Does Casein in Milk Trigger Type 1 Diabetes?

Does Casein in Milk Trigger Type 1 Diabetes?
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Why might exposure to bovine proteins increase the risk of childhood-onset autoimmune type I diabetes?

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Below is an approximation of this video’s audio content. To see any graphs, charts, graphics, images, and quotes to which Dr. Greger may be referring, watch the above video.

Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune disease that typically strikes children and young adults, in which your own immune system attacks and destroys the insulin-producing cells of your pancreas. If untreated, it’s deadly. But, “even with well-managed insulin replacement,” it could cut a decade off your life. “Families are devastated when a child receives a diagnosis of type 1 diabetes.” Thus, one of modern medicine’s “holy grails” is to understand what causes the body to attack itself, in hopes that we can prevent and cure it.

Genetic susceptibility plays an important role, but the concordance for type 1 diabetes is only about 50% among identical twins—meaning even if someone with the same DNA as you gets the disease, there’s only about a 50% chance you’ll get it too, meaning there must be external factors, as well.

Some countries have low rates; some have high rates. Japan, for example, has type 1 diabetes rates 18 times lower than the United States. And, that’s not just genetics, since when children migrate, they tend to acquire the risk of their new home—suggesting it’s got to have something to do with the environment, diet, or lifestyle.

In fact, the incidence rates vary more than 350-fold around the world. Some countries have hundreds of times higher rates than others, and it’s on the rise. Researchers looked at 37 populations from around the world, and the incidence is going up about 3% a year. In fact, they couldn’t find a single population going the other direction. 3% higher every year; our genes don’t change that fast. Something is going on, starting right around World War 2. “The best evidence available suggests that [type 1] diabetes showed a stable and relatively low incidence over the first half of the 20th century, followed by a clear increase [around] the middle of the century.”

And, the question is, why? A number of factors have been postulated for tipping children over into diabetes, including vitamin D deficiency, certain infections, or exposure to cow’s milk.

Decades ago, cross-country comparisons like this were published, showing a tight correlation between milk consumption and the incidence of type 1 diabetes—insulin-dependent, childhood-onset diabetes—showing as much as “94% of the geographic variation in incidence might be explained by differences in milk consumption [alone].” This country, with the highest rates at the top—Finland—led much of the research into this area.

It all started with studies like this, showing the less babies are breastfed, the higher the rate of type 1 diabetes—leading to the obvious conclusion: breast milk protects newborn infants.  On the other hand, if they’re not getting breast milk, they’re getting formula, which contains cow’s milk proteins. In the first few months of life, the gut is especially leaky to proteins. And, so, maybe, as our immune system attacks the foreign cow proteins, our pancreas gets caught in the crossfire. But, this was based on animal experiments. In susceptible mice, “a diet containing [the cow’s milk protein] casein produced diabetes.” But, it doesn’t cause diabetes in rats. So, are we more like mice, or rats?

So, researchers drew blood from children with type 1 diabetes to see if they had elevated levels of antibodies that attack bovine proteins, compared to controls. And, every single one of the affected kids had elevated anti-bovine protein antibodies circulating in their blood, compared to much lower levels in the control subjects.

Okay, that seems pretty convincing, but what about Iceland? They drink more milk than Finland, yet have less than half the type 1 diabetes. We’ll cover the Icelandic paradox, next.

Please consider volunteering to help out on the site.

Image credit: Ishai Parasol via flickr. Image has been modified.

Below is an approximation of this video’s audio content. To see any graphs, charts, graphics, images, and quotes to which Dr. Greger may be referring, watch the above video.

Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune disease that typically strikes children and young adults, in which your own immune system attacks and destroys the insulin-producing cells of your pancreas. If untreated, it’s deadly. But, “even with well-managed insulin replacement,” it could cut a decade off your life. “Families are devastated when a child receives a diagnosis of type 1 diabetes.” Thus, one of modern medicine’s “holy grails” is to understand what causes the body to attack itself, in hopes that we can prevent and cure it.

Genetic susceptibility plays an important role, but the concordance for type 1 diabetes is only about 50% among identical twins—meaning even if someone with the same DNA as you gets the disease, there’s only about a 50% chance you’ll get it too, meaning there must be external factors, as well.

Some countries have low rates; some have high rates. Japan, for example, has type 1 diabetes rates 18 times lower than the United States. And, that’s not just genetics, since when children migrate, they tend to acquire the risk of their new home—suggesting it’s got to have something to do with the environment, diet, or lifestyle.

In fact, the incidence rates vary more than 350-fold around the world. Some countries have hundreds of times higher rates than others, and it’s on the rise. Researchers looked at 37 populations from around the world, and the incidence is going up about 3% a year. In fact, they couldn’t find a single population going the other direction. 3% higher every year; our genes don’t change that fast. Something is going on, starting right around World War 2. “The best evidence available suggests that [type 1] diabetes showed a stable and relatively low incidence over the first half of the 20th century, followed by a clear increase [around] the middle of the century.”

And, the question is, why? A number of factors have been postulated for tipping children over into diabetes, including vitamin D deficiency, certain infections, or exposure to cow’s milk.

Decades ago, cross-country comparisons like this were published, showing a tight correlation between milk consumption and the incidence of type 1 diabetes—insulin-dependent, childhood-onset diabetes—showing as much as “94% of the geographic variation in incidence might be explained by differences in milk consumption [alone].” This country, with the highest rates at the top—Finland—led much of the research into this area.

It all started with studies like this, showing the less babies are breastfed, the higher the rate of type 1 diabetes—leading to the obvious conclusion: breast milk protects newborn infants.  On the other hand, if they’re not getting breast milk, they’re getting formula, which contains cow’s milk proteins. In the first few months of life, the gut is especially leaky to proteins. And, so, maybe, as our immune system attacks the foreign cow proteins, our pancreas gets caught in the crossfire. But, this was based on animal experiments. In susceptible mice, “a diet containing [the cow’s milk protein] casein produced diabetes.” But, it doesn’t cause diabetes in rats. So, are we more like mice, or rats?

So, researchers drew blood from children with type 1 diabetes to see if they had elevated levels of antibodies that attack bovine proteins, compared to controls. And, every single one of the affected kids had elevated anti-bovine protein antibodies circulating in their blood, compared to much lower levels in the control subjects.

Okay, that seems pretty convincing, but what about Iceland? They drink more milk than Finland, yet have less than half the type 1 diabetes. We’ll cover the Icelandic paradox, next.

Please consider volunteering to help out on the site.

Image credit: Ishai Parasol via flickr. Image has been modified.

Doctor's Note

The vast majority of diabetes cases are type 2 diabetes, so that’s what I’ve been concentrating on. For example, see:

I’m so glad to be getting around to type 1 diabetes, though. Stay tuned for my next video, Does Bovine Insulin Exposure Trigger Type 1 Diabetes?. And, please let me know what other topics you’d like me to cover.

If you haven’t yet, you can subscribe to my videos for free by clicking here.

185 responses to “Does Casein in Milk Trigger Type 1 Diabetes?

