How Not to Die from High Blood Pressure

How Not to Die from High Blood Pressure
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How to prevent and reverse hypertension, the #1 risk factor for death in the world

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Below is an approximation of this video’s audio content. To see any graphs, charts, graphics, images, and quotes to which Dr. Greger may be referring, watch the above video.

High blood pressure is the #1 risk factor for death in the world, affecting nearly 78 million Americans—that’s one in three adults. And, as we age, our pressures get higher and higher, such that by age 60, it strikes more than half. Well, if it affects most of us when we get older, maybe it’s less a disease, and more just an inevitable consequence of aging? No. We’ve known since the 1920s that high blood pressure need not occur.

Researchers measured the blood pressures of a thousand people in rural Kenya who ate a diet centered around whole plant foods—whole grains, beans, vegetables, fruit, and dark green leafies. Our pressures go up as we age; their pressures actually go down.

And, the lower the better. The whole 140 over 90 cut-off is arbitrary. Even people who start out with blood pressures under 120 over 80 appear to benefit from blood pressure reduction. If you went to your doctor with a blood pressure of 120 over 80, you’d get a gold star.

But the ideal blood pressure, the no-benefit-from-reducing-it-further blood pressure, may actually be 110 over 70. 110 over 70? Is it even possible to get blood pressures down that low? It’s not just possible—it’s normal, for those eating healthy enough diets.

Over two years, at a rural Kenyan hospital, 1,800 patients were admitted. How many cases of high blood pressure did they find? Zero. Wow, they must have had low rates of heart disease? No. They had no rates of heart disease. Not a single case of arteriosclerosis—our #1 killer—was found.

Rural China, too; about 110 over 70 their entire lives; seventy-year-olds with the same average blood pressure as sixteen-year-olds. Now, Africa, China; vastly different diets, but what they shared in common is that they were plant-based day-to-day, with meat only eaten on special occasions.

Now, why do we think it’s the plant-based nature of their diets that was so protective? Because in the Western world, as the American Heart Association has pointed out, the only folks really getting it down that low were those eating strictly plant-based diets—coming in at about 110 over 65.

This is the largest study of those eating plant-based diets to date—89,000 Californians, comparing non-vegetarians to so-called semi-vegetarians or flexitarians (eating meat more on a weekly basis than a daily basis); compared to those who eat no meat, except fish; compared to those who eat no meat at all; compared to those who eat no meat, eggs, or dairy.

Now, this was an Adventist study, so, even the non-vegetarians didn’t eat a lot of meat. And, they tended to eat lots of fruits and vegetables, and exercised, and not smoke. So, even compared to a group of relatively healthy meat-eaters, there appeared to be a stepwise drop in hypertension rates as people ate more and more plant-based. Same thing with diabetes and obesity.

So, yes, we can wipe out most of our risk eating strictly plant-based. But it’s not all-or-nothing; it’s not black-or-white. Any movement along the spectrum towards eating healthier can accrue significant health benefits. You can show this experimentally. You take vegetarians; you give them meat (and pay them enough to eat it); and their blood pressures go up. Or, you remove meat from people’s diets; and blood pressures go down—in just seven days! And, this is after the vast majority reduced or stopped their blood pressure medications completely. They had to stop their medications.

Once you treat the cause, once you eliminate the disease, you can’t be on blood pressure pills with normal blood pressure. You can drop your pressures too low, get dizzy, fall over, hurt yourself—so, your doctor has to pull you off the pills. Lower pressures on fewer drugs; that’s the power of plants.

So, does the American Heart Association recommend a no-meat diet? No, they recommend a low-meat diet, the so-called DASH diet. Why not completely plant-based? When the DASH diet was being created, were they just not aware of this landmark research, done by Harvard’s Frank Sacks? No, they were aware. The chair of the design committee that came up with the DASH diet was Frank Sacks.

See, the DASH diet was explicitly designed with the #1 goal of capturing the blood pressure-lowering benefits of a vegetarian diet, yet contain enough animal products to make it palatable to the general population. They didn’t think the public could handle the truth.

Now, in their defense, you can see what they were thinking. Just like drugs never work—unless you actually take them, diets never work—unless you actually eat them.  So, they’re like, look, no one is going to eat strictly plant-based. So, if they soft-pedaled the message, and came up with some kind of compromise diet, then maybe, on a population scale, they’d do more good.

Okay, tell that to the thousand American families a day that lose a loved one to high blood pressure. Maybe, it’s time to start telling the American public the truth.

Please consider volunteering to help out on the site.

Videography courtesy of Grant Peacock

Below is an approximation of this video’s audio content. To see any graphs, charts, graphics, images, and quotes to which Dr. Greger may be referring, watch the above video.

High blood pressure is the #1 risk factor for death in the world, affecting nearly 78 million Americans—that’s one in three adults. And, as we age, our pressures get higher and higher, such that by age 60, it strikes more than half. Well, if it affects most of us when we get older, maybe it’s less a disease, and more just an inevitable consequence of aging? No. We’ve known since the 1920s that high blood pressure need not occur.

Researchers measured the blood pressures of a thousand people in rural Kenya who ate a diet centered around whole plant foods—whole grains, beans, vegetables, fruit, and dark green leafies. Our pressures go up as we age; their pressures actually go down.

And, the lower the better. The whole 140 over 90 cut-off is arbitrary. Even people who start out with blood pressures under 120 over 80 appear to benefit from blood pressure reduction. If you went to your doctor with a blood pressure of 120 over 80, you’d get a gold star.

But the ideal blood pressure, the no-benefit-from-reducing-it-further blood pressure, may actually be 110 over 70. 110 over 70? Is it even possible to get blood pressures down that low? It’s not just possible—it’s normal, for those eating healthy enough diets.

Over two years, at a rural Kenyan hospital, 1,800 patients were admitted. How many cases of high blood pressure did they find? Zero. Wow, they must have had low rates of heart disease? No. They had no rates of heart disease. Not a single case of arteriosclerosis—our #1 killer—was found.

Rural China, too; about 110 over 70 their entire lives; seventy-year-olds with the same average blood pressure as sixteen-year-olds. Now, Africa, China; vastly different diets, but what they shared in common is that they were plant-based day-to-day, with meat only eaten on special occasions.

Now, why do we think it’s the plant-based nature of their diets that was so protective? Because in the Western world, as the American Heart Association has pointed out, the only folks really getting it down that low were those eating strictly plant-based diets—coming in at about 110 over 65.

This is the largest study of those eating plant-based diets to date—89,000 Californians, comparing non-vegetarians to so-called semi-vegetarians or flexitarians (eating meat more on a weekly basis than a daily basis); compared to those who eat no meat, except fish; compared to those who eat no meat at all; compared to those who eat no meat, eggs, or dairy.

Now, this was an Adventist study, so, even the non-vegetarians didn’t eat a lot of meat. And, they tended to eat lots of fruits and vegetables, and exercised, and not smoke. So, even compared to a group of relatively healthy meat-eaters, there appeared to be a stepwise drop in hypertension rates as people ate more and more plant-based. Same thing with diabetes and obesity.

So, yes, we can wipe out most of our risk eating strictly plant-based. But it’s not all-or-nothing; it’s not black-or-white. Any movement along the spectrum towards eating healthier can accrue significant health benefits. You can show this experimentally. You take vegetarians; you give them meat (and pay them enough to eat it); and their blood pressures go up. Or, you remove meat from people’s diets; and blood pressures go down—in just seven days! And, this is after the vast majority reduced or stopped their blood pressure medications completely. They had to stop their medications.

Once you treat the cause, once you eliminate the disease, you can’t be on blood pressure pills with normal blood pressure. You can drop your pressures too low, get dizzy, fall over, hurt yourself—so, your doctor has to pull you off the pills. Lower pressures on fewer drugs; that’s the power of plants.

So, does the American Heart Association recommend a no-meat diet? No, they recommend a low-meat diet, the so-called DASH diet. Why not completely plant-based? When the DASH diet was being created, were they just not aware of this landmark research, done by Harvard’s Frank Sacks? No, they were aware. The chair of the design committee that came up with the DASH diet was Frank Sacks.

See, the DASH diet was explicitly designed with the #1 goal of capturing the blood pressure-lowering benefits of a vegetarian diet, yet contain enough animal products to make it palatable to the general population. They didn’t think the public could handle the truth.

Now, in their defense, you can see what they were thinking. Just like drugs never work—unless you actually take them, diets never work—unless you actually eat them.  So, they’re like, look, no one is going to eat strictly plant-based. So, if they soft-pedaled the message, and came up with some kind of compromise diet, then maybe, on a population scale, they’d do more good.

Okay, tell that to the thousand American families a day that lose a loved one to high blood pressure. Maybe, it’s time to start telling the American public the truth.

Please consider volunteering to help out on the site.

Videography courtesy of Grant Peacock

Doctor's Note

You can imagine how overwhelming NutritionFacts.org might be for someone new to the site. With videos on more than 2,000 health topics, where do you even begin? Imagine someone stumbling onto the site when the new video-of-the-day is about how some spice can be effective in treating a particular form of arthritis. It would be easy to miss the forest for the trees. That’s why I created this new series of overview videos, which are basically taken straight from my hour-long live 2016 presentation HOW NOT TO DIE: The Role of Diet in Preventing, Arresting, and Reversing Our Top 15 Killers.

If you missed the first four videos in this series, check out:

If this video inspired you to learn more about the role diet may play in preventing and treating high blood pressure, check out some of these other popular videos on the topic:

If you haven’t yet, you can subscribe to my videos for free by clicking here.

