Does Bovine Insulin in Milk Trigger Type 1 Diabetes?

Does Bovine Insulin in Milk Trigger Type 1 Diabetes?
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Is it the casein or the cow insulin that explains the link between milk consumption and the development of type I diabetes?

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Below is an approximation of this video’s audio content. To see any graphs, charts, graphics, images, and quotes to which Dr. Greger may be referring, watch the above video.

The tight correlation among countries between the incidence of type 1 diabetes among children and cow milk consumption didn’t account for Iceland. So, you’ll see studies like this. “Cow’s milk…consumption [in children and adolescents was] correlated with the incidence” of type 1 diabetes—but only when they excluded the Icelandic data.

Is it just genetics? Maybe yes and no. The people of Iceland are genetically similar to other Nordic countries, but their cows are not. “Icelandic cattle have been isolated from interbreeding with other cattle breeds for over 1,100 years.” See, there are two main types of casein protein (A1 and A2), and Icelandic cattle are unusual in that they produce mostly A2 milk. And, that may explain the lower incidence of type 1 diabetes in Iceland.

See, A1 casein breaks down into casomorphin, whereas A2 casein doesn’t. And, casomorphin has opioid properties that may alter immune function—perhaps increasing susceptibility to infections that may themselves trigger type 1 diabetes. And, that’s the kind of milk you get with Holstein cows—the ones with the classic black-and-white pattern, who make up about 95% of the U.S. dairy herd, and much of the global dairy herd.

It got to a point where dairy boards began taking out patents on methods for selecting non-diabetogenic milk, to avoid triggering type 1 diabetes. It certainly did restore that tight linear relationship between milk consumption and type 1 diabetes, if you just looked at A1 casein consumption. But, these so-called “ecological [or country-by-country] studies, really only [serve to] suggest possibilities [that then need to be put to the test].” So, studies like this were designed, where hundreds of siblings of type 1 diabetics were followed for about ten years, and those that drank a lot of milk had about five times the risk of coming down with the disease, too.

By the mid-90s, more than a dozen such studies were done. And, overall, they found that “early cow’s milk exposure” appears to “increase the risk” of type 1 diabetes by about 50%. That was good enough for the American Academy of Pediatrics, who decided that “cow’s milk protein may [indeed] be an important factor in the initiation of the [process that destroys your insulin-producing cells].”

And so, “The avoidance of cow’s milk protein…may reduce…or delay [the onset of type 1 diabetes].” Yet, another reason to emphasize breast is best. For those at risk, they strongly encourage “the avoidance of…products containing intact cow’s milk protein,” as opposed to hydrolyzed formula, in which the milk proteins are all broken up into tiny pieces—which is used for kids with dairy allergies, or could potentially make it less risky. But, I mean, you don’t know, until you put it to the test.

Based on the population studies and meta-analyses of all those antibody studies, which suggested that “cow’s milk may serve as a trigger of Type 1 diabetes,” the next year, “a pilot study was initiated” to see if babies at high genetic risk would be less likely to develop antibodies that then attacked their own pancreas, if they drank casein that was chopped up first. And, here’s the study.

The hydrolyzed formula did seem to reduce the appearance of at least one autoimmune antibody—but not two or more, which is more predictive of the development of the disease. But, that was enough for the investigators to embark on the “ambitious” TRIGR study, the “Trial to Reduce Incidence of Diabetes in Genetically at Risk, a multinational, randomized prospective trial” involving randomizing thousands of newborns across 15 countries, with expected completion in 2017. But, in 2010, we got some preliminary data suggesting it may have helped, but didn’t quite reach statistical significance—meaning, basically, there was a greater than 1 in 20 chance it could have just been a fluke. And, indeed, when the autoimmune antibody results were published after 7 years of follow-up, the special hydrolyzed formula didn’t seem to help at all.

Now, they did just look at a special group of children at high genetic risk, with diabetes running in the family, whereas the great majority of children who get type 1 diabetes don’t have any afflicted close relative. But, perhaps most importantly, as the researchers themselves emphasized, their study wasn’t designed to test whether cow’s milk is or is not a trigger for the disease—just what effect the hydrolyzed casein formula might have.

Maybe it’s not the casein; maybe it’s the bovine insulin. “Insulin autoantibodies [antibodies our body produces to attack our own insulin] often appear as the first sign…in prediabetic children. Because cow’s milk contains bovine insulin, [cow insulin, around the same time the other researchers were looking into casein, this research team was following] the development of insulin-binding antibodies in children fed with cow’s milk formula.” They found significantly more antibodies to bovine insulin in the cow’s milk formula group, compared to the exclusively breastfed group—who may only have been exposed to a few cow proteins through their mom’s breast milk, if their mom drank the stuff.

Furthermore, the “bovine…antibodies…cross-reacted [to] human insulin,” potentially being that caught-in-the-crossfire cause that triggers at least some cases of type 1 diabetes, but you can’t know for sure, until (you guessed it!) you put it to the test.

Same as the other one, a randomized, double-blind trial. But, this time, they tried a cow’s milk formula from which the bovine insulin had been removed. And indeed, without the bovine insulin exposure, the children built up significantly fewer autoimmune antibodies. But, what we don’t yet know is if this will translate into fewer cases of diabetes. Stay tuned.

Please consider volunteering to help out on the site.

Image credits: Bradley Johnson via flickr and Jean-Alein via pixabay. Images have been modified.

Below is an approximation of this video’s audio content. To see any graphs, charts, graphics, images, and quotes to which Dr. Greger may be referring, watch the above video.

The tight correlation among countries between the incidence of type 1 diabetes among children and cow milk consumption didn’t account for Iceland. So, you’ll see studies like this. “Cow’s milk…consumption [in children and adolescents was] correlated with the incidence” of type 1 diabetes—but only when they excluded the Icelandic data.

Is it just genetics? Maybe yes and no. The people of Iceland are genetically similar to other Nordic countries, but their cows are not. “Icelandic cattle have been isolated from interbreeding with other cattle breeds for over 1,100 years.” See, there are two main types of casein protein (A1 and A2), and Icelandic cattle are unusual in that they produce mostly A2 milk. And, that may explain the lower incidence of type 1 diabetes in Iceland.

See, A1 casein breaks down into casomorphin, whereas A2 casein doesn’t. And, casomorphin has opioid properties that may alter immune function—perhaps increasing susceptibility to infections that may themselves trigger type 1 diabetes. And, that’s the kind of milk you get with Holstein cows—the ones with the classic black-and-white pattern, who make up about 95% of the U.S. dairy herd, and much of the global dairy herd.

It got to a point where dairy boards began taking out patents on methods for selecting non-diabetogenic milk, to avoid triggering type 1 diabetes. It certainly did restore that tight linear relationship between milk consumption and type 1 diabetes, if you just looked at A1 casein consumption. But, these so-called “ecological [or country-by-country] studies, really only [serve to] suggest possibilities [that then need to be put to the test].” So, studies like this were designed, where hundreds of siblings of type 1 diabetics were followed for about ten years, and those that drank a lot of milk had about five times the risk of coming down with the disease, too.

By the mid-90s, more than a dozen such studies were done. And, overall, they found that “early cow’s milk exposure” appears to “increase the risk” of type 1 diabetes by about 50%. That was good enough for the American Academy of Pediatrics, who decided that “cow’s milk protein may [indeed] be an important factor in the initiation of the [process that destroys your insulin-producing cells].”

And so, “The avoidance of cow’s milk protein…may reduce…or delay [the onset of type 1 diabetes].” Yet, another reason to emphasize breast is best. For those at risk, they strongly encourage “the avoidance of…products containing intact cow’s milk protein,” as opposed to hydrolyzed formula, in which the milk proteins are all broken up into tiny pieces—which is used for kids with dairy allergies, or could potentially make it less risky. But, I mean, you don’t know, until you put it to the test.

Based on the population studies and meta-analyses of all those antibody studies, which suggested that “cow’s milk may serve as a trigger of Type 1 diabetes,” the next year, “a pilot study was initiated” to see if babies at high genetic risk would be less likely to develop antibodies that then attacked their own pancreas, if they drank casein that was chopped up first. And, here’s the study.

The hydrolyzed formula did seem to reduce the appearance of at least one autoimmune antibody—but not two or more, which is more predictive of the development of the disease. But, that was enough for the investigators to embark on the “ambitious” TRIGR study, the “Trial to Reduce Incidence of Diabetes in Genetically at Risk, a multinational, randomized prospective trial” involving randomizing thousands of newborns across 15 countries, with expected completion in 2017. But, in 2010, we got some preliminary data suggesting it may have helped, but didn’t quite reach statistical significance—meaning, basically, there was a greater than 1 in 20 chance it could have just been a fluke. And, indeed, when the autoimmune antibody results were published after 7 years of follow-up, the special hydrolyzed formula didn’t seem to help at all.

Now, they did just look at a special group of children at high genetic risk, with diabetes running in the family, whereas the great majority of children who get type 1 diabetes don’t have any afflicted close relative. But, perhaps most importantly, as the researchers themselves emphasized, their study wasn’t designed to test whether cow’s milk is or is not a trigger for the disease—just what effect the hydrolyzed casein formula might have.

Maybe it’s not the casein; maybe it’s the bovine insulin. “Insulin autoantibodies [antibodies our body produces to attack our own insulin] often appear as the first sign…in prediabetic children. Because cow’s milk contains bovine insulin, [cow insulin, around the same time the other researchers were looking into casein, this research team was following] the development of insulin-binding antibodies in children fed with cow’s milk formula.” They found significantly more antibodies to bovine insulin in the cow’s milk formula group, compared to the exclusively breastfed group—who may only have been exposed to a few cow proteins through their mom’s breast milk, if their mom drank the stuff.