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      1. Julot, your comment on Fermentation is important. Fermentation has been around as long as Fruits and vegetables have been around. How does one think people preserved food before electricity. Fermentation changes Milk to Kefir which has been drank by man for centuries. Does any one remember the commercial on TV with the Old Georgian Women. They drank Kefir not Yoghurt. Fermentation will save you Gut and your gut will save You. God Bless and Gods Speed




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        1. So, your comments are based entirely on a forty-year-old advertisement featuring one old woman holding a cup of yogurt, paid for by the people trying to sell us yogurt? There’s an endorsement I can base potentially life-altering decisions on. Fermentation is old, clearly pre-dating electricity, which has replaced it as well as salting in food preservation. But none of this changes the fact that humans are the only mammal that continues to drink milk after weaning, and the only one to steal milk from another species to do it, presumably because we don’t get enough dietary bovine growth hormone, antibiotics, and pus in other ways.




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    1. Really, you have to ask that? Well maybe fermentation does change it but it has not been studied enough yet so till the facts are known it would be good to avoid all dairy, fermented or not!




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    2. Shafqat Ullah: I’m truly sorry for the snotty replies you have received, which are not in the spirit of this site. Usually we are a nicer bunch. I hope you will continue to explore the site and ask questions if you need some clarification. Here’s my answer to this question:
      .
      It is true that cheese is full of casein, a particularly troublesome protein when it comes to cancer (read The China Study for more information on that). If for no other reason, I would say: yes, cheese should be avoided too.
      .
      But cheese’s faults go far beyond the casein. I like to point out that cheese is “concentrated dairy.” NutritionFacts has a lot of information about the various ways in which dairy is bad for our health, most of which is likely to apply to cheese even more than milk. If you are interested, the following link is a nice summary. You can click through to find out more about particular topics. http://nutritionfacts.org/topics/dairy/
      .
      Hope that helps.




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      1. Thanks so much! I am on a ketogenic diet and eliminating cheese will make both my fat and calcium daily intake fulfillment a bit more challenging from alternative sources. I agree dairy is bad.




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        1. May I ask why you are on a ketogenic diet? Dr Greger’s research is so careful to exclude information from “research” that is really just marketing hype in disguise, so this site is far more trustworthy than most. If you search through it you will find that ketogenic, and all high fat diets, lead to earlier death rates.

          I know two women who followed ketogenic diets because they had cancer. They both believed that by denying their bodies carbohydrates there would be no sugar to feed cancer. But, while cancer cells often prefer sugar, many can grow without it, just the way normal cells do. Both these women were young, at least by my standard – one 50 something, the other mid 30s. Both died after a year or so. If your diet is for cancer you’ll find there is a lot of research showing the power of plant based diets to help in restoring health, while animal protein stimulates cancer growth in at least two ways.




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      1. I developed Type 1 at 35. Full blown. Now 47,000 injections 30 years later, I so regret the “doctor” did not address diet. Rather he told me I would be supporting Big Pharma the rest of my life. Low carb, mod protein, hi healthy fats. So I can shoot up far less GMO Fake insulin.




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  1. yogurt might be exempt from this? Don’t the cultures/probiotics break down casein, or is this wrong?

    I wonder if Iceland has protection due to high fish consumption?




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    1. Roxy: It is my understanding that fermented dairy removes some/all of the galactose, not the protein like casein. See this NutritionFacts video: http://nutritionfacts.org/video/is-milk-good-for-our-bones/
      .
      This is why I tell people who ask that fermented milk may be healthier than nonfermented, but it is still not a good overall food to consume as there are several other substances in milk that are associated with negative health outcomes.




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          1. lemonhead: You are our bookmark Queen! (or King!) I would love for Dr. Greger to re-address this question. I’ll see if I can get it on the list to address for the future.




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            1. Thanks!

              My speculation is that plant microRNAs might be available to / have biological activity in animals that eat them, but nothing to back it up.




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        1. lemonhead: Very, very interesting! And quite the head scratcher in terms of trying to figure out why fermented dairy seems to lead to less unhealthy outcomes compared to regular dairy.
          .
          Thanks for sharing.




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        2. When milk is Fermented with Kefir grains,the grains consume the Lactose and uses that to produce the most beneficial probiotics the gut needs. At the start of this video the doctor stated that T1B is an autoimmune disease, and probiotics cure autoimmune disease. Over 90% of diseases form in the gut because of Dysbiosis. Savy?




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          1. hi geo, in my dairy-consuming days I did enjoy kefir, but I truly enjoyed the unexpected health turnaround to the good when I dropped dairy entirely from my diet. At my local health food store I have seen water kefir grains for sale but I have not tried using them. Have you tried making kefir with water?




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    2. Roxy: To add to Thea’s comments, fermentation doesn’t destroy casein; it simply denatures casein, resulting in the semi-solid nature of yogurt. If you drink milk. the hydrochloric acid in the tummy does the same to casein.




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  2. SPOILER ALERT
    “…Icelandic milk has been found to have different protein composition than milk from other cow breeds which may play some part in lower incidence of diabetes in Iceland than in neighbouring countries,” says Guðný Steinsdóttir, spokesperson for Mjólkursamsalan, the largest milk distributor in Iceland. According to Statistics Iceland, the country consumes a staggering 183.1 litres per capita of milk products yearly, one of the highest milk consumption rates around world just barely behind Finland, trailing by only 0.8.” – http://grapevine.is/mag/articles/2008/09/03/iceland-got-milk/

    “These cows, often known as “Viking” cows, can be traced to the settlement of the country in the ninth century, which is also true for the Icelandic sheep and goats in the country. No new livestock have been introduced to the country in centuries. This kind of isolation gives the milk from these animals a different composition as well as a noticeably sweeter flavor.” – http://culturecheesemag.com/blog/world-cheese-culture-iceland

    I would seem that the protein composition of the milk from Iceland’s heirloom breed of dairy animals are significantly different from those of more modern breeds goes a long way in explaining the anomaly. As T. Colin Campbell research suggests, Casein is a bad actor.




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    1. I’m trying to remember something from Nessa Carey’s The Epigenetics Revolution – something about fermented butter containing a lot of butyrate and some genetic disease that was suppressed in men from a certain Nordic country consuming lots of fermented butter. Could it have been Iceland? Amazon’s ‘Look Inside’ indicates the information is on around page 310, but it won’t let me see the pages.




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    2. Yes, the cows have been isolated for 1100 years and there are some differences in the milk.
      The Icelandic milk was significantly (p B/0.05) lower in b-casein fractions A1 and B and higher in the
      A2 fraction, lower in b-lactoglobulin B and higher in A (p B/0.001), had less than half in n-6/n-3 ratio and
      was higher in the very long-chain n-3 fatty acids and conjugated linoleic acid. It was slightly higher in
      saturated fatty acids. No significant difference was seen in the total amount of b-caseins, b-lactoglobulins or
      nitrates.




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    1. awesome bhrollin! we have lots to be thankful for.. the knowledge for healthful living, access to great food, and the skills to put it all together. happy holidays to you




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      1. I’m with you, bhrollin. For Thanksgiving dinner at home, I had a couple of persimmons, some Ann Wigmore Energy Soup with baby sunflower and pea greens, dark green lettuces, seeded cucumber and celery, purple sauerkraut and apples, with a tablespoon of ground soaked flax seed and some tomatoes stuffed with seed and nut cheese (walnut and pumpkin). Nothing cooked and eaten right after preparation.




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    2. Looks good, thanks for sharing :)

      I realized only after I made our Thanksgiving dinner that it was entirely vegan (though not all WF – I bought the Gardein roast; we’ve pretty much weaned ourselves off the ‘transitional’ processed foods except for every now and then); in previous years I had used some butter, milk and cream.

