How to Avoid the Obesity-Related Plastic Chemical BPA

How to Avoid the Obesity-Related Plastic Chemical BPA
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Ninety percent of our exposure to the hormone-disrupting chemical bisphenol A (BPA) comes from certain components of our diet.

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The purported link between hormone-disrupting plastics chemicals, like BPA, and obesity was initially based, in part, on observations that the rise in chemical exposure seemed to coincide with the rise of the obesity epidemic—with graphs like these. But, maybe that’s just a coincidence. There’s lots of other changes over the last half century—like an increase in fast food consumption and watching TV—that would seem to be simpler explanations.

But why are our pets getting fatter, too? Fido isn’t drinking more soda. Of course, the more we watch Seinfeld reruns, the less we may walk the dog. But what about our cats? Well, maybe we’re giving both them and our kids a few too many treats? That would seem an easier explanation than some pervasive obesity-causing chemical in the environment building up in the pet and person food chains.

But how do we explain this? A study of over 20,000 animals from 24 populations, and we’re all getting fatter. The odds that this could happen just by chance is like one in ten million. Large and sustained increases in body weight across the board—even in animals without access to vending machines, or getting [less] physical education at school. So, maybe some environmental pollutant is involved.

Of course, we’re exposed to a whole cocktail of new chemicals besides BPA. But the reason researchers have zeroed in on it is because of experiments like this—showing that BPA can accelerate the production of new fat cells, in a petri dish at least. But this was at more than a thousand times the concentration found in most people’s bloodstream.

We didn’t know if the same thing happened at typical levels, until now. Most people have between 1 to 20 nanomoles in their blood, and even at 1 nanomole, a significant boost in human fat cell production. So, even low levels may be a problem. But, again, that’s in a petri dish. What about in people?

Why not just measure the body weights of a population exposed to the chemical, compared to a population not exposed to the chemical? Because there is virtually no unexposed population; the stuff is everywhere. Okay, then, how about those with higher levels compared to those with lower levels? Good thinking, which is what researchers at NYU did, and the amount of BPA flowing through the bodies of children and adolescents was significantly associated with obesity.

But since it was a cross-sectional study—a snapshot in time—we don’t know which came first. Maybe the [high] BPA levels didn’t lead to obesity; maybe the obesity led to high BPA levels, since the chemical is stored in fat. Or, maybe BPA is just a marker for the same kinds of processed foods that can make you fat.

What we need are prospective studies where we measure exposure, and then follow people over time. But we never had anything like that, though, until now. And indeed, higher levels of BPA and some other plastics chemicals were significantly associated with faster weight gain over the subsequent decade. Okay, so, how can we stay away from the stuff?

Though we inhale some from dust, and some through our skin, touching BPA-laden receipts, 90% of exposure is from our diet. How do you tell? You have people fast, and drink water only out of glass bottles for a few days, and their BPA levels drop as much as tenfold. Fasting isn’t very sustainable, though.

What if you did a three-day fresh foods intervention, where they had families switch away from canned and processed foods for a few days? You can indeed get a significant drop in BPA exposure.

Or, you can do the experiment the other way—adding a serving of canned soup to people’s daily diet, and see a 1,000% rise in BPA levels in their urine, compared to a serving of soup prepared with fresh ingredients.

They used a ready-to-serve canned soup, which, in the largest survey of North American canned foods, has about 85% less BPA than condensed soups, which are even worse. But the worst of the worst appeared to be canned tuna.

To see any graphs, charts, graphics, images, and quotes to which Dr. Greger may be referring, watch the above video. This is just an approximation of the audio contributed by Katie Schloer.

Please consider volunteering to help out on the site.

Image thanks to Sally via flickr.

The purported link between hormone-disrupting plastics chemicals, like BPA, and obesity was initially based, in part, on observations that the rise in chemical exposure seemed to coincide with the rise of the obesity epidemic—with graphs like these. But, maybe that’s just a coincidence. There’s lots of other changes over the last half century—like an increase in fast food consumption and watching TV—that would seem to be simpler explanations.

But why are our pets getting fatter, too? Fido isn’t drinking more soda. Of course, the more we watch Seinfeld reruns, the less we may walk the dog. But what about our cats? Well, maybe we’re giving both them and our kids a few too many treats? That would seem an easier explanation than some pervasive obesity-causing chemical in the environment building up in the pet and person food chains.

But how do we explain this? A study of over 20,000 animals from 24 populations, and we’re all getting fatter. The odds that this could happen just by chance is like one in ten million. Large and sustained increases in body weight across the board—even in animals without access to vending machines, or getting [less] physical education at school. So, maybe some environmental pollutant is involved.

Of course, we’re exposed to a whole cocktail of new chemicals besides BPA. But the reason researchers have zeroed in on it is because of experiments like this—showing that BPA can accelerate the production of new fat cells, in a petri dish at least. But this was at more than a thousand times the concentration found in most people’s bloodstream.

We didn’t know if the same thing happened at typical levels, until now. Most people have between 1 to 20 nanomoles in their blood, and even at 1 nanomole, a significant boost in human fat cell production. So, even low levels may be a problem. But, again, that’s in a petri dish. What about in people?

Why not just measure the body weights of a population exposed to the chemical, compared to a population not exposed to the chemical? Because there is virtually no unexposed population; the stuff is everywhere. Okay, then, how about those with higher levels compared to those with lower levels? Good thinking, which is what researchers at NYU did, and the amount of BPA flowing through the bodies of children and adolescents was significantly associated with obesity.

But since it was a cross-sectional study—a snapshot in time—we don’t know which came first. Maybe the [high] BPA levels didn’t lead to obesity; maybe the obesity led to high BPA levels, since the chemical is stored in fat. Or, maybe BPA is just a marker for the same kinds of processed foods that can make you fat.

What we need are prospective studies where we measure exposure, and then follow people over time. But we never had anything like that, though, until now. And indeed, higher levels of BPA and some other plastics chemicals were significantly associated with faster weight gain over the subsequent decade. Okay, so, how can we stay away from the stuff?

Though we inhale some from dust, and some through our skin, touching BPA-laden receipts, 90% of exposure is from our diet. How do you tell? You have people fast, and drink water only out of glass bottles for a few days, and their BPA levels drop as much as tenfold. Fasting isn’t very sustainable, though.

What if you did a three-day fresh foods intervention, where they had families switch away from canned and processed foods for a few days? You can indeed get a significant drop in BPA exposure.

Or, you can do the experiment the other way—adding a serving of canned soup to people’s daily diet, and see a 1,000% rise in BPA levels in their urine, compared to a serving of soup prepared with fresh ingredients.

They used a ready-to-serve canned soup, which, in the largest survey of North American canned foods, has about 85% less BPA than condensed soups, which are even worse. But the worst of the worst appeared to be canned tuna.

To see any graphs, charts, graphics, images, and quotes to which Dr. Greger may be referring, watch the above video. This is just an approximation of the audio contributed by Katie Schloer.

Please consider volunteering to help out on the site.

Image thanks to Sally via flickr.

