Avoiding Adult Exposure to Phthalates

Avoiding Adult Exposure to Phthalates
5 (100%) 17 votes

Eating a plant-based diet and avoiding scented personal care products and certain children’s and adult toys can reduce exposure to hormone-disrupting chemicals.

Discuss
Republish

Most of the attention on phthalates, a group of hormone-disrupting chemicals found in PVC plastics, has been on fetal and child health, particularly regarding genital and behavioral development, such as incomplete virilization in infant boys and reduced masculine play as they grow up, and for girls, an earlier onset of puberty, but what about affecting hormonal function in adults?

Men exposed to high levels of phthalate had lower testosterone levels, but that was for workers in a plastics plant. In the general population, the evidence is mixed. A study in Sweden of men in their 20’s found no effect on testosterone, whereas a U.S. study on men in their 30’s did, at levels of exposure much lower than those factory workers. When there’s conflicting evidence like this, ideally we’d put it to the test, but you can’t ethically expose people; so, scientists have come up with convoluted methods like implanting the testicles from human fetuses into mice to keep them growing, but we want to know about the effects on adult testicles, which are harder to procure…until now. Consent was obtained from all the donors. Now, I’ve heard of blood donors, but this is a whole other level. No, they obtained the testicles from prostate cancer patients who underwent castration to control their disease. And indeed, they were able to get direct evidence that phthalates can inhibit testosterone production at the kinds of levels one sees in general population studies.

What about breast cancer, the #1 cancer killer of young women? Women working in automotive plastics and food canning are at five times the odds of breast cancer, suggesting a link, but in a petri dish, at least, phthalates didn’t seem to accelerate breast cancer growth down at the levels of exposure expected in the general population, but more recently phthalates were found to boost breast cancer cell growth in vitro at the levels found circulating in the bodies of many women. Therefore, the maximum tolerable dose set by governments should be re-evaluated.

How do you avoid the stuff? Well, when you think plastic chemicals, you think water bottles, but they appear to only play a minor role—most comes from the food. How do we know? Well, if you take people and have them stop eating for a few days, you get a significant drop in the amount of phthalates spilling out in their urine. Fasting isn’t exactly sustainable though. Thankfully, we can see similar drops just eating a plant-based diet for a few days, which gives us a clue as to where most phthalates are found. However, there were a few cases of spikes within the fasting period after showers, suggesting contamination in personal care products.

So, we can counsel patients to reduce phthalate exposures by avoiding the use of scented personal care products, soap, and cosmetics, since phthalates are used as a fragrance carrier. Phthalates can also be found in children’s toys, as well as adult toys. On behalf of the Danish Environmental Protection Agency, the Danish Technological Institute made inquiries about consumption patterns to see what kind of exposure one might get based on worst case scenarios. Those working behind the counters at sex shops proved to possess very little knowledge on the material specifications; and so, they had to do their own testing. Turns out that “jelly” is plasticized PVC – up to two thirds phthalates by weight. Though the use of water based lubricants may reduce the health risks 100 fold, phthalate exposure still may have the opposite of the intended effect. Women with the highest levels of phthalates flowing through their bodies had over two and a half times the odds of reporting a lack of interest in sexual activity. And these weren’t women in a canning factory, but at typical exposure levels in America.

To see any graphs, charts, graphics, images, and quotes to which Dr. Greger may be referring, watch the above video. This is just an approximation of the audio contributed by Katie Schloer.

Please consider volunteering to help out on the site.

Images thanks to hiromitsu morimoto via Flickr.

Most of the attention on phthalates, a group of hormone-disrupting chemicals found in PVC plastics, has been on fetal and child health, particularly regarding genital and behavioral development, such as incomplete virilization in infant boys and reduced masculine play as they grow up, and for girls, an earlier onset of puberty, but what about affecting hormonal function in adults?

Men exposed to high levels of phthalate had lower testosterone levels, but that was for workers in a plastics plant. In the general population, the evidence is mixed. A study in Sweden of men in their 20’s found no effect on testosterone, whereas a U.S. study on men in their 30’s did, at levels of exposure much lower than those factory workers. When there’s conflicting evidence like this, ideally we’d put it to the test, but you can’t ethically expose people; so, scientists have come up with convoluted methods like implanting the testicles from human fetuses into mice to keep them growing, but we want to know about the effects on adult testicles, which are harder to procure…until now. Consent was obtained from all the donors. Now, I’ve heard of blood donors, but this is a whole other level. No, they obtained the testicles from prostate cancer patients who underwent castration to control their disease. And indeed, they were able to get direct evidence that phthalates can inhibit testosterone production at the kinds of levels one sees in general population studies.