      I was very happy with how the green bean casserole turned out. I mixed some cooked green beans (sliced up ‘french style’) with a sort of barley risotto made with mushrooms, onion and cashew cream, topped off with toasted chopped pecans coated in a little bit of low-sodium tamari and onion powder.




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      1. There was a time that green bean casserole was as much an obligation on Thanksgiving as Turkey. However, this is the first recipe that I thought looked appetizing. I plan to shamelessly steal this one. Thanks for posting.




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        1. lemonhead’s casserole sounds awesome. Just an FYI for both of you, I really like the green bean recipe from the Vegan Casserole cookbook. Was a big hit.




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      2. That casserole sounds fabulous. I’ve never tried Gardein roast but I have tried one of the Field Roast products. I can’t remember which, but it was great. We even used to get the Lite Life “Turkey” slices (non fat and vegan) and eat them on Thanksgiving. I love just about any vegan food as long as it’s not too much fat and low added sugar. But since we switched to WFPB it kind of grows on you and that’s what you like best. I also like to eat whatever I grew a lot of. I usually do pretty well with butternut squash. This year, 109.




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        1. That’s a lot of squash! Really good from a nutritional standpoint – lots of magnesium, manganese, carotenoids, etc. My favorite variety is delicata. I keep bringing them up hoping to start a delicata squash craze so that they will be more available [it’s a new superfood! Just the right size for 2! They can be cooked whole in the microwave in minutes! You can eat the skin (and seeds)! They can be grown in planters and trellised!]. I know squash can keep a while, but do you freeze / preserve any? Can they be refrigerated whole for longer shelf life?

          I actually prefer the Gardein roast to real turkey; I used to have a cat that went absolutely crazy for roast turkey breast, but he was really the only one in the family that really liked it as opposed to the ‘fixin’s’ (once the turkey started cooking he would start running around the house, attacking his toys, etc.) Now if I had a choice between Gardein roast and duck, then I would have trouble keeping vegan.




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          1. lemonhead: I was first introduced to delicata squash in a whole plant food cooking class that I took. I’m not a fan of squash in general, but that squash definitely gave me a new look at the stuff. I’m still not the biggest fan in general, but I definitely give props to delicata. I support your movement! ;-)




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          2. Delicata is excellent. My favorite is buttercup, though you can’t eat the seeds. I’ve even eaten butternut squash skin on very well done squash. The problem with those squashes is that they don’t store well. You can freeze any vegetable well but it has to be properly blanched and kept at 0F. So it’s some amount of work and you have to have the freezer space. As far as pressure canning goes, I’ve done it but it overcooks them and they end up mushy. It would be fine if you use the squash in soup. Squash should be stored around 50F and in the dark. But absolutely not below 50F, so don’t refrigerate them. Acorn store pretty well also, but buttercup can easily store for 6 months. I’ve heard of them storing for even longer.




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            1. With the thicker meated winter squash such as butternut, sweat meat, banana, hubbard, can be cubed and peeled or not, put in a bag raw and freeze. When taken out of freezer either boil, steam or bake. Do not thaw before cooking/baking. It works great.




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              1. From a quick web search, it seems like a lot of people are doing just what you say with good results. And I know someone who freezes different things without blanching with good results. I don’t know how long before they use them though. But every agricultural extension service and university recommends blanching. I don’t understand this. I’ve read three reasons for blanching. To retain vitamin content, to retain vitamin C content, and to deactivate enzymes that cause the food to spoil. I didn’t think that berries needed blanching either. All very confusing.




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        1. Not really. Dr McDougall refuses to be described by the term vegan as vegans often consume very unhealthy diets. He therefor will not adopt a vegan lifestyle. He is a WFPB advocate and I’m doubtful that he really consumes any animal protein ever.

          Vegan also gives very little though to health. The entire vision is based on ethics alone (not science) and to them its a very big sacrifice to give up meat since they see it as part of the natural human diet. Dr McDougall is of the opinion that animal protein is not food for a human.




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            1. From the vegan philosophy “A philosophy and way of living which seeks to exclude—as far as is possible and practicable—all forms of exploitation of, and cruelty to, animals for food, clothing or any other purpose; and by extension, promotes the development and use of animal-free alternatives for the benefit of humans, animals and the environment. In dietary terms it denotes the practice of dispensing with all products derived wholly or partly from animals.”

              Veganism is based entirely on the ethics of sentient beings as a commodity. I generally agree with this, but there is more to the story. Some vegans have no issues living on potato fries and high fat foods, the exact thing a whole food plant based diet seeks to exclude. Most vegans will proudly tell you that they don’t care about their health and that its for the animals. There is no definitive vegan diet and new vegans often complain about health issues. A whole food plant based diet being the most natural diet for a human is very well defined and has only health benefits. Unfortunately in this manner, I see veganism as an irrational lifestyle.




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              1. I see nothing irrational about the content of the quote. One can certainly adhere to it and live a very healthy lifestyle. I suscribe to that view, try to base my diet on science, generally try to be rational, and have never felt I was sacrificing anything. Just because some vegans live unhealthy lifestyles, or are ignorant of the importance of eating a healthful diet. etc. does not justify labeling veganism as an “irrational lifestyle”.




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                1. Basically the point is that veganism tells people what not to eat, but does very little in terms of telling them what to eat. Soy based meat alternatives although healthier is not really required for a healthy lifestyle. People like Dr Mcdougall, Dr Greger, Dr Barnard and many others have done a great deal to actually tell people what to eat to attain health.

                  I am very happy that you base your diet on science, the sad reality is that the majority of vegans don’t and see it as little more than a noble cause.




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                  1. Riaan De Winnaar: re: “I am very happy that you base your diet on science, the sad reality is that the majority of vegans don’t and see it as little more than a noble cause.”

                    I’d have to see some numbers on this to believe it. Your claim does not reflect my personal experience. The majority of people I know who are excluding meat, dairy and eggs form their diet are doing so for health reasons first and only later adopt some of the ethical reasons as part of the reason for continuing.




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                    1. Only every vegan on social media I have ever conversed with. It’s easy enough to find the proof you require… Join any Facebook vegan page and ask the question why the members are vegan, for health, our planet or the animals.

                      As edited above Veganism doesn’t automatically mean healthy.




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                    2. Riaan De Winnaar: Can you see how “join Facebook vegan page” does not tell us very much about vegans in general? Perhaps ethical vegans flock to those pages as opposed to the people who flock to say NutritionFacts? Looking at what people say on a website is not very good evidence for making the type of claim you are making.

                      No one is arguing that veganism automatically means healthy. Neither is anyone arguing that junk food vegans do not exist. The issue is your sweeping statements about vegans in general. I would need to see a real study before I would believe your claims, since as I said, they do not mirror my personal experience.




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                    3. Vegans join vegan Facebook pages and therefore it would make a fitting study. Let you know how it turns out.

                      The claims as they stand are that vegans are ethically inspired and give up meat for animal welfare and that vegans aren’t automatically healthy. The vegan lifestyle as outlined in its principles is based on the ethical treatment of animals. I find that with humans, ethics are mostly negotiable. If anyone is capable of empathy, everyone is… And the same is true of apathy. Vegans do however, generally speaking, view themselves as ethically superior to meat eaters. I will add that if the natural diet of humans were a meat based diet and anyone stopped eating meat based on ethical reasons, it would be very ill thought trough… Pretty much every vegan I encounter does believe that humans are omnivores as does every human that consumes meat.