Please note the quote mismatch discrepancy. Hat tip to Todd and “guest” for figuring that out! As is customary on NutritionFacts.org, anyone who points out an error gets a free DVD or book of their choice (and my eternal gratitude!).

181 responses to “How Not to Die from High Blood Pressure

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  1. When I have my BP measured – either by a nurse during a blood donation, or at one of those do-it-yourself meters at Walmart et al., it varies between 110 and 120 over 60/70. Not too bad.

    Every time I visit my doctor, my readings are high 130 – once it was 140!!!

    I’m aware of the “white coat effect” on BP but these are just routine visits and I’m not aware of being nervous – I like my doctor and enjoy the visits.

    One thing, my doctor visits are always early in the morning – 8 or 9 AM while my BP tests at the other venues are always in the afternoon.

    So, are BPs typically higher during the morning hours and lower as the day wears on? Hope so.




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    1. @Richard W I definitely have white coat hypertension, even when I’m not consciously nervous. When I go to the doctor’s office, the nurse takes a reading and it’s *always* quite high–routinely 140 or more. When I take it at home, in the morning, these days it’s below 120, with the medication (but before I take it). My doctor knows all this and always checks it again after I’ve been in the office for a while, and when he checks it, it’s back down close to where it is when I check it. To answer your question, my BP tends to climb during the day, but I think this is something that varies from person to person. The only way to know is to check it throughout the day.

      Incidentally, my doctor had me bring my cuff into his office to check against his. Mine tended to be two or three points higher, but was generally consistent with his.

      For the record, I’m still obese, with BMI=31, so it’s not terribly surprising that I have hypertension.

      Over the years, I’ve noticed that certains kinds of exercise, especially high-intensity intervals, are more effective than others for reducing BP. For example, if I pedal a stationary bike for 15 minutes, and throw in three or four 30-second intervals where I go as fast as I possibly can, my BP will go up for an hour or so after the workout but will then be lower than usual for a day or so. Steady aerobic exercise won’t do this for me, and neither will lifting weights.




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      1. I have white-coat hypertension and also morning hypertension. I was lucky that my insurance sprung for an Aldosterone/Plasma Renin Activity Ratio serum blood test and both my aldosterone and renin levels were normal! What is behind my issue turned out to be elevated levels of norepinephrine, and no corresponding high levels of epinephrine. I’ve found that just one minute of hyperventilation will immediately lower serum levels of norepinephrine and therefore systolic blood pressure by up to 10 points. I also found that over-the-counter melatonin (1mg timed release) taken at bedtime will lower blood pressure and can be all one needs for morning hypertension. But I ended up taking just 0.05mg of clonidine, which is extremely effective.

        The Risk of Waking Up: Impact of the Morning Surge in Blood Pressure
        http://hyper.ahajournals.org/content/55/4/835.long

        Blood Pressure Response to Hyperventilation Test Reflects Daytime Pressor Profile
        http://hyper.ahajournals.org/content/41/2/244.full

        Presynaptic effects of melatonin on norepinephrine release and uptake in rat pineal gland.
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/1681046

        Therapeutic effects of evening administration of guanabenz and clonidine on morning hypertension: evaluation using home-based blood pressure measurements.
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12658028




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    2. “Systolic blood pressure (SBP) and diastolic blood pressure (DBP) of healthy normotensive individuals rapidly rises on waking and declines
      relative to daytime levels by >10% during sleep. This pattern originates from daily rhythms in the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system, autonomic activity, and from rest/activity-related differences in mental and physical stress.”
      https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4768354/




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      1. Related to this, the incidence of strokes peak at 3 AM when BP is lowest and the incidence of heart attacks peak at 9 AM when BP and stress hormones are the highest.




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    3. I have major anxiety about having my blood pressure taken, I’m always worried it will be high and big surprise – I make it high! Even on my own it takes me multiple tests to get an accurate reading.




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  2. Interesting. In this Pam Popper video (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=B_IDJjjDI_o), she talks about data that suggest that while lower BP is better in terms of CVD risk, much of the advantage is lost if the BP is reduced via medications, unless the BP is quite high to begin with. I wonder, though, if this is because BP *reduction*, by any means, is simply not as effective as never having hypertension to begin with.

    This is something I have to deal with. My BP crept up as my weight crept up. I’ve been on Diovan 80mg + 12.5 HCTZ since January. When I started WFPB a few weeks ago there was an immediate drop in BP and I started feeling woozy so I chopped the pill in half. A few days ago I tried foregoing the med altogether but I’m not there yet. My BP spiked back up to 140/80, so I’m back on the half, even though I still feel woozy at times. Maybe if I can drop more weight… These BP meds are not to be trifled with. I’ll probably have to go to a quarter pill for a while.




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    1. Interesting that you mention Pam. She has a bunch of videos that make sense and are mostly in agreement with Dr. G’s research.

      However, in one video she talks about salt and how the 1500mg limit is way, way too low. Of course, this is in direct conflict with Dr. G’s findings.

      Congratulations on your progress. Keep at it, you’ll get there.




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      1. @nfdev-f3f64102d3726f3a58c564c77b11117a:disqus The HCTZ is built into the Diovan/Valsartan. I’ve been on 25 mg of HCTZ for a couple of years, so this is a reduction of that. I was also on Metoprolol for a while, but found that to be very bad. It was also hard to wean off of. My current sodium consumption is much less than what it was, but I couldn’t tell you exactly what it is. I’m still getting used to eating no meat or cheese, and not yet tracking sodium. But I don’t put salt in my recipes and I don’t add it to my food. I do, however, use some dressings etc. that contain sodium, but I don’t use ones that seem to me to have a very high sodium content. For example, I use this stuff on rice: http://www.earthnvine.com/products/tangerine-chili-ponzu-marinade-dressing It has about 200 mg of sodium per 2 Tbs, which is about what I use.




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        1. If you’re eating low sodium and also taking HCTZ, then your blood volume can get reduced enough that you get episodes of dizziness. If you can try a prescription of the Diovan without the HCTZ, then that may be a better start for you. Or maybe get two prescriptions, one for the 80mg Diovan and another, separate prescription for the diuretic if you must. Then you can adjust the dosage of each individually. Maybe change to chlorthalidone, which is safer than HCTZ.
          https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23993697




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    1. OT: Well Jack Nicholson’s character tries to justify the principle : The end justify the means (at ll costs). It doesn’t make him right regardless how self-righteous he feels he is. /rant

      Dr Greger’s message, while similarly sounding, is not as extreme and as not as sacrificing so I agree with your last statement.




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      1. I’ve always felt that the means were the ends, and I don’t agree with your character mapping. Obviously, Tom Cruse is playing the part of Dr. Greger.




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  3. We eat mostly from plants. My wife has BP in the range of 93/69 .Is there any limit on how low one can be? How can it be increased if it is under recommended? I also have low but not this low (110/75). Thanks for any comments.




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    1. As mentioned in the video, if your BP gets too low you will start to get dizzy and if it gets low enough you will eventually pass out. This is because your blood pressure has to be high enough to fight gravity, and get blood to your brain. If you wife isn’t having any issues with dizziness or passing out, I wouldn’t worry about it. If you are having issues, the good news is that adding some salt to your diet can help pick your BP back up a bit without much trouble. Luckily adding salt back into your diet isn’t particularly hard to do.




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    2. I started to get some wooziness when standing up because of low blood pressure, but I found that if I make sure to drink enough water it is not a problem at all. I think I heard Dr. Greger mention drinking water to maintain blood volume in a podcast one time.




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    3. Low B/P is more dangerous than high B/P. Why doesn’t Dr G recommend 6G l-Lysine plus 6G Vit C per day to empty out arteries of plaque to drastically reduce risk of H/D and Stoke according to Linus Pauling famous for his research.




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    4. When I weight under 100 lbs, my BP was 80/50..That was normal for me. I never felt dizzy etc.
      Now I’m older and weigh about 130, my BP is about 117/72..I think weight has allot to do with BP. and also
      eating processed foods raises your BP..It has allot of salt in it. (btw I’m a women)




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  4. I get frustrated with this topic.. as a meat-eating, dairy quaffing, nachos every friday person, my blood pressure was consistently 112/72, or, 110/70 — right up until heart surgery. Since going wfpb, seems my pressures are rising, eg 128/65. its just not working for me apparently




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    1. Well there’s a big difference between looking at risk factors, and looking at actual risk. the population level wisdom doesn’t seem to apply to you all that well. high blood pressure makes it more likely that a sclerotic plaque in your arteries will rupture and cause harm-but in the absence of such plaques, CVD can’t really occur. You can take comfort in the fact that being WFPB with a higher blood pressure, you are much healthier and unlikely to have another heart attack, even if your BP is trending up a bit.




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      1. Thank you adam, this is encouraging. If I talk about wfpb to the doc, I get the deer caught in headlights look. LOL maybe thats what raises my bp. thanks again, I shall persevere




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    2. Actually, your mean blood pressure (MBP) isn’t significantly different between the pressures you provided. MBP = 1/3 SBP + 2/3 DBP. However, of potential concern is that your pulse pressure (SBP – DBP) has increased slightly over 60 mmHg. You may want to discuss this with a cardiologist after confirming for yourself that the numbers you provided are accurate and sustained.
      http://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/high-blood-pressure/expert-answers/pulse-pressure/faq-20058189




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        1. One cause of elevated pulse pressure is stiffening of the aorta (part of the arterial system just downstream of the heart). To make the aorta less stiff a low cost therapy often recommended by cardiologists is to substantially reduce salt intake. How does one control their salt consumption? In the order of importance:

          1) Prepare your own WFPB meals, don’t eat out. For example, a veggie burrito seems like a healthy selection yet a single veggie burrito from Chipotle has over 2200 mg of sodium, which is at least 4 times more than the daily maximum if you were on a true low salt diet.