Furthermore, the “bovine…antibodies…cross-reacted [to] human insulin,” potentially being that caught-in-the-crossfire cause that triggers at least some cases of type 1 diabetes, but you can’t know for sure, until (you guessed it!) you put it to the test.

Same as the other one, a randomized, double-blind trial. But, this time, they tried a cow’s milk formula from which the bovine insulin had been removed. And indeed, without the bovine insulin exposure, the children built up significantly fewer autoimmune antibodies. But, what we don’t yet know is if this will translate into fewer cases of diabetes. Stay tuned.

Please consider volunteering to help out on the site.

Image credits: Bradley Johnson via flickr and Jean-Alein via pixabay. Images have been modified.

Doctor's Note

If you missed the prequel to this video, check out Does Casein in Milk Exposure Trigger Type 1 Diabetes?

More on the concerns with cow’s milk exposure in infancy and childhood in:

So what’s The Best Baby Formula? Breast milk!

If you haven’t yet, you can subscribe to my videos for free by clicking here.

170 responses to “Does Bovine Insulin in Milk Trigger Type 1 Diabetes?

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  1. So is A2 milk safe as far as not causing type 1 diabetes? How about type 2 diabetes?

    Can the A1 milk also contribute to type 1 diabetes in adults on the same level it has been shown
    to be associated with/contributing factor to type 1 diabetes in children?




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    1. Roxy,
      Type 2 has a totally different mechanism. It is the result of insulin receptors in the muscles and other tissues becoming resistant to insulin and thus depriving the cells of glucose. Sugar can’t get into the cells, so blood sugar goes up. Fat accumulating in the muscles (intramyocellular lipids) seems to be the main cause of insulin resistance. Recent research has shown that consuming animal protein pulls calcium from the muscles (presumably to buffer the acidic animal protein) which alters the metabolism of the muscle tissue leading to the accumulation of fat. So all animal protein – and especially animal protein accompanied by fat – can increase insulin resistance This is why a plant-based, low-fat diet has been shown to prevent and even reverse type-2 diabetes.




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      1. They could make pdf files available to download (with a donation) so people could print their own on cardstock. They may not turn out quite as nice, depending on the cardstock, printer, etc.




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  2. But, but, but…

    If bovine insulin is the culprit, then the special Icelandic cows wouldn’t offer any benefit – which apparently they do. So, isn’t bovine insulin really a red herring?




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    1. Hi – I am a volunteer moderator for Dr. Greger – a plant based dietitian located in Scottsdale, AZ. Remember that it is the Holstein Cows (black and white) that have the A1 Casein protein which break down to caseomorphins that are associated with Type1DM. A2 Casein found in Icelandic Cows does not break down to caseomorphins (associated with T1 DM development. Maybe there is some type of a differential bovine insulin issue that is associated with different genetic types of cows. What do you think about that??




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  3. Crazy that official guidelines recommend (low fat) milk when there actually are sufficient data to claim that milk is a problematic food. It tastes awful and you risk diabetes, prostatecancer, cardiovascular disease and cancer. And benefits regarding bone health are – at least – conflicting. Talk about a lose lose situation. And to make things worse, I have actually seen advertisement for milk in a medical journal (demeaning broccoli due to a lower calcium content)




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    1. Plantstrongdoc: Wow. That last bit, comparing calcium content of broccoli to milk is particularly bizarre when you consider that the body absorbs more of the calcium from greens than from milk. From what I remember from Brenda Davis’s talk, we absorb 40% of the calcium from most greens and only 30% from dairy. You would think a medical journal would know that… Did they mention it?




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        1. I just found more detailed information from Brenda Davis than I had seen before. For you interest:

          “But the other big question is whether calcium in plants is bioavailable. Can we actually absorb calcium in plants?

          A lot of people believe that you can only absorb calcium from milk

          The truth is that you actually absorb a considerable amounts of calcium from plants. You absorb about 32-34 percent of calcium in dairy products. That compares to about 31 percent for tofu and about 20-28 percent from legumes and soy milk.

          Here is the good news: you absorb about 40 to 70 percent of calcium from dark green leafy vegetables like kale, broccoli, Chinese greens, turnip and mustard greens. You absorb close to twice as much calcium from those foods as you do from milk.

          The bad news is that some greens contain oxalic acid or oxalates. Oxalate binds with calcium, greatly reducing its absorption from these foods.

          You only get about 5 percent of the calcium from spinach. Beet greens and Swiss chard are also rich in oxalates, so not great calcium sources. A lot of people ask me about collard greens. Collards are somewhere in-between the greens with excellent calcium availability and those that aren’t so great. So, although we don’t have exact figures, it is likely somewhere around 20 percent or so. This doesn’t make spinach, beet greens and Swiss chard “bad greens”. There is no such thing as bad greens unless they are poisonous. Greens are the most nutrient dense foods on the planet. Spinach may not be the best source of calcium, but it is an excellent source of folic acid! Just don’t rely on it as a calcium source.”

          There’s more great stuff in that interview for anyone who is interested. Here’s the link: http://www.choose-healthy-food.com/brenda-davis-interview-calcium-rich-foods.html




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            1. Plantstrong doc MD,
              Wouldn’t the absorption of calcium be affected by the phytic or oxalic acid you eat in other foods at the same time? For example, if you pair some greens with whole grains or legumes, both rich in phytic acid, would the phytic acid (negatively charged, right?) bind the otherwise bioavailable calcium (positively charged, right?) in the greens?




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                1. lemonhead: OHHH!
                  .
                  Good question. I don’t know, but I think you could figure it out if cronometer includes how much oxalates it has. So, we know that spinach is considered to have a lot of oxalates and broccoli is considered to have little. So, you could compare those foods to Dandelion greens and get a pretty good idea of how much calcium you actually absorb? If you figure it out, please let us know as I find that question interesting.
                  .
                  One more thought for you: I’ve only seen 3 or 4 greens specifically mentioned when the caution about calcium absorption comes up. Now, it’s possible that dandelion greens aren’t mentioned simply because they aren’t that common (as a food). BUT maybe dandelion greens aren’t mentioned because they are more like broccoli.
                  .
                  I think this is a good time to mention something that I was confused about for a long time, until I heard Brenda Davis answer this question once. NO FEARS when it comes to eating say kale with your spinach. The oxalates bind up the calcium IN the spinach. It does not affect absorption of calcium in other foods. (You may have known that already lemonhead. I wanted to say it in case others got “fearful” of mixing greens.)
                  .
                  On a related (or unrelated?) note: I have different plants in my yard that I think all count as dandelions. And I’ve often wondered how different the nutritional profile is for the greens from the different types of plants. I’ve also wondered which specific plant everyone is talking about when they talk about eating dandelion greens.

                  .
                  This may not have been the most helpful reply, but I hope it helped a little…




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                  1. Thanks a bunch, Thea. I was wondering about mixing greens just today (broccoli and beet greens at the same meal). I think dandelion is considered mid-range on oxalates. I’ll just keep drinking my commercial soy milk and eating whatever greens look good at the store / market and not worry about calcium. :)




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                  2. Thank you for answering the mixing the greens question! My mind was definitely headed towards worrying about my steamed mixed greens that I have most lunch times.




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                1. They probably are in the same family. I remember chicory from other states I’ve lived in. It had blue flowers and was taller than dandelions, but I don’t remember much more about it. I think the roots of both the chicory I’m talking about and dandelions have been used as a coffee substitute, and roasted chicory root is still added to coffee in some parts of the South. The sell fresh dandelion greens at my food co-op. Is it sold fresh at your store?




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                  1. Best deal in town is Kroger with a big bunch of organic ‘dandelion’ greens for $2.50. I’ve also seen them quite often at Harris Teeter and Whole Foods.

                    I tried to grow them myself in a pot but of course it did not work since they have a long taproot; they were stunted, sort of like bonsai greens.




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                    1. I used to live where there was a Kroger, in my Arkansas farm wife days, don’t know anything about Harris Teeter, Whole Foods is 30 miles away. It’s back to my local food co-op!




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          1. Thea,
            Spinach does not provide ‘Folic Acid’. Folic Acid is a synthetic version of Folate which is what Spinach provides. Folic Acid is found in supplements because it is stable and cheap, however there is question as to whether
            it is cancer causing. Folate from leafy greens is desirable.




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            1. Brian C.: Thanks for you post. I’ve heard similar info in the past and have no reason to doubt what you wrote. Note: I was copying a quote, so I won’t change it. But your post adds nice clarification for those who are interested. Thanks!




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            2. The naming of the salt of and acid and a base is appended with the suffix -ate. Following this convention then, folate refers to folic acid in the salt form. In solution the two forms exist simultaneously. The proportion of the acidic form vs the salt form depends on the pH. If the acid is at physiological pH then it is correct to refer to it as the salt because more than 99.9 percent of it is ionized. Would it be better to say say “Spinach provides vitamin B9”? might help avoid confusion.




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          2. Thanks Thea, I can´t find references for the absorption percentages you state and that are stated in your link. Any clue where i can get these links?
            I have done nutritional analysis for peoples foods, all that do not consume dairy are short of calcium in their foods, including me. That´s how I knew i needed more calcium (other wise the general conception is every one is getting too much calcium…). I need 800mg from supplements to meet up my daily needs, even though i consume 600-1000g vegetables a day (i choose these veges to cover other needs that calcium).




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            1. Brita: Brenda Davis is a very well researched RD. But that was an interview, not a formal paper. So, I don’t know where the numbers came from. You might try e-mailing her to see if you could get the sources?
              .
              re: I need 800mg from supplements to meet up my daily needs. You might see if you can find the post I did for EuqaYona which reviews calcium RDA requirements and what we know about populations with healthy bones. Bottom line: For someone on a healthy whole plant food diet with some basic exercise, 600 mg total daily (not even considering the absorption issue) is a generous amount. You can easily get that from foods without supplementing.