                      And it is also true that Veganism only specifies what not to eat… In other words, you could eat oreo’s for the rest of you life and be vegan (unless you want to be a palm oil free vegan, of course). Many foods are vegan and unhealthy. Most vegans don’t care. If the ingredient label is animal friendly its all good. These you’ll find to be the facts if you do your research https://uploads.disquscdn.com/images/1c0ceffc3cfbea583529f7547a11b233324b0c3940541ffc6bd897c4b8ddb04a.png .




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                    4. re: “Vegans join vegan Facebook pages and therefore it would make a fitting study.” You are missing the point. I think it’s called self selection bias. Anyway, there’s no discussion we can have if you don’t understand why doing a poll of vegan Facebook members is irrelevant to the question at hand.




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                    5. Actually “self selection bias” applies to your perspective here. I think vegans call it cognitive dissonance, where a person denies the facts because they them self form part of the target audience.

                      I am not saying that there aren’t healthy vegans. I am say however that veganism has never been a focus on health. Plant based is focused on health and the benefits to our Earth comes second. Animal welfare is a happy side effect from eating our natural diet. There are no junk food WFPB’ers ;)




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                    6. Riaan: You can see how self selection bias applies to me, but not to people who participate on a Facebook page which attracts/is dominated by ethically minded vegans???




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                    7. Hi Thea, I again was simply referring to the fact that you are denying that Facebook would be an effective means to ascertain why people are vegan because the result is conflicting with your opinion. Simply using nutritionalfacts.org to base your opinion on, is in fact self selection bias. Its obvious that people seeking health advice would join a medium dealing with nutritional health. Facebook though is a social media format. Humans are inherently social and people from all walks of life join this format.

                      I my self learned this the hard way, that I am in fact not a vegan. Veganism is an ethical lifestyle and possible health benefits and the impact on our earth is happy side effect. Basically I am stating that there are only ethical vegans and if your reasons are primarily health our ecological or scientific you are a plant based human.

                      So i am a plant based human, for my health and for this planet. That this is friendly to animals are simply also a happy reminder that eating my natural diet is also ‘coincidentally’ inline with my ethical believes. As stated previously, if someone is of the opinion that a human is a natural omnivore and requires meat for a balanced lifestyle (and seeks replacement in the form of soy meat replacements) but gives this up (the sacrifice) that’s an ill considered decision.




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                    8. Hi Thea, I again was referring to you denying that Facebook would be an effective medium to ascertain why people are vegan since the result conflicts with your opinion or perspective. Basing your entire perspective on those who join nutritionfacts.org is self selection bias. It is obvious that those seeking health advice would follow a medium that provides health advice. Facebook on the other hand is not a vegan medium nor a health medium nor an ethical medium. Its socially based and people being inherently social organisms join Facebook. Vegans among them or those living vegan lifestyles then join vegan groups. So the issue here is not that “Ethical Vegans flock to Facebook”.

                      I am a plant based human, I eat this way because, contrary to what i was taught, scientific investigation proved to me that we are biological herbivores and by eating an unnatural food source which is detrimental to our health we are also threatening life on this planet. Veganism has always been about ethics and never been about health. So if your reasons are primarily health, ecological or scientific and not the ethical treatment of animals you are not in fact a vegan and that should not be an insult to anyone.




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                    9. Riaan: You misunderstand me. I never said that Facebook was invalid *because* of my personal opinion or perspective. I’m not the person making sweeping statements about vegans. That was you. I never even said that Facebook was invalid because of my personal experience. And neither did I say that my entire personal perspective is based on those who join NutritionFacts (far from it). Since I don’t think effective communication is happening here, there isn’t much more that can be said.




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        2. yes nc54, I recall hearing or reading dr mcdougall describe eating the turkey dinner and trimmings every other year at his daughters house when it was their turn to host the holiday dinner. They have since become wfpb for the most part, so dinner is turkey-free now last I heard.




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    3. Brown rice is high in arsenic and not a high nutrition food. Sweet potatoes are much more nutritious but if you going to insist
      on rice consume black rice.




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  3. It would be wonderful if preventing Type 1 diabetes was as simple as avoiding dairy. One mother has put together a wonderful website on all the possible environmental causes of T1D and her personal experiences with the condition. “We avoided dairy, gluten, and other allergenic foods with my youngest child, both while I was pregnant, and in his first few years of life. He breastfed exclusively for 6 months, and for a few years afterwards. He still developed diabetes.” http://www.diabetesandenvironment.org/home/other/diet/wheat-dairy




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            1. I can help you with the math but giving you some common sense is a different problem.

              But I really do not care to carry on this conversation with you so pester someone else…bye :-)




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          1. Richard: Several of your posts have been inappropriate for this site. Please review the posting rules for this site – by clicking the green Comment Etiquette button at the top of the page. This is your warning. — Moderator




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          1. As the video states, twins with the same DNA only progress to type 1 diabetes 50% of the time. Now I’m not sure how your logic works, but if 1 off 2 twins (that’s 2 people with the exact same DNA) can avoid the disease, its 100% avoidable. Do you really want to argue the evidence?




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    1. “We avoided dairy, gluten, and other allergenic foods with my youngest child, both while I was pregnant, and in his first few years of life. He breastfed exclusively for 6 months, and for a few years afterwards. He still developed diabetes.”

      Cows milk is for cows and should not be avoided for the first few years of life, best avoided lifelong.




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  4. Did any of you watch Betrayal? It was a seven-part documentary about autoimmune conditions, their causes, what to look for in tests that show the developing problem well in advance of symptoms, how to find solutions. It concerned a most complex problem and included many world expert doctors and researchers. I only saw bits of it, and later wished I’d seen it all, but I didn’t buy the DVDs. It was certainly thought provoking. There were a lot of patients who had gotten their lives back after being devastated by serious conditions like rheumatoid arthritis, lupus, Hashimoto’s Thyroiditis, etc. etc.

    It talked a lot about the microbiome and how it becomes damaged and out of balance by our diets and the unregulated proliferation of chemicals that permeate our world. Most, if not all, of the doctors interviewed, had found leaky gut to be a common denominator among all autoimmune diseases. It seems the undigested proteins that leaked into the bloodstream would cause one disease or another depending on which of the body’s organs they became attached to. I don’t fully understand the chemistry of that part. But all of those working with patients successfully concurred on leaky gut being the origin of all autoimmune conditions.




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      1. These materials are full of marketing speak. They sound like someone trying to make a profit rather than an earnest attempt to inform the public.




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      2. Thanks Joe! Did you watch it? I don’t think any or many of the docs recommended WFPB, but they definitely recommend lots of veggies, fruits, and fiber, and since I didn’t watch the whole thing I’m not certain.




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    1. hi Rebecca, the idea of that series sounds fantastic, and just the type of thing we enjoy watching. When I read about it though , the interviews included drs perlmutter, mercola, hyman, and ilk. think I’ll pass, and look for similar topics on univ. of calif tv.




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      1. Susan, yes, they definitely had the marketing arm wide awake, and I’m with you on those doctors you mention, but I still found the two I watched had good information about things we all need to be aware of. And, for people who are still on the SAD, it would be an eye opener and perhaps a big step in the right direction. Sometimes we make changes incrementally, which may not be the best, but an interim program would be better than the way most people eat today.