          2) When you buy processed food (e.g., diced tomatoes, ketchup, salsa, roasted nuts) read the label and look for no salt or low salt items. Limit your use of processed foods and salty condiments. For example, soy sauce has about 1000 mg sodium per tablespoon.

          3) Don’t sprinkle salt on your food. Use salt-free spices.




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          1. ty again Gatherer, I do appreciate the suggestions and I will follow them. I try to stick to whole foods but do purchase canned tomatoes, canned beans, and rarely vegetable stock so I will check all labels.




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  5. I’m a 72 year old woman and I have been eating a whole foods plant based diet for about 8 years. Started with the Esselstyn book and lost 40 lbs – but I cannot get my blood pressure low enough to get off medication – I’m now up to 40mg Lisinopril/day. My kidneys are okay. I come from a high blood pressure family – without meds, my father’s and his mother’s blood pressure would run over 200 systolic, and they had to take lots of meds to control it. On the other hand, my mother’s systolic is around 118…and she is 97. I acknowledge that my BP would probably be worse on animal products, but even water fasting for 25 days (at True North Health in Santa Rosa CA) barely put me in the range where I didn’t need BP meds…and that didn’t last all that long. Is there such a thing as hereditary high BP? I feel so frustrated. Any suggestions?




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    1. @macbev:disqus The way I see it, there are several ways in which BP gets to be elevated. One has to do with the chemistry of nitric oxide production. Since NO causes vasodilation, which should cause BP to drop, anything that interferes with NO production could cause hypertension. This should be fairly quickly corrected by a WFPB diet. But another factor that could be relevant is the gradual stiffening of blood vessels by accumulation of calcium. If I understand it correctly, as this occurs the blood vessels simply become mechanically less capable of dilation, regardless of NO status.

      If this second mechanism is valid, it’s less clear whether diet can correct it. There’s some evidence that vitamin K2 could help, since K2 tends to move calcium from soft tissue into teeth and bone. K2 is produced from K1 by gut bacteria, but some researchers believe the conversion is not very robust in many people. Dietary sources of K2 include high-quality butter from pastured cows, and certain aged cheeses, in which bacteria have had a chance to do this job. The only plant-based source I know of it natto, the fermented soybean product eaten in northern Japan. But you can get supplements made from natto. The plant-based K2 is called MK7, as opposed to Mk4, the animal-based kind. The jury is still out on which kind is more effective. In fact, the jury is still out on whether K2 can bring about meaningful reduction of arterial calcification. There are some encouraging studies but this is really very new science. For a long time K2 was ignored because it was thought to be an uninteresting variant of K1.

      But I think it’s at least possible that K2 could help with hypertenstion, but it would be expected to take quite a while–more than a year–to see any effect.




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    2. My Dad had the same problem in his 70s, and his MD didn’t offer any suggestions. But then he decided to cut out all salt in his diet (other than what he got naturally) and lo and behold, his blood pressure dropped like a rock. People forget how important that salt issue is…




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    3. Hi Macbev, There is certainly individual variation, and likely some hereditary element in your situation. I assume you have had the renal arteries checked at some point. There may still be some hidden salt in your diet, it crops up in all kinds of places, such as bread, especially bakery bread which is not labelled, and even plant milks. Who knew? Another possibility is that 8 years of WFPB may not yet balance out the previous years of a possibly less healthy eating, and ‘hardening of the arteries’. As I am sure you know, many people with hypertension require more medication over time, so if things are stable with you on one medicine and not getting worse, There is cause to feel encouraged rather than frustrated. Additional factors could be, still having some weight to lose, alcohol intake, lack of exercise etc, and, of course, stress. Systematic and regular relaxation can help or an activity such as Tai Chi which combines movement with relaxation. By the way I have also spent time at True North and possibly we even met there! Overall the WFPB style of eating has so many benefits, Having a possible strong hereditary factor on your father’s side is all the more reason to keep eating well. Having a 97 year old mother is probably very auspicious! I hope that is helpful!




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    4. I haven’t got any idea if this would be helpful to you or not, . . but Dr. G. has done video’s on beets and beet juice. Beets are known to increase nictric oxide, relax the vascular system and is generally very excellent for our blood supply systems. Athletes ‘power up’ on beet juice for these reason. Roasted beets are wonderful in a salad. You’ll find beet juice in health food stores. Or just cook beets on teh stovetop and find ways to incorporate them. Hope this is helpful to you.




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    5. macbev, Nothing works for everyone so although statistically a vegan diet normalizes blood pressure for most people doesn’t mean some of us don’t need to do more. I suggest you read Blood Pressure Hoax by Sherry Rogers (out of print but used copies available). Its working for me. But I suggest you supplement her book with Linus Paulings recommendations. The essential components of both are 3,000mg of liposomal vitamin C, 500mg magnesium, 500mg proline, 1,000 mg lysine, and 1,000mg niacin. There is more in her books but that is enough to get results for most people. According to my research, in my opinion, the other thing is most people are still mislead about fats. That is, all these highly used fats like canola, safflower, soy, sunflower, etc are actually all bad fats. The only good vegan fats are virgin coconut oil and extra virgin olive oil. If your eating other fats your causing heart problems.




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      1. Ed. You wrote: “The only good vegan fats are virgin coconut oil and extra virgin olive
        oil. If your eating other fats your causing heart problems.”

        Actually, those oils are bad for the heart also. In particular, check out this NutritionFacts video: http://nutritionfacts.org/video/olive-oil-and-artery-function/ For a more complete answer, I will refer you to a post I just did for you here: http://nutritionfacts.org/video/what-causes-diabetes/#comment-2961032272




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    1. Yes .It is a simple but a crutial question: can we handle the truth? We are raw frugivores( there are many scientiffical evidences ). So, 80% raw fruits, 15% raw vegetables and 5% raw nuts and raw seeds – are our natural food ,.with add B12 as a suplement, and that is the Truth. Isn ‚t it ? Can we handle the truth ?




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  6. the truth is slowly coming out. big pharma next on chopping block, then maybe maybe, they will come out with the truth about aliens and those running our country, we want our country back !!!!




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          1. well the Big Pharma gave me Cholesterol meds, that took all the Cholesterol from my Nervous system and my brain, so been working to correct that for over a year now. Soon I will be better, and then I will learn to heal without drugs, welcome to my world :)




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  7. I have been a vegan for almost 6 years and during that time my BP has been in the 125 / 80 range. in feb 2016, I fell on some ice and my BP shot up to 190 / 145. It got as high as 220. Only 3 days before I fell my BP was normal for my yearly physical. I am currently on 2 meds to maintain about 145 / 80. Has anyone heard of BP being affected over a long term, it’s been 9 months now, because of a fall? Doctor’s are stumped and happy to have me stay on the meds.




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    1. @joemilani:disqus I’ve heard of it. There’s some research that suggests that misalignment of the cervical vertebrae can affect BP, and chiropractic manipulation can help to correct it. I’m generally skeptical of chiropractic, and I’ve never visited a chiropractor myself, so I can’t speak from experience. I’m just passing along what I’ve read. See http://www.webmd.com/hypertension-high-blood-pressure/news/20070316/chiropractic-cuts-blood-pressure#1




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    2. Might sound dumb – but is it possible you’re just nervous to have it taken now since you got the high reading? Whats your pulse when you get high readings?




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      1. no, I’m not nervous when I go to have my BP checked. If fact, they will often have me relax in the room for a while. I have found that wen I take BP readings at the kiosk/machines at Rite Aid, it is actually higher. I think that the machine is a bit off.
        I got the high reading after I fell, and then it spiked about a week later – it was 220 at the kiosk at both Rite Aid and Stop & Shop and was about 215 when I got to the hospital. that is when I went on the meds. I get it checked frequently now, but I am more upset that the doctors are happy to give me the meds without trying to find the source of the issue.




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        1. Sorry to hear – I’m no doctor but from what I understand BP can’t jump from 120s average to 200 average in a day – maybe a spike here and there but that’s it. It’s a gradual rise and drop in average numbers from everything I’ve seen.

          Might sound dumb but do they always check the same arm? Is it both arms that have that pressure?

          I also wonder if the chiropractic thing is something to look at – (TOTAL guess) maybe there’s something being pinched that somehow isn’t actually giving you pain but still firing the signals to your brain so that your BP jumps AS IF you’re in pain. I don’t see how any doctor could not, at least for the sake of CURIOSITY, look at this further.




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        2. Hi JoeM, I’m one of the sites moderators. As you know a systolic (top number) blood pressure reading over 200 is very high and worrisome. Many things can cause ones blood pressure to be high. Anything that causes the blood vessels, primarily arteries to narrow will increase the amount of force the heart needs to generate to push your blood through the many miles of blood vessels you own. That’s why smoking, certain drugs like caffeine or worse cocaine can cause your BP to rise. Adrenaline from your adrenal glands is the fight or flight hormone and gets you ready to run away fast or duke it out. Pain also raises this hormone and is one reason why patients with pain will usually have a high blood pressure. It wouldn’t surprise me if some of the early elevation was due to your pain. These raise your blood pressure a lot and can happen quickly but it should go down quickly after the episode is over. Sometimes people become “adrenaline Junkies” and are always on high alert and this raises their adrenaline. You could be in a period where this might be happening but you could also have a more organic reason for increased BP. This can be seen in tumors that produce chemical to raise the blood pressure as well as narrowing of the blood vessels to the kidneys/ adrenal glands. It would seem that since this is a recent occurrence that has not been explained you might want to see an internist or endocrinologist to have a work up to make sure you don’t need an intervention beyond medical management of your BP.




