. It saved my child’s life and it is appropriately named. The only thing better would have been a public option.

          • SeedyCharacter

            So glad to know your child’s life was saved by the ACA. So many uninsured families have prematurely lost family members and/or gone bankrupt simply because of lack of access to heath insurance. I am post -polio and could never get any insurance carrier to cover me (in spite of being otherwise healthy) without paying a fortune. The ACA eliminated that form of exclusion, which has made a tremendous difference to thousands of people.

          • HaltheVegan

            “What the government (or insurance co.) gives to one person, it must first take from another.” Just sayin’

          • SeedyCharacter

            Eliminating the “middle man” from the health care equation would drastically cut costs. We’re massively subsidizing CEOs and other highly paid executives in the insurance and pharmaceutical companies, for what? Everything I’ve read about Medicare says it runs fairly efficiently and cost effectively. So, I’d rather pay taxes towards Medicare to treat people in early stages of disease than pay to keep emergency rooms and ICUs functioning as the primary care facilities for poor Americans with advanced conditions.

          • HaltheVegan

            I agree with you that CEO’s and executives in insurance and pharmaceutical companies are over paid! But, unfortunately, Medicare is also filled with fraud, and politicians and bureaucrats are also over paid. And government run operations have always been very inefficient since practically no one can be fired and there’s no accountability. At least CEO’s and executives can be fired. And companies can be sued. When the government controls everything, the people are at the whim of bureaucrats. This is how the old Soviet Union worked and it collapsed under all the corruption. Socialism has been tried many times in the past and failed every time. It sounds nice in theory, but just doesn’t work in reality. I do agree with you that the medical system is broken and we need to treat diseases in early stages and not use emergency rooms in place of primary care. We both want to same goals :-) But I feel from past experience that creating a government controlled system using tax money will not get us to those goals but only exacerbate the problem. I lived through Lyndon B. Johnson’s “War on Poverty” in the 1970’s that was going to eliminate poverty through government run programs. A lot of these programs are still in existence and we now have more people on the welfare rolls than ever before! It seems that individual responsibility must play a central role in any successful system. (That’s why I read this website everyday and try to educate myself on how to stay healthy so I won’t have to rely on the broken medical system :-)

      • Wade Patton

        All about the MegaCorp Profits and Political favor$. fuck us. pardon my colorfulness.

        • SeedyCharacter

          Of course “Medicare for all” would eliminate the massive profits that still exist within the ACA but god forbid we would go for evil communist, er, socialist medicine!

      • Joe Caner

        Introducing the landmark “Sunshine, Rainbows, Unicorns and Puppy Dog’s People Come First Amendment”

        Finally, a law that enshrines our most cherished notions of Democracy and Capitalism in one simple statement. It simply stipulates that:
        A) Any congressional or state law, Constitutional Amendment or Constitutional clause that is found to contradict the by-laws of any Fortune 500 company is forthwith, To wit and without review null and void;
        B) Any action, written communication or utterance that can be directly or indirectly inferred to diminish corporate profit represents a civil and legal liability of the offending party; and
        C) All corporations that have been in continuous existence for 50 years or more are now eligible Social Security and Medicare benefits prorated to their projected profit structures with the general funds making up any short falls in actual profit realized by operations.

        Welcome to our glorious future!

  • Dommy

    dogulas wrote:
    “The problem is that there isn’t much fiber in most high-fat plant foods. Neither nuts nor avocado are good sources of fiber.”

    Freshly ground flaxseeds has tons of it.
    Problem solved :-)

    • VegGuy

      Yes, chia seeds too (5g/TB). Avocados are actually loaded with fiber (14g each)

  • Lawrence

    Regarding upcoming microbiome videos: Dr. Greger, given the impetus towards endoscopic colon cancer screening in our society, and our right to make an informed decision whether or not to submit to such procedures, I am hoping that one of these videos will address answers to fundamental questions such as:
    1) how disruptive to the colon microbiome is the process of bowel preparation?
    2) does the colon microbiome recover to its pre-procedure state and in what time duration?
    3) what are the cleaning protocols used for endoscopic instruments and how effective are they?
    4) given the difficulty in 100% cleaning of endoscopic instruments, is it reasonable to assume that microbiota from previous patients is unwittingly deposited into the colon of the current patient, and does this represent an uncontrolled experiment in fecal transplantation?
    5) how does one research the a. cleaning protocols used in a given facility, b. complication rates for a given facility; a given doctor?