Doctor's Note

I previously touched on bisphenol A in BPA Plastic and Male Sexual Dysfunction. Some companies make canned foods without BPA, for example, Eden Foods. (See Do Eden Beans Have Too Much Iodine? for more information.) You can also buy aseptic packaged beans or boil your own. Personally, I like pressure-cooking them.

For more on BPA, see:

Phthalates are another concerning class of plastics chemicals. I covered those in Avoiding Adult Exposure to Phthalates and What Diet Best Lowers Phthalate Exposure?.

If you haven’t yet, you can subscribe to my videos for free by clicking here.

209 responses to “How to Avoid the Obesity-Related Plastic Chemical BPA

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  1. I’ve largely moved away from packaged foods but I still use a few canned goods. Artichokes are tough to find in water, and variety is slim to none in the store, only one store I’ve been in had two brands. The most frequent purchase I make now is tomato products, some stores I walk out empty handed because they don’t carry no salt versions, BPA free is pretty tough. At least on the chart the tomato paste is very low, and I buy passata in glass bottles, still a few areas to work on though.

    1. Trader Joe’s sells frozen artichoke hearts – or they used to, it has been a while since I’ve shopped for them (perhaps I should since artichokes are a source of apigenin, and they taste good).

      Both Whole Foods and Earth Fare carry a brand of organic tomato paste in glass jars; I don’t think any salt is added, if I remember correctly the only ingredient is tomato paste.

          1. I”m not entirely sure, but I remember reading that all canned tomato products (in metal cans, not sure about the wax cartons) have BPA due to the high acid content in tomatoes. So, you might want to check the Cento brand. I’m Italian, so would love it if Cento didn’t have BPA.

            After seeing this video, I think it might be time to start canning my own tomatoes in glass, not sure I can afford the ones in glass from places like Whole Foods because I eat a lot of tomatoes.

      1. The problem is that the end product may be in glass jar but what is the food stored in before it is put in glass jar? We cannot control it.

        Only way to eat BPA free or try to, is to eat foods off the ground. But there is also BPA from fertilizer… Ah!

        1. There’s BPA in fertilizer??? Do they put it in there on purpose, or is it ubiquitous in the environment? What about organic fertilizer?

    2. Trader Joe’s has no salt added Marinara sauce in glass jars (the lid likely has BPA?) Otherwise we use real tomatoes.
      Since we’re retired we have time enough to cook dry beans & peas & lentils & rice … no cans. No salt either.
      We do hummus pizza every week or so. The recipe has black olives which come in cans. Maybe pimento olives in glass jars (except for the lid) would have less BPA?

      1. Not American, so a lot of these American only stores and options don’t help, the selection here in Canada is much much lower than you’d think. Since getting an instant pot I don’t use canned beans anymore.
        Pizza is where I use my artichokes.

        The tomatos I’m using are diced or whole tomatos in a can. Some of the fresh tomatos we have here are terrible, some times of the year they are still green in the store, so not an option to just do fresh. Like I said, I have to leave stores with nothing because they don’t even have no salt added tomatos, let alone BPA free, I know in the US, shopping has easily 5x more variety, but here not so much.

        1. Nick Presidente: Here’s another idea for you: I have heard that even more than beans, some people love their pressure cooker because it makes cooking artichokes easy. So, maybe if you can’t find them in stores, you could give that a try? Just an idea.

          1. I watched a few people making artichokes and decided that buying them was way easier, they take a lot of time, lol.
            Cooking for one on this type of diet is difficult enough as it is, with work and excercise there isn’t a whole lot of extra time :(

            1. Nick Presidente: I’m all for convenience! So, I’m totally with you there. I just thought I heard that a pressure cooker makes it easier. But certainly buying them already cooked and prepared is the easiest and what I do myself. I hope you are able to find something good in your area.

        2. It’s time consuming but what about buying fresh tomatoes when they are okay and jarring them yourself to last for at least 6 months? Jar them whole or make sauce. :Maybe it would take a weekend and some time to learn but then you’d have them for awhile and you’d know they were chemical free.

          1. Hi. Hate to advertise my “easy” ways (lazy?), but years ago when we had a large garden & freezer, I would just freeze my tomatoes (washed/dried) whole and just add them to soups/stews all winter. Worked for me.

      1. Thanks, definitely will look into that, I don’t have a membership there anymore because their fresh stuff is just too much in quantity and the rest is largely processed, being single it is hard to justify going there.

    3. Tomato paste, is what I buy, it’s an already cooked for of tomatoes. I don’t eat raw vegetables from a nightshade family because of unwanted properties of such veggies. I buy Costco’s brand, Kirkland, which doesn’t state that a can is BPA free, but I contacted Costco (which you may as well just to verify), and a product manager verified that cans are BPA free. No additives and much deeper red color as compared to others.I try not to scrub paste from walls of a can , just to be on a safe side.
      I also buy Natural Directions paste (BPA free) and Bionaturae organic tomato paste in a GLASS buttle, no salt added (but it’s a bit watery as compared to brands in a can).

          1. Sam: The tomato section of the Wikipedia page you found seems to indicate there is not likely to be a problem eating raw tomatoes. It’s just an anecdote, but I’ve been eating 3 to 5 pounds of raw cherry tomatoes for years now and never had a problem.

      1. That’s interesting about the mustards. I’ve been using the Grey Poupon Dijon, but don’t know whether that’s considered brown/hot or not. Thanks for the info.

        1. Yeah I think his point was convenience. One could soak and cook a big batch of dried beans etc a head of time and store them in the freezer/fridge in a bpa free container, still not as convenient as a can ;)

          1. But Eden is way too expensive. Whole Foods in my area is selling a BPA free, no salt, can of beans for 79 cents each. Compare that to Edens 2+ dollars per can. Eden is a ripoff!

            1. Maybe, but don’t be sure till you get written assurance from WholeFds (WholePaycheck) that their cans aren’t lined with BPS, BPF or any other delights of chemistry replacing BPA.
              Someone correct this if wrong– Eden hasn’t substituted another BPfamily coating.

        2. The sort of answers you got here Christoph, makes me sad and suspicious, it looks like this is a sect and the master can not, under any circumstances, be wrong. Look at them, instead of saying that dr G just missed that, or that the book didn’t go into details deep enough, or that dr G found out new info after he published the book, they fabricate excuses. #pathetic

  2. I am so happy to see this. Last three four years I been telling parents about the harmful effects especially the estrogen given off the cheap plastic water bottles when they get warm. It kills me to see are young boys fill up with this “change your
    genes stuff”. I hope the good Dr. address this later. I have a small website I throw out the light articles and link my friends to the heavy hitters, like this one. Thanks again for this one.
    Dale Neff

  3. Speaking of using a pressure cooker, I recently bought an *electric* pressure cooker and it has made my bean-preparing life much easier. The electronics automatically keep the contents at just the right temperature to maintain the desired pressure for the specified time. No more dried-out beans. No more spatter mess. I do not have the time or memory to “keep an eye on” any cooking apparatus, and with this I don’t have to. Pressure Cooking for Dummies! :)

    1. Nicholas Sterling: Welcome to the club! I was a hold-out for a long time, thinking the drawbacks of electric pressure cooking over the stove top kind out-weighted the benefits. But I eventually broke down and tried an electric one and have been completely won over.