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          1. On Monday, 1/11, I had my physical and BP was 125. On Wednesday, 1/13, I fell and when I went to the doctor my BP was 190. Thursday night after I went to the hospital and BP was 215 (220 at Rite Aid). I don’t smoke or drink caffeine or alcohol. When I go to the doc now, they take BP in both arms to be sure that one is not giving an elevated reading. I have had a CAT scan, stress test with a cardiologist, and been tested by a neurologist with no further understanding of the cause.
            I was at the chiro today and mentioned this. I have been going for some time for upper neck pain. there is some background for the cervical vertebrae problems creating elevated BP. I plan to investigate further and hope that the treatments at the chiro to realign the vertebrae. Hopefully this helps, as I said, I hate to treat the symptom.




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    3. Hi Joe!
      Some people are very sensitive to oil and salt and sugar and even refined wholegrains (such as wholewheat pasta and breads). I would recommend a diet without those completely (not even a sprinkle of salt) and see how that goes. Base your meals something like-
      B- Oats/wholegrain/starchy vegetable + fruit and vegetables or salad
      L/D- Wholegrain/starchy vegetable + legume + vegetables/salad
      No salt, oil, sugar or refined grains.
      You can also try a few days on just greens/fruit juice for natural diuresis and BP reduction.
      Also have 1 TBLSP ground flax per day and add hibiscus tea if desired!
      Also you want to move your body everyday- at least 30-90 minutes of walking/cycling/yoga/weight training etc…
      Hope this helps!




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      1. Thanks, I will give it a try. Cutting out salt and sugar is easy and doesn’t affect my diet that much. I do have a little oil on my salad at night and that may be more difficult.
        My issue has not developed gradually over time as most diet issues do. The strange thing with my current condition is that it happened quickly. On a Monday I had a physical and my BP was as it always was around 125 and then on the next Wednesday a couple of days later I fell (hard, twice) and when I got checked for a concussion my BP was 190. While I can’t help but relate the rise in BP to some effect from falling, I can’t find a correlation between the two and neither have my doctors. I will try your advice and report back.




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        1. Have a look here for oil-free dressings-
          https://sites.google.com/site/hgkprintablerecipes/big-list-of-no-oil-salad-dressings

          http://www.onegreenplanet.org/vegan-food/oil-free-dairy-free-salad-dressings/

          http://www.veganrunnereats.com/3568/homemade-oil-free-salad-dressings/

          http://veganamericanprincess.com/10-simple-recipes-for-no-oil-vegan-salad- dressings/

          https://happyherbivore.com/2013/06/how-to-make-oil-free-fat-free-vegan-salad- dressing/

          http://plantbaseddietitian.com/tag/salad-dressing/

          It may seem hard to change your diet, but better than high BP and its associated negative health outcomes. Even 125 can benefit from being reduced. However I understand what you are saying, BP can rise as a stress response, but seems strange it would remain elevated. Honestly I would personally consider an additional medical opinion- perhaps you injured a structure relevant to blood pressure homeostasis when you fell, such as adrenals, baroreceptors, lymphatic drainage, nervous system, CNS etc…. It doesn’t sound normal in my opinion.




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    4. Hi JoeM, I was reading your post with interest since I have climbing bp in recent months that is a mystery. Todd mentioned chiropractic adjustments, and I went searching for more info.
      http://www.uchospitals.edu/news/2007/20070314-atlas.html you might find it worth checking out. My sister recently started treatment with one of these chiropractors that work on the c1 vertebrae. She had amazing results. Im going to try it if my bp does not lower in the next month. All the best to you Joe




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  8. Blood pressure can be too low. My usual is 90/60. It is not good circulation and I sometimes dizzy. I wanted to donate bllod for myself before a surgery, bt my blood pressure was too low to give blood.




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  9. I’m curious about those 4 stars or less these videos get at times. I cannot imagine not giving 5 or more. This is a tremendous public service done without a price, for our very own benefit. What else can we say but thank you NF Team!




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    1. People find the truth inconvenient, apparently. Seems I notice less stars when meat eating is called into question. I think Dr McDougall says everyone wants to hear good news about their bad habits.




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    1. Hi Chelsea, if your blood pressure is generally that 95/75 you should see your doctor about what to do regarding any medications that you are on. Very likely you may need fewer, lower doses or none, but you the safe way is to see your doctor and get clear instructions. If you lowered you BP through diet would also be a nice chance to share this with your doctor. Doctors do tend to be impressed by good results and the more good results they see, the more likely they will take nutrition more seriously and use it to help others. WIn win situation! I hope that is helpful!




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  10. I’d say my 3 yr plant based diet went pretty well. With fish 2 or 3 times a week the past yr and no added salt.
    5-2014 at age 59 I had 137/89
    9-2015 age 60 down to 111/67
    and 9-2016 age 61 down to 108/62 with some fasting thrown in. I also set a personal record of 14 pull-ups. The best I ever did was 12 at age 20…so not too shabby.




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    1. I am curious as to why you felt the need to add fish several times to your diet? Not sure I can see a health benefit in adding fish to a plant based diet, but perhaps you had a medical reason for doing so.




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      1. My hormone level got to low, “low T” so it was a problem I had to correct with some added fat and fish to my diet. I also had more wrinkles in my skin like doing the under eye skin pinch test and the skin would not bounce back like it should.
        All is good now including my cholesteral levels. So like the Dr said, keep doing what you’re doing, so that’s what I’m gonna do.




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        1. ty for taking the time to reply gary. That’s interesting.. I do suffer with dry skin and would dearly love to be using my oil/lemon juice salad dressing even but I can’t seem to be able to get away with anything without a cholesterol increase. Well, good for you Gary! All the best to you




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          1. I think they now have vegan hyaluronic acid supplements that might help with dry skin; there’s also some good topical hyaluronic acid formulations out there.




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    2. Fish is not fruit nor vegetable, but fish is animal ,so fish is not human food. Fish is food for carnivore and omnivore animal species, and humans are frugivores :-)
      Thanks Dr.Greger an thanks to NF team !




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  11. the American Public will not be asked to “handle the truth” so long as BigCo Inc. & Assoc. are able to affect the decision making of regulatory agencies designed with the notion of protecting us.




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  12. My problem is not high blood pressure but low blood pressure. I am told that it means that my eyes don’t get enough blood circulation, making my glaucoma worse. I have tried to research for Hypotension, but no luck.




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  13. I love the new video series. This is THE video I need to share with an Argentine friend who has seen me change over the last five years from eating chicken, tuna fish, and dairy to strictly plant based, and getting very slim in the process. Today, after eating my usual plant based meal at home, I went to his home with homemade hummus to share. Then he fried pork, dumped some canned vegies on the plate with a slice of tomato, washing it down quickly with some powdered orange drink. He takes medication daily for high blood pressure and high cholesterol. Both concern him, but he won’t change his diet. He sampled the hummus on rice crackers and topped with curry powder, and liked it. I left a supply that should last the week. We have our blood pressure taken weekly at the park. Mine is always 100/60; his is usually 130/80 after taking medication for years, now age 74. I speak gently about how diet and exercise would change his life, but he’s not ready. He’s overweight and has no energy to do anything after sitting in a car all day. I know how a plant based diet would change his life and extend it. When the video is captioned in Spanish, I’ll make him watch it. Then it’s up to him to change.




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  14. If you’re on a plant based diet but still have bloodpressure of 162/91 what else could be the cause and what would be the best thing to do about it?




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    1. Could be too much salt, could be a problem with the blood flow to your kidneys, maybe a benign tumor on your adrenal gland. You need to see a doctor about this and hopefully they will give you tests to pinpoint the cause.




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    2. Hi Kathleen!
      Some people are very sensitive to oil and salt and sugar and even refined wholegrains (such as wholewheat pasta and breads). I would recommend a diet without those completely (not even a sprinkle of salt) and see how that goes. Base your meals something like-
      B- Oats/wholegrain/starchy vegetable + fruit and vegetables or salad
      L/D- Wholegrain/starchy vegetable + legume + vegetables/salad
      No salt, oil, sugar or refined grains.
      You can also try a few days on just greens/fruit juice for natural diuresis and BP reduction.
      Also have 1 TBLSP ground flax per day and add hibiscus tea if desired!
      Also you want to move your body everyday- at least 30-90 minutes of walking/cycling/yoga/weight training etc…
      Hope this helps!




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  15. Still another great video. I love what you are doing Dr.Greger. Keep it up. I’ve been on this trail since the 1970’s. So sad to see health care adulterated by greed.




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  16. Can I ash exactly where the graph at 5:12 comes from? I looked up the POLS Medicine reference & could not see the same graph…Thanks in advance for any help!




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  17. I totally agree with the video and the evidence presented however I am sadly an exception to the population data linking plant based diets to lower blood pressure. I’m an “outlier” so to speak. I was raised in a vegetarian household, had a brief period in my teens when I ate meat, and then returned to vegetarian at 19. I’m now 41 and vegan and have a fabulous well balanced diet consisting of vegetables, nuts, seeds, fruits, legumes etc. I’m a personal trainer and yoga teacher and for all intensive purposes, a very healthy person. Sadly however, I was diagnosed with hypertension at 16 years old (regularly clocking readings of 160/115) and have spent my life fearful of the impact on my heart and the potential for a stroke. I admitted defeat a couple of years ago and committed to medication because I don’t want to die or have a stroke, becoming a burden on my family. I had a couple of warnings where I ended up in hospital with malignantly high BP so I’m not taking any more chances. I guess I post this here in case anyone else is in a similar boat, or in case anyone has any suggestions for me. I’ve obviously had all the usual tests and a bunch of unorthodox ones (all costing thousands) to try and determine the cause and have tried all sorts of remedies. I would still love to understand how this can happen to someone like me but if all the doctors and alternative therapists I’ve seen over the years can’t figure it out what chance do I have! . Anyway… Thems the breaks huh? Kindly, Kylie




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    1. I should also clarify that I am vegan because of ethical reasons relating to the welfare of animals and protecting the environment, not for health reasons (Although I reap the benefits there too obviously, my BP just isn’t one of them!)