    I suspect the answers to these questions may be unsettling and may be seen by ‘officials’ as serving to dissuade the general public (read: SAD eaters) from engaging in colon cancer screening. But, those of us who frequent NF can handle the truth.
    Thank you very much for considering this request.

    • Thea

      Lawrence: “I suspect the answers to these questions may be unsettling…” *answers*! Try the questions! ;-)

      Great questions with some ideas I had never considered. I don’t know if we have the answers or not, but it seems like we ought to…

    • Wade Patton

      As I am nearing that “magic” age where the establishment strongly pushes colon examination, I too would like some information to assure myself as well as mi madre that it’s not such a crazy idea to NOT submit my bowels to such a “routine”. The one we’ve all heard about a few times-which is probably beneficial in itself for the SAD eaters.

      Butt we aren’t they.

      Having been high-fiber for about two years before (a few years back), and now WFPB, I’m going to refuse the polyp hunt so long as I can keep the peace. Need ammo.

      • Lawrence

        Ammo. Absolutely right. I’m currently in negotiations with a gastroenterologist (following the standard recommendation from my primary care doctor for a colonoscopy), and I am advocating Dr. McDougall’s position which I will post below. His front office seemed shocked and amazed that anyone would have the gumption to advocate for anything less than the ‘gold standard’ colonoscopy. It remains to be seen how this will turn out.
        https://www.drmcdougall.com/misc/2010nl/aug/colon.htm

        BTW, I enjoy reading your posts. For example, your recent suggestion to drink better coffee, straight up without additives, is one that I’ve taken to heart. You were right; works for me!

        • Wade Patton

          thank you, and thanks for the link.

          • Lawrence

            Sure. For your benefit and for others, I recently (7/14/2015) had a brief email exchange with Dr. John McDougall about his position on colonoscopies with respect to his 2010 article as above. I hope beyond hope that I am not violating any protocols here, but I will cut and paste directly from my inbox as follows:

            ” My general advice is for one screening about age 60 and that can be a stool for blood, a Cologaurd test (new), and/or a sigmoidoscopy.

            John”

            The reason I am posting this is because I had never heard of this new Cologuard test; perhaps others have not either. The link I am providing is for healthcare professionals (of which I am not, but I can read, right?); there is also a patient side. This test is more sensitive and specific for colorectal cancer than the Fecal Occult Blood Test, and it might be something worth considering. So, ask your doctor if Cologuard is right for you y su madre. Hasta luego, amigo!
            http://www.cologuardtest.com/hcp

          • Wade Patton

            Hey thanks for that. Can’t see how it would be “off limits” unless John didn’t expect his current thoughts on the matter. This place is about truth not sales.

            Buys me 11 years anyway. No telling what sort of wizardry will be available then, or if I continue in my success as a death dodger that long.

      • SeedyCharacter

        Just today I accompanied a mid-50’s year old friend to her first radiation treatment for stage 3 colon cancer. She is feeling seriously regretful that she did not have a colonoscopy a year ago when she had some mild symptoms that she attributed to hemorrhoids. Rest assured that the colonoscopy prep (admittedly yuck!) and process (not so bad–cool to see one’s rosy colon on the screen) is much less distasteful and harmful than the chemo and radiation she is forced to use in order to save her life. (BTW, she does NOT eat a SAD diet. As vegans/vegetarians, we are not immune to cancers. I know; I was the ED of a cancer resource center for many years in a town with a large percentage of vegans/vegetarians.) So, Wade, consider erring on the side of caution so tu y tu madre don’t end up in the oncology radiation department rather than the screening colonoscopy department.