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        1. Excellent points Rebecca, and I agree. The whole topic of gut health through life stages, autoimmune disorders increasing , and microbiome etc is fascinating to me. Even in the brief discussions about it here on this forum has helped me put pieces of the puzzle together in my own life. (I got off prescription proton pump inhibitors after 10 years ! yaaaah!) Anything we can learn to prevent these conditions, or to heal them in first stages would definitly be a big step in the roght direction. Thanks Rebecca
          If I do come across a good video or lecture on these topics I’ll be sure to post them.




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          1. When I think about how long I’ve been interested in and reading on nutrition subjects, making improvements all along the way for 50 years – and yet I only learned about Colin Campbell’s work, Dr McDougall, Dr Esselstyn, Dr Greger, and all the others who advocate WFPB eating in the last few years! So, if a person follows less than stellar advice, yet gets results, it sure beats what was happening to them during previous years. Most of those interviewed were fairly young when symptoms of rheumatoid arthritis, etc. began. All they knew to do was follow their doctors’ advice for drugs, and it didn’t help. Nobody even hinted they had power to arrest their disease or at least slow it and alleviate the pain and misery they were in through diet and lifestyle changes. Some of them took several years to even get a diagnosis.




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    2. Hi,
      I watched all 7 episodes, and i learned some useful medical details. But on the other hand they are promoting animal based diet, oils, some of them are pro-vaccines too, basically saying all grains are bad – they don’t consider different type of gluten, even some of the interviewed medical doctors and “cured” people are clearly not in a good health conditions.

      My bottom line about this 7 videos is that they say the half truth only(like Dr. Mercola) cause they try to reach wider audience-patients.
      I don’t blame them at all – but i won’t recommend them either.

      Contemplate 95% raw food – think about the millions of years bodily evolution before we had begun using fire.




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      1. I would love to see something about autoimmune diseases dealt with by the doctors we know about and admire on this forum. I’ve mostly seen only heart disease reversal, which is fabulous, but there are so many more problems out there in the world of hurting patients.




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    3. Like you, I watched some of it, but it was very paleo based and biased, there was not a single plant based speaker, and for me it missed the big picture because of my own experiences. If improving your diet some helps, why not utilize the BEST diet that has been proven to reverse even heart disease? I found that all the major health problems I had, and even all the “sensitivities” to different foods went away almost entirely ONLY when I cleaned up my diet and got all the oils, processed garbage and animal products out. A diet that improves some on the S.A.D. but still placates people with what they have learned to enjoy is not the answer and is cheating those who have the toughest issues. You may laugh, but I wouldn’t doubt the whole paleo idea was or is funded by the animal industries in light of the overwhelming proof from research that shows how harmful animal products are. Twist and dispute that fact to create doubt and feed preferences, demonize legumes as an alternate source of protein to reinforce it, and omit just enough to make people feel they are practicing self control and doing something beneficial, and then the final hook, to be part of the “club”, to belong…the new religion? Whatever, apparently it works.




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      1. I hear you and I agree, but still…I can’t help thinking of those hurting people who did get help. I, too, feel they could ditch the animal protein and oils, etc. and do even better, but at least they are no longer bedridden, in pain, unable to take care of their families and even themselves. And, of course they used the most poignant examples to make the films compelling.

        But think about this: Most people out there in the world don’t even know there are other forms of healing than what their MD orders: drugs and surgeries, along with all the side effects and harm they cause. At the very least, I imagine the films opened the eyes of many to realize their doctors don’t have a clue! So now they can begin researching for themselves to find new answers.

        I had a dear friend who had rheumatoid arthritis for many years. Her hands and feet were misshapen, and though she never complained and took few drugs, she had to be in pain a lot of the time. She read and researched about nutrition incessantly, saw all kinds of practitioners as well as MDs and did all the things she felt might help, but she never stumbled across WFPB in all those years, and neither did I. She died three years ago of congestive heart failure, after a second valve replacement didn’t work well. Later, after I learned about this way of eating, and how people who follow McDougall arrested rheumatoid arthritis, I was so sorry I hadn’t learned about it earlier. She would have given it a good try, and would probably even have gone to TrueNorth and fasted, but we didn’t have the best information. So I still see improvement as worthwhile, even if it isn’t the best. Perhaps it is a waystation on the road to even better.




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    4. Hi Rebecca, I think the series covered a lot of important information about autoimmune disease and its causes that many in the general public may not be aware of and conventional medicine does not acknowledge. On the other hand, as many on this site have already alluded to, there was a heavy bias toward paleo diets and elimination of grains. Unfortunately that is a bias that is prevalent among the Functional Medicine community and many of the experts featured in the series are involved in the Functional Medicine movement. I think one needs to know how to sift the wheat from the chaff (pun intended) when watching and listening to these types of docu-series. Many of the regulars who comment on this site are able to do this easily and can gain some insight and wisdom while discarding that which ought not be consumed. It sounds from your description above that you got from it some of the most important information I feel it delivered which is that leaky gut is a real entity which is at the root of most if not all autoimmune diseases. I would caution against taking everything in any series such as this as gospel truth but I also caution against throwing the baby out with the bath water. I’m both a WFPB eater as well as a Functional Medicine practitioner. I was WFPB first and in studying FM I have come to know many things I never would have known otherwise (the concept of intestinal permeability and it’s relationship to autoimmunity being one) and that knowledge has improved my understanding of why a WFPB diet works so well.




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      1. Yes, it’s wonderful to know that I’m not the only one who landed here after a period of time, trying other things, seeking better and trying to learn the value of everything while tossing out the chaff.

        I was aware of leaky gut for years before I learned about WFPB, but had not really understood that it seems to be the connection between all autoimmune conditions.

        Years ago I followed an elimination diet to verify the results of skin allergy testing, which I understood was not all that accurate. At the time I got some reaction or other every time I reintroduced a starchy food. Rather than go through the whole list I stopped all starches and the terrible hay fever I’d suffered for three miserable months each year since I was 12 disappeared. Gone! Gone for over 20 years.

        Then I read Dr McDougall and he convinced me to try starches again. I mean, who doesn’t like ’em? Over the years I had been eating some starches, but didn’t make them a major part of my diet, and still the hay fever stayed away. But, three months after eating much more starch, the hay fever started to get show its’ ugly face again. Not like when I was younger, but enough so I had to pop a few Benadryl two summers ago. Last summer it was a little worse. So I’m going to be very careful, especially with grains to see just what affects me and what doesn’t. We are all so different. Sometimes we have to find our own way through the jungle. Even in the best of research, results are seldom 100%. Some people are exceptions. We can be allergic or sensitive to things that would otherwise be most healthful. So, while I don’t ever plan to go back to animal protein, I try to learn where I can and keep as open a mind as I can without spilling my brains out the hole!




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        1. I couldn’t agree more. I had a similar experience with hay fever and wheat (actually white bread) and I discovered it is dose related. I can get away with a little on an infrequent basis but too much too frequently will set off my symptoms. I also found that I didn’t have the same problem when I ate a whole grain bread like ezekiel bread so it clearly wasn’t necessarily a wheat/gluten thing but rather more likely a processed flour thing. Although I had learned that experientially, it made perfect sense when I began studying FM and learned about IGG food sensitivity and how it’s a delayed response that is dose dependent. In any case I encourage you to keep at it, we’re on the right track.




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    5. Rebecca Cody, I watched all 7 episodes. There was some good stuff in there, but you really had to sift through a lot to get at it. I’m a firm believer in “Don’t throw the baby out with the bathwater”. Sure there were some paleo docs interviewed–so does that make every last morsel of information wrong?




