BPA on Receipts: Getting Under Our Skin

BPA on Receipts: Getting Under Our Skin
4.6 (92%) 5 votes

Using skin lotion or hand sanitizer before touching thermal paper (cash register receipts and printed tickets) can facilitate the absorption of BPA into the body.

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Below is an approximation of this video’s audio content. To see any graphs, charts, graphics, images, and quotes to which Dr. Greger may be referring, watch the above video.

The plastics chemical BPA was banned from baby bottles in Canada in 2008, in France in 2010, in all of Europe in 2011, and in the United States in 2012. But in 2015, France forbid the use of BPA “in any food or beverage packaging”—something the U.S. FDA decided was not warranted. But, what about the 90+ studies reporting links between BPA levels in people’s urine, with a wide array of adverse health outcomes—”including a[n apparent] significant increase in the likelihood of developing [heart disease] and…diabetes, obesity, impaired liver, immune, and kidney function, inflammation, reproductive effects in women…and men…, altered thyroid [function], and [developmental] deficits in children, such as aggressiveness, hyperactivity, and impaired learning.”

Only a very small minority of studies appear to support the federal government’s assertions that there were no effects at low doses. So, where’s the disconnect? Governments determine safety levels by sticking tubes down into the stomachs of lab animals. The BPA is released directly into the stomach, where it goes to the liver to be detoxified into an inactive form, called BPA-glucuronide. So, very little active BPA gets into the bloodstream.

But, that’s not what studies on humans show—people have active BPA in their blood. And so, the FDA response was to reject all such human studies as implausible. The problem with a blanket rejection of human data is that there may be sources of BPA exposure that are not modeled by stomach tube exposure in rats. After all, “[T]his isn’t how food enters our bodies,” actually. “We chew it, move it around in our mouths…before it enters the stomach.” And, it turns out “BPA can be completely absorbed directly into the bloodstream from the mouth,” thus bypassing instant liver detoxification. The same would be the case for BPA absorbed through the skin.

So-called thermal paper is 1 to 2% BPA by weight. That’s like “cash register receipts, luggage tags, [and] bus/train…lottery tickets.” Taking hold of a receipt can transfer BPA to our fingers, especially if they’re wet or greasy. But, does it then get absorbed into our system through the skin?

Well, cashiers were found to have more BPA flowing through their bodies. But, that was just based on a few people. Same problem with those studies showing those eating more plant-based diets having lower levels of BPA: too small of a sample size to really make a conclusion. It’s been estimated that even cashiers handling receipts all day long may not exceed the tolerable intake. However, if they’re using something like hand cream, that could change.

“…[M]any skin care products…hand sanitizers, lotions, soaps and sunscreens, contain…chemicals that [enhance skin penetration].” So, using a hand sanitizer before touching a receipt could, in theory, cause a breakdown of the skin barrier. Theoretically, that is—until now.

We now know that holding a receipt and eating food, after using hand sanitizer, results in high blood levels of active BPA. Researchers at the University of Missouri “conducted [a] study to mimic aspects of the behavior of people in a fast-food restaurant where [they] observed people using [a] hand sanitizer,…handling a…receipt,…and eating food with their hands.” They found that when people handled the receipt right after using Purell, BPA was transferred to their fingers, then fries, and then the combination of absorption through the skin and the mouth led to significant levels of active BPA in their blood.

You can hold a receipt in your hand for 60 seconds, and only come away with 3 micrograms in your body. Whereas, if you pre-wet your hands with hand sanitizer, you get 300 in just a few seconds—a hundred times more. These findings show that just a few seconds touching a receipt after using something like hand lotion could transfer large amounts of BPA.

And so, this could explain why dozens of human studies show active BPA in people’s systems—contrary to the assumptions based on stomach tube studies in rodents. When actual evidence contradicts your assumptions, you reject the assumptions. But, what the FDA did was instead reject the evidence.

Please consider volunteering to help out on the site.

Image credit: MPCA Photos via flickr. Image has been modified.