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        1. Hi Nani. Thanks for the response! All that was ever found was mildly sluggish thyroid, low level mercury toxicity and major gluten intolerance (but not coeliac). Everything else is normal. Do you think they could be implicated? What do you mean about salt and oil? I am probably a little heavy on the olive oil if I’m honest but as I literally eat no processed foods and add salt sparingly to cooking, so my salt intake is minimal.




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            1. Yes, I would go salt and oil free and see if that helps. I would eat celery and tomatoes for sodium needs. I would also eat a couple of Brazil nuts a day to help with the mercury detoxification.




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    2. Hi Kylie! I just wanted to add to the thoughts below, some people are very sensitive to oil and salt and sugar and even refined wholegrains (such as wholewheat pasta and breads). I would recommend a diet without those completely (not even a sprinkle of salt) and see how that goes. Base your meals something like-
      B- Oats/wholegrain/starchy vegetable + fruit and vegetables or salad
      L/D- Wholegrain/starchy vegetable + legume + vegetables/salad
      No salt, oil, sugar or refined grains.
      You can also try a few days on just greens/fruit juice for natural diuresis and BP reduction. Hope this helps!




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    1. Vegan is good, but not enough! You need a healthy vegan diet, a whole food plant based one, with no oil, lots of greens, legumes, seeds (flax, chia), fruits, no processed food (or little), no (or very little) added sugar, no (almost) salt, no white flour. Than your cholesterol will drop, and your BP and your weight…




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    2. Retromodgirl, I understand your frustration. I’ve been (McDougall) vegan – and yes, WFPB, no oil – for 9 years now. When I first made the change I lost weight. And then slowly put back 20 of the 30 original that I’d lost. Although I never had the high BP issue, my BP did lower, finally, when I figured out the problems in my healthy vegan diet. So here’s what I did. I went to McDougall’s site and watched a bunch of his webinars. They are open to all in the Education section (I believe) of his website. Watch the video on “How to Lose Weight” by Dr. Lim the new medical director at McDougall’s. He talks about the issue of nutrient density which I found very helpful. But also for myself I decided to eat any high calorie concentrated carbs in the morning/earlier part of the day. Rice, bread, potatoes, winter squash, grains. I do this so that my body has a chance to burn them off, especially if I am trying to lose weight. After 3 or 4pm I eat only low starch vegetables: leafy greens, broccoli, artichoke, cauliflower, giant salad, another giant salad if needed. Perhaps 1/2C beans or one small potato in the salad, but not very much. Just enough to feel satisfied. Then I also cut off the eating in such a way that I have a minimum of 12 hour fasting period before eating again the next day. This long period of no food consumption allows the body to burn off additional calories and also to perform its vital cleaning work. If you get hungry or just have that gnawing feeling, consume some herb tea. I’ve found chamomile with stevia helpful for that. It has taken me since January to do it, but I have now lost that extra 20 lbs I’ve gained and my BP went from a lifetime of 120/75 to now 110/65-70.
      In addition to the above, however, I added in some weight lifting exercise 2,3 times per week to build muscle since muscle burns calories faster than fat. Also 1/2 hr minimum of just walking or some sort of movement exercise. The weight came off very slowly but kept trending downward despite some variation in the week. Also, I am 63 years old, post menopausal, which makes losing weight a little more difficult. I want to add also that I made sure to add to my diet the list of foods that Dr. Esselstyn requires for his heart patients which put out the inflammation in the body, relax the arteries, and increase nitric oxide. Beets and beet greens are known to increase NO and flow in the arteries, which positively affects blood pressure.
      I, too, was frustrated with weight gain despite consuming a healthy vegan lifestyle. I just had to figure out how to make the diet work for me. I hope some of this is helpful. And good luck to you !! Keep the faith!.




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      1. I wanted to add that Esselstyn has 6 veggies that he recommends people eat who are trying to heal their cardiovascular system. Here are the 5 I can remember and if you know the 6th please speak up. They are beets, beet greens, arugula, kale, spinach. I’m guessing the last one is collards but it escapes me at the moment. He shares that chewing these veggies creates nitric oxide in the stomach which is then available for the cardiovascular system. It damps down inflammation but also relaxes the vasculature which lowers blood pressure. I have switched to spinach and baby kale salads from romain. Hope this is helpful to you.




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  18. Hello Dr Greger, I highly respect your work. I recently came across a situation where I faced a health problem which I could not prevent due to my lifestyle. As a curiosity, I determined that my health problem could have been prevented if I’d not followed that lifestyle. Thus, I was deeply driven to prevent health problems of others, and I created an application called Dr Prevent. This app helps you to prevent your health problems by changing your lifestyle. I would love if you could review and guide us through the same initiative that we have been working. Thanking you in advance.

    Link: https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.thigale.drtreatearly




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  19. I am 44 years old, I arrived to US in 2013, since then I have been gaining weight , I am 40 pounds heavier now, and my blood pressure have been going up too, currently I am taking 3 different pills for my BP, and still not controlled , almost always over 150/100, I understand the power of plants, I have been trying to follow this diet, but I found it is hard to me, I know , my life is at stake, any advise please.




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    1. Hi, Manuel. I am a volunteer here at NF. Congratulations on recognizing the need to make lifestyle changes for your health! That is an important step. You say that you have been trying to follow this diet, but that it is hard. Without knowing more, it is difficult to answer your question. What is it about the diet that is hard for you?




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  20. It’s crazy, I know the 1h talk by hard now having watched your seminars, individual videos and read the book sever times over!

    Question:
    I’m a medical student, planning on presenting my master’s thesis next year (covering nutritional deficiencies in obese kids and the beneficial effects of weight loss on the matter). My question is what type of software, app, template you use for these presentations? I’ve been wondering this for over a year now, and I think now is the right way to ask as I’m inspired to present my thesis similarly.

    I’m sure you guys read and hear this too much already, but BEST WORK EVER. Nutritionfacts.org is a revolution in medicine and nutrition. So grateful for this incredible resource.

    Take care,
    Thomas.




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  21. I think the “Blood Pressure in the African Native.” article is misrepresented in this video.

    The text “The diet was based primarily on cereals, principally maize, with legumes, vegetables, fruit, and wild greens.” that is superimposed over this article, is not in the article. The only statement I could find that the author makes directly about diet is: “Meat is frequently consumed by the races in South Kavirondo [the African population that was studied], though possibly not to the extent that it is consumed in England.”

    The author proposes 3 theories for the blood pressure differences:

    1) Chronic infection – the author appears to discount this theory.

    2) Derivatives of protein digestion – the author does not seem to believe this theory (he makes the meat comment above), but keeps an open mind, saying: “In this connexion, some observations upon blood pressure in the Masai tribe, who feed largely on milk and ox blood, would be of interest.”

    3) Mental stress – this appears to be the theory supported by the author. He says, in part: “I suggest that … the greater mental stress required by the European citizen in his everyday life, as a result of the tendencies of modern civilisation, has had its effect upon the physiology as well as the pathology of the race.




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    1. I’ve ordered the article through my institution, in order to check the content as you’ve done. If I can confirm that the claim about diet zoomed and superimposed in the video is not in the article text, I’ll post here. This would seriously undermine my confidence in Dr. G’s research team, since I’ve assumed that these zoomed and superimposed passages are always verbatim quotations from the source. If they’re not, and especially if they contradict the source, that’s worth knowing.




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        1. @guest I received the article and can confirm exactly what you reported: The statement, “The diet was based primarily on cereals, principally maize, with legumes, vegetables, fruit, and wild greens”, presented in the video as a quotation from the Lancet article, doesn’t appear in the article (which is only two pages) anywhere. The only comment about diet is the one you quoted, “Meat is frequently consumed by the races in South Kavirondo, though possibly not to the extent that it
          is consumed in England.” So the only conclusion we can draw about diet from this article is that the Africans studied probably ate somewhat less meat than English people of the time, but still consumed it frequently. It’s reasonable to surmise that the rest of their diet was unprocessed whole plant foods, but it’s not stated. There’s nothing at all to suggest that this population was vegan or “near vegan”, to use a phrase we sometimes see. So, whatever the explanation of the low blood pressure readings for these people as they age, it’s not absence of meat in the diet.

          This is extremely disappointing in terms of the credibility of the video, which clearly invites us to conclude that the absence of hypertension has something to do with the absence of meat. It’s worse that the statement about diet that’s presented as a quotation simply isn’t one.

          It’s interesting that pyorrhea, or periodontitis, was common in those under 30 and “almost universal” in those older than that. Whatever they were eating wasn’t protecting them against gum disease.




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          1. Todd: Just in case you did not see it, I wanted to make sure you are aware of the reply from the NutritionFacts staff who looked into this issue today. @stevenl said that the quote in question came from a different study which has now been added to the Sources Cited list. Thanks for your follow up on this as it caught people’s eyes.