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            2. Brita: I’ll add one more suggestion. If you are interested in bone health, I *highly* recommend the book: Building Bone Vitality. It is a quick, easy read and does an awesome job of explaining the more complex issues regarding bone health than just “get enough calcium” or even “it’s only a calcium issue”. https://www.amazon.com/Building-Bone-Vitality-Revolutionary-Osteoporosis-Without/dp/0071600191/ref=sr_1_1_twi_pap_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1480603267&sr=1-1&keywords=building+bone+vitality




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              1. Thanks Thea.
                I found the post with reviewed calcium requirements. I´m aware that calcium is probably the least needed, per say for bone health. I do nutritional analysis of foods, and if its very limited in the food, it needs to be supplemented. that goes for me and those I coach. (A lady with leaky gut and candidaitis came to me for help 6 months ago. I had uped most of her nutrients and asked her to stop taking calcium tabs. Her relfux became so bad, she was choking at night. After I did nutritional analysis on the foods she has been consuming for the last 1 month, we could see she only had 30% of the recommended amounts in her food. This lady had gut issues too, she was def short of calcium, I asked her to include calcium to the other supplements, since she couldn’t eat so many veges, together with some exercise and less starch and sugar, her reflux is gone.)

                I don´t do dairy at all, and honestly, I do not feel like eating some days, but I know I still need my nutrients… I rely on 800mg because i factor in absorption and leaky gut issues on my part. I also focus more on magnesium, other minerals and vitamins.

                I will sure have a look at the book, I`m willing to learn more.




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        1. Yes, broccoli has much greater bioavailability than milk, but it takes 12 oz of broccoli to get the same amount of calcium one gets from 8 oz of milk. I am not in any way advocating for cow’s milk, but one has to be realistic. How many people eat 12 0z of broccoli a day? And that is only a quarter of the RDA for calcium.




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          1. EquaYona: You raise a point that is often raised. Some thoughts for you: I think the RDA for calcium is based on how much you eat, not how much you absorb. Yes? So, I’m not sure that the comparison here makes sense?
            .
            Another thought is that the RDA for calcium is way higher than it needs to be based on the available evidence, especially for people who are on a plant based diet. Dr. Greger recommends about 600 mg : http://nutritionfacts.org/2011/09/12/dr-gregers-2011-optimum-nutrition-recommendations/ From what I have seen, that recommendation might even be higher than necessary. “…total calcium consumption among women in China, Peru, Sri Lanka, and many other non-Western countries is only about 500 milligrams a day, yet fracture rates are very low.” (from page 9 of Building Bone Vitality) And while the authors of Becoming Vegan, Express Edition recommend the RDA, they do acknowledge, “A somewhat ambiguous and predictable relationship exists between calcium and bone health. While the evidence generally supports a positive association between calcium intake and bone health, some populations who eat less than 400 mg of calcium per day have lower rates of osteoporosis than populations who consume more than 1,00 mg per day. This is because calcium *balance* is more critical than calcium intake.” (from page 41) That point about balance is key. There are a variety of factors in play, so requirements would be different for people depending on their diet and exercise.
            .
            Another thought is that people really do eat 12 oz or more of greens a day. For example, people who follow Esselstyn’s or Chef AJ’s diet. Cook 12 oz down and it just slides down pretty quickly/easily. I was eating a pound (16 oz) of broccoli a day for breakfast for a while.
            .
            My final thought is that plant based milks have at least as much calcium as dairy milks. At least the packages I have seen say they have as much if not more. And we know that our bodies absorb as much calcium from plant based milks as from dairy–as long as people shake the container: http://nutritionfacts.org/video/calcium-absorption-soy-milk-versus-cow-milk/ So, if people prefer to get their calcium from 8 oz, then they easily do so without the baggage that comes with dairy.
            .
            I present these thoughts to you in order to put the issue under discussion into perspective.




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            1. Great response! Thanks Thea. As I said, I do not use nor would I ever advocate for using dairy milk. I guess I missed that video or just plain forgot the info. I spent a lot of time last year catching up on a lot of the videos and I have read Doc’s great book. Thanks again.




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              1. :-) I figured I wasn’t telling you anything you didn’t already know. But it was a good point and I wanted to give my take on it.
                .
                re: catching up on videos. I can’t even imagine doing that. I came in at the beginning. Now there are so many videos, I don’t think it is even possible to see them all, but if you do, it’s easy to forget details. I often surprises me when someone refers to a video that I had completely forgotten existed. ;-0

                Take care.




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          2. I’m going to pipe in here and add my 2 cents since I used myself as a human experiment of one. I am 63 years old. When I was about 12 I stopped drinking milk. Just couldn’t stand the stuff. I did, however, consume cheese in very small amounts until my 30’s. No yogurt, didn’t like that either. My most recent bone density test showed no bone thinning at all.
            All of my women friends whine about their osteopenia. I have always eaten greens and every night have a large green leafy salad for dinner before any thing else. Being WFPB SOS now for 9 years, I have only seen improvement in my health numbers.

            So even though the discussion here is about whether or not one absorbs enough calcium, let me just say that from my experience I clearly have. And, as we all know, calcium absorption is not the primary correlate to healthy bones – activity is. It is the pulling of the muscle on the bones that stimulate the osteoblasts to build bone. In the presence of D3 our bones are even more healthy.
            We also know now that too much calcium in the body will accumulate around the vessels of the heart. Many physicians now are stating that one should not supplement with calcium pills. Remember, . . calcium is actually a mineral, a stone, and it has to go somewhere.

            Interestingly I stumbled up the Vitamin K2 workshop. Their speaks are showing that it is the presence of Vitamin K2 that allows calcium in the blood to move into the bones and wihtout K2 the calcium remains in the blood stream and settles in our organs. So green leafy vegetables K2 (highest source is Amaranth, then kale, swiss chard, cabbage) is necessary for our health. The highest source of K2 is natto which most people do not enjoy (me neither :-) But I have always consumed green leafy vegetables.
            Here are the links to the two Vitamin K Workshops. Very interesting:
            https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DTspHSbuxQU

            Part II :
            https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7R5S22DEuJg

            Here is a list of the best sources of Vitamin K2:
            http://nutritiondata.self.com/foods-011104000000000000000.html?maxCount=330




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            1. Rachel, Thank you for sharing your experiment of one. And congratulations on your good health.

              In the 1970s I lived for six years in Arkansas, where, at that time, everybody had a garden and most people ate greens every day. Most people were at a healthy weight. I was back there a couple of years ago and now everybody appears to be eating deep fried everything, no greens on the plate and obesity is off the charts. I imagine they’re all on those nasty osteoporosis drugs by the time they hit 40.




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    2. Plantstrongdoc M.D., I found it ironic at my latest doc appt. that after decades of ‘calcium level chasing’ with dairy and many kinds of supplements touted by pharmacists and doctors alike, my calcium levels measured 2.5 after being on a plant based diet exclusively for 14 mos. My doctor is amazed and takes notes every appt.




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      1. We all hear that if you don’t drink milk, then you need calcium supplements, but calcium supplement use may increase the risk of cardiovascular disease.




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        1. Exactly! Having survived a quadruple bypass at the age of 56, I will no longer take any chances at all. Exercise and broccoli! It’s what the doctor ordered LOL




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        2. Plantstrong – pls take a moment and take a look at my post below re: the Vitamin K2 Workshop Parts 1 and 2. This information helps put the whole calcium, greens, picture together. Although the first speaker advocates VitK2 supplementation, if you listen to the end you will see that he suggests supplements because he does not eat greens. (Duh!)
          It takes about 2.5 hrs to watch the entire presentation but it is extremely interesting and makes it clear why a person should not supplement calcium separately. The calciums, with VitK2, settles in the organs of the body including the heart creating stenosis in the valves.
          Thank you.




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  4. Research that I’ve seen implicates a 17-amino acid polypeptide labeled ABBOS found in bovine albumin. Antibodies in genetically predisposed children attack the ABBOS. It turns out that ABBOS is identical to a protein found on the beta cells in the islets of Langerhans, so the antibodies also attack the pancreas – leading to a damaged pancreas and type-1 diabetes. Maybe the milk of Icelandic cows does not contain the ABBOS. It’s another possible mechanism.




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    1. Spayneuter: No, you misunderstand. The video (and just about all of this website) is talking about probabilities. Consider: Everyone who smokes doesn’t get lung cancer. Smokers just have a better chance of getting lung cancer. Apply that same logic to consuming non-human breast milk.




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    1. I’m not sure what CRON style is. But the best book I have found is Dr. McDougall’s “The Starch Solution”. He really emphasizes basing your diet primarily on starches. Potatoes, rice, corn, wheat, oats, beans, squash. It doesn’t get much cheaper, or better than that. The starches provide the majority of your calories. (All whole plant foods are nutrient dense I think.)




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        1. White potatoes are the only single food, that I’m aware of, that a human being can survive and thrive on. (Unpeeled of course.) Dr. McDougall talks about the study in “The Starch Solution”. I’ve seen him talk about it in a few other videos. Surprised me too. But evidently, if you had to be on a desert island with one and only one food, it had better be potatoes. Get eatin’ those taters!




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            1. Ok lemonhead – I am going to join you and ask Dr. G’ and/or staff to clarify this potato issue. I have been following Mcdougall and making potatoes a whole lot of my food base (along with other good stuff of course). But, this is disturbing. This video you’ve shared with us doesn’t give us enough information to really evaluate the issue but does give us enough information to scare the sh__ out of us.
              So c’mon Greger. Step up and give us some better information here.