Below is an approximation of this video’s audio content. To see any graphs, charts, graphics, images, and quotes to which Dr. Greger may be referring, watch the above video.

The plastics chemical BPA was banned from baby bottles in Canada in 2008, in France in 2010, in all of Europe in 2011, and in the United States in 2012. But in 2015, France forbid the use of BPA “in any food or beverage packaging”—something the U.S. FDA decided was not warranted. But, what about the 90+ studies reporting links between BPA levels in people’s urine, with a wide array of adverse health outcomes—”including a[n apparent] significant increase in the likelihood of developing [heart disease] and…diabetes, obesity, impaired liver, immune, and kidney function, inflammation, reproductive effects in women…and men…, altered thyroid [function], and [developmental] deficits in children, such as aggressiveness, hyperactivity, and impaired learning.”

Only a very small minority of studies appear to support the federal government’s assertions that there were no effects at low doses. So, where’s the disconnect? Governments determine safety levels by sticking tubes down into the stomachs of lab animals. The BPA is released directly into the stomach, where it goes to the liver to be detoxified into an inactive form, called BPA-glucuronide. So, very little active BPA gets into the bloodstream.

But, that’s not what studies on humans show—people have active BPA in their blood. And so, the FDA response was to reject all such human studies as implausible. The problem with a blanket rejection of human data is that there may be sources of BPA exposure that are not modeled by stomach tube exposure in rats. After all, “[T]his isn’t how food enters our bodies,” actually. “We chew it, move it around in our mouths…before it enters the stomach.” And, it turns out “BPA can be completely absorbed directly into the bloodstream from the mouth,” thus bypassing instant liver detoxification. The same would be the case for BPA absorbed through the skin.

So-called thermal paper is 1 to 2% BPA by weight. That’s like “cash register receipts, luggage tags, [and] bus/train…lottery tickets.” Taking hold of a receipt can transfer BPA to our fingers, especially if they’re wet or greasy. But, does it then get absorbed into our system through the skin?

Well, cashiers were found to have more BPA flowing through their bodies. But, that was just based on a few people. Same problem with those studies showing those eating more plant-based diets having lower levels of BPA: too small of a sample size to really make a conclusion. It’s been estimated that even cashiers handling receipts all day long may not exceed the tolerable intake. However, if they’re using something like hand cream, that could change.

“…[M]any skin care products…hand sanitizers, lotions, soaps and sunscreens, contain…chemicals that [enhance skin penetration].” So, using a hand sanitizer before touching a receipt could, in theory, cause a breakdown of the skin barrier. Theoretically, that is—until now.

We now know that holding a receipt and eating food, after using hand sanitizer, results in high blood levels of active BPA. Researchers at the University of Missouri “conducted [a] study to mimic aspects of the behavior of people in a fast-food restaurant where [they] observed people using [a] hand sanitizer,…handling a…receipt,…and eating food with their hands.” They found that when people handled the receipt right after using Purell, BPA was transferred to their fingers, then fries, and then the combination of absorption through the skin and the mouth led to significant levels of active BPA in their blood.

You can hold a receipt in your hand for 60 seconds, and only come away with 3 micrograms in your body. Whereas, if you pre-wet your hands with hand sanitizer, you get 300 in just a few seconds—a hundred times more. These findings show that just a few seconds touching a receipt after using something like hand lotion could transfer large amounts of BPA.

And so, this could explain why dozens of human studies show active BPA in people’s systems—contrary to the assumptions based on stomach tube studies in rodents. When actual evidence contradicts your assumptions, you reject the assumptions. But, what the FDA did was instead reject the evidence.

Please consider volunteering to help out on the site.

Image credit: MPCA Photos via flickr. Image has been modified.

Doctor's Note

Wait, Why BPA Hasn’t Been Banned? Check out the video!

More on BPA in:

Other examples of Food and Drug Administration failings include:

There’s another class of concerning plastics compounds: phthalates. More here:

If you haven’t yet, you can subscribe to my videos for free by clicking here.