What about breast cancer, the #1 cancer killer of young women? Women working in automotive plastics and food canning are at five times the odds of breast cancer, suggesting a link, but in a petri dish, at least, phthalates didn’t seem to accelerate breast cancer growth down at the levels of exposure expected in the general population, but more recently phthalates were found to boost breast cancer cell growth in vitro at the levels found circulating in the bodies of many women. Therefore, the maximum tolerable dose set by governments should be re-evaluated.

How do you avoid the stuff? Well, when you think plastic chemicals, you think water bottles, but they appear to only play a minor role—most comes from the food. How do we know? Well, if you take people and have them stop eating for a few days, you get a significant drop in the amount of phthalates spilling out in their urine. Fasting isn’t exactly sustainable though. Thankfully, we can see similar drops just eating a plant-based diet for a few days, which gives us a clue as to where most phthalates are found. However, there were a few cases of spikes within the fasting period after showers, suggesting contamination in personal care products.

So, we can counsel patients to reduce phthalate exposures by avoiding the use of scented personal care products, soap, and cosmetics, since phthalates are used as a fragrance carrier. Phthalates can also be found in children’s toys, as well as adult toys. On behalf of the Danish Environmental Protection Agency, the Danish Technological Institute made inquiries about consumption patterns to see what kind of exposure one might get based on worst case scenarios. Those working behind the counters at sex shops proved to possess very little knowledge on the material specifications; and so, they had to do their own testing. Turns out that “jelly” is plasticized PVC – up to two thirds phthalates by weight. Though the use of water based lubricants may reduce the health risks 100 fold, phthalate exposure still may have the opposite of the intended effect. Women with the highest levels of phthalates flowing through their bodies had over two and a half times the odds of reporting a lack of interest in sexual activity. And these weren’t women in a canning factory, but at typical exposure levels in America.

To see any graphs, charts, graphics, images, and quotes to which Dr. Greger may be referring, watch the above video. This is just an approximation of the audio contributed by Katie Schloer.

Please consider volunteering to help out on the site.

Images thanks to hiromitsu morimoto via Flickr.

82 responses to “Avoiding Adult Exposure to Phthalates

Comment Etiquette

On NutritionFacts.org, you'll find a vibrant community of nutrition enthusiasts, health professionals, and many knowledgeable users seeking to discover the healthiest diet to eat for themselves and their families. As always, our goal is to foster conversations that are insightful, engaging, and most of all, helpful – from the nutrition beginners to the experts in our community.

To do this we need your help, so here are some basic guidelines to get you started.

The Short List

To help maintain and foster a welcoming atmosphere in our comments, please refrain from rude comments, name-calling, and responding to posts that break the rules (see our full Community Guidelines for more details). We will remove any posts in violation of our rules when we see it, which will, unfortunately, include any nicer comments that may have been made in response.

Be respectful and help out our staff and volunteer health supporters by actively not replying to comments that are breaking the rules. Instead, please flag or report them by submitting a ticket to our help desk. NutritionFacts.org is made up of an incredible staff and many dedicated volunteers that work hard to ensure that the comments section runs smoothly and we spend a great deal of time reading comments from our community members.

Have a correction or suggestion for video or blog? Please contact us to let us know. Submitting a correction this way will result in a quicker fix than commenting on a thread with a suggestion or correction.

View the Full Community Guidelines

  1. Do the clear produce bags (for fresh greens, carrots, broccoli, fruit, etc.) at the
    grocery store pose any sort of exposure risk? Do they leach their own host of chemicals?

    Yes, I know there are alternatives (cotton bags), but regardless, what does the science say about these bags
    leaching onto greens, broccoli, apples……harmful, harmless?

    1. Hopesteph: I looked this morning on PubMed, and couldn’t find anything specific about clear produce bags. I have also wondered about these bags. I often use them just to protect my veggies from getting dirty, from the store to home, then recycle the bags, and don’t think there could be much exposure from that. (But if someone knows differently, please let us know!!). I would be willing to bet that this soft plastic does not stand up well to aging or to sunlight.