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              1. A lot phytonutrients are hormetic. They are typically the plant’s own insecticides; in high doses may be harmful, but in low doses they are beneficial. Insects are small creatures and are often affected much more than people (people who eat a varied diet, that is).

                {I’m more a fan of Fuhrman than MacDougall}




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                1. Yes, that’s correct. As well, antioxidants and phytonutrients – the things that give plants their color – are also reactions to adversity in the natural environment. Things we eat that then protect us (as I am sure you already know).
                  But I was disturbed by the tone that Dr. G left in the video you cited. Makes it look like potatoes are bad for you. I would like to hear a response about that, wouldn’t you?




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              2. hi Rachel, on the comment section of the video that Lemonhead posted, Dr Greger does give more info. He details the advantages of eating coloured potatoes like, purple, or the deep orange of ruby or jewel yams. He answers a few questions about it, and overall I think is most supportive of including potatoes and vegies with the most vibrant colours we can find… he says white potatoes can be ‘pro oxident’ by comparison. Anyway , its worth a second look… I am not on a pc so I cant copy paste, sorry.




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                1. Oh, . .thanks Susan. I’ll check it out. But to hear McDougall tell it, potatoes are a food one can live on for weeks. And,, . . apparently, . . he has since he’s been doing this for decades now. He’s going to retire some day, him and Mary, and we’ll be all the poorer for it.
                  Thank goodness he was a pain in the tush for so many years shouting about all of this.




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              3. Rachel and lemonhead: I do not have a definitive answer for you. I offer some thoughts in the hope that my take on it will be helpful.
                .
                First, the following video covers a relatively safer way to eat plain potatoes: http://nutritionfacts.org/video/toxins-in-sweet-potatoes/
                .
                Second, I would keep in mind that this is an older video. I don’t speak for Dr. Greger, but I recently listened to an interview with Dr. Greger where the big potato question came up. I listened to this interview a few weeks ago, though darn if I know when the interview took place or can remember who it was with. It was on youtube somewhere I think…
                .
                Anywhooo, here’s what I remember from the interview (which may or may not accurately reflect what Dr. Greger said): Plain potatoes are not so much good or bad, but more about “relative to what”. A baked white, plain potato is a whole lot healthier to eat than say white bread or french fries. On the other hand, a white potato is not nearly as healthy as sweet potatoes. What are your choices? If your choice is between a sweet potato and a white one, choose the sweet. But if your choice is between a white potato and white bread, choose the white potato. In the interview, Dr. Greger did not mention the toxin that is discussed in the NutritionFacts video: http://nutritionfacts.org/video/toxins-in-cooked-potatoes/
                .
                Here is how I put all this together: I would guess that Dr. Greger would phrase his conclusions with a lot more nuance if he did such a video today. In other words, I don’t think Dr. Greger considers it as simple anymore as “white potato bad, sweet potato good”
                .
                To further back my thoughts: In Dr. Greger’s book, How Not To Die, on page 328, Dr. Greger writes, “Sweet potatoes are healthier than plain potatoes, but if you’re going to choose the latter, seek out those with blue or purple flesh. The consumption of one boiled purple potato a day for six weeks was found to significantly decrease inflammation, something neither white nor yellow potatoes were able to accomplish.”​ Notice he doesn’t mention the toxin. I think if he thought it was a big deal, he would have mentioned it in the book. (If it’s there an I missed it, please let me know.)
                .
                More thoughts: Dr. McDougall thinks that plain white potatoes are very healthy. And as Dr. Greger even points out, there have been entire societies that have lived on plain, white potatoes. Though not blue zones I don’t think…
                .
                To share, here’s the decision I made for myself: I have decided that white potatoes should not be the basis of my diet, but are perfectly healthy to have from time to time without any guilt or concern at all. But I do use white fleshed or purple fleshed sweet potatoes most of the time when I eat potatoes, finding that they work great in most recipes, even those that call for plain potatoes.
                .
                What do you think? Does this help? I would normally forward a question like this onto our medical moderators (I’m just a lay person), but based on what I heard Dr. Greger say in that interview, it’s my guess that there isn’t anything more definitive. But if you want me to forward it on, I would be happy to do so and we can see what answer may appear.




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                1. Well, let’s see, we have two highly respected WFBP doctors that appear to have diametrically opposed views on potatoes. Potatoes are a staple in many diets and evidently groups of people have essentially survived on these things throughout history. And Dr. G. really hasn’t commented too much on them at all that I’ve heard, other than that one negative video and a few brief sentences in his book. So yes, I would like to hear more about plain old white potatoes.




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                  1. Blair Rollin: I disagree that Dr. Greger hasn’t clarified his position, re my post above. But I forwarded your post to the medical moderators and hopefully you will get a reply you like better. :-)




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                    1. Thanks. It’s not that I don’t like your reply. I read it again, and I read the book, and I watched the video, and it still seems to me that, at best, Dr. Greger’s message is that white potatoes aren’t really good for you, and worse case scenario, they may be harmful. Where Dr. McDougall would classify them among the best foods on the planet. Not sure. That’s just my take.




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                    2. Yes, that’s a good video and probably the one he refers to in the book. But my real question is not whether russet potatoes are good or bad, I have no particular allegiance to potatoes. It’s why two nutrition doctors, both of whom I have the highest respect for, have hugely different views on them.




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              4. Rachel: I would like more information, also. I’ve been eating a lot of sweet potatoes lately with the skins, too. Wasn’t it the Okinawans that ate a lot of potatoes and had one of the longest lifespans? Thanks for bringing this to our attention Lemonhead and Rachel.




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                1. I eat sweet potatoes and their skins. When I make them mashed, I microwave the skins briefly and make them crisp like a chip – too long and they burn, though. They are from a different plant family and AFAIK don’t have the same issue.




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                2. HaltheVegan, if I remeber correctly , dr greger lovesss sweet potatoes. In fact , the video about potatoes is followed by one on the health benefits of sweet potatoes. Boiled, with skin on is the most nutritious way to eat them . Its just the white russet variety that dr greger is not enthused about. Any coloured flesh potatoe is a big step up nutrition-wise. dr mcdougall is irish which he says explains his liking potatoes.




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                3. HaltheVegan: To clarify: Sweet potatoes are not an issue at all. The only *potential* issue is white, plain potatoes. And that situation is easy enough to avoid. You can peel the plain potatoes and/or follow the ideas in the link that Tom Goff found. :-)




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                  1. Thanks Thea. Good to know I can keep eating those delicious sweet potatoes. I had forgotten about all those videos on potatoes from many years back. And the comments that go along with them, too. Like you’ve stated elsewhere, this website has so much good information going back for many years, it’s difficult to remember all the details :-) And thanks to Susan, Lemonhead, Rachel, and Tom for all the replies.




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            2. That is a very interesting thought.

              Given the large numbers of people in the Americas and Europe that have apparently subsisted in good health on diets consisting mostly of potatoes, I had always assumed that this was not a significant problem.
              .http://www.history-magazine.com/potato.html

              However, it is definitely worth thinking about.

              I see though that HealthCanada has commented

              “Limited information is available on which to assess the health impacts of long-term exposure to low levels of glycoalkaloids. However, the fact that potatoes have been consumed regularly by millions of people worldwide suggests that the low levels of glycoalkaloids normally found in properly stored and handled potatoes are not a concern.
              http://www.hc-sc.gc.ca/fn-an/pubs/securit/2010-glycoalkaloids-glycoalcaloides/index-eng.php

              And the Hong Kong food safety centre has also provided some advice on this
              http://www.cfs.gov.hk/english/multimedia/multimedia_pub/multimedia_pub_fsf_112_01.html




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              1. Tom Goff: Thanks for chiming in on this! I was composing my post when you must have been composing and posting yours. I’m going to incorporate some of the info you found as this is a common question/concern. Thanks!




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            3. Thanks. I somehow missed that video. The implications were not exactly clear to me though. At what levels was a major question in my mind and from what Tom said below maybe that should have been better addressed. Nevertheless, Dr. G. says they’re bad and he and Dr. McDougall can’t both be right. As far as I know, potatoes have 13,000 years of successful history going for them in South America and many years in other parts of the world. So that’s one point in their favor.

              I can also relay my personnel experience. I was eating a pretty good vegan diet for 15 years before I read “The Starch Solution”, “The China Study” and “How Not to DIe” about a year ago. Low fat and low refined sugar, but some, and with a fair amount of processed foods and almost no potatoes. I switched to a WFPB diet incorporating the daily dozen (except nuts) and also started eating potatoes regularly. And lots of them. Rarely do I go through a day without eating potatoes. I can say that I am visibly leaner, fitter, and healthier than I was one short year ago. I am in better physical condition than I was at age 18 over 35 years ago. It’s remarkable. Did the taters help or hinder? I don’t know. YMMV.

              I would say, if it bothers you, don’t eat them. Eat oats, barley, corn, rice, beans, squash etc. All very cheap and great for you. I’m going to do an experiment on myself and see what happens if I eat a lot of potatoes.




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              1. The problem is that you may not notice any effects from chronic exposure until may years later. It’s probably not a big deal, but I’d suggest that if you do eat a lot of white potatoes, buy organic, peel them and don’t let them turn green/sprout. If the information on wikipedia is correct, then your best cooking method is probably microwaving.*

                *https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Solanine

                It’s not so much about me – I’m doing alright. My husband and I are both rather skin-flinty, but not when it comes to food. But I do get concerned about public policy and food. I was appalled that potatoes were removed from WIC, but now I’m wondering if they had reasons other than ‘they’re just empty calories’ (which, as you correctly pointed out, they are not).