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            1. @Thea I appreciate the response to the problem, which *guest* noticed. I wouldn’t have thought to check the original article until he/she first did it. I think, however, the error still leaves the video in a problematic state. The issue is the 20 seconds from 0:37 to 0:57 where Dr. G explains how we’ve known since the 1920s that BP need not go up with age. That knowledge is based on the 1929 Lancet article by Donnison, from which the BP tables zoomed in the video are also taken. It’s useful to know that the Kenyan people studied maintained low BP into their senior years, and also useful to know that this effect can’t be entirely credited to a plant-based diet, since the researchers reported that they were frequent consumers of meat. No one watching this video would be able to figure this out. Instead, you’d get the impression, as most of us did, that the protective effect (for BP) was due to a vegan or near-vegan diet, since that’s what the superimposed quotation from the other article describes.

              The article that mentions the near-vegan diet of “cereals, principally maize, with legumes, vegetables, fruit, and wild greens”, by Walker and Walker, is from 1978, not the 1920s. Moreover, it’s a study of HDL cholesterol, not blood pressure. Blood pressure is mentioned only in passing. Of the 98 men and 184 women in the 60-69 age bracket, “seven elderly men and 27 elderly women had a diastolic pressure of 90 mm of Hg or more.” Since that would be considered elevated pressure, that means at least 13% of the seniors had hypertension. In fact, a diastolic pressure of 80 or more would be considered elevated. We aren’t told how many of the seniors fell into this category, but presumably it would be more than the 13% with diastolic pressure over 90. It’s mentioned that seven of the eleven men were smokers, but none of the women were, so that doesn’t appear to be the full explanation.

              If we compare the Walker & Walker results with the 1929 results *for hypertension*, the interesting question is, why do these South Africans on a near-vegan diet have worse BP results than the Kenyans on a diet of regular meat consumption? Logically, there is no basis for using the 1978 Walker & Walker article as some kind of support for conclusions reached on the basis of the 1929 Donnison study. Adding the Walker & Walker study to the Sources Cited doesn’t change this, since it has no relevance to the diet of the 1929 Kenyans.

              In my opinion, this video needs to be taken down and edited. As it stands, it is simply not logically sound and is potentially misleading.




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                  1. Sorry it’s taken me so long to chime in I’ve been on the road and it’s just so hard to get anything done. Thank you so so much for pointing this serious discrepancy out. I wish I could put all full-text links in the Sources Cited section so everyone could have immediate full access to all of the primary literature. You could always access pretty much any scientific paper in history by going to http://www.sci-hub.cc, but of course I wouldn’t encourage that because it’s not legal. Wouldn’t want access to life-saving medical research (much of which paid for by tax-dollars) to be a human right or anything. So again, I wouldn’t recommend going to http://www.sci-hub.cc to check the original sources yourself. If people did, though, it would certainly help catch mistakes like these.

                    I’ll have to go back and see what happened here and fix it. If I remember correctly, the Chinese study was more explicit about diet composition, but the Kenyan study didn’t go into detail, so I must have had one of my researchers search for papers that better describe the traditional per-Westernization Kenyan diet and then when the final presentation was created the quote got mismatched to the paper. I’ll definitely add it to my list of videos I want to redo, but it doesn’t change the substance of the argument.

                    The African and Asian studies were just to show that we’ve known that hypertension is not just a natural, inevitable consequence of aging for nearly a century. The question then becomes, OK, then what factors were at play. Maybe it had absolutely nothing to do with diet at all! That was just to establish that there appeared to be some sort of external cause, which then brings us to the modern era of nutritional research (like the Harvard, Adventist, and interventional studies I cite) in which people’s diets are actually nailed down. Then it can be put to the test (like the what happens to pressures when you give meat to a vegetarian study). It’s like the atherosclerosis work, where first it was established in networks of missionary hospitals set up throughout subsaharan Africa that heart disease was not inevitable, but it wasn’t until Ornish reversed it in a randomized controlled trial in 1990 that it was proven to be lifestyle related (and Esselstyn’s work further honed it down to be the diet). This is all not to excuse the mix-up. Thank you so much for helping to keep this site as evidence-based and error-free as possible!




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                    1. Dr. Greger: re first paragraph. What a fun Saturday morning read. I literally laughed out loud! My household came running to ask what was happening. :-)




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                    2. @Michael_Greger_MD:disqus Thank you for the reply. I wasn’t aware of http://www.sci-hub.cc/ but now that I am I’ll be sure to avoid it at every opportunity… At any rate, I have no problem using my institutional access to get stuff. I’m very interested in this topic because I am myself taking meds for hypertension but I’d like to discontinue them as soon as it is safely possible to do so. I’m only about three weeks into my current WFPB experiment. I did about three weeks before, in late August, then lapsed into chaos for a while.

                      I agree that they 1929 Donnison paper about the Kenyans does help to establish the claim that hypertension is not an inevitable concomitant of aging, even on an omnivorous diet, but since the dietary details are left pretty vague we can’t say much more than that, from that study anyway. To say that the Kenyans ate meat frequently but probably less often than an ordinary Englishman isn’t really saying anything very specific at all. I imagine the typical English diet at that time contained a lot of traditional animal foods: sausages, cheese, meat pies, mutton, Scotch eggs, blood puddings, clotted cream, and so on. It’s a safe bet the Kenyans weren’t eating anything like that, and the non-meat component of their diet was very likely starches and whole plant foods. But we just don’t know. All we can say with any confidence is that they were omnivores of some sort. Their “frequent” meat consumption may have been, by modern standards, abstemious.

                      Anyway, thanks again for the reply. It’s anything but easy to navigate through all of these published articles. I appreciate the work that goes into it.




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                    3. Hi Todd – As is customary on NutritionFacts.org, anyone who points out an error gets a free DVD or book of their choice! Please email me at steven (at) nutritionfacts.org with your choice and mailing address and we will get it out to you :) Thanks again!




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                    4. @stevenl That’s very kind, but the book or DVD should go to *guest*, who first noticed the discrepancy between what was on the screen and the content of the Lancet article! My contribution was only a follow-up.




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                    5. The Chinese study was more explicit about diet composition. It says: “In all cases the chief diet of these mountaineers is corn and not too abundant in amount; the Chwan Miao eat some rice. Meat is not used as a general diet, being almost entirely limited to weddings, funerals, and celebrations. Milk, butter, and cheese are not used in either group. Vegetables are sparsely eaten.”

                      Interestingly, the study subjects in the Chinese and Kenyan studies all lived at high altitudes. The Chinese study states: “All these people live in the mountains above sea level, the Chwan Miao at or about 3000 ft., the Ta Hwa Miao at 7-9000 ft., and the Noso at 5-10,000 ft.” The Kenyan study states the following: “It should be pointed out that the investigations at Kisii
                      were carried out at an altitude of about 5700 feet, and, on tour, in country varying in altitude between 3500 and 5000 feet.

                      The Kenyan study discounts altitude as being a factor: “It seems unlikely that such altitudes could have any marked influence upon the blood pressure of inhabitants.” However, in this article on blood pressure (not cited in the video) “Prevalence of Hypertension in Indian Tribes: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Observational Studies” (http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371%2Fjournal.pone.0095896#pone.0095896-Appleton1), it states: “The lower prevalence in Himalayan and north-eastern region (higher altitude regions) as compared to other regions could be partly explained by altitudinal differences. The BP lowering effect of high altitudes is a well-established fact i.e., chronic hypoxic stress at high altitudes leads to vasodilation and consequent fall in BP.”




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        2. Hello – As is customary on NutritionFacts.org, anyone who points out an error gets a free DVD or book of their choice! Please email me at steven (at) nutritionfacts.org with your choice and mailing address and we will get it out to you :) Thanks again!




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          1. Thanks. That is kind of you, but I’m set. I have more to read and view right now than I can handle. I’ve had How Not to Die for weeks, and I’m only about a third of the way through.




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    2. Thank you so much for pointing this out. The text “The diet was based primarily on cereals, principally maize, with legumes, vegetables, fruit, and wild greens” is actually from another article, “High high-density-lipoprotein cholesterol in African children and adults in a population free of coronary heart disease” and has been added to the “Sources Cited” section above.




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  22. What if your blood pressure is like 110 over 70 but maybe even lower in some circumstances and you feel that it is too low?
    Because I feel so. I feel rather sleepy all day long. I fall asleep very quickly – at an instant (and before going vegan a year ago it wasn’t like this). Because I am so thin/bony when I go to sleep I am later covered with dents/almost bruises (no fat to cushion me) which are painful because there was no circulation. And it’s not a matter of my bed because I bought myself the best bed there and it wasn’t enough (it’s medium hard). I had to buy 3 inches tall upper foam (hardness: soft) in order for the bed to be soft and only now it is somehow possible for me to sleep in it. These two layers do a good job (and you can’t buy a mattress which has layers like medium hard and soft in it, they will always be both medium hard). Otherwise the problem persists.
    What do I do? Seriously.




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    1. Low blood pressure doesn’t usually cause tiredness? Do you feel symptomatic, such as fainting or dizziness?

      110/70 really isn’t that low, it’s just low compared to the fat sick average person.

      How much water do you drink? One thing I have seen help people is some vegetable broth (homemade) as it contains natural sodium.

      Can you gain a little weight? Such as incorporating some weight lifting/strength building exercises and more calorically dense foods such as nuts, seeds, legumes etc…

      This is quite helpful for healthy weight gain-
      https://www.drmcdougall.com/misc/2003nl/jul/030700puhowdoigainweight.htm




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    2. I wonder if you are eating enough calories.