    1. My son, who is in medical school, told me that one of the biggest exposures of BPA are sales receipts, which are coated with BPA. Sigh. That piece of information rocked my world when I heard it; today’s video reinforces what I already know…. :-)

    2. Use COMMON SENSE! how thick is the skin on your palms? the thickest skin on body second to feet. HOWEVER, using lube has contact against the thinnest layer of skin exposure of which ‘PENETRATES……’ easier or has less skin to PENETRATE…… to through……

    1. I know the feeling.

      As far as personal care products go, two of the best you can make yourself, with no added fragrance or preservatives. They are vitamin C serum and niacinamide serum. You can make them once or twice a week so you don’t need to add preservatives. The basic ingredients are vitamin c(15%) or niacinamide (5%), distilled water and vegetable glycerine (15-30%). You can find recipes here:

      http://www.essentialdayspa.com/forum/viewthread.php?tid=11902

        1. Careful on how you bookmark / make notes online. I made a bunch of detailed notes on scientific talks on YouTube for my own use and they got moderated away. I don’t know why since they were mostly just timestamped direct quotes from the talks, transcribed slides and links to the scientific articles that were referenced in the talks. Nothing controversial and no copyright violations AFAIK. Best to bookmark and annotate on your local drive or keep a local backup.

          For Disqus posts you can click on the timestamp, e.g. “George -> lemonhead * five hours ago”, move the mouse pointer over “five hours ago” and click. Then the comment url will appear in the url bar and you can use your browser’s bookmark feature to save and add tags. But now I think it is perhaps better to use another form of note-taking software since the original comment may be deleted either by the commenter or the moderators (or the site may go offline), so it might be prudent to copy/paste the whole comment.

          Yup, I’m going to make backups from now on.

          1. You’re right, where will we get if everyone will publicly add a note that in fact should be private (a remember to self to read something later)? I’ll use a different (and more appropriate) approach.

            1. Sorry if I came of as a scold or something; certainly people should do what is most convenient for them. I was just relating how I got burned by that approach (it just happened to me yesterday) and how to avoid it. Cheers.

    2. Lilyrosa: I know what you mean. Living in our chemical world means we’re going to be exposed to hundreds of chemicals, no matter what we do, because they are in the air we breathe, and the water we drink. But it’s a question of degree. The human body is remarkably resilient. As Dr. G. makes clear in this video, just by eating a plant-based diet for a few days, you can lower the level of phthalates in your blood. It is also wise to minimize your use of plastic bottles and plastic wraps, and especially don’t microwave your food in plastics. Here is just one study I found on PubMed that looks at increased leaching of toxic metals (e.g. antimony) from microwaving plastic: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20309737

      Another study shows that even “BPA-free” plastics are not safe: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24886603

      This video is to raise awareness that it’s not just babies who have to worry about phthalate exposure; and that these chemicals are common in various scented personal care products. Again, it is impossible anywhere on this planet to avoid all exposure to chemicals. But there definitely ARE many things you can do to reduce your exposures: eat organically grown whole plant foods, minimize use of plastic — glass is much safer, use natural skin care products, look at ingredient labels and try to avoid foods with lots of substances you can’t even identify.
      I hope this helps, a little.

    3. I agree in some ways. Personal care products, food, and even sex toys??? Brother. It reminds me of the great song by Joe Jackson. Enjoy this musical interlude with a smile and a sigh for our human need to attempt to eliminate risks, control our environment, and protect ourselves so we can avoid the inevitable. We are so human!

  2. BPA-free liners are being found to be possibly more toxic (or at least as toxic) as BPA containing liners.

    Have you considered this, Dr. G, and looked at the data and published science?

    1. Hello! The data for dangers of BPS and other BPA-replacement phthalates is becoming available, but I think there will always be more things we don’t know than things that we do know. In the meantime, it might be best to avoid plastics and plasticizers as much as possible, for instance sticking to food containers made from time-tested materials like glass.

      1. Totally agree…if it’s been manufactured from petroleum products or synthetics of any kind, PASS until proven otherwise. May sound extreme, but look where we’ve gotten us!

  3. For those interested, the Green Science Policy Institute ( http://greensciencepolicy.org/ ) has information on how to protect yourself from everyday chemicals and help support work to get chemicals banned. They’ve had a lot of success lately in getting changes in getting dangerous “flame-retardant” chemicals banned for use in furniture and other products. I put the word in quotes because, ironically, the chemical wasn’t really shown to suppress fires better than natural means and posed a toxic danger to firefighters. It’s in clothing, children’s sleepwear, computers, car interiors, drapes, carpet, etc. GSPI is now going after chemicals in cosmetics.