      I still keep my stove top pressure cookers around because the pots still work great as pots without the lids–and the stove top kind can work with a rocket stove (StoveTec) in an emergency situation. But for everyday pressure cooking, I always find myself reaching for my electric pressure cooker. Glad you found one. :-)

      1. Does the pressure cooker have any plastic that contacts the water or food? What about the jar lids that you buy yourself, do they have any plastics on them? I’ve returned several electric cooking items realizing that a lot of plastic parts are involved.

        1. Cat: In the pressure cooker I have, the list has some plastic over the metal, but no part of the lid, metal or otherwise should come into contact with the food. Since the temperature gets so hot in a pressure cooker, I can’t imagine any pressure cooker having plastic that comes into contact with the food. But all I can vouch for is my own version.
          .
          If you are interested, the one I have is called an Instant Pot. They can be ordered on Amazon. There are a couple of different models. One nice things about the Instant Pot is that the pot is stainless steel, not aluminum. At least, that was a plus for me. Another plus for me is that the pot is not non-stick. It’s just stainless steel.

          1. That’s really good to know. I will have a serious look at the Instant Pot. I get exhausted looking for safe cookware and then just give up and keep using what I’ve got. I actually considered going raw to avoid trying to find something. I considered cooking over an open fire with a stick but that’s dangerous too! :D Isn’t it amazing how many non stick items are still being made? Thanks so much for the info.

            1. “I get exhausted looking for safe cookware and then just give up and keep using what I’ve got.”

              I did that time ago, after a lot of research I found out that some (not all brands) of ceramic coated non stick cookware are really inert and safe.

              1. Thule: Nice. Do you happen to remember off the top of your head some of the safe brands or what specifically to look for the “inert” property?

              2. Same question here. We just use stainless steel. My understanding is that the manufacturers are not always clear about what makes up the “ceramic” coating. Some of them are just new chemicals that haven’t yet been villified.

                1. I am using stainless steel at the moment and also clear glass Pyrex, Anchor hocking type casserole dishes in the oven. I really miss have more convenience like rice cookers, slow cookers but many things just smell like chemicals before you even use them and I take them back. I’m going to try looking at some of the cookware suggested here & also think about canning. But I found out that even the nicest glazed pottery can test positive for lead, including Staub. I don’t know that it leaches into the food but I don’t feel comfortable using it anymore. I feel happiest with the clear glass bakeware but use the stainless for boiling things.

                  1. I agree if it smells like a chemical it’s not a great idea. Even the canning lids are coated in plastic (BPA-free or not…and some of those items have just swapped out for bisphenol-S). I don’t miss our nonstick cookware and find a little water in a hot stainless steel pain works well for most veggies.

                    I didn’t realize (or at least I’d hoped it’s not true) that even nicer pottery could have lead. I mostly use glass coffee mugs (they’re inexpensive and look nice, too!) but my mother bought us some beautiful locally glazed pottery mugs. Maybe I can test them.

    2. I just bought one, too, when Amazon had them for $50 off. I’m loving it. I haven’t cooked beans yet, because I already have home canned ones, but my other pressure cookers, from my farming days, are aluminum so I don’t cook food directly in them. I love the set-it-and-forget-it aspect, and that it keeps food warm after it’s finished cooking. Also love the other uses, like making soy yogurt, etc.

        1. Yes, you MUST use a pressure canner. You can even put dry beans into the jars, pour over boiling water, put the lids on, bring the pressure up and can them. I prefer to soak them overnight, drain off the water, then proceed as above. There are specific directions online for timing and the amounts of beans to put into pint and quart jars. It’s important not to put in too many beans or the jars will explode as they expand.

          1. I had never heard of a pressure canner, so I checked it out on YouTube. Looks like serious business; my hat is off to you, Rebecca! :)

            1. Nicholas Sterling, my two pressure canners go back to my farmwife days in my long-ago 20s-30s. I grew big gardens and spent weeks canning everything in sight when I wasn’t on a tractor baling hay!

        1. Witchwindy, I used to think that too, but research shows that soy actually helps prevent breast cancer. It has a weak estrogenic effect that goes to the estrogen receptors, keeping stronger estrogen from getting to them, as too much estrogen favors cancer. I only use organic soy and I don’t use a lot of it. Nor do I use phony soy meats. Occasionally I eat tofu and small servings of unsweetened soy yogurt. It isn’t a huge part of my diet. Check this out: http://nutritionfacts.org/2011/08/29/soy-and-breast-cancer-an-update/.

            1. You seem to read a lot of propaganda, might want to look up soy on this website, the stuff on that natural health website is all twisted garbage

            2. Phytic acid/phytates can be anti-nutrient for some minerals but also antioxidant, and the component other than phosphorus is inositol, a nutrient in its own right.
              And ‘neutralization’ can occur by adding yogurt/kefir, lemon juice, or vinegar.

    3. Are you preparing canned beans or foods in general? I have a question for homemade canned foods in general, can you keep non-refrigerated because I don’t have enough room in my refrigerator.

      1. No, after the beans cool I put some in containers and throw them in the freezer. I put curry powder in the beans, both for the benefits of turmeric and to slow down the microbes; that allows me to use larger containers without the beans going bad quickly.

        Perhaps @rebeccacody:disqus could answer your question about canning?

          1. Jimmy, you don’t have to refrigerate or freeze the home canned beans until *after* you open the can (jar). They’re shelf-stable until then, which is kinda the whole point of canning them. Hope that helps.

            1. The Ball canning lids were coated with BPA last time I checked.
              Also, about Pressure Cooking: be sure the product, electronic or stove-top, is stainless steel and not aluminum.

              1. It wouldn’t matter if your pressure canner was aluminum, the food doesn’t come in contact with the canner, only the jar.

                  1. I just looked at the Weck website. They sell expensive water bath canners, jars with rubber gaskets and glass lids. Unfortunately, you cannot use a water bath canner for anything but acidic foods like fruits and tomatoes. You can’t use that method for canning beans. They must be canned using a pressure canner. For people who don’t have canners or don’t want to can beans, freezing them also works. Or use a pressure cooker, which cooks them much more quickly than regular stove top cooking.

                    1. “Unfortunately, you cannot use a water bath canner for anything but acidic foods like fruits and tomatoes. You can’t use that method for canning beans.” Why is that?

                    2. In a water bath canner you can’t get the food hot enough to kill botulinum toxin. You MUST use a pressure canner to keep food safe. This includes all beans, meats, fish, fowl and garden veggies other than tomatoes, pickles using vinegar and fruit.

                    3. Oh I see! Thank you so much for explaining that! I may try canning in the near future so it’s really helpful to understand this.:)

                  1. It appears they’re only safe for water bath canning. That would be unsafe for vegetables and beans. It’s only for acidic things like fruits, pickles, and tomatoes.

              2. Thanks. That’s exactly what I was wondering. Old fashioned ones have the metal thing that compresses a glass lid (tho it must have had some kind of rubber) onto the jar.