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        2. I’ve been thinking about why I rejected white potatoes as budget and health friendly a while ago.

          As Blair Rollin pointed out, their nutrient profile is surprisingly good (especially with respect to B vitamins). With skin or without? I checked cronometer and you do lose some riboflavin, folate, and magnesium without the skin, but not too much and the B6 and B5 are about the same. Glycoalkaloids tend to concentrate in the skin.

          Another thing to consider s that potatoes are on the EDF dirty dozen. If the pesticides are cholinesterase inhibitors (organophosphates), then you are getting a double shot. I haven’t priced a big bag of organic potatoes lately, but I’m not sure a big bag is a good idea. I do buy organic russets on occasion and have noticed they get sprouty a bit quicker than conventional, which is bad for solanine levels.

          The glycoalkaloid issue may be more important for kids than adults since they are smaller and their brains are developing. Another point to consider is that there is genetic variability with respect to cholinesterase activity. It is a shame there have not been more studies on chronic exposure.

          So I’m not sure what I would recommend to someone on a tight budget. Perhaps polenta and other whole grains with nutritional yeast (Bragg’s, since they test for contaminants) would work out better.




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        3. About the glycoalkaloids, we have been growing potato at home since I was a child, everyone was taught that one shouldn’t eat the green potato (tuber exposed to a sun, beginning to produce chlorophyll and a poisonous alkaloid – solanine) nor feed it to any animals.
          It is easy to avoid meaningful amounts of these alkaloids, avoiding green tubers and best to avoid eating regularly those with lots of defects (it can produce alkaloids against any kind of damage). BTW, while nutritionally superior, paradoxically, it is harder to notice an exposure to sun in purple and blue potatoes.

          Aside from that it seems to me that it is like with many other poisonous compounds in the nature – a bit of poison can have positive effects too – https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NMkm_pZUejc

          Potatoes are not bad. It could happen with many food items (bad storage, then molding etc.) that it can turn out to be harmful to human health.
          You don’t avoid traffic for accidents, you just drive safe! And obviously, eating plants is the safest route in life.




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      1. I’m pretty sure that you will find a link somewhere on Dr McDougall’s site for a downloadable cookbook a woman wrote with meal plans and recipes for eating whole food plant based on $5 a day. I’ve also noticed somewhere on Google another woman who has a recipe book for WFPB on $4 a day – per person. I bought the first one and I like the recipes that I tried, but I haven’t followed it as a total meal plan. I remember making her granola, and that was good – without oil or sugar.

        I just googled whole food plant based inexpensively and there are several sites for you to peruse. One had a $1.50 a day challenge.




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      1. Thanks!

        I just filled out a purchase request form on my local public library system’s web site. I would suggest others do the same. [Our library already has multiple copies of How Not to Die since they always buy the NYT bestsellers, so no need there.]

        It’s a good idea for people to examine their local library’s collection and make suggestions, even if they personally don’t use the library much – it’s a great public resource.

        You can also make donations, but be sure to learn about the library’s donation policy; sometimes they won’t add a book even if it is in good condition due to shelf space limitations or other considerations. I donated a like-new copy of Ursula K. LeGuin’s The Word for World is Forest, and it wound up in the book sale.




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        1. lemonhead: Your post prompted me to check our local library for How Not To Die, something I’ve been meaning to do for some time. They have 4 copies of the book and many holds on all 4 copies. Yeah!




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          1. Dr. Greger must be good at marketing strategy or have someone good advising him. It seems he built his following / public profile to a point, then he released his book – rather than the other way around (publish a book, then do a series of speaking engagements and interviews). Since his book is on the bestseller list it gets much more media exposure and many libraries have a policy of buying NYT bestsellers automatically.




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            1. lemonhead: I’m not so sure it’s strategy so much as just the way things happened in terms of opportunities. But I agree that the way it worked out has been really effective.




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  5. Dr. Greger, I love all your videos and I bought HOW NOT TO DIE and have given it to friends as presents so I’m a big fan. However, might I make a suggestion. Please don’t pop up and walk in your videos! It distracts me from the video and it has no purpose other than to startle me.




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    1. Jennifer Pierce: You are not alone! The NutritionFacts staff got the message loud and clear. There will be no more new videos made with the popups. However, please note that there were a sizable number of videos pre-recorded with the popups – through the end of this volume. So, just hang in there. It won’t be forever. :-) – Moderator
      .
      re: giving the book as presents. You and me both!




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  6. Dr Greger. Are you referring to the first studies in NEJM 2008. Dietary intervention in infants to prevent type 1 diabetes. The study concluded that they know the (4) four or possible (5) causes of type 1 diabetes onset.
    1) Genetic predisposition and the onset occurs in the first 3 years of life.
    2) Chromium and Vanadium deficiencies.
    3) Intestinal permeability caused by mother and fetus/infant gliadin and glyphosate.
    4) Bovine protein in dairy. Bovine is the antigen that engages the immune system, collateral damage occurs and the immune system attempts to attack the bovine protein but mistakes the structurally similar beta cells. Auto-Immune 101.
    Possible 5th) MMR vaccination link to the onset of type 1 diabetes. (pubmed.gov and NEJM) multiple studies.
    In my case, 1 (both g-grand mothers had it) 2 (tested), 3 (mother had celiac spru during pregnancy) , and 4 (given Similac not ever breast feed because mother told it was a dirty practice) At age 12months. four days before I slipped into a 10 day diabetic comma, I got my MMR vaccination and immediately stopped talking and walking. (had to relearn those skills). It is funny that my doctors won’t even talk to me about what I learned.
    I went raw vegan, cut out all grains, cut out all dairy, and went off insulin for 2 years. Evidently this threatened to many big industries: dairy, grain, diabetes industry. No one wants to talk about what I have done. Curious what your thoughts are. Please contact me. Robb PDX




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    1. Robb, I can understand why no affected industries want to talk about what you have done. However, I’d bet that EVERY Type 1 diabetic on the planet (and their families) would love to know! Please share.

      You say you went off insulin for 2 years, did you have to go back on insulin after that?




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    2. hi Robb, thank you so much for posting your amazing story. Awe-inspiring is what I’d call it. Very best wishes to you for continued success, and optimum health

      This is a documentary called Simply Raw : Reversing Diabetes in 30 days. I love this video for showing people who take their life back and live it well.
      https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=2pjkC71exKU




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      1. Susan – I watched the video. Wow is that a great one. Very moving! Very inspiring and it instantly makes me want to learn more about the raw part. I would like to get some recipes – especially the raw vegan lasagna!!! :-)
        Thank you so much for posting!!




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        1. my pleasure Rachel, I have been on a steep learning curve in the past year or two because of the great info here on NF, and in some of these documentaries. So much I didnt know about diabetes and the challenges it presents to those who have the “condition” as Stewart (valued NF contributor) says.
          Yes, I thought I would keep a look out for good raw recipes and try to keep a couple of dishes in regular rotation. thanks Rachel




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  7. Whether one agrees with it or not, there is no more interesting and
    professional presentation of nutrition matters on the web. That aside, it
    appears both T1D and T2D are caused by the destruction of pancreatic beta cells
    at different stages of life, infant, adolescent and adult. However, this
    destruction is not necessarily related to immune malfunction. For example,
    10-30% of T1D is idiopathic, that is, completely unrelated to immunological
    factors. In these cases at least casein or bovine insulin are not obviously
    implicated. For the majority of cases that are immunologic, the demographic
    statistics I presented in the comments section of the previous video demonstrate
    no obvious link. That is, it suggests either the link does not exist, or if it
    does exist, the effect is minute. Rather, these demographics suggest a lower
    incidence of T1D in populations which live in a less aseptic environment.

    I emphasise I am not a medical practitioner. Nonetheless, if one proposes
    to maximise the prevention of juvenile T1D (as distinct from fiddling at the
    margins), I cannot help believing the most effective advice one could give to
    mothers is to breast feed for the first 3-6 months, minimise antibiotics, scrap
    all the antibacterial whatnots in the home, live in a property with a backyard
    and plenty of dirt, and invest in pets – cats, dogs, birds, rabbits, mice, etc.
    Arguably, T1D is principally a consequence of genetic predisposition in
    combination with increasing industrialisation and urbanisation – where children
    are increasingly raised in sterile environments that fail to adequately
    challenge their immune system at a critical developmental period of life. It
    would be interesting to graph the incidence of T1D (and allergies and autism)
    with the growth of apartment dwellings.




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    1. hi Pete Granger, as I read through the second half of your post, I was reminded of a documentary that I enjoyed watching a while back. Its an award winninfg presentation Ayurveda: Art of being. It may not be your cup of tea at all, but I post the link here for anyone who may be interested. https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=feTiygXQyq0
      ancient sanskrit teaching text there is a written admonishment to avoid living in the ‘villages’ since this was seen as an unhealthy lifestyle compared to dweĺling in the countryside.




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  8. Is it completely unacceptable to just not reproduce if you are carrying the Type 1 genotype? If your family has Type 1 in it why not just adopt or go childless? Or Huntingtons or any incurable disease that can be predicted based on testing and or family history. We are up to 8 billions or more. We really don’t need your bad genes in the pool. OK maybe that was uncalled for…I am not trying to provoke, but I am interested in your opinion on this.