        • Wade Patton

          Thanks for your concern. I’m a bit hung up on the death by perforation statistics shared by Dr. MacDougall and may follow his recommendations. I wish your friend the best.

        • Lawrence

          Seedy: In no way am I attempting to diminish or contradict anything you have said. This is about your friend’s sense of regret, which may be unfounded. Deepest sympathy and best wishes.
          https://www.drmcdougall.com/health/education/videos/free-electures/why-did-steve-jobs-die/
          https://www.drmcdougall.com/misc/2011nl/nov/jobs.htm

        • Charzie

          We are all dealt a different hand and the best we can do, is to do our best to maximize our health. Personally, after watching my brother die of chemo and radiation in the worst possible way, I think it is both the body and the mind together that keeps us well… or not. He heard “cancer”, and felt hopeless, the “loop” of questionable and ineffective medical procedures took him down quickly. Not one doctor or provider gave him any real hope or made him feel like a person himself, he became his disease, and ironically the best care he had was in Hospice, where he actually rallied, but his body was too beaten down by that time. The war on cancer can’t ever be won with radiation, and procedures. I’ve seen a few go on in spite of it, but too many succumb. Even when we are apparently healthy, we’re encouraged to get bombarded with x-rays “preventatively” in mammograms and CAT scans, and as a known carcinogen, I think this is just insane! By the time a cancer is distinguishable, it has been there for quite a while, prevention is the way to go. I think the diagnosis alone can contribute to one’s demise, with or without the addition of the lethal toxins used to attack it, and we need to find a way to care for the total person when the SHTF! I am totally on board with McDougall.

          • SeedyCharacter

            Charzie, I agree with much of what you’re saying. Prevention is incredibly important. We’re all reading/viewing NF because we’re committed to prevention of major illnesses through nutrition. Yet our exposures to unavoidable, unknown toxins means that we are all vulnerable to cancer. Prevention is only one piece of the pie. What happens when you’ve employed all the preventive strategies you can and you or your child end up with an aggressive life-threatening cancer? There are many types of cancer. Doctors need to be honest with patients about the effectiveness of what they have to offer–if patients want to hear those truths. With some cancers, conventional treatments give only a small or no benefit with great suffering from side effects. But with other cancers, radiation and/or targeted chemo and surgery can be effective. I had a friend who had 10 lesions in her brain including a big one wrapped around her brain stem (metastasized breast cancer diagnosed late). She had weeks to live and was in extreme pain. She received cyber knife radiation and hormone blockers (with no apparent side effects) and is living pain-free and in remission 5 years later. In the past 5 years she has worked and helped care for her elderly parents.

            Conventional oncologists badly need to know about and integrate complementary treatments, nutritional oncology strategies (as Jeanne Wallace, PhD, does. Check out nutritional-solutions.net). If you want to look at the organization I helped found that offers supportive/non-traditional “total person” services to women with cancer, go here: http://fsa-cc.org/womencare/ I wish every city had these organizations.

            But to avoid screening due to a belief that receiving a cancer cancer diagnosis is somehow the cause of the cancer progressing is a marriage of denial and magical thinking IMHO.

    • Rhombopterix

      Each species of microbe requires a substrate to grow upon, just as a plant needs soil. There is a fairly narrow range of pH and nutrients required for most organisms to flourish. So if you want to grow a cactus you don’t emulate a rainforest. Similarly if you eat whole plant foods diet, very soon after the citrate flush out, you will establish the growing conditions for good bugs. They will nudge out the bad bugs who will go looking for a meat eater anyway.

      I assume that there is a constant “challenge” to my inward world. Spores and living bacteria slip through to act as seeds that are constantly vie-ing for a foothold. The only way to select for the good ones is to maintain a healthy, plant-based substrate that favours their survival.

      I think 3 through 5 should be no. 1!