    I’m hoping that if the people can retake the government away from big corporations and make it work for us again that we’ll be able to prohibit the use of chemicals until they are proved safe, and not allow them until proven unsafe.
    Mark G

    1. I was under the impression that the only reason big corporations were using the “flame-retardant” chemicals was because of governments misguided requirements for their use.

  4. Hello! I am a volunteer with Nutritionfacts – a whole foods plant based mindfulness oriented dietitian from Scottsdale, AZ. Today’s video is near and dear to me – I got interested in phthalate exposure when my son was young (he’s almost 28). Back then, I was hearing about links to phthalate exposure and behavioral problems in little boys (in California, no less). Wanting to avoid going the Ritalin route, I learned everything I could about environmental and dietary exposures to different chemicals which may affect behavior. I found the Environmental Working Group website at that time, and have been using its resources ever since. A great site as a resource on exposures.

  5. For anyone interested, http://www.amazon.com/Sliquid-Organics-Lubricant-Oceanics-Carrageenan/dp/B004ODQJUE?ie=UTF8&psc=1&redirect=true&ref_=oh_aui_search_detailpage

    Vegan Ingredients: Purified Water, Plant Cellulose from Cotton, Aloe Barbadenis*, Natural Tocopherols (Vitamin E), Extracts of Hibiscus*, Flax*, Alfalfa*, Green Tea*, Sunflower Seed*, Carrageenan*, Nori*, Wakame*, Potassium Sorbate, Citric Acid. *=certified organic

    Haha sorry, I had to.

  6. That’s true. I always cringe when I buy things that say “this is know to cause cancer in the state of California” (or something like that). I bought some screws the other day that said that!
    I avoid plastic as much as possible, make most of my cleaning supplies and use natural hair and skin care (sometimes I make my own). But lately I’ve been questioning my vitamix and zero water containers. They’re both supposedly bpa free, but who knows what else is in them that could cause harm. Specially since I use both of them everyday!

    1. I really want a Vitamix, but the price and the plastic keep me from buying. I want to try making vegan cheese and my own nut milk (the idea of a barley and nut blend intrigues me). I have a good blender with a borosilicate glass jar, but it’s just not as powerful.

      1. Lemonhead, I have a Soyajoy milk maker which is stainless steel inside. Much cheaper than a Vitamix. It has a setting to make raw nut or seed milks without heating but you would probably want the barley cooked? If so, there are a couple of settings that heat and cook the grain in water before grinding.

    1. Good question! I checked the original article that reported the link between phthalates and showering and it reported shower-associated increases in phthalates in men but not women. This makes it less likely that the increase had to do with the water (or with the shower curtain, another big source!).

      1. That’s interesting. Men are typically bigger and have more surface area, but they would also have larger blood volume, so maybe it scales linearly or maybe it doesn’t. I dunno.

        Maybe the ‘fragrance’ they use in men’s products tends to contain more phthalates? Or maybe men use more deodorant?

        [ I read that it is best not to buy stuff that just uses the term ‘fragrance’ in the ingredient list]

        1. This is really the wildest of guesses, but my hypothesis would be that men shave their faces daily, and this makes their skin raw, and then they put highly fragranced alcohol-based solutions (aftershave, shaving cream residue) right on that area. Women might shave less often, or with less pressure/different products, or oils and lotions for legs might contain less phthalates on average than do aftershaves. I imagine that men and women shower much the same way, except for the shaving itself and the post-shaving skin care products!

  7. One means of exposure to phthalates not touched upon was the ubiquitous use of BPA and related phthalates in thermal register receipts and how using common products such as hand lotion, sunscreens and alcohol hand sanitizers exponentially increases blood levels. As a bookseller at the largest book store, I’ve been greatly concerned ever since listening to public radio’s Science Friday which had a segment on new research on the subject spring of 2015. I followed some of the research for a while and tried to interest colleagues to little effect. I believe it has huge implications and cannot be ignored, especially for those who work at cash registers. I’m 64 years of age, not young as so many retail workers are, and I no longer use the aforementioned personal skin products while at work. I think it interesting that Connecticut has banned the use of this register paper (there are alternative based on other technologies, but no doubt more expensive), and that my book store headquarters are located in that state. Dr. Gregor, I hope that you will look into this.

    1. Hi Linda! Thank you for sharing your concern. Not many people are aware that BPA can be found in thermal register receipts. It seems like there’s no escaping from BPA, especially if you work at a retail setting which typically involve operating the cash register. Hopefully more states will follow Connecticut’s footsteps in the near future and ban the use of BPA in receipt paper!