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  5. A couple of years ago I told one of my colleagues (pediatrician) about the link between milk and type 1 diabetes in children – he stubbornly refused to accept it.




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    1. I’m a WFPB person who has LYME disease that is driving me and family members crazy with the ongoing symptoms of nausea, brain fog, joint aches etc. (test confirmed, refuse antibiotics). Doc what else can I do nutrition wise to help my symptoms. Perhaps Dr G can address this type in a separate video. I’ve searched his site and have his book. It seems like I’ll have to do MORE nutrition wise but just don’t know what. I know this is off topic and I apologize but didn’t know how to get this in a discussion.




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      1. Unfortunately many of the chronic infectious diseases such as Lyme are very resistant to treatment. It appears in some that the bacteria is able to sense a hostile environment such as antibiotics and surround themselves with a biofilm for protection. Dr. Greger has only one video on Lyme see http://nutritionfacts.org/topics/lyme-disease/ which is interesting but doesn’t offer many specific suggestions. There are several books on Lyme… I’m sure you are most likely familiar with some of them. I met and have read the writings by Dr. Jon Sterngold who has detailed his experience with chronic Lyme Disease. His story gives a good picture of the challenges and issues with treating Lyme. Good luck as you wrestle with your condition. I would work with interested and experienced clinicians and use caution.




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      2. The area where I live has very high Lyme Disease incidence. People with your list of symptoms often have another tick-borne disease in addition to Lyme. The only cases cured that I know of used serious multi-month antibiotic treatment. I know several people who live with Lyme Disease and attempt to manage the symptoms with herbs and supplements (such as resveratrol).




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      3. A friend of mine used a RIFE machine for Lyme. Unfortunately, we’ve been out of touch for aw few years so I don’t know how that worked out. I know she took a lot of supplements and did other forms of alternative therapies. I know that for a year or two she was convinced she was cured or, as she put it, post-Lyme, but I don’t know if she still feels well.




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  6. Very…very…very interesting. We see people avoiding inoculations for know diseases because of a fear they cause an illness that is yet to be shown in any study. Yet we have studies that show simple cows milk could be a link to Type 1 Diabetes? How is this possibly not more well known?




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      1. No, it makes me furious! In fact, I wish Dr G could do a video especially for moms and moms to be who still believe milk does a body good, and condense ALL the many reasons it does the opposite, and why the bogus message is still out there bigger than ever. I need to share it with a few moms who think I’m the crazy grandma with a mental ‘protein deficiency’! I just learned Dr Spock encouraged a vegan diet in his last update of Baby and Child Care, which sure would have swayed me back when, so worth a mention too. If it could help prevent even one case of T1, it would be worth it!




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        1. I asked the Dairy Farmers of Canada to answer some questions about milk , they don’t return phone calls and I have not received a reply from my email with the question is milk good for my bones , I also sent them a link to Dr. Gregers video of March 16th 2015 asking that same question




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    1. Mike, when I was in University I learned about this association 30 years ago. The Dairy Industry is very, very powerful and has a lot of money to confuse the issue.
      My two siblings contracted Type I as toddlers. Both are gone now after dealing with this nasty disease their whole lives. It is simply unconscionable, in my opinion, that this scientific information is not taken seriously.

      But money is always the trail to the truth.




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  7. Well, if type I diabetes usually starts at people under 20, then they kept the same genes and probably the same diet as when they were younger.




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  8. I believe its what those cows have been fed that is causing not only diabetes but many more autoimmune conditions. When you feed an animal grains that are not part of their natural diet it makes for a sick animal that passes this into not only its milk but its meat as well. Cows eat grass not grains. Grains are fed throughout our food supply to animals because its subsidized by our government making it basically free for the industries to feed those animals. I get severe symptoms eating animals fed grains as well as milk the comes from cows not fed a proper 100% grass diet. BTW 99% of the corn is GMO that is technically a pesticide.




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  9. Can you do a video on grass-fed meats. Much is being said that they have lower amounts of saturated fat and cholesterol, but what’s does the science say about grass-fed?




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    1. hi Percy, well, in this video we see that the science says the upper tolerable intake for saturated fat, trans fat and cholesterol is zero. http://nutritionfacts.org/video/trans-fat-saturated-fat-and-cholesterol-tolerable-upper-intake-of-zero/ With this in mind, ‘lower’ is not helpful.
      And since a beef cow is still a cow, whether finished in a feed lot or out in the back field we still incur the hazards of eating meat regardless.

      This amazing array of informative videos and articles fully linked to research will give you some idea of the benefits we have in avoiding animal foods and embracing a whole foods plant based lifestyle http://nutritionfacts.org/topics/protein/




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    2. Percy10121: This reply is not to take away from your request to have NutritionFacts do a video. In the mean time, I hope this information will be helpful to you:

      It’s a fair question. Here’s my answer: “Just eat grass-fed” argument is similar to the “just eat organic meat” or “just eat wild” arguments. re: Is meat always bad for our health? Yes, and I’ll give some evidence below. But I first want to say that people can make a relatively legitimate argument that organic or wild animals are healthIER to consume compared to conventional. But that doesn’t make them healthy. Making such a statement is like saying that a Snickers bar (a candy bar with peanuts) is healthier than a Milky Way bar (essentially a Snickers without the peanuts). Yes, the peanuts make the Snickers marginally healthier, but the inherent problems with the sugar and fat and highly processed ingredients in the candy bar do not go away just because the “food” also has peanuts (a very healthy food) in it.

      Whole animal products, regardless of how they grew up, are going to have animal protein, saturated fat, cholesterol, and more contaminants than their plant counter parts. Well respected forum participant, Darryl, once wrote: “Many of the constituents of animal foods of most concern are also present in organic, grass-fed, free-range, lovingly stroked animals too. Organic dairy milk will have high levels of leucine and microRNA-21, for example. Its intrinsic to milk’s biological purpose.”

      If eating modern factory farm animals and “processed products” as you put it were the only problem, then people who ate animals in the 1920’s would have been fine. But here’s what Healthy Longetivity has pointed out/quoted: “In Nutrition Past and Future, Plant Positive reviewed a number of high quality studies that strongly contradict the claims of low-carb advocates such as Taubes. These studies include the observations from the China Study and numerous earlier observations in China that are in general agreement with Dr. Colin Campbell’s findings. For example, the observations that the nomadic Sinkiang in northern China who consumed diets rich in organic grass-fed animal foods experienced a 7 fold greater incidence of coronary artery disease than the Chinese living in Zhoushan Archipelago who consumed a diet much richer in plant based foods. These findings resemble even earlier observations from the 1920’s of the nomadic plainsmen in Dzungaria in northwest China and across the border in Kyrgyzstan who consumed enormous amounts of organic grass-fed animal foods and experienced severe vascular disease at young ages.”
      to see the Plant Positive’s video that Healthy Longetivity is talking about: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ioadYLEho8M

      Here is an article on the topic article from Susan Levin, MS, RD, director of nutrition education at the Physicians Committee for Responsible Medicine (PCRM), a Washington, D.C.-based nonprofit organization dedicated to promoting preventive medicine. Ms. Levin researches and writes about the connection between plant-based diets and a reduced risk of chronic diseases, including cancer, diabetes, and heart disease. http://www.forksoverknives.com/will-switching-to-organic-meat-dairy-and-eggs-save-your-health/

      And Tom Goff has pointed out that in Uruguay for example where all beef comes from grass fed animals, the more beef eaten, the higher the rates of cancer.