72 responses to “BPA on Receipts: Getting Under Our Skin

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  1. If I have my receipts email to me with this reduce the BPA on my skin. :) but I suppose if I use the mouse on my computer after using hand sanitizer I still might get some.




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  2. What about the new non-BPA receipts that whole foods uses? Do these get a free pass?

    I have read credible studies stating very clearly that the “NON-BPA” canned beans and other products
    are now being found to be worse for us than the BPA it replaced!

    Please Dr. Greger do some videos to clarify the science out there telling us that the BPA-free alternatives are
    being found to be even worse for us.




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      1. Scott, thanks for the link. The article was comprehensive and easy to understand for those of us who often find studies beyond our comprehension. It’s scary how unsafe all those unregulated chemicals in our world are changing us through illnesses and children with so many problems that were simply not around very much at all in earlier, less contaminated times.




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    1. I think they’re using BPS in canned items. I don’t buy much canned, but I do use Amy’s organic soups.The front label clearly says: NON-BPA Lining*. The asterisk only is seen on the back as: *Visit us at Amys.com. The FAQ on their site only says they do not us BPA linings and that’s it.




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  3. Pretty scary for me since I work in a restaurant, I handle receipts every day..
    I also use hand sanitizer countless time every day ! :/ does it count if it’s a vegan restaurant ? sadly no :/




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      1. Go get a bottle of 190 proof alcohol… put some in a little bottle to carry with you and wipe your hands using that. I will killl ALL the bacteria/germs etc. and there is no toxic poison in the alcohol.. as there is in rubbing alcohol.
        That anti-bacterial stuff is NOT good.




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        1. I wouldn’t count on ethanol (vs isopropyl “rubbing” alcohol) to help in this manner. BPA is not a germ. We don’t know if ethanol also acts as a carrier for lipophilic / non-polar substances like BPA. We do know that alcohol disrupts our skin barrier and natural defenses. I hate to say it, but we are not meant to slather hand sanitizer or wash our hands 50 times a day. Tough to reconcile for those of us who work in the restaurant and health care industries or otherwise come into contact with many people each day.




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        2. Purell, and many other hand-sanitizers, use only ethanol as their active ingredient. I agree that ethanol is the most innocuous of the anti-bacterials. However, ethanol is still a highly effective solvent for the BPA in receipts, and that is the problem that is being addressed in the video. If you buy 190 proof alcohol, you still need to keep it away from those receipts! : )




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    1. Actually, yes it does. Read “The China Study,” by Dr. Campbell. The animal products in our system help cancers grow. Your restaurant is just doing what the it needs to do to stay in compliance with regulations.




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    2. May you should show this article of Dr.Greger your manager… he runs a vegan restaurant so I think, he is a informed man and would be glad also to avoid BPA in his body. ;-) It’s a attempt worth




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  4. Those receipts look like of Dr Greger’s own groceries. Yummie. Could this become digitally availlable and an easy way for us to know WDYEDG (What Do You Eat Dr Greger)? :-)




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        1. Oh, is that what the RS is? Probably, right? Then yes, that’s another reason! (though it would be because of AGE production not trans fats). I was thinking it’s because of the baba ganoush! (Im the book I talk about not liking eggplant; but actually, baba ganoush is pretty tasty–I’m a man of contradictions! :)




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          1. I was going to say it’s because Baba Ganoush normally contains (traditionally olive) oil. But maybe you allow small amounts even at home?




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            1. You can get baba ganoush without the olive oil! The kind I buy is made with tahini and lemon juice instead. The only downfall of prepackage baba is the added salt. I have tried making my own once— but it did not turn out so well. One of these days, I will have to give it a try again! And yes, the almonds were roasted. If I remember correctly, there was a sale on the bulk section that day and all the raw almonds were out— everyone must have read the book! ;) I prefer raw almonds over roasted for taste reasons, but as Dr. Greger mentioned– there are good health reasons to choose raw nuts.