              1. Sorry, it won’t fit in the overhead. Wish I could personally deliver it. We’re having a mostly cool, often cloudy summer here in the Pacific Northwest. Hawaii sounds delightful about now. This is August???

                  1. Yikes! I spent July and August in Phoenix in 2010, I remember needing potholders for the steering wheel and waking up to a gray sky that I thought meant a pleasant early morning walk, only to discover it was already 92 outside. You should spend summers here and I should spend winters there, as many do.

            1. Thanks a lot! I always want an Instant Pot but when people talk about pressure cooker the other day, I thought it is for something else. Yep Instant Pot can be used for a lot of cooking. I have a slow cooker and that was my most used cooking pot.

            2. Hi Nicholas, I have a question. The one on sale is the deluxe one which has the high pressure cooking function while the duo which is not on sale, has both high and low pressure cooking. Do you need low pressure cooking for canning? Thanks.

              1. Oh, I may have misled you, Jimmy. That is probably not a good pressure cooker for canning; those are usually much bigger, from what I have seen in YouTube videos. What I do is just cook a pot of beans and throw half in the freezer for later. Lots of canning experts in this thread, though!

                1. No problem, I may buy it anyway to cook other foods. As for canning, I thought that the pot is too small to do it. I don’t plan to do canning right now but when I do then I will buy a regular pot for that.

          1. Benjamin Dowell, My canners are old. I bought them back in the 1970s when I lived on a farm for six years. I think they are Mirromatic, if I remember correctly. I actually have two of them, one huge one, one smaller that only holds a few jars. They are aluminum, so I don’t cook food directly in them. I hadn’t heard of the Weck system, but I plan to look into it. The main canner itself is a big pot that is designed to keep the steam inside and can release it as needed, in small, controlled amounts. This allows the heat to build up enough so the food can be cooked and sealed so it becomes safe to keep on the pantry shelf until opened.

            You have to stay nearby to adjust the burner temperature if it is releasing too much steam, or not venting enough. It’s noisy and requires frequent attention.

            The new electric pressure cookers are smaller, not designed for canning, but rather for cooking food directly in stainless steel. They adjust their own pressure and are quiet, so you don’t have to stay in the kitchen. Set it and forget it. I don’t see why you couldn’t can small amounts – maybe 4 quarts or pints.

          2. http://www.wearever.com/mirro/Pages/pressure-cookers-accessories.aspx. The Mirro company has evolved, merged, changed products, changed locations, and it appears to now be Wearever Mirro. Just from quickly scanning it looks like they sell the pressure canners at Walmart, Sears, and Target, though I didn’t go to their websites to check. You can still buy parts that occasionally have to be replaced, like gaskets, lead plugs that blow if the pressure vent gets blocked, to save a dangerous explosion of the entire pot, jigglers, etc.

    4. Tip: to mimic slow cooked beans, cook 1 pt dry beans with 4-5 parts water under pressure (~25 minutes for kidney sized beans), saute onions/garlic/peppers/spices/etc in another pan, then just add them to the beans and simmer another hour or so. Don’t bother soaking, or discarding cook water.

  4. I remember an earlier video in which Dr. Greger encouraged eating canned beets, or said he eats canned beets regularly. I do too, no salt added ones. But I can’t find any that say the cans are BPA-free, even searching online. Does Dr. Greger use a brand that’s BPA-free and also no salt added?

      1. Thea: please google this :”BPA-Free Plastic Containers May Be Just as Hazardous”, which is the title of an article that appeared in Scientific American.

        1. George: Thanks for the note. I’ve read similar articles in the past. I’m aware of the potential risk of the BPA replacement, but at this point am not sure what to make of it. I hope there will be enough solid evidence for Dr. Greger to do a video on that topic in the future some day. Thanks!
          .
          For anyone who is interested, here’s the article that George is talking about: http://www.scientificamerican.com/article/bpa-free-plastic-containers-may-be-just-as-hazardous/
          .
          My 2 cents is: It’s worth educating yourself on the topic so that you don’t become lazy and think: “If the plastic is BPA free, it’s safe!” Not necessarily.
          .
          There was a great article that someone pointed me to recently which ranked plastics according to their likely safety level. I have ***no*** idea if this is a properly researched/accurate article or not. But for anyone interested: http://littleacornstomightyoaks.co.uk/Articles/toxicplastics
          .
          For what it is worth, here is my approach to this issue for anyone who is interested: I treat BPA/plastic in a similar way to Dr. Greger’s recommendation for carrageenan. If consuming it helps me to eat more healthy products, like beans, then I don’t stress about it. If avoiding it means that I avoid foods that I shouldn’t be eating anyway, like say those highly processed veggies burgers, then I use the plastic issue as one more reason to avoid the processed food.
          .
          Another factor I take into consideration is the ‘alternatives factor’. Is there a convenient alternative, even if I have to pay more? For example, I used to get almond butter from Trader Joes. They sold it in a glass container. But then they switched to plastic. So, now I pay much more, but I get my almond butter from a health food store that cares enough about my health to still carry brands that are stored in glass. (Note: TJs recently started selling Tahini in glass jars. And pretty ones at that.) (Yes, the glass jars still have a little bit of plastic in the lid, but it is dramatically less.)
          .
          Finally, I consider the ‘amount of contamination’ factor, which is just something I completely made up. But my guess is that a cold, non-liquid, non-acidic food is likely to have extremely little contamination relatively. For example, cherry tomatoes sold in a plastic container are going to have to be kept cold, are non-acidic when they are whole, and are not liquid. So, I’m guessing that the amount of contamination is very little. (And I’m thinking this video supports this belief, though not directly.) On the other hand, a product like say tomato juice or something that is put into the plastic hot (or expected to be heated in the microwave in the plastic container–like frozen meals) is likely to have a lot of contamination. So, I try to make my plastic/processed purchases with those general ideas in mind.
          .
          Those are just my personal ideas that I’m sharing.

          1. Little acorns to mighty oaks are a company that primarily sell products aimed at babies and infants with a large leaning towards safety and eco-friendly. Of course, the article is not referenced in a friendly way, but having dealt with them personally over the years I believe they care a lot about only providing the safest products. So subjectively speaking, I like the article :-)

      2. Switching to Eden Brands is a good alternative , you vote with your $ every time you shop after all. One problem for some might be the price , that particular brand is about 3 times the money in this area . Everyone that has a favorite brand should write the company and simply ask if their cans are BPA free and if not when could we expect them to be BPA free . I would be willing to wager that everyone that wrote would get a reply . Most likely from the president or at least the head of quality control, most likely a coupon for some free product too .lol Every companies only goal is the bottom line, It;s almost unheard of to actually hear from a customer . One company screwed up their recipe , I;ll call it a jello type product . The guy operating the mixer forgot to add one ingredient , well he did but only half the amount . Weeks later quality assurance people grabbed a pack of the stuff and it would not set proper when they did a spot check . So how many people complained out of the 10000 packages produced? One. That note was on the bulliten board for years and hardly ever a meeting was complete till that complaint was talked about . I;m just trying to tell you , you as a customer you have huge impact on policy at the company level .

        1. esben andersen: Oh yes, the cost issue is a huge one!