      ———
      What do you think? Is this compelling information?




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      1. We notice much, if not most of the misinformation floating around is due to frantic dis-information campaigns by industry to cloud and dispute mounting scientific evidence– if not challenge the credibility of science, itself. The dis-information efforts warp into industrial scale, for example, when science informs public policy debate on climate change.




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    3. Percy, I was convinced of the need for pastured meat, fowl and wild caught fish, properly raised eggs, etc. along with lots of veggies and fruits. So for two winters I bought a quarter of a cow that was raised right, butchered and hung, etc. I bought only local organic chicken and eggs, etc. Then came the cancer diagnosis: a large breast cancer that has NOT been detectable a year earlier. It was only after that that I discovered how all animal protein stimulates the growth of cancer, and that milk protein is probably the worst offender. That was almost seven years ago and I’m well, but I’ll never go back to animal protein, especially not dairy foods.

      For a real education on the subject, read The China Study or watch some of the many Youtube videos by Dr. T. Colin Campbell. He researched the issue at Cornell and other places for 30-40 years, yet many doctors don’t even know about his very telling research results.




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  10. What if someone already has Type 1 Diabetes? Will continuing to eat dairy products cause them any addition problems above the problems of consuming dairy that affects any individual?




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    1. Good question Sara. I do have T1 diabetes and eliminating all animal products has been extremely important. Given that my beta cells are history, further destruction there is not an issue. However,,,, insulin resistance in T1 diabetes is of prime importance as it is associated with greater muscle atrophy than with non diabetics.
      The milk avoidance also is extremely important for avoiding CAD and we diabetics have greatly elevated risk of heart disease due to elevated advanced glycation end products. We produce the AGEs with a higher a1c but we also consume them with any animal products including milk. The AGEs in turn increase insulin resistance. And they are also important in heightening atherosclerosis. The animal proteins are particularly heavy not only in casein but other branched chain amino acids as well. It has been shown that there is a symbiotic relationship between the activities of branched chain amino acids and saturated fatty acids to produce insulin resistance.

      So back to your question of whether milk is worse for a t1 diabetic than anyone else. I will argue that yes it is but at least we don’t have to worry about developing t1 diabetes. I have lowered my insulin needs by 25% by eliminating all animal food from my diet and by lowering the AGEs from diet and maintaining good control, I come close to having a reasonable life expectancy.




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      1. Stewart: Awesome answer! I think you have helped others in the past with similar information. The best I could have done was vaguely talk about a poster who was able to lower his insulin after cutting out animal products… Your first person experience answer was way better. And cool. Thanks for taking the time to do that.




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    2. Hi Sara – Thank you to Stewart. And to add to the information you’re seeking if consuming milk can be further damaging, the answer is a resounding yes! Don’t forget Dr. G. very recent information on bovine leukemia virus found in virtually 100% of milk vats (where the milk gets dumped before treatment and bottling) in this country. BLV has now been isolated in breast cancer tissue via University of California-Davis:
      http://www.doyoudubonnet.com/about.shtml
      Having Type I is bad enough. . . I’m assuming one would rather not have breast cancer as well.

      I prefer to think of it this way: Even cows don’t drink cows milk past infancy. And THEY are perfectly healthy. Why would human beings drink it at any time?
      If you haven’t read Dr. Campbell’s (T Colin) book “The China Study” yet, I encourage you to waste no time. Also “Whitewashed: The Disturbing Truth About Milk and Your Health” – Joseph Keon.
      Youtube:
      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NRimJqx392g




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      1. Sarah, I also forgot to mention that cows milk contains rBGH:

        rBGH is a genetically engineered artificial hormone injected into dairy cows to make them produce more milk. Despite opposition from scientists, farmers and consumers, the US currently allows dairy cows to be injected with recombinant bovine growth hormone (rBGH), also known as recombinant bovine somatotropin (rBST).

        Should you contract an estrogen positive breast cancer your physician will tell you to stay away from an phytoestrogens in the diet – such as tofu (they will mention). But they NEVER mention that cows milk contains not only natural cows hormones but additional hormones injected into the cow by the dairy industry.
        Thank you.




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  11. I think T. Colin Campbell, the Cornell nutritional biochemist, pointed out infants under 3 months have leaky intestines so partially digested cows milk (cows milk is for calves!) results in compounds which are similar enough to islets of Langerhans for the immune system energized by the cows milk compounds to also attach the islets of Langerhans. I’m a computer engineer so this is way out of my field.




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  12. I developed Type 1 diabetes when I was 34 and was breast fed for several months as a baby. This seems to go against the theory that drinking breast milk at an early age is protective. I’ve been watching some webinars about toxins as the cause of autoimmune diseases. Anyone know why I might have developed Type 1?




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    1. Hi Judy. I do not think that breast feeding for a few months is absolutely protective since milk exposure later can also allow the ‘foreign” milk protein to enter the blood stream undigested and provoke an immune reaction, which, as Dr Greger says, catches the pancreas in the crossfire. Some people are more genetically predisposed to autoimmune disease, and often such people have more than one, like celiac disease, thyroid, vitiligo, etc…One of the prevalent theories, which you have probably heard of, is the “leaky gut” theory, where incompletely digested proteins leak from the small intestine into the blood stream and cause immune reactions. The gut can become leaky in the presence of infection and also some toxins and even food additives. I don’t know if it will ever be possible to find out exactly why you developed type one diabetes. The main thing is to take care of it. apart from standard treatment, you may want to read Dr Joes Fuhrman’s writings on the subject, if you haven’t already. He goes into detail about the use of a plant based whole food diet, and exercise, to reduce insulin needs even in type 1, and reduce long term diabetes complications.




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    2. Judy I was just about to bring this up when I saw your comment. I developed T1 at age 21. Actually I started with the symptoms about my 21st birthday. I have worked with two individuals who developed T1 at 47 and 35 respectively. So I believe this is rapidly getting to be a very important question.

      I might well have developed it in the Navy because of agent orange exposure though I cannot prove that. But assuming that is true what about you and the other two I mentioned. I haven’t seen studies on this but it seems to be a growing epidemic.
      My hypothesis is that our diets are becoming worse all the time due to dead animal and animal juice being constantly promoted as associated with the “good life”.

      Other than the T1 diabetes, at about age 59 I developed psoriatic arthritis. When faced with something to suppress the immune system as a way to control the condition, I started looking seriously at the science of nutrition and decided that with all the inflammatory factors in animal products, it couldn’t hurt to eliminate those factors. ( I particularly than this web site and the presentation of the science.) Within 3 months all residual symptoms were gone. I did not pay any attention to the which pro inflammatory factor as none of them looked healthy. So in eliminating all of them in so far a possible, I cured my arthritis and I can do mundane things like dance and snap my fingers again. And,,, I increased my insulin sensitivity by about 25%.

      So the issue is this; we have growing levels of auto immune disease of which T1 diabetes is only one. We could reduce the auto immune diseases by going back to the animal product consumption of 100 years ago. While that would certainly be a very good thing, it seems that a 90% reduction rather than a 30% reduction would be much better. So eliminating all animal products would be very good.