  • Lori

    What about the person who has had a cholecystectomy? Is there a constant trickle of bile going into the intestines? What about a vegan who has had a cholecystectomy?

    • siriusfarm

      After my mom had a cholecystectomy, she developed what the doctor referred to as Post-Cholecystectomy Syndrome (PCS). Because the gallbladder was not there to act as a reservoir for the bile, the increased bile flow into the GI tract caused her to have gastritis and esophagitis. Her doctor suggested a 100% plant-based diet and her issues went away within the week! Definitely not a scientific study but in additionally the new diet helped her to lose and keep off over 100 pounds and reverse her diabetes. Not bad side effects if you ask me!

      • Charzie

        I had the same problem for years after they took my gallbladder out, in addition to severe IBS and other issues. Though I knew from experience that eating fat would initiate an attack, myself nor any doctor made the connection that afterwards avoiding fats would help! Many years later after being diagnosed with diabetes, I decided to investigate alternatives to being on nasty meds forever, learned of a WFPB diet via “Forks Over Knives”, gave it a trial and never looked back because it eliminated more issues than I was even aware of, that were fixable or avoidable in the first place! I had been on 12 different meds including narcotics for severe arthritis, fibromyalgia and lots of back issues, which “mysteriously” nearly disappeared, and was able to get off all the crap. At almost 63 I have NEVER felt better, and implore everyone, young or old, to give it at least a fair trial for a month. The only thing you have to lose is a lot of grief, pain, aggravation…and weight, if you need to!

      • Thea

        siriusfarm: re: “Her doctor suggested a 100% plant-based diet…” That’s one advanced doctor! I’m sorry your mom had to have that procedure and complication, but I’m glad she got some really good advice.

  • Bat Marty

    Thank you for the video! I have been a vegan now for a few years, but seeing this video reminded me that I have Gilbert (is that genetic more bile than normal, right?) do you know how can I decrease this bile and if the vegan diet could already have that bile decreased? or am I at colon cancer risk in any case? thank you

  • Catkin 3

    Why does everyone keep refering to plant fat?? Plants to not make fat they produce oils which are different?

    • Thea

      Catkin 3: I don’t understand your post. Why do you think oils are not a form of fat? What do you think the difference is? I’m just trying to understand what you are thinking/asking.

      My understanding is that there are 3 types of macronutrients: carbohydrates, protein and fat. Fat can be found in plants and animals, though generally with different compositions and sometimes different health outcomes. But it’s still fat, consisting of various percentages of mono, poly and saturated.

      I don’t know if this will help, but check out the following page which shows the nutrition breakdown of walnuts. You can get walnut oil from walnuts, but that oil is a type of fat:
      http://nutritiondata.self.com/facts/nut-and-seed-products/3137/2

      Does that help?

  • Rodrigo Cardoso

    In some parts of this video, the speed of the speech feels too uncomfortable when I try to follow it reading the subtitles in Portuguese. I doubt many people, even those knowing English (not natives), are able to watch it till the end without moving to something else when they get tired in their eyes and mind or just feel lost in the information.
    I’m trying to readjust the timing so it compensates but there’s not much space/time where to put the words.
    Just a thought that I wanted to share and maybe Dr. Greger will consider it in future videos.

  • Rodrigo Cardoso
  • Rochelle Knutson

    ok so I have eaten meat my whole life and a recent diagnosis of a liver disease, as well as inflammation problems has led me to think about becoming a vegetarian. The whole idea of giving up meat and going strictly vegetarian is overwhelming to me. How does one learn how to become a vegetarian? and are there different vitamins and nutrients you get from meat that you need?