    Or glasses…if you need glasses. Or you just ugly. See where I’m going? Is ‘Eugenics’ a legal activity anywhere? Can we select for ‘intelligence’. Should we select for certain traits, if we want to that is. Say a small group wants to isolate themselves to have ‘better’ babies. What would be a good mix? Oh dear, what i am thinking right now. I’m not worthy but Sofia (Loren) and I woulda made such a beautiful family. Oh Madonna, Madonna, Madonna




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    1. You might just be fighting entropy here, Rhombo.
      http://discovermagazine.com/2010/sep/25-modern-humans-smart-why-brain-shrinking

      Could we all be getting less and less smart as the centuries roll by? I mean look at all the knowledge and evidence that has been accumulated and yet huge numbers of people seriously believe in “intelligent design”, or that we need to eat cholesterol, that high saturated fat diets are healthy, or that gambling is an effective form of financial planning. Our ancestors didn’t have the education or widespread access to knowledge that now exists … we don’t have that excuse.




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      1. “idiocracy is where we are now.” That seems self evident and our shrinking gobs supports your conclusion…but it also suggests (to me at least) that our propensity to preserve bad genes out of our empathy for others (generally considered a good trait) has a measurable consequence.

        People have believed in the supernatural since day one… that what we do today has its reward in the afterlife. Moreover, You could argue rather persuasively that altruism confers survival advantage on a given population. And yet it seems that our brains are rapidly dwindling, something we could assume ‘a priori’ is a negative… Perhaps there is another mechanism at play.

        what happens when people who would otherwise have died young due to their harmful mutated genes live to reproduce? Are we not living proof that we can alter our evolution for ill? I have always held an expectation that everything will improve with time. But have they? OK silicon has revolutionized our… social lives and entertainment options.

        Are we better off, decade by decade? I’m asking? If we are not advancing then shouldn’t we ask wassup? I know what I think is happening: If it is deemed too hard or immoral to hold everyone to high standards the obvious solution is to dummy everybody down. Just aim low enough and everybody succeeds.

        I seem to remember the story told by the parents of the William tennis sisters. to the effect that they intentionally chose to ‘breed’ athletic children…in effect, mum and pop at least partially chose each other based on physical and intellectual prowess. I don’t think they are alone in that quest.

        In the long run humanity could see the emergence of new kinds of subspecies’. Especially in countries not afflicted with our bourgeois obsession for egality.

        BTW/ Whats Kleptocracy? And why do you talk so gay? ; )




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        1. Hmmm, heavy stuff.

          Kleptocracy is rule by thieves by the way.

          My girlfriend bought me a short-sleeved shirt and a pair of shorts a while ago. They look OK and are a good fit. However, when I happened to look at the shirt size label some time later, I saw it said “3”: The shorts also have a zip up front that closes on the left. I thought it was a bit odd but it was a French brand so didn’t think any more of it. Perhaps I am talking so gay now because I am wearing women’s clothes, do you think?




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          1. hahaha… i think you are not putting enough Mountain Dew on yor crops. Yes, nowadays any mention of eugenics evokes flickering images of healthy Nordic girls exercising in Lebensborns.

            Kleptocracy, Democracy its all the same thing Man.




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              1. ahgggg OH! I said gay because about that movie when all the guys said that time travel man sounded gay for espeaking in normal intelligent speakery. but that whole french fabrique thing you got going troubles me deeply.

                I drive by a dairy farm most days. they just sprayed all the grass in this one paddock with something powerful. It turns the grass to yell ow in hours. Then they plant some turnip or beets for winter fodder.

                but what did i see today, like 48 hours later, the herd in on it eating down all that toxic “food” to turn into milk for us dweebs. I know the young manager…college degree, a real good kid. does he not know what he is doing…nope, so I’ll get on my knees and pray…we don’t get …oh, wait…we did. nevermind




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                1. Yes, I figured that’s what you meant but I why ignore an opportunity for a cheap joke? Still, it might have been worse …. I could have dusted off some old NZer jokes.




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      2. The Buddha said that the “uninstructed worldling” is motivated by three things; hate, greed, and ignorance. Or aversion, desire, and delusion, if you like. That holds true as well now as it did 2500 years ago.




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          1. “how do you know he said that?” Because I have heard many,many Theravada Buddhist monks say so and I have read it many, many times in translations of the Pali Cannon.

            “does that make it so?” That’s one of the nice things about Buddhist teachings. You can verify their truth and efficacy just by direct observation of your own thoughts, speech and deeds.




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    2. Sofia Loren , has not done anything spectacular in reproducing beautiful people . She has had 2 miscarriages and two sort of ordinary looking boys . She herself was made fun of as a child for the way she looked and she has said “everything you see is the result of spaghetti .”
      A 100 years ago there was a lot of interest in improving corn genetics , they realized they were going no where fast in breeding the best looking corn to the best , it did not work. Then someone started fooling around with inbred corn and hybrid corn took off, The most miserable tiny malformed cobs when crossed with another line of inbred resulted in spectacular corn.
      http://www.genetics.org/content/148/3/923




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  9. I have an Off Topic question:

    I have been following Dr. Greger’s advice for over two months now. My diet is virtually 100% of his recommendations (I use his phone app, which is a nice tool). Where I fall short is simply in not eating all recommended servings sometimes for some of the foods. All this time I have been having bouts of malaise, or mild depression, and I cannot seem to shake it. My mornings are not too bad, but as the day progresses I feel the malaise coming on. Has anyone else had an experience like this? Does anyone have any advice? Thanks in advance!




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    1. Many possibilities but Tryptophan (gut) -> Serotonin (brain) -> Fantastic Mood. This conversion process works most efficiently in a modest protein diet style. I rely on slow carbs with fiber (colorful, whole veggies/fruits), slow fat with fiber (avocados, nuts, seeds) and modest but diverse protein. You could try to enter an average day’s food into Cronometer to see if you are lacking any basic vitamins, minerals, amino acids or essential fats. After I tried this, I started to use more nutritional yeast to boost my B vitamins which supposedly can add some pep to your step. Cheers!




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      1. (Like your screen name, GreenSmoothieParty!) Thanks for the tip regarding Cronometer, much appreciated. I wish it could be easier to determine some variation of a PBWFD that works optimally for me. I would be willing to pay for a service that guides me through the process, one that incorporates appropriate testing with professional interpretation to ensure everything is going the right direction. Maybe a marketable business idea Dr. Greger could initiate? — maybe he could start a network of other nutritionally aware medical doctors that could provide such a service.




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          1. GreenSmoothieParty,

            Good luck in finding nutritional yeast with folate vs the inexpensive folic acid. I did a bit of a search, without luck to isolate the active form in yeast products. I think the concept is on the mark and perhaps suggesting same to the manufacturers would be in order. Keep us informed with your experiences.

            I would recommend that you might consider testing for your MTHFR genotype and if appropriate then supplement with an active folate form. A good resource on this issues can be found at: http://mthfr.net/tag/q-and-a/ Also keep in mind that some of the nutritional yeast products contain lead: seehttp://nutritionfacts.org/2015/07/30/three-brands-of-nutritional-yeast-contain-detectable-lead-levels-but-the-risk-is-minimal/ for some better brands.

            Dr. Alan Kadish Moderator for Dr. Greger




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          2. As for food sources for folate, I find the most convenient to be lentils and other pulses, spinach (but not other some green leafies such as swiss chard), asparagus, and broccoli to be convenient.




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    2. Jerry: Many people who switch to whole plant food based eating experience an improvement in their mood. But some people experience the opposite. What could be the cause of people who try a whole plant food based diet and feel bad? While we don’t know for sure, there is a good theory. Dr. Michael Klaper is well respected and has helped many people make the transition to a whole plant food based diet. His theory sounds plausible, and what’s even better, presents a path forward for those interested. Below is a clip from his talk which covers the theory.

      I’ve heard the whole talk, including a detailed explanation of the solution. If you watch the talk and are interested in trying it out, I’ll write out the solution for you. Another suggestion I have for you is to do a phone consultation with Dr. Klaper. He is not free, but he is an expert and is actually willing to talk one on one with people. If you want to give it another go, you might try the phone consultation.

      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0tJyb1wTxg4

      @Marcel: This talk may interest you too.




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      1. Thea — Very interesting video. Thank you very much for that. I am interested in what Dr. Klaper’s solution is. If you are willing to write a brief overview I would appreciate that.

        One thought I had while watching the video clip is: among those in the U.S. who decide to become vegans, why are there not more people who are having the type of problem Dr. Klaper described? I wonder this because most people in the U.S. are, or have been, meat eaters, so it seems at least possible that the adaptive changes he described would have occurred to a significant percentage of the population. Yet, it seems people like me with this problem are a small percentage of those who transition to a vegan diet. (Although, there may be a self-selection process going on at websites such as this one since people who succeed are highly likely to be the ones who continue to post, and those who try vegan and fail may no longer be motivated to participate in such websites.)

        By the way, most of my adult life I have not generally been a big meat eater. Sure I ate meat, but meat was a much smaller proportion of my diet than those of everyone else I was aware of, and in general ate much healthier than they. So, I confess a little surprise that I could have developed the problem described by Dr. Klaper — but his description makes so much sense.




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        1. Jerry: You raise some interesting questions. I agree with your speculation about selection bias. Depending on who you talk to / where you look: either almost all vegans will fail soon after trying or almost no one will fail… I don’t know where the truth lies. I do believe doctors like Dr. Klaper, Dr. McDougal, Dr. Barnard, etc are truthful (without exaggeration) about their great number of successes. But that’s not the same as a long term study.
          .
          As a lay person, I also can’t say why someone who had never been a big meat eater would have this problem. I can offer three ideas to think about: 1) Biology. Some people hit the biology lottery. They can smoke every day for decades, live to 100 and never get cancer. It happens. It’s just not very common. On the other hand, some unlucky people might smoke for a few years, quit and still get lung cancer. Maybe their bodies are super-sensitive. Maybe your body is just rigged to have this problem???
          .
          2) “The devil is in the details”, one of my favorite sayings. By this I mean that you describe your diet as being low in meat and generally healthier than your peers. But I don’t really know what that means. I’m not asking for details. I’m just making the point that you may have been eating less meat than those around you, but that may not be saying much. Then there’s also the issue of dairy and eggs, which also have animal protein. All those foods added together could create a problem.
          .
          3) Health issues are rarely linear. For example, you are not likely to get much different health outcomes if you smoke 1 pack a day verses 2 (I would guess). The person smoking 1 pack a day is smoking 1/2 as much! But health wise, maybe that’s over a threshold. Something similar may be going on with you. You may have been eating less meat than your peers, but if you are over a threshold for bad outcomes, it may not matter. Keep in mind: I don’t know how much animal protein you have taken in over your life and I don’t know what the threshold is or even if there is one. I’m just offering some speculation that may be useful to you.
          .
          This post is too long, so I’ll give you the solution in another post.