    2. Thank you for your comment, Linda. As noted it may be difficult to escape BPA. As a nurse since exposure is to the hands, it reminds me of the old-fashioned but perhaps even more warranted advice of careful hand washing. I’ll be more diligent now after handling cast register receipts, esp. before handling my produce.

  8. Before the advent of plastics people seemed to be able to get things done without plastics. They used metal, leather, hemp rope, cotton, glass, and many other natural products. This video just goes to show you, when you get away from nature, you get into trouble. And that’s spelled with a Capitol T – R – O – U – B – L – E……Yes sir….ladies and gentlemen we have trouble here in River City.

    1. And don’t forget waxed paper and waxed paper containers. And glass was re-used and had deposits to encourage its return like Coke used to be (helping with environmental pollution). It’s always the money – probably some government deal making plastics unfairly cheap – like corn syrup is – due to subsidies or tax breaks.

    2. Again the same old appeal to nature phallacy. Why are people so afraid of progress? Just because something isn’t natural doesn’t mean it’s bad. All those materials you mentioned aren’t as hygienic and or more difficult to process.

  9. We must keep reminding ourselves and be aware that plastic products touting themselves “BPA-free” typically never claim to be BPS-free.

    BPS is the little known but increasingly used BPA substitue but is just as much a hormone disrupter — some say it’s even worse than BPA.

    1. Thank you for pointing this out! You’re absolutely right. BPS disrupts hormones as well. This is why I carry a reusable glass water bottle instead of buying plastic ones that claim to be “BPA-free”.

  10. Regarding hormone disrupting chemicals found in cash register receipts and other discarded paper products, it should be remembered that personal-use paper products (paper towels, tp, napkins) that are virtuously advertised as “Made from Recycled Paper” will have been pulped from those very same cash register receipts and other BPA coated papers.

    1. Most brands of canned beans are lined with unhealthy BPA/BPS, which is a good idea to avoid. Fortunately some companies like Eden do NOT line their canned beans with these toxic liners.

        1. Almost certainly BSA. BSA is the only BPA substitute the canning industry uses (to my knowledge) but is just as bad for you.
          Unless Eden or Amy’s or whoever specifically claims their cans are “BSA-free”…. count on it — it’s not.

  11. Need to tell coworkers to stop using LUBE. Very important Topic to talk about on breaks. Thanks Doc. Michael Greger for Researching Good topics!

  12. the Europe Union is going to ban this plastic bags for Europa in the near future. Not because the are harmful to the health of the people, the are feeding the rubbish mountains…
    A other thought cross my mind in this morning:
    Phthate may responsible for 6 loins less in IQ, mercury in fish can make 10 point less IQ in infants, pesticide can make another 10 – 15 points… so I ask my self – is there a plan behind? I mean, a child which grow up with a smaller IQ mayas an adult isn’t interested in thinking so much about the world and whats going on in her. He oder she is satisfied by watching stupid television game shows, make his work and eat his dirty food… also, she oder he is a good slave of the economy? Disgusting….

      1. esben Andersen: As a moderator for NutritionFacts, I would like to remind you that the internet is an international place. Steffen’s English is a million times better than my German (which is none). And it didn’t take much for me to figure out what Steffen is saying. I have appreciated Steffen’s participation on this site and hope that he will continue to participate in the future.
        .
        Please make sure that your posts on this site are polite. For a review of the posting rules, you can click the “Comment Etiquette” button at the top of the comments section.

        1. Hi Thea
          I haven’t been able to scroll down into the comment section on my iPhone or iPad and just now got on my computer. Has anyone else been having the same problem? thanks, Gale

          1. WFPBRunner: I haven’t had any problems today and I haven’t seen comments from anyone else having any problems. I’ll keep a lookout to see if anyone else notices the same problem. If it doesn’t clear up tomorrow, you could post about this and I’ll make sure the technical staff see it. Hope the problem clears up!

        2. I have learned as much from the comment section on here as Dr G , Well maybe almost . as he.s pretty good, Congratulations to Dr. Greger and everyone involved on this site.
          English is not my first language either. I certainly did not intend to insult or make fun of anyone on here. I simply didn,t understand what he was saying and I used a direct approach. I always read with interest what Steffen has to say, I just thought he may want to clarify it a bit. I certainly do apologize if it came across as a insult.