    • Thea

      Rochelle: I can understand how it would feel intimidating. In general, you will find that you can get all of the nutrients/vitamins you need from plants. The big one you have to be wary of (and really, many meat eaters have to be wary of this too) is B12. B12 supplements are cheap and easy to take. You don’t even have to swallow a pill. You can get a little one that dissolves under the tongue. Here are Dr. Greger’s overall nutrition recommendations. Scroll down until you get to the B12 section for specifics.
      http://nutritionfacts.org/2011/09/12/dr-gregers-2011-optimum-nutrition-recommendations/

      One of my favorite graphics to refer people like you to is the PCRM Power Plate. (PCRM = Physician’s Committee for Responsible Medicine, a very respected, well researched group that Dr. Greger has referred to on other pages.) I like this graphic because it shows how simple things can be in order to meet your basic nutrition needs. Fill your plate from the 4 food groups and you are golden. Based on information on the NutritionFacts site, you might find that adding a small side (about 1-2 ounces) of nuts and seeds is also a good idea. And don’t forget the fungus/mushroom category either.
      http://www.pcrm.org/health/diets/pplate

      Now for the fun part! HOW do you do it? What should you eat? As much as I like the above graphic, it’s not really enough information for a newbie who needs some good old ‘how to’ basic info for actual meals. For that, I refer you to a free PCRM program called 21 Day Kickstart. They will hold your hand for 21 days, including meal plans, recipes, videos, inspirational messages, and a forum (moderated by a very respected RD) where you can ask questions.
      http://www.pcrm.org/kickstartHome/
      (Click the green “Register Now” button.)

      I have more ideas, but I didn’t want to overwhelm you. Let me know if you want any more suggestions. Good luck!!!

  • Bat Marty

    do people that have the Gilbert disease (more bile than normal) are more at colon cancer risk (even if following a vegan diet)?
    thank you

  • Bat Marty

    what about Gilbert? is it dangerous?

  • Rebecca Cody

    I have sometimes wondered if a very low fat diet causes gallstones because so much less bile is expressed, with little fat to process. Doesn’t it sit there in the gallbladder and precipitate out calcium and other factors to create stones? Nobody ever talks about whether or not this happens.

    A second thing I think about is this. There will ALWAYS be people who won’t give up meat eating. I think each study involving meat eating vs. vegan or vegetarian diets should include an arm where the meat has been raised on pasture without grain feeding. It may not be the ideal way to eat, but I think this would be a serious indictment of the cruel and totally unhealthy factory method of making meat.

  • Bat Marty

    I had posted this question already but it keeps disappearing (?) – I have Gilbert syndrome that is I produce more bile than normal since birth. I am now 45 never had problems and doctors said not to worry but could this syndrome be dangerous? (I am plant-based now, since 2-3 years ago but haven’t checked my bile recently. Thanks

    • Jen Drost, PA-C, NF Volunteer

      Hi Bat! Love your pic btw. Gilbert’s is NOT dangerous thankfully. Can be just a little inconvenient. And Gilbert’s actually has to do with the liver not breaking down Bilirubin as efficiently as possible. (I know it’s a lot of similar sounding words, but your Bile Acids should not be affected by Gilbert’s.)

      • Bat Marty

        Thank you Jen :-)

      • Bat Marty

        thank you :-)

  • Chris Weston

    The key idea is that you want to eat a diverse diet, so that you have a diverse population of gut bacteria. These bacteria are primarily responsible for activating the secondary bile acids in your colon. If your diet is diverse, then your bacteria will likely be diverse. So don’t eat too much of any one thing, particularly beef. Fish is okay to go crazy on. When choosing a food, ask yourself, “how nutrient dense is this food, does it contain a lot of omega-3 fatty acids, is it rich in fiber, how processed is this food, how much sugar is in this food?” If you ask these questions simultaneously, then you will probably make excellent food choices.

    Second, we evolved to be able to eat anything that we could get our hands on. There are no absolute right or wrongs about food consumption. If you have access to a variety of foods, then eat a variety of foods. If not, then eat what you can.

    It doesn’t need to be any more difficult than this. And get off your butt and exercise, outdoors preferably (get some VitD3 stimulation from the sun).

    Chris

  • Flora Mason Van Orden

    love the way you explain things, Michael.

  • Jon

    haha…that ending