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    1. HansKeulenTheNetherlands: I remember Dr. Greger saying that he thinks of all of Part 2 of his book How Not To Die as being a detailed sharing of what he eats day to day. It’s not the same as a receipt, but maybe better? :-)




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  5. Part of the problem is that these receipts get tossed and work their way into our waterways. Plus just manufacturing them and using then spreads them. We need to support organizations that are fighting to stop the insane use of chemicals, all in the name of corporate profits. And that won’t happen until enough people demand it from their elected officials.




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  6. I dont see the point of using these “sanitizers”, just wash your hands more often with water especially since tap water already contains chlorine or similar~




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  7. A problem without a solution is not much help. So are we supposed to (1) be dirty and not wash our hands, and (2) stop trying to keep our hands soft and let them crack, chip, bleed? Are some moisturizers okay, like glycerine??!!!




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    1. mh, my first thought was – how many woman (people) use hand lotion for how many years now and what do the others? Who wins most by selling lotions?
      The other thing is – maybe more studies are available soon and the time fpr BPA is soon over?




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  8. Such a comfort that our government is always watching over our best interests isn’t it? It also warms my heart they trust business enough to let them make whatever chemical concoction they need, AND decide for themselves if it’s safe to use before they dump it on us. Why make a special effort to cage and abuse lab animals for testing, we are them.




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    1. .
      Are We Still Guinea Pigs for Industry?

      .
      Vege-tater said, “Such a comfort that our government is always watching over our best interests isn’t it? It also warms my heart they trust business enough to let them make whatever chemical concoction they need, AND decide for themselves if it’s safe to use before they dump it on us. ”
      —————————-
      Lab animal experiments once were justified by the possibility they spared human beings from experimental hazards. Now, we discover, all too often, we are the experiment. And to confirm, only the EPA, historically, has been a consistent and outspoken critic of industry hazard to consumers.

      FDA has been a problem for a long time. In fact, about 2004, when FDA official Dr. David Graham spoke against FDA approval of heart-killing pharmaceuticals Crestor, Vioxx and others, he was taken aside by management and brusquely informed the mission of the FDA is to bring good products to market, not limit or regulate industry. Graham and peers soon learned FDA management had them under investigation for having leaked information about FDA regulatory actions to the press. Graham was forced to seek legal assistance from the non-profit Government Accountability Project, founded to protect “whistle-blowing” in government. Only after a warning to FDA from GAP legal counsel did FDA’s Nixon-style search for leaks abruptly cease– a truly sad commentary on where the FDA has been in the perennial conflict of interest between industry profits and consumer health.

      That was then. In 2005, perhaps after a firestorm of public indignation about the FDA scandal, the agency was given new legislatively-mandated regulatory power over industry, including the power to review industry studies of drug efficacy and safety and require standards for industry compliance. That is, actually regulate industry. FDA reform measures passed into law in 1962, but never implemented, finally were, including requirement pharmaceuticals must be proven safe and efficacious. FDA’s new Center for Drug Evaluation and Research (CDER) was monitored by the FDA’s Drug Safety Oversight Board, composed of officials from FDA, NIH and Veterans Administration. Howver, the effectiveness of that interagency arrangement is still in doubt.




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  9. Why worry about that? Just stop purchasing the plastic items. None of the plastic that we produce is good for any of us – from grocery bags, to clothing, to household items . . .It gets sent to our landfills, never fully breaks down, but does disintegrate sometimes into particles that make their way into our streams and oceans. There is a “plastic island” the size of Texas floating and swirling in the northern Pacific ocean made up entirely of plastic parts and piece. Marine animals – including marine birds – swallow pieces of plastic thinking its food. These pieces lodge in their gut unable to pass or be digested and starve the bird (or other animal) to death.
    I am old enough to remember when we did not have plastic in our environment. We grew up using glass jars, items that were/are biodegradable and we got along just fine. I do my utmost best to not allow plastic into my home and there are many ways to do that.