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          1. Thea — Thank you for your thoughtful response. I agree with everything you said.

            Here is a personal example of “winning the biology lottery”: My mom lived to over 100 years old and she ate some meat almost every day, eggs three days each week, and not many vegetables!

            I gave only a relativistic comparison to the meat eating of my peers (“less than they eat”) because I have never quantified my meat eating. If I were to guess, I would say most of the last 30 years I have eaten about 3 to 4 ounces of meat per day on average. As for eggs, prior to discovering Dr. Greger, I was eating about 2 eggs per week, sometimes less. But your points remains, there are unknowns about my body, meat, and Dr. Klaper’s discussion, and health issues are rarely linear.

            I much appreciate your input to my concerns! Your speculation is indeed useful.




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        2. Jerry: This is part 2: What is Dr. Klaper’s potential solution to meat addiction?

          Dr. Klaper says that he has had great success weaning people off meat using this method: Step 1 is to figure out the minimum amount and frequency of meat you have to eat in order to feel perfectly healthy and stabilize on that amount. So, can you get buy with 1/4 cup worth once a day? Once every other day. No hurry. Take some time to figure out the very lowest amount you can take, but still feel healthy. Stay on that for a bit.
          .
          The second step is to *verrrrrrry* slowly extent the time. So, say you have some meat today and you had stabilized on having that every other day. Instead of eating meat again in 2 days, see if you can go 3 days. If so, stay at 3 days for a while. No hurry. If 3 days works at first, but then doesn’t work. Try 2 days one span and then 3 days for the next span and alternate for a while. Then see if you can go 3 days every span. Just keep pushing it out that like.
          .
          One of the big points of this method is to treat meat as *medicinal.* So, keep track of what you eat and schedule your consumption accordingly. It’s medicine: So be disciplined about it and keep records of your meat intake as well as how you feel. You can use the records to evaluate your progress and adjust as needed.
          .
          Dr. Klapper says that it may take a long time before you are completely off meat. But he eventually talks to patients who are eating some meat every 4 or 5 months or so. Soon after that, they may realize realize that they really don’t need it any more.
          .
          I can’t promise that it will work. If you give it a try, good luck!




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        3. I’m sure Dr. Klaper covered this too, but there are hormones in meat and even more in dairy products that produce addiction. The hormones are there to make the calf want to consume more milk. Coming off any type of addiction will leave you feeling malaise at the very least. It think it may take six months for some people to get cleansed of this.




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  10. Great video, milk is really a problem for many. I eat almost like a vegan, but find it unlikely to give up meat ad animal fat. These two keep my glucose under 4mM daily and my energy is great. I also consume up to 1kg vegetables daily,(no grains, the moment i include them, I bulge and BM stops for days…) but if i don´t get supplements like fish oil, calcium, magnesium and potassium, I start feeling drained. Is the vegan for everyone, or is it just me? my health may be already greatly compromized…




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    1. @Brita: In case you didn’t see my reply to a similar question on this page, I’m copying it for you:

      Many people who switch to whole plant food based eating experience an improvement in their mood. But some people experience the opposite. What could be the cause of people who try a whole plant food based diet and feel bad? While we don’t know for sure, there is a good theory. Dr. Michael Klaper is well respected and has helped many people make the transition to a whole plant food based diet. His theory sounds plausible, and what’s even better, presents a path forward for those interested. Below is a clip from his talk which covers the theory.
      .
      I’ve heard the whole talk, including a detailed explanation of the solution. If you watch the talk and are interested in trying it out, I’ll write out the solution for you. Another suggestion I have for you is to do a phone consultation with Dr. Klaper. He is not free, but he is an expert and is actually willing to talk one on one with people. If you want to give it another go, you might try the phone consultation.

      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0tJyb1wTxg4

      Hope that helps.




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      1. Thanks for the video Thea. But I am just tired of the split between animal eating and vegan lifestyle. I just belief that we are all biochemically different being and will thrive in a specific combination of foods. This article talks about TMAO from both animal products(fish) and grains. that makes both animal diet and vegan diet an activator of TMAO at some level. The particular food and the particular person is what matters, quality too. for example, vegans will do great by reducing grains and increasing fats, while meat eaters will do great by reducing meats that are acid forming and has higher load of components that aggravates arthritis. Just like vegans, people who eat meat also become centenarians in good health.

        I think the whole food stuff is more complex that what meets the eys and it will save me best to just learn even more and curve my own path.
        Thank you for the concern
        https://chriskresser.com/choline-and-tmao-eggs-still-dont-cause-heart-disease/




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          1. Thanks for the input WFP. I am aware of Chris´s standpoint on nutrition :-)

            I live almost like a vegan, I have to learn for myself and put the last bits and pieces in place. I just belief some amount of animal product is naturally necessary, it´s just my belief, backed up by science, of course.

            But I must say, thanks to NutritionFacts, I have figured out how to sort my veges and motivated to top the potions. So much data on this site.




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            1. Hi Brita
              “I just belief..” but it isn’t. Many people here are thriving without animal.
              But good for you for being almost completely WFPB. Eventually you may just realize that little bit you are eating isn’t necessary!




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  11. Marcel — Oh my, your experience sounds scary! From your experience it appears you are certain the beans / whole grains and your depression are connected. Do you need to eliminate both at the same time to avoid depression, or would eliminating just one of them make a noticeable improvement? Have you had any luck finding out what it is about beans and/or whole grains that causes this problem for you?

    As I said above in response to GreenSmoothieParty, I wish it was easier to find out how to live great on the type of food suggested by Dr. Greger. Sometimes when I am feeling the low mood I can become negative in my thinking about this and I wonder why such a healthy approach to eating should impose such difficulties?!




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    1. I’m not 100% certain which food causes more harm to me. It is hard to tell because the worsening of the depression starts with a delay of 1 to 2 weeks.
      This are the observations I have made in regards of beans and whole grains.
      After eating whole grains I get a strange taste/feeling (hard to describe) in my mouth, which even stays there after brushing my teeth with toothpaste. Also my face becomes hot, but this is not all the time the case.
      Beans cause the same taste/feeling in my mouth, but to a lesser extent. It is only noticeable when I put my attention on it. They also cause discomfort in my gut. This will happen around one day after eating them. It’s not the gas that causes this discomfort, because after eating beans for a couple of weeks the gas disappears, but the discomfort stays there.
      Then after some days my gum moves back which makes my teeth sensitive to temperature. After a week my finger and joints start to hurt after using them (lifting weights / cutting things in the kitchen etc.). It takes around a month to make my appearance worse (dry skin / pimples).
      I didn’t test them individually, but after 2 mouth of eating grains and beans I stopped the grains and only ate the beans, which didn’t improved my situation.
      I didn’t investigate what causes the problems for me because being unable to eat this way feels like a failure to me. It is hard to accept, that I can’t eat the way I want to. Especially because this way seems to be the best for the animals, environment and the future of humankind. Totally stupid to feel this way but I can’t help it.

      Writing all this I can’t believe how stubborn I was and still am.

      Sometimes when I am feeling the low mood I can become negative in my thinking about this and I wonder why such a healthy approach to eating should impose such difficulties?!

      It seems that not everybody is the same when it comes to food. For the majority peanuts are a healthy snack, but for the person with a severe allergy, one peanut could be lethal.




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  12. Quick question about the beneficial phytates in beans. Does pressure cooking destroy them, like it does lectins? And aren’t canned beans all pressure cooked? Thanks for your replies.




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      1. Thank you Joanne! I guess enough phytates survive to provide the beneficial effect seen in the studies cited here in the series of bean videos. I do wonder if African populations eating lots of beans, with low cancer rates, cook their beans really slowly, or just how do they cook them? I recently read that slow cooking beans can actually increase the level of lectins in your beans, which should not be a problem, unless they are kidney beans and you are a very small person and you eat a lot of them. Just wondering about that. The complexities of diet are just endless. Although I think the bottom line is that if we were all raised eating a whole foods, plant based diet as Dr. Greger recommends, we would not have to obsess about anything at all, because we would just be healthy our whole lives. I am probably not alone here in feeling like I’m trying hard to reverse the harm of a lifetime of bad choices, and consequently I am prone to obsess over the details!




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  13. This is my first day as a registered user here, glad to be here! We need to know the truth about the nutrition! :)

    Sorry for an offtopic question, although related to milk products. What is the best thing to use in coffee instead of cow milk or cream? Can’t do without some additional fat in there, I am afraid.
    I like the tea but freshly ground coffee also and can’t stand to drink it black (I like less bitter, less acidic taste). I have been using some soya product (powder form, 25% of which is fat) containing solid corn syrup and ca. 30% of soya (partially hydrogenated soya oil, soya protein),

    then in smaller amounts of potassium phosphate, emulsifier E471 (mono- and diglycerides it seems), sodium caseinate, silicon dioxide.
    It clearly does not seem healthy, and the hydrogenated soya oil in there is basically a margarine in powdery form.