      2. We all have our shortcomings when trying to communicate. This is particularly true when speaking in a second language. Kindness however is a universal attribute and can be easily recognized.

        I know you’re here trying to learn and talk about a WFPB diet so lift your head up and realize that we are in this together, esben. We all have a lot to learn. (At least I do.) Here is an idea; when commenting understand that you don’t know who you’re talking to so be nice because it might just be St. Peter looking to see what kind of person you really are.

      3. Hi Ebson, I saw my mistakes sorry there for. At the moment I arrived Berlin to join the VegMed. Dr.Greger will speak tomorrow here….
        I will make my words and thoughts more clear on monday. I hope this is ok. Thank you.

      4. Apparently the issues Steffen is talking about have already affected you. English isn’t the native language of the world. How many languages do you speak? What happened to your empathy… I’m not sure why being so rude is necessary.

      1. Warriah: Before you post again, please review the rules for posting on this site. You can find the rules in the FAQ page linked to at the bottom of this page. – Moderator.

  13. I was just about to apply some DAP 3.0 Advanced Kitchen & Bath Adhesive Caulk to a safety grab-bar in my shower when I decided to read the directions/warnings. Lo and behold…it contains PHTHALATE esters. In addition to the usual Calif. warning about birth defects, it also says to use with adequate ventilation and avoid skin & eye contact. I have used it in the past and smoothed the caulk bead with my finger and then faithfully washed my hands, but just put up with the annoying smell till it dissipated. I think this time I’ll look for another caulk. It’s surprising where we are exposed these harmful chemicals.

  14. I’ve recently switched to using more plastics. Although, I’ve avoided scented skin care products and plastics for years due to skin allergies… I recently learned that my constant itching, including rashes, blisters, and adult acne is a nickel allergy. So, no stainless steel for me. I’ve noticed a marked improvement after removing all canned foods, switching to plastic eating utensils (the metal ones cause a rash on my hands) and adding a plastic lined heavy metal filter to the sink and shower. The western medicine treatment for this is a diet that excludes nuts, beans, seeds and grains which are all high in metals. I also react strongly to any true tea (green or black). Tea has 700 times the RDA for nickel. I guess this is a little off topic for the video, but I’m feeling stuck between a rock and a hard ‘plastic’. If eel like I’m moving backwards with this one. Is there any solid research out there on metal hypersensitivity? I’m not finding natural alternatives, clean eating strategies, or much research at all on this topic.

  15. This is the first I’ve heard of it being found in scented personal care products. But the good news is the main products I use that are scented refuse to use phthalates and state on there website. Let’s hope they are honest.

  16. I’ve been buying beans in those square ‘”juice box” type cartons or in soft pouches to avoid the BPA/BPS in canned beans. As I opened one carton the other day I realized they seem to be lined with a silvery material which I think is aluminum. I’ve also been avoiding aluminum for a whole now because it is also not healthy to be in contact with food. So I’m wondering if it’s any safer now to use those cartons instead of cans, it seems both are unhealthy and I must pick my poison or buy dried beans in bulk from bins. I hate cooking beans and love the convenience of cooked beans.

    Could I be wrong about the silvery lining of the cartons and pouches? Could it be something else and not aluminum?

    1. Hello and thanks for your question,

      the metal (aluminium) is usually covered with plastic lining which contain BPA.

      Citing http://www.aluminum.org/bpa-aluminum-cans :

      “Many aluminum food and beverage containers sold in the United States feature a protective liner on the interior of the can containing trace amounts of Bisphenol A (BPA). This liner forms a barrier between the product and metal, providing protection against food-borne diseases. These coatings have been critical to improving food and beverage safety since being introduced more than 50 years ago.”

      Health Support Adam P.

  17. Hello Dr Greger! My son has problem – he has not been growing taller for more than 1 year.(163cm, 15 years old)
    His IGF-1 levels are in normal range, but low(~270). Growth zones are open. Is there any natural treatment of short stature? Without using synthetic HGH?

  18. Here is a great review of the evaluation and treatment of short stature that was published in the New England Journal of Medicine. They discuss when evaluation is needed, and when treatment is advised or not. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5754004/pdf/nihms926660.pdf

    Dr Greger would advise a healthy, diverse diet of whole foods that are plant based for children and adults. There’s not a specific nutritional treatment of short stature other than assuring the child gets all necessary nutrients and sufficient calories.

    Best luck to you and your son!

    Dr Anderson, Health Support Volunteer

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Pin It on Pinterest

Share This