    Let me also add that the helium balloons that people love to release often at a funeral/memorial service are also harmful to our environment. They take flight and when they run out of helium come down often in our waterways or large bodies of water – oceans and lakes – where they, again, are mistaken for food. Let me suggest that if someone wants to release balloons for whatever the reason that they consider flying a kite instead.
    Thank you.




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  10. I would like to know where else we find BPA plastic. Is it still lining the cans of of prepared foods? Outside of cash register receipts and cans, where else is it? Anyone have a good resource for that info?
    Thanks!




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  11. related: I live a few k from a dairy farm. To extend the season they like to plant some fodder crops. First They spray a paddock down with some kind of super herbicide – the grass goes yellow within hours literally. and they immediately follow up by putting the herd on it to graze down that last bit of grass before they plant the crop. I think the logic goes: A) spray poison onto grass and allow the blades to conduct the poison systemically and kill the roots. B) Convert the poisoned grass into milk to get all the milk out of the land one can possibly get. C) Dilute the poisoned milk with the bulk supply at a large factory… genius!

    Now I’ve taken more than a few turns around old Sol and I can tell you that this sort of capitalist mentality pervades all of the food industries that i’ve worked for. Before giving in to despair I urge you to let your thoughts be known. If you have local representation then that is a good starting point. Town meetings always provoke some interesting discourse. I have made enemies here but also a few friends. And please ask yourself, what is the alternative future if we continue to do nothing to stop these sorts of practices. Got Milk?




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    1. Wow. Thanks for sharing. This is even worse than most of us imagine. Feeding recently herbicide-sprayed dying grass to lactating cows and selling the milk and meat to people who will eat it? If that doesn’t convince someone to go vegan I don’t know what will. We humans are a stubborn race.




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      1. Yeah, thanks. i know. I grew up in Corning NY. I liked to go fishing at the river for bullheads. Walking along one day looking for a good spot I witness this horrible chemical smelling, weirdly whitish/yellowish chemical dumping out of a big pipe right into the river. My memory is that there was a corning plant about a 1/2 mile away across a big corn field.

        My scout master suggested that I go talk to them about it and see if we could find something out. I put on my uniform and rode my bike over. I was so pumped. it was like a movie but a zillion years before Brockavich

        They treated me so good. She asked me to wait because I didn’t have an appointment but a really nice man came out after a few minutes and he praised me for being a concerned little pain in the neck. He assured me that this particular plant did not discharge anything bad into the river and they had all the proper paperwork to show how good they were about all that kind of thing. They did testing, see, look here.

        Thing is everybody works for corning or something serving corning or something serving something ….

        Thats the end, sorry. Everybody kinda accepted that I’d done a good thing and now we sorta know that the proper papers were there so i guess I just learned a little lesson there more or less. No sequels though.

        I just wish I’d thought to say, “Hey Man, we eating these dam Bullheads!”

        Corning Inc. Putting the papers first.




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    2. All that and the spraying of animal and human waste onto farm fields. Where I live is corn/soybean/CFO country. I’ve seen irrigation rigs out in a few fields and wondered WHY in an area that usually gets enough rain….turns out that they are spraying animal waste onto the fields. I drive by one field where they are tanking sewage sludge from a small city and spraying it on fields. Heavy metals and pesticides/herbicides get concentrated this way.

      In this area the counties have been redoing drainage under roads due to all the “tiling” of fields for drainage causing greater runoff. The farmers have also been clearing hedge rows of brush a trees at a high rate. Driving through the countryside you see lots of newer construction of commercial places where they sell farm supplies…mainly chemicals/seeds…etc?

      Farming is INDUSTRIAL….grains sent to other countries…when they still take GMOs…or used to make ethanol.

      While people on this forum use the best research to determine the best foods to eat….in the *real world* their ability to avoid unhealthy food is declining at a rapid rate. Cognitive dissonance?




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      1. Right on Fred. They do that here too. So many people have asked me about the E. coli outbreaks on fruits and veg. “If vegan is so healthy why do we get sick from them?” The circle is unbroken. Madness reigns.