          Thanks for the story about the “jello type product”. Very interesting!

        2. One reason they got so few complaints is the person making the product COULD have blamed themselves – thinking they did something wrong. However, I get your point. I go to companies’ Facebook pages to make comments – don’t know if that is more or less effective. Sometimes I write directly. I did what I could to get Subway to get the sulphites out of their meats but to no avail. At least The Food Babe got them to get the rubber mat stuff out of their bread.

        3. Absolutely correct, ALWAYS complain in writing to a company when a product/service fails to meet your standards. And when a product does meet your expectations or exceeds them, write and let them know that as well. Remember, the consumer has ALL the power when it comes to products and services, even including government regulations and inspections; a business wants to profit and they cannot do that if people don’t buy their products/services, they want their customers to be happy and buy the product or service again. I actually trust non governmental quality control orgs over government any day, best example, UL no one would buy ANY electric/electronic item that does not carry the UL label, also think about Consumer Reports, Good Housekeeping Seal of Approval, etc., the best companies engage them and willingly submit the products for testing, no charge.

    1. Have you considered buying fresh beets, eating the greens, and throwing the chopped roots into your next pot of beans? I always add beet root or carrots or squash to beans — that little bit of sugar perks up the dish!

    2. I remember Dr Greger encouraged eating canned beans to save time cooking. Same with canned tomato paste. Do they have the same BPA risk?

      If I have to, I only buy made in USA advertised BPA free product. My question is unless they are made of fresh plastic resin, a lot of time made-in- USA plastic products are made of recycling material. So how do they control the source, or with recycling and reused, the BPA may be gone? That sounds illogical to me.

      And last, there is more than BPA that contributes to weight problem. Personally, I got rid of my BPA food containers in my household a long time ago but I had a little bit of weight problem back then and it is gone only after I ate a lot of plant foods a few years ago. And people in Asia use a lot of plastic products but their weight problem is not as severe as in the Western world. I am not saying not to avoid BPA but I am saying that BPA is not the sole source of weight problem.

      1. Rewatch toward the video’s end, where he shows a contamination table; three of the six items are vegetable, two more soup, contents not specified. One is tuna, right on top in both mean and max contamination. No need to zoom.

        1. You are taking my humor wrongly. Sure tuna has the most BPA contamination among all the fishes, no denying for that. But what I joke about is that the good doctor always seems to zoom in to meat as the source of BPA contamination while it is everywhere too in the plant kingdom if one does not pay attention to how plants are grown. Just don’t be complacent that if one eats a pure plant food diet then it is warrantied free of BPA and other contamination. I showed a link the other day about turmeric spice being contaminated with mercury and having to be recalled.

          http://www.mnn.com/family/family-activities/blogs/bpa-plant-growth-study-yields-unexpected-results

          1. This may be a confusion of categories, or not reading replies clearly. BPA is NOT a substance found in tuna OR veggies, but put in the linings of cans containing whatever.
            What tuna has lots of, compared to many fish, is mercury. And that’s not normally found in plants, unless grown near old gold mines.
            And while I drop in only weekly, I find the suggestion of a Greger bias against meat a bit odd. Regulars can point you to his discussion of why vegans don’t live longer than others, or why a vegan diet of frites/French fries (or crisps/chips) and beer is hardly better than most diets. There are also different criteria under which chicken, for example, show up worse than red meat.
            A useful Greger reply to “Is X(meat) Good or Bad?” is “Compared to what?”
            Among people I know well, I often note a powerful tendency to falsely assert biases in others whose inverse, or mirror image, the accusers possess. They taught me not to make such assertions before asking whether I’m projecting an unexamined bias.

            1. Well you take it wrongly. My statement was made in light spirit. I don’t care if Dr Greger is for or against meat eater but in the context of this particular video, Dr Greger singled out meat and tuna in particular and not mention anything about other plant foods that are also packaged in BPA can such as corn and bean. I don’t care to look at tuna because I only eat wild caught salmon because it is less contaminated and has the most amount of Omega-3 which is what I am after. Now you have to ask yourself why tuna has more BPA than let say salmon that is also canned in most cases. And then what is the level of BPA in canned bean which Dr Greger recommended us to eat?

              1. ” in the context of this particular video, Dr Greger singled out meat and
                tuna in particular and not mention anything about other plant foods”
                That may be the problem here– the table he showed DID (as I said) show 3 results for veggies and two for soups that may or may not have been veg. MG did NOT single out meat or even tuna, the paper he cites showed tuna as #1.
                Don’t accuse the messenger… he also didn’t cover canned chicken.
                I assume canned salmon wasn’t covered in the study, worse luck; but IF tuna rated higher, it could be because of greater can surface compared to fish volume.

              2. I may have failed to post my reply, or it may be delayed, but since then I’ve looked at other publications by Cao et al out of Canada, and they do cover 52 examples of canned fish. In other publications, they cover any number of items in Canadian stores, enough to satisfy your concerns.
                But again, Dr. Greger reports a table summarizing six categories of food, and tuna topped the list.

  5. My coffee maker is almost completely made of plastic. I assume that it is leaching BPA into my coffee. Can anyone recommend a coffee maker that doesn’t put plastic in contact with my coffee?

      1. They also have french press made of all stainless steel. I bought one at Amazon. With french press you also get more of the good stuff (polyphenols) but it is also a more cloudy type of coffee.

    1. We use an all-stainless steel electric kettle to boil the water, then pour it over the coffee in our glass french press. It’s been known for years – *decades* – that all plastics have the potential to adversely affect those who are exposed to them, so we strive for plastic-free food storage and preparation as much as possible.

  6. I bought the audio book so I can’t get the recipes. Is there a site where the recipes are posted?? and the ingredients that are recommended. I also bought the small condensed book but no recipes in there either. HELP!!!

  7. Wow. I have gone through my kitchen and have removed as much plastic as possible. But even my glass containers have plastic lids. Besides avoiding using plastic are there ways to eliminate it from our bodies?

    1. I consume cilantro to try to remove as much toxins from my body as I possible. And eating plant foods with a lot of fiber does help too.

      1. Yes, I forced myself to like cilantro for that reason. I used to hate it.. I started small and built up now I love it by the handful in salsa, on tacos, etc.

        1. I view getting a small dose of toxins from our polluted environment and then consuming cilantro to detoxify them like building up our immune system like it is done with vaccine. Vaccine is by definition injecting a small dose of certain virus to trigger the body to build the immune system to counter against it. So unless we live in a perfect world, we cannot shield ourselves from all the toxins around us and so we need to build a good immune system and get foods that can repair DNA damage and detoxify.

        1. Actually you don’t need a lot. During the detox period that you do perhaps once every month, you consume for a couple of days, 1/4 cup of tightly-packed cilantro per day. You can also detox using broccoli sprout. Dr Greger had a video on the subject.

          http://www.drdavidwilliams.com/cilantro-clay-for-detoxification/

          Since I first reported on Dr. Omura’s work over a decade ago, numerous doctors have informed me of similar successes using cilantro. It is an excellent method for detoxifying and removing heavy metals and other neurotoxins. I’d suggest consuming at least 1/4 cup of tightly-packed fresh cilantro stems and leaves per day during a detox.