      Your blood pressure may actually be ideal
      http://nutritionfacts.org/video/how-not-to-die-from-high-blood-pressure/

      However your apparent emaciation and tiredness are symptoms that need checking out. Some completely vegetarian diets may not supply sufficient calories and this could be the cause of those symptoms. However, I would suggest a check-up by a physician because there are other possible causes of your symptoms,




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  23. I’ve viewed all your videos on hypertension, but have not seen much information presented regarding a common type of hypertension often found in women over 60. As an older fairly active woman of healthy weight and BMI, following a plant-based diet, my systolic pressure varies from 120-170 (and when it is elevated, I am quite concerned) but the diastolic number always remains constant at about 70-74. I have a low heart rate, resting 48-52. I do not take any medical treatments for BP other than diet and various teas (hybiscus, for one). I am curious about what’s in the literature about isolated systolic hypertension and about dietary treatment. Dr. McDougall cautions people about
    over treatment of systolic hypertension.




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      1. I consider myself >95% plant-based. My salt intake is very low salt — I rarely add it to anything I cook. What little oil I use is olive oil. I stay away from sugar pretty much completely — my only sweets are fresh or dried fruit, occasionally a teaspoon of honey in my oatmeal, but not usually. Grains I eat are whole grains (only rarely refined). 1-2 x/ month wild caught salmon, 1-2x per year I may have range-raised, grass-fed beef. I stay away from dairy, eggs & chicken completely. I enjoy a glass of red wine in the evening. I’ve made a study of tea and its benefits, and drink various herbal teas throughout the day, most are organic in origin. A few years back I had a health scare, amarosis fugax and my BP in the ER was 170/70. After a year of various testing to determine if the transient vision loss was embolic or not (neurological exams, brain scans, cardiac exams, bubble study, carotid echo, you name it, I had the test) it was determined by rule out diagnosis that it was non-embolic and likely the result of spasms in the retinal artery. I had a few more episodes of amarosis fugax over the year of testing, but as I changed my diet to plant-based, the episodes diminished and I’ve been incident free for a few years now. During all the tests, it was discovered that I had non-diagnostic nodules on my thyroid and also had Hashimoto’s. The only medication I take is synthroid for thyroid replacement and the endocrinologist is watching the nodules. In my youth, I always had BP of <120/70. I'm wondering if there is a connection between thyroid and BP.




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        1. Another thing I was thinking… have you been tested for sleep apnea? It’s a common cause of isolated elevated systolic BP.
          With regards to diet, some people have to be much stricter than others to maintain optimal BP, sometimes near enough isn’t enough. As in NO oil and NO salt, not just a little olive oil. May seem unfair but better change what goes in your mouth than have the consequences of high BP. Caffeine in your tea? Do you do some form of relaxation (yoga, meditation)?, get plenty of sleep, exercise? Maybe consider an appointment with a plant-based physician as there are a lot of factors here it’s hard to address everything in an online comment! There are strong links between thyroid and BP, for example-
          https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3230087/

          https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/3338842

          https://thyroidresearchjournal.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/1756-6614-1-3




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  24. I’ve been a lacto-vegetarian for 35 years until about 3 months ago. For the last two years I’ve been cutting back on dairy and being vegan on an off. I’m mostly vegan now. About once a week some dairy barges its way into my diet. I used to eat so much cheese I called myself a fromageterian. My blood pressure was often spiking to 155/95 and was typically 130-40/80-90. Now it is typically 120-130/70-80 but I didn’t accomplish that on diet alone. I am taking a ton of nutritional supplements I learned about in Sherry Rogers book Blood Pressure Hoax. I also got some info from Linus Pauling. The main things I do that got my blood pressure in the safe zone are these daily: 3,000mg Vit C, 1,000mg Lysine, 500mg magnesium, proline 500mg and Niacin 1,000mg. There are 35 all together that I take but I plan to cut way back once my weight is down. My doctor tells me that if I loose twenty pounds and my sleep apnea goes away as a result then my blood pressure should be normal. So I’m on a diet and trying to get some exercise in which of course can only help blood pressure go down. My diet is vegan lots of fruit, veg, and beans, mostly mung bean soup and very little grains. I’ve lost 10lbs so far. So my point is that you many not experience immediate results by going vegan or mostly vegan, especially if you are overweight and have family history of high blood pressure. But don’t be discouraged, do more research and do more. You may need to loose weight and/or use supplements.




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    1. Looks like you were/are vegan but your diet was/is not healthful. That’s why you were/are overweight, that’s why your blood pressure was too high. Too much cheese equals too much saturated fat (among other bad things). Imagine someone whose diet is french fries and beer – it’s vegan all right but it’s not healthful. Now you have to understand what was done incorrectly in case of your diet.




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      1. Mick, yes my diet had to be part of the problem but now it isn’t and I still need supplements because I’m still overweight. I think once the extra weight is off I will see if the blood pressure is okay without supplements.




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  25. I copied this information from Payoung, NF Moderator from a page on heart disease. Since so many are asking about some resistently high Blood pressures, I thought it informative to share. Here it is.
    • Reply•Share ›

    Avatar
    payoung NF Moderator Bart McKnight • 2 days ago
    Hi Bart,
    Sorry to take so long to get back to you. I generally don’t have much time to comment on the site outside of my scheduled shift which is Monday evenings so hopefully you will see this reply.
    The reason I was asking is because I often hear the same scenario you’re describing when people are checking their BP several times a day and blood pressure does fluctuate depending on the time of day and many other factors in your life and environment (as Thea alluded to). It does seem however that you are doing it right. Checking first thing in the morning when you first wake up.
    The reason I asked if you had had high blood pressure prior to your change was to get a sense of whether or not there might have been something in the change that precipitated the increase in BP or if this was a problem you were already struggling with, and based on your answer it seems to be the later.
    Given that you’ve had the problem long before your diet change, I would think of other more rare causes for hypertension that are not as dependent on diet and lifestyle. The first that would come to mind would be renal artery stenosis. Sometime people can have a narrowing in one of the renal arteries (arteries that bring blood supply to the kidney) which can be structural in nature but can be the cause of hypertension. I’m certainly not saying that this is a likely cause in your case because you would typically see much higher pressures with renal artery stenosis (unless the narrowing was very slight) but since the screening test is relatively noninvasive and easy to do (a renal ultrasound) it might be worth exploring. I don’t know if you have ever been on blood pressure medication but if you have, and were still unable to get your blood pressure down to acceptable levels then that would strengthen the argument for ruling out renal artery stenosis in my opinion.
    Let me also warn you that the BP numbers you are averaging are at the upper limit of normal for most conventional docs (although I thoroughly recognize that the goal should be for optimal numbers not acceptable numbers) so they might not be as concerned as you are and may not feel its worth looking into further.
    There are a few other conditions that cause resistant high blood pressure like Pheochromocytoma (a pretty rare tumor of the adrenal gland) however in the absence of other symptoms and very high numbers or very wild swings in your pressure I doubt thats what you are dealing with.
    I would have a conversation with your doctor and let him or her know of your concerns and see if they have any other suggestions and perhaps see what they think of ordering a renal artery ultrasound.




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    1. Olivia: Nice! I often repeat what others say (and give credit like you did), because there are some really amazing posts in the forum that can get lost. Thanks for taking the time to share a super good, quality post when so many others are asking the same question.




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  26. You state repeatedly that you read every nutrition journal published to bring us the most updated scientific information…
    Yet predictably you cite studies conducted decades ago. The Kenyan study, 87 years ago. Does this really qualify as best information available? Or even credible since the variables are innumerable? I think there are far more compelling reasons to eat a vegan diet.




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    1. I did a quick review looking at the studies cited in How Not to Die from High Blood Pressure and could find no indication of if there was a analysis of the meat consumed (whether organic or not). However, before we conclude that the findings would be less true if organic meat was used, I think a review of the benefits of organics is warranted, especially focusing on meat. Such studies seem to be lacking. (See:
      <a href="http://nutritionfacts.org/video/are-organic-foods-healthier/&quot; )Yes, organic reduces exposure to pesticides, but that would not suggest that organic meat decreases the saturated fat, cholestrerol, and other health risks associated with meat and high blood pressure.




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    2. Just to add to Joan’s reply, I would like to repeat something I have previously posted about Uruguayan beef. This is all organic, grass-fed, no-growth hormones etc etc. Yet they have found that that the more (organic0 BEEF THEY EAT IN uRUGUAY




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      1. Agreed Tom! Browsed the articles you posted. I think there is a common misconception that organic equates healthy food. There are many other factors in beef/red meat that have other connections to chronic diseases including saturated fat and heart disease, how meats are cooked and various cancers etc.




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  27. Since in Rural China and Kenya you mentioned the studies showed the population had such low (normal) blood pressure, did they also live longer than Westerners eating meat, dairy & eggs ? I know that high blood pressure causes many other diseases such as stroke, heart attack, erectile dysfunction, etc….




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  28. If anyone has any suggestions

    I have isolated diastolic blood pressure with normal systolic. My diastolic is in the 80s.

    I have been plant based for over 7 months.




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  29. My 90 year old father eats a fairly typical American diet- lots of meat, sugars and not a lot of greens, though he does drink V8 daily- but he exercises a LOT, walking, cutting loading and chopping his own firewood. He does not drink, never smoked and his BP is low, around 100/60. Maybe exercise has more to do with it than it’s given credit for.




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  30. I had hypertension on a balanced diet with daily exercise when I was 47 and it resolved within three months after going plant based. Five years later at age 52 I’m at 110/70. Still get a slight white coat effect at Dr. visits due to adrenaline surge. I think the Drs. know where to draw the line. White coat effect on top of resting hypertension can spike it up to 200+/100+. Happened to me once.