        The phosphate (read guano) they use here from pacific islands is so loaded with mercury and cadmium the farm paddocks have been concentrating to ever higher levels for many years.

        I grew up on a small family farm. Back then the waste was properly composted and then returned to the fields. But big daddy warbucks can’t be bothered with quaint traditions. Just top dress with filth. time is money.

        There is a movie, Idiocracy. In the future They used Gatorade instead of water and wondered how to save the crops. Trumpie’s got Gatorade stock right?




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    1. The FDA obviously enables corporate interests so they are free to sell you stuff. If they did the responsible thing and protected the consumer…corporate interests would be SOL?

      Stop and think about all the TV/internet/magazine advertising. I think most people are living in a bubble of advertising….usually made so as to make people feel good so they can be sold something…except for the ones that involve fear of something.

      There are a few sites like this that are dedicated to rational truth.




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  12. The hand-sanitizer used in the study was Purell, active ingredient ethanol 63% by weight. It is the solvent action of ethanol that carries the BPA into the body. I use plain old 70% isopropyl alcohol as my hand cleaner, and I have often noticed that it instantly causes receipts to blur and smear.

    I knew that receipts contained lots of BPA (you can smell it!), but I never previously made the connection that alcohol might be capable of carrying it through my skin. Thanks, Dr. Greger! New receipt-handling protocol goes into effect immediately in my household.




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  13. The most simple of all solutions is don’t take the receipt .What the heck do you need it for?
    At the grocery store they have these loyalty cards , that you fill out and they need your email address to sell you on their groceries I guess.
    Well they keep track of your buying habits, I get two emails a week , telling me you must be almost out of bananas or cleaner or something , I go look and holy crap they are right , they can do all that and we need a receipt? For what? Big brother is really watching me?
    So after about a year using my rewards card the clerk told me I could use my rewards on my purchase, I got $29 bucks off my purchase , felt like a sweet deal .lol However after a year , it still doesn’t give me a sense of security , I’m still a precariat .




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    1. IN laymans’ terms:

      So now they can throw a few dozens or hundreds of millions at assuring the buying public (the dollar stream) that BPS is SO MUCH BETTER than BPA, that BPA was inDEED really bad, but that this BPS is soooo NOT bad.

      And it’s probably, as noted above, just as bad-but “more studies”… oh the cycle.




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  14. The USA has a lot of mouths to feed. As does Spaceship Earth. Now we are all pretty much agreed that change is needed. So lets change the law so BPA is Illegal. But as Wade so eloquently put it, the replacement chemical is not good either. OK, I hereby declare that BPS is illegal. See where I’m headed? What is the real problem? Is it plastic really? well partly sure…but if you have a minute please read this article:

    http://www.nextbigfuture.com/2017/01/why-birthrates-may-not-continue.html

    If we wish to face the evidence then we need to look at the big picture. We need to look at the force(s) that make unhealthy practices, in addition to profitable, perhaps necessary. I mean how do you feed 7+ billions without taking shortcuts even if they all switch to plant based diets? Is it not incumbent upon us to need to offer alternatives too?

    And is 7+ even a desirable population? I remember when it was half that. Maybe that is why people say that life seemed so much simpler and less stressful back then…because it really was.

    One possible advance would be to raise population as a world wide issue. To me the whole topic seems to be deeply buried in the “too-hard” basket. Isn’t it time for humanities to decide what our numbers should be? Or are we like all the other examples of life forms and we will simply reproduce unchecked until some external force limits our numbers? Before we take steps like china’s one-baby-policy we really ought to decide how many people are best for all concerned. A Big ask of course but if we don’t do it ourselves Mother surely will.

    I Once overheard: “Humans are the only animals that never live up to their full potential.” dig it

    OK, i’m off my soapbox, thanks.