  8. Thank you so much for this video! I “kitty-sit” for an overweight cat who gets four tablespoons of canned tuna a day. I will share this with his owner. I wonder if there are any alternatives to canned tuna? He has arthritis from his weight, so it would be great if he could lose some.

  9. The more I think about my almost vegan diet, the more I’m concerned about the research in this video. I eat lots of bean-based meals using canned organic beans in different varieties along with canned pumpkin, yams and many green veggies. I buy various flavors of plastic packaged hummus and now I’m even worried about the plastic bottled carrot juice I consume in a smoothie every morning. Should I be concerned about organic spring lettuce mix in 16 oz. plastic containers? What about veggie burgers sealed in plastic? Most items don’t reflect a BPA free container. This is a dilemma as almost everything packaged for convenience and price is manufactured with plastic. For starters, any assistance making varieties of hummus would help. Loading up on three or four bean salad (or any others) in glass will be one of my first steps. Costco is one of the few places where I have seen that. This video is a real eye-opener.

    1. My take is that the benefits outweigh the risks and so continue to eat as much plant foods as possible and worry about BPA and other contaminants later. Try to avoid when you can but when you can’t, the worse thing is not to eat beneficial foods.

      And the reports are conflicting too:

      http://www.motherjones.com/environment/2015/06/list-canned-foods-bpa

      http://www.npr.org/sections/thesalt/2014/02/26/283030949/government-studies-suggest-bpa-exposure-from-food-isn-t-risky

      1. Thanks Jimmy. You’re right. The reports are conflicting. Continued research and public avoidance of the chemical, though difficult, is probably the best mantra.

    2. Oil is a far worse problem than BPA. Veggie burgers are rather high in oil. Hummus is easy to make, the net is full of recipes, try to use one that doesn’t use oil.

      1. Two Oil free veggie burgers that you can buy at Whole Foods market are: Engine 2 Plant Strong and Organic Sunshine Burgers. I like the Pinto Habanero for the Engine 2 and the Shiitake Mushroom for the Sunshine Burgers.

    3. I was making my own hummus for a while, but got lazy and bought the organic red roasted pepper hummus (store brand) at Target and it is just so much better than what I can make (much smoother, even when I spend 30 minutes peeling the skin off of the chickpeas – which I made from dry, a long process and I can never get the chickpeas to cook uniformly). Of course, store bought hummus and most traditional recipes have added oil, so there’s that to factor in as well.

  10. It seems like a lot of fresh organic produce comes in plastic containers, e.g. baby kale and fresh cut cabbage. I find this in all the grocery stores. I wonder if/how much BPA is in those plastic containers. The only way to avoid the containers is to buy whole fresh produce and put it in the plastic bags they provide. Do the plastic bags have BPA?

    1. Marilyn, Beth Terry over at http://myplasticfreelife.com/ uses lightweight cloth bags for her produce. I’ve been reluctant to do that at the store for high-cost items purchased by weight, but I take them out of the plastic bags as soon as I get home and store them in cloth bags. And I do use cloth bags for items purchased by count. Small clean pillowcases, and the cloth bags sheet sets come in, are very good for this.

    2. Yep all prepared produce comes in plastic bags, organic or not. My take is that until you heat plastic that most BPA will leach out. I am not saying that they won’t if you don’t but it should be just a tiny amount. We cannot go through industrial life worrying about everything.

  11. The problem Dr. Greger presents must not be that important or critical to our health. Today’s Billions of people on earth are exposed to BPA and yet this generation of people on earth today have longer life spans than previous generations who lived before the industrial revolution and who were not exposed to BPA.

      1. Sure the reports are conflicting – particularly those from industry, and from government agencies that have revolving doors held wide for people from the industries they’re supposed to be regulating. Reminds me of the (*koff*) trumped-up “controversy” around tobacco, and climate change, and and and…
        That npr link is to a 2 1/2 year old piece. The science has moved on since then.

      2. Even though people are living longer, more of them are experiencing quality of life that has lessened, with more time spent in decline and ill health, nursing homes, hooked up to machines to keep them alive, etc. Not many people want to live out their last years in those ways.

    1. John, our medical interventionist system has quite a bit to do with today’s longer life spans. For myself, I’d rather be able to shed these extra even-though-vegan pounds I’m carrying, so I can *enjoy* that longer life span, rather than becoming feeder stock for the modern Medical-Industrial-Complex.

      1. Genetic entropy is still unavoidable, we may have increased life mortality by chemical intervention,but I can affirm in my job of caring for the elderly and the disabled that quality of life is apparent. Cognitive and physical decline is heart breaking to watch. Working with the palliative is a conversion experience.

        1. Thats why many of us are on here, we want a better quality of life in our last years. A healthy plant based diet really helps. How many of the elderly you care for are on a healthy daily dozen type of diet that is recomended on this site?

      2. Are you a strict vegan? Dr. Esselstyn has had to take a really close look at some of his patients who went on a vegan diet but had great difficulty in losing weight and getting their cholesterol down. Inevitably he would discover that they were making mistakes like using salad dressings that had oil, or consuming avocados and olives. He discovered that some of his problem patients would even cheat. Have you tried intermittent fasting, which is just eating one meal a day coupled with daily exercise? The ultimate program to lose weight is a program like the one that Dr. Alan Goldhammer has at his health resort called TrueNorth. His program involves intense fasting under medical supervision in a group setting with other patients. There are plenty of vegans out there and calorie restriction advocates who have lost weight and remained slim despite being exposed to BPA. I just don’t think we can blame BPA for not being able to lose pounds. Anybody who goes to TrueNorth facility and gets INVOLVED with Dr. Alan Goldhammer’s program loses weight….EVERYBODY !

        1. My wife is still about 15 pounds overweight on a perfect diet for many years. For some people it just might be impossible because of genetics and age to not be a little overweight.

          1. Any human being can lose weight. Dr. Alan Goldhammer has worked with people who claim they cannot lose weight and has them losing weight in no time at all. It’s called fasting under medical supervision. You can read about Dr. Goldhammer’s facility at TrueNorth by clicking on the link below:
            http://www.healthpromoting.com/

            1. Yes I agree , if you strave yourself you will lose weight , but that is not what most of the WFPB diet websites say . They say eat as much as you want of “approved” foods and will lose weight . That is not true in the people i have known , some do but of the 5 people I know , only 3 lost a little weight . It very well could be some chemicals in the diet like BPA . Also fasting would also help to get rid of toxins.

    2. But I sure hope the BPA I am exposed to is not making me fatter then I have to be. That’s my big issue. My wife is more overweight then myself, and we both eat as healthy as possible, so I am going to try to cut down on the canned goods and see if that helps.