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    1. musaire: Welcome to the group!!

      .
      I agree, that soya product you describe sounds something like a nightmare. I don’t drink coffee myself, but I have relatives who do. They went vegan a few years ago, and they like cream in their coffee! From their example, I have two ideas for you: Sometimes they get a fresh vegan based coffee cream, either soy or coconut based. I’m not sure how the ingredients of those products compare to the powder you are talking about, but if memory served, they are a bit better.

      .

      The option my relatives love best is to use coconut cream. You can buy a full can of coconut cream from places like Trader Joes. It’s solid in the can and you just scoop out what you want. It will melt into your coffee as a smooth cream.

      .

      A third example is one that they’ve never tried, but I wanted to pass on. I’ve seen recipes for making your own cream, say based with cashews. If you have a good blender, you could give that a try and control exactly what goes in it. Chef Skye (?) has a cookbook with a cream recipe that is specifically for using in applications like coffee. If memory serves, it has all of 2 or 3 ingredients. I can try to find that cookbook if you are interested.

      .
      There’s nothing wrong with WFPBRunner’s suggestion. In fact, I’d say that a soy milk probably is healthier than any of the suggestions I’ve made. I just thought I would give additional suggestions in case you are really needing something richer to help with your transition.

      .
      Hope this helps.




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    2. My favorite is cashew cream. Take 50g of raw cashews (Trader Joe’s sells them for not too much) and soak them overnight in 100g of water. Dump it all in a blender and blend until smooth.




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  14. What about Cheese ? I read that it takes 9 LBs of milk to produce 1 LB of cheese and probably 10 times more people eat cheese than drink milk. If it takes 9 LBs of milk to produce 1 LB of cheese then the incidents of type 1 diabetes should much more easily be correlated to eating cheese (leverage) than drinking milk especially since also more people eat cheese than drink milk.




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    1. Ray,

      Funny you should ask about cheese vs milk. The government keeps tabs on this subject in detail, see: https://www.ers.usda.gov/data-products/dairy-data.aspx and did you know that there is an increase in cheese consumption in the US…http://www.idfa.org/news-views/media-kits/cheese/cheese-sales-trends . As to the amount of milk per lbs of cheese it varies but is typically approximately 9.7-10 ish lbs cheese /100gal of milk.

      Want the whole story ? http://www.progressivedairy.com/topics/management/how-much-cheese-is-there-in-a-hundred-pounds-of-milk . “In its 2010 report on 2009 operations, CDFA reported that the vat-to-cheese yield was 13.93 pounds per hundred pounds of vat milk that tested 4.74 percent for BF and 9.66 percent SNF.”

      PS. goats milk takes less milk to make cheese and is increasing in the marketplace. http://wtop.com/food/2016/01/mooove-over-cows-goat-milk-sales-climb-in-u-s-dairy-market/

      Dr. Alan Kadish moderator for Dr. Greger




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  15. I have a grandson 1.5 years old. Our pedia recommends whole milk to augment his growth needs. If milk its harmful to children what substitute should we give for growth needs of kids?




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    1. According to google/USDA, cow’s milk has 3.4 times the protein (by weight) of human breast milk and cow’s milk is also loaded with growth hormones injected into the cows to make them grow faster and bigger (boost productivity/profitability).
      Google : Human Breast Milk Protein % and then Cow Breast Milk Protein % (change 1 cup to 100 Gram to compare with same scale – by weight). from : http://humanisherbivore.com/babybrain.html




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      1. My daughter no longer give breast milk. she stopped when my grandson reached 1 year old. He eats regular food but is very active so the pedia recommended milk and in fact supplements like pediasure. Pedia says they need the calories to feed the growth of kids.




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        1. Why would Pedia recommend milk and supplements for “Calories” ? What about potatoes, rice, fruits, nuts ? They are all loaded with calories, vital vitamins and vital nutrients. I think you should hire a different Pedia.




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    2. carlos: I have some great resources for you.

      But first, note the following quote from a position paper from the ADA: “It is the position of the American Dietetic Association that appropriately planned vegetarian diets, including total vegetarian or vegan diets, are healthful, nutritionally adequate, and may provide health benefits in the prevention and treatment of certain diseases. Well-planned vegetarian diets are appropriate for individuals during all stages of the life cycle, including pregnancy, lactation, infancy, childhood, and adolescence, and for athletes.”
      .
      Also note this quote from Dr. Greger’s book, How Not To Die, page 411-412: “Vitamin B12-fortified plant-based diets can offer health benefits for all stages of the life cycle. [When] Dr. Benjamin Spock, the most esteemed pediatrician of all time,…died at ninety-four, he advocated children be raised on a plant-based diet with no exposure to meat or dairy products. … ‘Children who grow up getting their nutrition from plant foods have a tremendous health advantage and are much less likely to develop health problems as the years go by.’ ”
      .
      But having said that, there are some ‘gotchas’ when it comes to young children and whole plant food diets (just like there are gotchas with children and any diet). So, it really is worth spending some time reviewing accurate, evidence-based information on the topic. Here’s some ideas for specifics:
      .
      PCRM is the Physician’s Committee For Responsible Medicine, headed up by Dr. Barnard. Dr. Greger has mentioned Dr. Barnard and PCRM favorably in posts and his book. Here are two articles from PCRM that I think contains the type of information you are looking for:
      http://www.pcrm.org/health/diets/vegdiets/vegetarian-diets-for-children-right-from-the-start
      http://www.pcrm.org/pdfs/health/info_children.pdf
      http://www.pcrm.org/pdfs/health/info_advchild.pdf
      .
      I’ll also refer you to a site called the Vegetarian Resource Group, VRG. Their articles are usually very well researched and Dr. Greger has mentioned VRG favorably at least once. VRG has a whole section on kids on their website.
      Here’s the main page. Scroll down to the Nutrition section:
      http://www.vrg.org/family/kidsindex.htm
      This is one of my favorite articles on that page. which starts with babies and goes on up:
      http://www.vrg.org/nutshell/kids.php
      .
      Finally, I highly recommend getting a book called, Becoming Vegan, Express Edition. That book is a great over-all reference book for the whole family. It also has an entire chapter on children and what to feed. The authors of that book have been guest bloggers here on NutritionFacts. They are very well respected and extremely knowledgeable about nutrition science and how it applies to all ages.

      I hope this helps.




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  16. I personally follow a WFPB diet and have seen dramatic improvements in my health. But… recently a FB friend diagnosed with Type II Diabetes has been posting his success in weight loss and dramatic improvements in bloodwork including improved blood sugar, and decrease in HDL and triglycerides. He is accomplishing this with exercise and following a high-fat Ketogenic diet, with increased consumption of meat, heavy cream, butter, bacon, etc. His blood work does not lie. He sent me a link to the medical research promoting this diet https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/p… This research goes against everything I’ve read based on the work of Dr. Greger, McDougall, Campbell and Esselstyn. While I have no intention on changing from a WFPB diet, I am very confused and concerned about the conflicting research. Clarification on this would be greatly appreciated.




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  17. Does it apply to adults like people between 30 and 40 ?
    French ISERM has published the following article about GABA neurotransmitter (presse.inserm.fr/en/a-molecule-to-regenerate-insulin-producing-cells-in-type-1-diabetic-patients/25908/) , is it real hope for T1 ?




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  18. Does it apply to adults, like people between 30 and 40 ?
    French ISERM
    has published the following article about GABA neurotransmitter
    ( presse.inserm.fr/en/a-molecule-to-regenerate-insulin-producing-cells-in-type-1-diabetic-patients/25908/ )
    , is it real hope for T1 ?




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  19. Hmm..I’m not going for this milk thing. My son was diagnosed a couple months ago with type 1..he never drank formula or milk as a baby or toddler..or even until he got this. Now he has to..for protein…I don’t like it..but it helps him from going low. I didn’t even drink it while pregnant! This is interesting..but definitely not in our case…probably from an infection they believe.




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  20. my brother in law always argues with me and my wife about veganism because he has type one diabetes and his doctor told him if he didnt eat meat he would die because of his liver . my wife and i tell him thats going to kill you too you should look into plant based options what should we tell him cause he needs facts




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    1. mike: A whole food plant based (WFPB) diet will not cure type 1 diabetes, but it can sure help. Stewart, one of the forum participants wrote, “I have lowered my insulin needs by 25% by eliminating all animal food from my diet and by lowering the AGEs from diet and maintaining good control, I come close to having a reasonable life expectancy.” Hopefully Stewart will see your post and chime in.
      .
      You might also see if you can check out from the library Dr. Barnard’s book on diabetes. The majority of the book is about type 2 diabetes, but there is a section on type 1 that provides important perspective.
      .
      Good luck!




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  21. any new information on type 1 diabetes? my nephew is 14 and has been diagnosed. all I know that the pancreatic cells are still growing in his age so is there something we can do? how to stop autoimmune system from killing the cells?




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  22. How is this study accurate when it’s not looking at every variable in these babies lives? How can you say for sure it MAY be the cows milk causing these issues, when in fact it could be other dietary, environmental, or genetic causes? This is not a controlled experiment to prove accurate findings.




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  23. Hi Stevie,

    I am a volunteer for Dr. Greger. Thanks for your question.

    Regarding research, the only type of study that can really prove causation are randomized controlled trials. However, this would never be able to be done with testing whether milk intake increases risk for type I diabetes. We can really only use observational studies, and try to make inferences on the associations that we see. That’s why you see language like “may be the cow’s milk”, because we can’t tell for sure. But it’s as good of a theory as there is right now.

    Overall, science is very difficult, but we have to make do with what is possible and what has been done. That’s the best we can do.

    I hope this helps clarify!




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