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    1. Rhombopterix: Two of my favorite charities (besides NutritionFacts of course) are Population Connection (formerly known as Zero Population Growth) and Population Media Center (which creates educates through entertainment – like soap operas. Those shows get people talking and thinking through stories, which is very powerful for humans).




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  15. Emailed receipts would be fine with me but no one except K-Mart and Sears ever asked me about this as a receipt option. I’m gonna start asking/suggesting this at the stores where I routinely do my shopping. I also get texts and emails from my bank on all card transactions.

    I think that returning items could be the only drawback IF a receipt is required for a return. If it’s emailed, then they can pull it up by my e-address.

    Doubt that Trader Joe’s would do this but then I can ask if I definitely need a receipt to return something. Since most everything is identifiable as having been purchased there I think that would work out okay. Have them File 13 the receipts. Okay, I know… environmental issues as well here… but I can’t solve the world’s problems all on my own.




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  16. .

    Guinea Pigs for Industry?
    .
    Vege-tater said, “Such a comfort that our government is always watching over our best interests isn’t it? It also warms my heart they trust business enough to let them make whatever chemical concoction they need, AND decide for themselves if it’s safe to use before they dump it on us. ”
    —————————-
    Lab animal experiments once were justified by the possibility they spared human beings from experimental hazards. Now, we discover, all too often, we are the experiment. And to confirm, only the EPA, historically, has been a consistent and outspoken critic of industry hazard to consumers.

    FDA has been a problem for a long time. In fact, about 2004, when FDA official Dr. David Graham spoke against FDA approval of heart-killing pharmaceuticals Crestor, Vioxx and others, he was taken aside by management and brusquely informed the mission of the FDA is to bring good products to market, not limit or regulate industry. Graham and peers soon learned FDA management had them under investigation for having leaked information about FDA actions to the press. Graham was forced to seek legal assistance from the non-profit Government Accountability Project, founded to protect “whistle-blowing” in government. Only after a warning to FDA from GAP legal counsel did FDA’s Nixon-style search for leaks abruptly cease– a truly sad commentary on where the FDA has been in the perennial conflict of interest between industry profits and consumer health.

    That was then. In 2005, perhaps after a firestorm of public indignation about the FDA scandal, the agency was given new legislatively-mandated regulatory power over industry, including the power to review industry studies of drug efficacy and safety and require standards for industry compliance. That is, actually regulate industry. Even FDA reform measures passed into law in 1962, but never implemented, finally were, including requirement pharmaceuticals must be proven safe and efficacious. FDA’s Center
    for Drug Evaluation and Research (CDER) was monitored by the FDA’s Drug Safety Oversight Board, composed of officials from FDA, NIH and Veterans Administration. However, the effectiveness of that inter-agency arrangement is still in doubt.




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  17. most well associated with needy greedy people requiring receipts on all of their purchases, because they count each cent and are strict financially. what a strange way sins play role




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    1. It’s a sin to pay attention to one’s finances? Maybe you should worry about the sin of being insanely judgmental… “insanely” being the operative word. Receipts are also important for taking back purchases that have flaws, e.g. the blender doesn’t work. Wow.




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    2. Not sure why my comment was deleted but this post was not. How horrifically judgmental among other things. People use receipts for many reasons and aren’t “sinning” for using them to keep finances in check. To suggest that the irresponsibility, carelessness, and greed of our government and FDA plays a role in “punishing sinners” just seems wrong on at least a couple of levels. Even those you for whatever reason judge for using receipts do not deserve to be poisoned.




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  18. Does anyone know how long the effect lasts after putting on lotion? Does it go away or significantly lessen once it’s completely absorbed in the skin? I hate receipts, they need to come out with not only a safe way but also a more environmentally friendly way of giving out receipts. Plus the stupid BPA lining ruins or contaminates the recycled paper supply as traces get in due to BPA covered receipts and things. Makes me livid. Our FDA is disgraceful. Brilliant exposé!