      1. I went from 205 pounds down to 168 by intermittent fasting on a vegan diet. With intermittent fasting, you only eat once a day, but you get to eat as much as you want. However, it has to be a vegan approved diet, with B12 supplements, and sources of omega-3 fatty acids such walnuts, ground up flax seeds, and ground up chia seeds. Also, you have to stay busy. You have to occupy your time with work: yard work, running errands, building projects, and so on. You can’t be a couch potato. If you are idle, the thought of food will haunt you and you will be prowling around the ktichen. In order to make fasting work for you, you really need to be in a supervised group of people who are all on the same journey as you. This can be done by finding a clinic such as TrueNorth. Also, in order to make fasting work you have to have knowledge about the benefits of fasting, and know all about it by reading books, and listening to videos by such people as Dr. Alan Goldhammer on YouTube. Eating only once a day is a challenge, that is why you need a support system and the ability to stay really busy, and fully understand the physiology of fasting and the psychology of fasting.

    3. Someone with better records will be able to cite the video in which Dr. Greger points out that a recently lengthened US lifespan went with MORE years less-than-fully functioning.
      One year forward, 2-3 back.

  12. We’re mostly on whole foods vegetables, fruits, nuts, legumes, whole grains, … with occasional canned ingredients. We have no problem with weight. Fitness exercise helps. Maybe frozen ingredients would be better although I haven’t seen anything I remember on the plastic in the boxes and bags? In season there are some produce stands here.

  13. I used to be able to identify BPA canned goods by the white colored coating inside the can. Is that still how to do it or is there a transparent coating now?
    Also, are all canned goods labels “Organic” BPA free?

    1. I don’t believe organic is equal to BPA free. When I buy canned beans I specifically look for cans with the BPA free label (Eden is one).

  14. I cook and I drink with Poland spring water . Water tap is better or Poland Spring? Can u give any recommendations . Any brand filter can use ,thanks

    1. If you have a good municipal water system then tap water is as healthy as bottled. “Poland Spring” is likely just a product name an has nothing to do with the water actually coming from a spring. In fact the source of most bottled water is simply the municipal water system in the location of the bottling plant. But even if the water did come from a spring the water still must be treated and disinfectants (mostly just chlorine bleach) has to be added to keep it safe to drink as it sits in the bottle.

      Plus most bottles today are plastic. So before the bottled water gets to you it sits, potentially in a hot warehouse, for days, weeks or months slowly leaching any BPA, BPF, BPH, BP? out of the bottle and into the water.

      So unless you have reasons to not drink the tap water, like the good folks in Flint Michigan do, I would just use tap. If you are still concerned about your water systems, at least in the US, are usually required to file reports of a chemical analysis of the contents of the water. You should be able to request a copy of that report or might even be able to find it on-line. I just looked and I found the Cleveland Ohio 2015 annual water quality report showing the details of range of contamination levels found in the 300 daily samples they take at the treatment plants and random locations through out the city. And of course for the price of a few cases of bottled water you can pay to have the water coming out of your tap tested.

  15. Tuna – wow. I don’t eat any animal products but my grand daughter eats tuna although I tell her it is full of mercury and other bad stuff and now this!!

    1. nani: I’m all for Vitamix getting rid of the plastic container (which I use until liquid food gets hot all the time–ouch). But rather than a steel container, I’d rather have glass. They claim that they can’t safely do glass, but I have a hard time believing that since you can get bullet-proof glass… What do you think of the glass idea? Why do you prefer steel?

      1. You are right, I would prefer glass! Just they claim it isn’t possible, so … But if the BPA free container really contains hormone-disrupting additives, it is quite an issue thinking of the use of the blender!!!

        1. nani: I agree that it is quite an issue. I just wish someone could explain how it is possible that they can’t do it out of glass. I think they can and just don’t want to. Maybe they don’t want to do glass due to expense and trying to compete with the increasing number of high speed blenders that people can choose from? I’d pay more for the glass, though. I think a glass jar would draw a lot of people.

          Thanks for sharing the link above.

          1. Hi Thea, I think the weight of the glass might be a factor, too, in why Vitamix is reluctant to use glass. I really like my Vitamix, but the motor is quite heavy in and of itself, and if the container were made of thick, unbreakable glass, I would need to build up my biceps a little more to lift it ;-) But I would definitely pay more for glass whenever it’s available. I think most glass food containers are worth the extra cost.

            1. HaltheVegan: I’m sure you are correct. I think that weight would definitely be an issue. One of my pet theories is that they know they can make a glass jar safe, but making a thin enough glass jar that won’t turn off people who expect plastic weights would probably be difficult to do safely. I say, give me the weight. I can always carry the pieces separately. I usually do anyway, just because of the awkwardness.
              .
              Maybe the Vitamix CEO or someone on the board of directors will see our conversation and see the light. :-)

      2. I think they may be telling the truth about glass. I have an Oster with a borosilicate glass jar. When I first got it, I inspected it closely and noticed some small inclusions and I sent it in for a replacement; they handled the transaction very nicely and efficiently. Now if I ever dropped it I would probably also try to get a replacement jar (at my expense) even if I could not see any damage due to the possiblitly of microfractures. Problems in quality control can be handled by the company, but stuff like the consumer dropping it and not realizing there are small fractures is not something they could control. [I also don’t do any abrupt hot/cold transitions, even though properly made borosilicate glass should be able to handle it.]

        I can’t think why good quality steel would not work, though.

        1. lemonhead: I can understand being worried about customers dropping the jar but I don’t think that should stop them. They market themselves as being about health. Overall health would be served with glass jars.
          .
          I saw an article the other day about glass bridges being made over deep canyons. And people are walking over those glass bridges. I may have no idea what I’m talking about, but I think that it just can’t be that hard to make a glass blender jar that is safe. And if it breaks, have it break like bullet proof glass–with no sharp edges.
          .
          The problem with steel is that you can’t see the food. I use the side view of the food to make a lot of judgment calls on speed and timing. It also helps me to see when food is not being properly mixed/stuck in a corner or two.
          .
          If I had to choose between plastic and steel, that would be tough for me.

  16. Food industry and Media in the United States are the worst enemies of the health in the this country. They are the main reasons for creating Obesity by falsifying the facts with distortion of scientific principles

  17. So, we’ve determined that food sources affect BPA levels in the body, and that BPA accelerates fat cell growth. But given a male with a healthy diet and a goal to lose body fat (say from 20% to 15%), would reducing BPA help in this case? Does the presence of BPA decrease the rate at which fat cells are eliminated?

  18. So how risky are canned goods? Dr Greger has recommended canned beans in previous videos… Are they no longer recommended (or am I making this up)?

  19. If you currently eat canned beans because of the hassle of cooking them, check out this *electric* pressure cooker (on sale today at Amazon):

    https://smile.amazon.com/dp/B0073GIN08

    It makes cooking beans really easy — throw ingredients into a pot, press a button, and walk away. Nothing to keep an eye on, no spattering, no dried-out beans (since steam is not escaping).

    Of course, you can use it for much more than just beans. :)

  20. Westbrae Vegetarian Organic Beans are also in BPA-free cans. They do not contain Kombu seaweed and thus there is no concern of potentially getting too much iodine. For reasons not related to nutrition, my family and I stopped patronizing Eden Foods a couple of years ago, so they may have changed their ingredients in the meantime.