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    1. This is very similar to another study that’s gotten alot of scrutiny called the ACCORD study wherein type 2 diabetics were put under tight or loose control. Surprisingly the tightly controlled diabetics did worse than those under looser control – another U shaped curve. If you read through the entire study – and thanks for the link to the full text – they speculate in the discussion that despite excluding people with severe diseases that might confound the results making them a more sickly portion of the population it was speculated that people that have had higher blood pressure up until the intervention of the study may have problems with end organ perfusion and other metabolic functions that may have depended upon the higher blood pressure causing them to have a higher mortality rate. At the time of writing they could only speculate. My background as a pathologists would love to see some tissue sections as I think those reasons are highly likely and would not be hard to demonstrate microscopically. Clearly this is an area that will probably see more research as we have been telling people to get their blood pressure lower and lower and it seems that there may be a higher cut off point. Stay tuned and thanks again for the article.




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  31. In several of the video’s, as well as in the book, you mention that the occurrence of heart disease in traditional plant eating cultures is almost non-existent. But if they don’t die of heart disease and have less prevalence of cancers, how do these people then die?




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  32. Since my 20’s I suffer from so called essential hypertension. Since that time I take a daily dosis of 10 mg of Enalapril.
    During all those years (I’m 65 now) my lifestyle did become gradually more healthy. No processed foods, no extra salt, no smoking, vegetarian and since 5 years vegan, daily long distance running, eating a lot of fresh vegetables, fruits, flaxseed, oatmeal, etc. From time to time I’ve tried to stop taking Enalapril, but unfortunately my blood pressure went up again directly.
    My question is whether it still makes any sense to try to stop my Enalapril intake now and then to see what happens.
    My bloodpressure is around 71/122 (as measured today)




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  33. Hi Dr. Greger. My wife and I love your site. We both became vegans. We have friends who promote the idea that meat is healthy, and better than fruits and vegetables. An article came out on ncbi – https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27881394 which has been picked up by those who use it to promote eating meat as a health choice.

    For example, today UK’s Daily Mail then promoted this report as proof that Purdue University’s study – really an analysis of 24 prior studies – shows eating meat does not negatively affect cholesterol and blood pressure over the short term, not mentioning the long term. See http://www.dailymail.co.uk/health/article-4052606/Eating-red-meat-does-NOT-hurt-heart-New-study-insists-large-portions-beef-pork-wonders-blood-pressure.html And the same article extols the vitamins in meat. Here is a key quote: “According to the study, eating more than the recommended daily amount of red meat does not affect short-term heart disease risk factors, such as blood pressure and blood cholesterol.”

    I am wondering if they selectively chose these 24 studies. Because much of the studies you cite, I believe, prove the opposite both on the short term and long term. Can you help?




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    1. Hi Douglas, Thanks for posting these links. I’d seen some reference to these articles in the past few days but didn’t read the references until now. It is unfortunate that I don’t have access to the full text of the review article but two things stand out to me after reading both links. 1) Of over 900+ articles he chose 24 studies to review which makes me wonder about the other 900 articles? 2) Dr. Campbell from Perdue is a reviewer for the USDA as well as several other organizations. I’ve posted the link to his university bio and you can see that much of his published writings are about the health benefits of all sorts of animal proteins. Pretty much what you would expect from someone that does his work for the USDA. As in all things one must consider the source and make your own conclusions. Hope this helps. https://www.purdue.edu/hhs/nutr/directory/faculty/campbell_wayne.html




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  34. This is my biggest frustration. I’ve gone WFPB since Aug. 1st and dropped my cholesterol meds since then, lost 30 pounds, nearly eliminated my heart-burn meds, stopped snoring at night and feel great! But….my blood pressure has not dropped and when I measure it at home (measure it weekly) it is frequently 145/95 and I’m still on 2 blood pressure meds. Does it take awhile for blood pressure to correct itself or am I destined to live with it?




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    1. Hi Patrick, congratulations on your success so far. Its hard to say without knowing more about your medical history and knowing exactly what you are eating. If you changed your diet almost 5 months ago and you’re still needing to take some heart-burn meds (I’m presuming you mean something like omeprazole) then there’s likely some things about your diet that need to be tweaked. If so, that may be contributing to your blood pressure. In my experience heart-burn is one of the first things to disappear on a WFPBD.
      Try taking your blood pressure every day at the same time of day (as soon as you awake in the morning, before you even get out of bed) for two or three weeks. then average those numbers to get a better idea of your average blood pressure as opposed to just looking at the highest readings. blood pressure can fluctuate from minute to minute depending on what you are doing at the time so you have to look at averages.
      Finally perhaps you can speak with your doctor about looking into potential underlying causes for your elevated blood pressure. Many people have renal artery stenosis (narrowing of the arteries that bring blood to the kidney). Through a complicated feedback mechanism the kidney regulates blood pressure based on the amount of blood flow it receives. If the renal artery is narrowed thus decreasing the amount of blood flow the kidney sees, the kidney increases blood pressure in an effort to preserve vital organs. As simple non-invasive ultrasound can determine if one or both of your renal arteries are narrowed.
      These are a few things you can explore, hope that helps.




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  35. Hi Dr. Greger –

    I eat 100% plant based, including lots of celery, blueberries, non-fat cocoa and zero added salt (total sodium from plants only ~ 1g / day). I exercise. I eat no oil. I think I’m doing everything correctly. Yet my BP remains extremely high. I am tremendously frustrated.

    My cardiologist says it’s genetic, there is no way to specify the particular cause (as in genes) and the ONLY way to deal with it is to go on meds. Sigh. I am so very frustrated.

    I welcome your comments, Dr. G, or those of any qualified medical or RD people, if you’re willing.

    Thanks,
    Rob




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    1. HI Rob – I’m a dietitian and volunteer moderator who helps Dr. G. answer questions. Your diet sounds awesome …. low in sodium and I’m sure high in Mg, K, and Ca from plant sources…. all the right ‘ingredients’ to support reduced blood pressure. I’m going to toss out a few other lifestyle factors for you to consider. Maybe you’re already good with these, but just in case … Stress is a big one – how do you manage stress? Exercise, meditation? Also, body weight is an independent risk factor for hypertension. If you have any weight to lose, keep in mind just a 5% loss can have a significant positive impact on BP. Even breaking up sedentary time if you have a desk job for example is also an important component of managing BP. I wish you every success with managing BP through lifestyle change but as moderator payoung mentioned above there may be other medical factors to consider and discuss with your doctor as well.




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  36. Dr. Greger and The Team… I would love you to help me with my mom’s problem. All doctors only want to give her drugs… Upon awakening, her blood pressure is high, almost 160/100… then as the day goes on, it gets lower, and after lunch and on it’s about 120/80-ish…

    She has been plant-based for over 5 years. She is retired, 72 years, fit, walks daily 15,000 steps, works out with weights 4-5 days a week. She doesn’t take any drugs/medicines. She cooks all her food (no salty restaurant food). Why this super high morning pressure?

    My theory is that she snores at night, and maybe the lack of oxygen makes her heart work harder? She does drink a little alcohol, maybe a glass or two of wine in the evenings, which I want her to stop. Any ideas what it could be. She has been scheduled to other heart doctors, and they all don’t even care about plant-based foods and immediately want to give her drugs. Any thought or ideas would be very welcome. Thank you!




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    1. Hello Suzanna,
      Sorry to hear about your mother’s blood pressure problem. I am a family doctor in private practice, and a volunteer moderator for this website. I have several thoughts:
      1) You may be on to something with her snoring. Snoring often goes along with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA), and this in turn can directly cause high blood pressure. Her doctor can order a “sleep study”, which can determine if she has OSA; if so, then using a “CPAP” machine at night can help resolve both the sleep apnea and the hypertension.
      2) Some people are extremely sensitive to sodium (salt) in their food. Your mother might be one of those, in which case she could benefit from being on a “very low sodium” diet — less than 500 mg per day. It might be worth a try to put her on this type of diet for a couple weeks and see what happens.
      3) There are other causes of “secondary” hypertension (see Payoung’s comments above), including renal artery stenosis. A good internist can order the necessary studies to rule these out.

      I hope this helps. If none of this pans out, she might just have to take some medication. However, we now know that for people over 60 who have mild hypertension (systolic BP 140-150), and who don’t have diabetes or chronic kidney disease, the risks of antihypertensive medications outweighs the benefits.

      I hope this helps, some.




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  37. Dear Dr. Greger hello,

    You are doing an enormous good by having this website. Nutritionfacts.org is a beacon of knowledge that guides ignorant minds to salvation.

    With every article, I write to my blog thirsty4health.com I always try to link your site with as many articles of yours possible because people like you and the work you are doing should be promoted and advertised with any mean possible.
    Keep the amazing work.
    Have a healthy and happy day.
    My warmest Regards,
    Andreas Michaelides




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  38. This is very similar to another study that’s gotten alot of scrutiny called the ACCORD study wherein type 2 diabetics were put under tight or loose control. Surprisingly the tightly controlled diabetics did worse than those under looser control – another U shaped curve. If you read through the entire study – and thanks for the link to the full text – they speculate in the discussion that despite excluding people with severe diseases that might confound the results making them a more sickly portion of the population it was speculated that people that have had higher blood pressure up until the intervention of the study may have problems with end organ perfusion and other metabolic functions that may have depended upon the higher blood pressure causing them to have a higher mortality rate. At the time of writing they could only speculate. My background as a pathologists would love to see some tissue sections as I think those reasons are highly likely and would not be hard to demonstrate microscopically. Clearly this is an area that will probably see more research as we have been telling people to get their blood pressure lower and lower and it seems that there may be a higher cut off point. Stay tuned and thanks again for the article.




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