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  19. Almost EVERYTHING comes in plastic nowadays so it’s easier said than done but I would like to be much more mindful of this issue now. I wonder what the archaeologists would think of us a 100 years from now. One great thing the ancient nations did not do was to leave a lot of rubbish behind. I look at what we’ll be leaving behind and It is quite a depressing sight. We can do things at an individual and community level but unless the industries also change the way things are done it is never going to be resolved. I never was fully convinced by the “recycling” idea though it sounds “nice”, shouldn’t there be a way of not buying or making plastic and using it as packaging , which do not break down for 400 – 500 years to begin with?




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    1. We should definitely avoid plastic as much as possible but recycling is VITAL. Plastic simply does not biodegrade. It’s always best to avoid plastic for both health and environmental reasons (even for being humane as it causes SO much suffering and death to countless animals in the wild both land and sea), but because like you said, almost everything comes in plastic, the things we’re unable to avoid containing plastic must at the very least be recycled as an unwavering rule. But yes, we need to stop using plastic, it’s ridiculous. The ocean is turning into one giant land fill, mother marine birds and baby birds are suffering tremendously and falling over from slow and agonizing deaths due to having bellies full of our plastic junk, and the list goes on and on… There was even a case in Sarnia Canada when the plastic factories were open (they’re either closed now or better regulated) where only females were being born and there was a shortage of males because the BPA in the air was preventing male development in the womb (BPA can actually reverse the development of males in the womb, there is a whole little documentary on this which I’ve lost the link to), not to mention what it does to the poor birds flying by.
      So truly the order goes reduce, reuse, recycle. There are so many more sustainable and safer resources they could be using other than plastic for so many things, too. They can make things out of agricultural scraps from banana, mangos, etc. So it is sad, to say the least, that our devastation to the planet isn’t for lack of other alternatives, not that convenience is ever an excuse to destroy the planet and poison people even if there weren’t so many other options.

      A few things I like to do is avoid plastic straws as they can’t even be recycled and crazy amounts are discarded every single day, they should be banned. Plastic bags should be totally banned as well. I’ve stopped using saran wrap and zip lock bags a while ago and store things in glass jars now–I always save glass jars now, it’s like free tupperware! but that doesn’t poison you. Oh and I can’t believe those horrible plastic beer/pop can holders haven’t been banned decades ago! Here’s a cool article I was recently reading too on tips on how to reduce plastic use: http://www.onegreenplanet.org/environment/life-hacks-to-help-you-cut-plastic-out-of-the-picture/

      The industries will never change until the people outright demand it. “Power never concedes without demand. It never did and it never will.”




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      1. Hi Shaylen, I also recently saw online somewhere about an entrepreneur who is selling skin-care products such as face cream, in paper cartons just like how ice cream used to be sold. I guess the best we can do as individuals is to support businesses such as this one.




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        1. That’s awesome! :) Hope their products are palm oil free and vegan friendly as well. I agree, I think it’s important to support companies with that kind of integrity. It makes a big difference.




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  20. I understand why Purell or other hand sanitizers would increase absorption (disrupting the oils that provide a barrier on the surface of our skin & alcohol being a great solvent), but I do not understand why hand lotion (oil based– not mineral oil or paraben) would increase absorption— is it because BPA is fat soluble and therefore lotion holds on to it? Also, i did not hear lotions mentioned in this video although it is in the title.




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    1. He said because many lotions contain ingredients to increase penetration. It would be cool to know what types of ingredients caused this, specifically, and which didn’t and if natural oils would have the same or similar effect as well. I don’t know if they looked into all that in this study though.




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      1. Thank you for your/his reply! My husband and I really appreciate these exceptional easy to understand videos! We are so thankful he reads the research so we don’t have to :-)




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  21. Dr. Greger,
    What options do you suggest one consider for BPA-free dental (filling) resins, sealants or other materials?

    I noticed that Ultradent has some resins and sealants with very low BPA exposure levels. Are there any other dental material companies to consider for BPA-free dental filling materials?

    Please advise me on any other related options to consider to replace dental fillings.

    Thank you,
    A.




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