    1. Jacob Dijkstra, M.D.: FYI: Dr. Greger did a blog once that covered the amount of iodine in a can of Eden beans. (http://nutritionfacts.org/2012/07/05/do-eden-beans-have-too-much-iodine/ ) I believe the analysis shows that *if* you consume the liquid in the can, you would get just enough to about cover your daily iodine needs. It seems unlikely to me that anyone would get too much iodine from a can of Eden beans, especially since most people drain the liquid.

      Please note, I’m in no way trying to say you or anyone should eat the Eden brand. I appreciate that you pointed out an alternative for people as Eden can be expensive and may not be available to everyone. And I’m all for making purchases that support whatever wider ethical (or whatever) concerns people have. I just don’t think the iodine in the Eden can is a concern. For me, the opposite is true. I really appreciate the iodine in the beans as I don’t often get enough other ways. And I’d much rather get my iodine from seaweed than a pill. (A personal preference. I’m not saying anything is wrong with the pills.)

  21. Westbrae Vegetarian Organic Beans come in BPA-free cans. Do not contain Kombu seaweed, so no concern about too much iodine (see Dr. Greger’s entry above: “Do Eden Beans Have Too Much Iodine?)”.

    1. Look up the harmful effects of the non-bpa can linings, and ask west brae if they are using this type of non BPA in their
      linings. There is scientific data that some non-BPA linings are just as bad as the BPA, maybe even worse. Depends on the
      the type, I think.

  22. I’ve been wondering about the canned food I feed my cat. He eats about 75% home cooked food and the rest from canned. I think I need to switch to 100% cooked. The problem with my water is we live on former farmland which has past run off from pesticides and as far as I’m aware filters don’t remove this so I drink Voss water. And some Smart water but I’m not happy about that as it’s in plastic. I don’t know what else I can do.

  23. I am considering growing my own greens hydroponically and wonder if BPA gets into the vegetables that we grow in plastic containers. Is there any studies on this?

  24. What about coffee makers? Is there risk of BPA getting into the coffee? I read that many of the parts inside (that become hot and are in contact with the coffee) are made of plastic, and I thought maybe the pot is also plastic. It’s not labeled. Are there any coffee makers (for use at home) that are made with something other than plastic and have glass pots? Some countries, until relatively recently, used a more traditional method of a small fabric bag that you put the coffee into and then pour boiling water over it… I suppose that’s an option.

    For the most part, I avoid canned foods and plastics as much as possible, by buying fresh foods and storing in glass containers. However, I was just curious about this: I heard that in products labeled “BPA-free” there are now other harmful chemicals being used in place of the BPA… is that true? If so, what are those chemicals?

  25. Hi, as a dental assistant who reads the inserts on the dental materials, I know for a fact that we are exposed to a ton of BPA in the dental products, especially the composite (white filling) resin that we fill cavities with. So between plastics, food, and fillings, we are so exposed!! It’s awful.

    1. Valerie Spinner: That’s a really important comment. Many people are concerned with mercury in metal fillings. I had not considered previously that they put BPA in the white fillings. That makes a completely different risk-benefit ratio in my mind. Thanks for sharing.

  26. 1. Should I replace food containers made of plastic that are meant only for storage with ones made of glass?
    2. When not home, I may microwave plastic containers which carry the kitchenware sign, meaning they are made of plastic that had been tested to withstand very high temperatures without leaching into food. Any thoughts regarding this?

    Thanks.

  27. Embryonic,

    Ditch the plastic……it’s an ecological issue as well as a health issue. Clearly some plastics #2,4,5’s are better than others when it comes to leaching however….. is there really a good reason to use this approach ? Go with glass and silicon tops as one example. Keep in mind that some foods degrade with light so….. pantry or dark glass.

    Those plastics that are rated to withstand high temperatures may indeed not leach the dreaded phthalates and their irk however we still circle back to the ecology of both the manufacturing and disposal of the items and there’s more…….

    I’d direct your attention to a slightly older publication, which found
    “Conclusions: Many plastic products are mischaracterized as being EA free if extracted with only one solvent and not exposed to common-use stresses. However, we can identify existing compounds, or have developed, monomers, additives, or processing agents that have no detectable EA and have similar costs. ” The FDA site will give you a much more in depth evaluation of the specific polymer and the requirements and testing.

    My belief, the real question should be why even use these items when simple glass, stainless, bioplastics, and other non-toxic renewable solutions are available.

    Dr. Alan Kadish moderator for Dr. Greger http://www.Centerofhealth.com

    1. Thank you for investing your time in replying to me. I raised my questions while in the process of watching all the NF.org videos discussing plastic use and reading users’ replies; ultimately, the information I encountered, along with your comment, made it clear that conventional plastic is probably unsafe under all conditions. As you noted, the ecological aspect should be taken into consideration as well. I assumed that glass containers would be expensive, but apparently, I was mistaken. Actually, glass containers are on their way to my house as we speak! Is silicon the same as plastic?

  28. Embryonic,

    Awesome work….glad you found the glass alternative. Silicon is completely different vs plastic. It is: “Silicon is the eighth most common element in the universe by mass, but very rarely occurs as the pure element in the Earth’s crust. It is most widely distributed in dusts, sands, planetoids, and planets as various forms of silicon dioxide (silica) or silicates. Over 90% of the Earth’s crust is composed of silicate minerals, making silicon the second most abundant element in the Earth’s crust (about 28% by mass) after oxygen.[9]” thank you wikipedia….

    There are different grades however of silicon. For our food exposures…get the medical grade when possible.

    Dr. Alan Kadish moderator for Dr. Greger http://www.Centerofhealth.com

  29. Ryo,

    (This information is summarized from UpToDate, an evidence-based journal that synthesizes the current scientific consensus on different medical topics.)

    Obesity is associated with an increased risk of multiple types of cancer (obesity causes about 20% of all cancers and increases the likelihood of dying from cancer). The absence of excess body fat has a cancer-preventive effect. Adipose tissue is an endocrine organ that secretes hormones and has a significant impact on all of the organ systems. Along with cancer, obesity increases the risk for basically every disease.

    Dr. G has loads of info on obesity that you can find here:
    https://nutritionfacts.org/topics/obesity/

  30. Is there truth and studies on the level of BPA in food stored in Mason type jars. I see a mention on the internet, but I want to know if there is any data.

  31. The Green Valley brand sells BPA-free pouches containing organic beans that are cooked while inside the pouches. In case any of you has information regarding other plastics possibly contained in the packaging, please share. This could be a safe alternative..

  32. So, why does canned tuna have so much BPA? Is it in the tuna before it’s canned, from the can material, or some combination?

    Thank you,
    Greg

  33. Aaaaargh! One can with that profound an increase! Now I’m really glad I’ve been making my beans from scratch. I wonder if they used a soup with acid, like tomato? That said, I store my daily meals in plastic containers in the fridge. No acid in the meals, so I wonder if I still need to worry about BPA leaking in the short (1-day) or longer term (5 days) containers, assuming the containers might be manufactured with BPA or other similarly-acting constituent? I hate to buy more stuff before old stuff is out of commission as a sort of low consumption value.

  34. Water is challenging as city/tap water has a lot of issues and other water sources all involve plastic. Seems minimization is about the best we can do.

    Stay Healthy!

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