      Your development at age 34 is up for speculation as to the particulars. But it seems to be part of this growing onslaught of dietary pro inflammatory factors. Citrus, various grains, nightshade, nuts or soy might be a factor for some people but we know for a fact that 95% of those with auto immune conditions improve with an exclusive whole foods plant based diet. Half may show a complete cure.

      Given this point it seems absurd to look for the minor factors when the major and more probable one should be considered first. I am cured of arthritis. If I had only shown improvement with a diet change, I would then look for other factors and might find the additional tomato, potato or nut that would make the difference. Those drugs for auto immune conditions are nasty to say the least. (I am amazed that anyone would take them without exhausting every other possibility.)

      OK we got the condition. Now it is up to us to not let it be a disease.




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  13. Consider one crucial issue:
    The risk of Type 1 Diabetes is determined by several interacting factors, most important is genetic predisposition
    The interaction between genetic & environmental factors may trigger -and later promote- the disease process. This interaction may occur as early as foetal life (during pregnancy) !! … therefore some children get Type 1 Diabetes as early as 1 yr of age, around puberty (10-12 yr), or even as late as 65 yr of age. Still certain viral infections, cow milk and early (< 6 months) introduction of solid food are most suspected triggers.




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  14. Intuitively, new born babies are best fed mother’s milk for the first six
    months of life – rather than cows milk. Nonetheless, drawing a link between
    bottled cows milk and type1 diabetes is tenuous at best. Indeed there is some
    evidence of increased risk* in breast-fed infants, albeit this may be unrelated
    to the type of milk consumed.

    Other research** suggests environmental and genetic factors in the
    development of TD1, with the genetic factors being common to TD2. These genetic
    factors have nothing to do with cows milk.

    In the USA there is a huge disparity of TD1 incidence between racial
    groups. It is twice as high in whites, as blacks – with hispanics in between. In
    Australia, indigenous infants are more than twice as likely as non-Indigenous
    infants to have never been breastfed (17% compared with 7%)]. However, the
    incidence of TD1 is lower in these indigenous populations. The incidence of TD1
    in remote and very remote areas of Australia is also very much lower —only 7
    cases per 100,000 population compared with 11–13 elsewhere.

    The countries with the world-lowest incidence of breastfeeding (equally 1%
    ) are United Kingdom, Finland and Greece. Their incidence of TD1 are
    respectively 24.5, 57.6, and 10.4 per 100,000. This is a huge (500%) disparity.
    Again, it suggests something other than breast/bottle feeding as contributing to
    TD1 incidence.

    In many respects these figures also mirror the increased incidence of
    autism and allergies in white populations. It strongly suggests an
    environmental effect other than bottle feeding of cows milk. Perhaps the
    overprotective use of antibiotics, anti-bacterial/viral sprays and over-sterile
    home environment. Arguably, the maturing infant’s immune system is primed for
    exposure to bacteria and viruses. When denied this exposure in the first six
    months of life and when subsequently challenged, the adaptive immune response is
    inappropriate in genetically-susceptible infants. These ‘sterile’ practices are
    less common in undeveloped nations, some races, and remote regions. This appears
    to be protective against TD1. Notwithstanding some individuals develop allergies to milk proteins, I am unconvinced cows milk is the TD1 culprit.

    *http://www.breastfeedingprosandcons.info/breastfeeding-and-diabetes.htm

    **http://blogs.nature.com/freeassociation/2016/03/genetic-link-between-type-1-and-type-2-diabetes.html

    http://www.aihw.gov.au/WorkArea/DownloadAsset.aspx?id=60129550898

    https://www.dpmc.gov.au/sites/default/files/publications/indigenous/Health-Performance-Framework-2014/tier-2-determinants-health/220-breastfeeding-practices.html

    http://www.aihw.gov.au/WorkArea/DownloadAsset.aspx?id=60129550898

    http://www.sbs.com.au/news/article/2015/11/12/baby-formula-shortage-why-do-chinese-women-shun-breastfeeding

    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/10426365




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    1. It may be wrong to assume T1D has only one cause or culprit as you put it. Just like there can be a number of factors involved in CVD or cancer prevalence, there may also be multiple risk factors for T1D.




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    2. TIME OUT, PLEASE
      How did discussion of the weight of best research showing cow’s milk in high correlation with type 1 diabetes incidence morph into criticism of breast-feeding?

      Most of us understand this website’s mission to present the weight of best research, and not an intractable, universal position from Dr. Greger. In fact, he has been quoted as saying he has no “position” on anything, but follows the best research, wherever it leads. That research– at least, so far– leads very strongly in the direction of dairy products as a major cause of T1D.

      You will recall the usual smokescreen of delay and obfuscation arising from last-ditch efforts of the tobacco industry to put out flames of criticism– even to the point of paying the AMA to shut up about tobacco-borne cancer risk (with the tobacco industry funding, quid pro quo, the AMA campaign against Medicare). We should expect the same smokescreen from other industries threatened by not only new research, but re-examination of existing, even decades-old research that remains intensely relevant.

      Dr. Greger is persona non grata with industry and certain establishment figures for his inclination to point the finger where it belongs. We sense his exasperation, for example, about the fog of ignorance perpetuated by “authorities” about tobacco– it is a long, long list of rogues completely derelict in their duties.

      As you will agree, the ultimate issue is not how best to protect industry, but how to serve the public interest with medical science.




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    3. Pete Granger wrote, “I am unconvinced cows milk is the TD1 culprit.”

      Dr Greger clearly did not say or imply that bovine milk is the only culprit in type 1 diabetes either. He presented evidence that cow milk may be involved.

      Here is quote from Dr Greger’s 2nd citation (of Sources Cited):
      J Mol Endocrinol. 2013 Jul 12;51(1):R1-13.
      “This review provides an overview of some of the most well-known theories found in the literature: hygiene, viral, vitamin D deficiency, breast milk and cow’s milk hypotheses. Although the hygiene hypothesis appears to be the most promising, positive evidence from animal, human and epidemiological studies precludes us from completely discarding any of the other hypotheses. Moreover, due to contrasting evidence in the literature, a single factor is unlikely to cause an increase in the incidence of diabetes all over the world, which suggests that a multifactorial process might be involved.”

      By the way, the first citation in Pete Granger’s comment above is written by a person with an apparent agenda on breastfeeding who has a business school background and took a few courses in the life sciences. The author cites his superior intellect as his greatest qualification ( http://www.pollutionaction.org/ ).




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      1. Dr Greger may not have ‘implied milk is the only culprit in type I diabetes. However, I am responding to an evidence-based report he wrote headed ‘Does Casein in Milk Trigger Type 1 Diabetes?’. I think the report’s (undiluted) intention is quite clear from the title, if not its content. I explicitly responded to Dr Greger’s proposition in an evidence-based manner with a different proposition. I fail to see how anyone can criticize this unless ‘my’ hypothesis is scientifically flawed. The ‘casein hypothesis’ appears full of holes. The ‘hygiene hypothesis’ appears far less full of holes. This is not to say allergic responses to casein are not a contributing factor. But based on the evidence I presented it does not appear to be significant. I suppose there is an implied criticism from me that the evidence against casein was presented in a selective, that is, in a somewhat non-objective manner. This may be the product of an underlying assumption that animal produce is ethically and/or nutritionally bad for us. That may be sometimes true, but not exclusively so …especially in the case of cow’s milk. Incidentally, I very much enjoyed Dr Greger’s excellent report on soy produce/milk. If we accept his evidence (and I have no reason to doubt it) it may well be prudent for post monopausal women to replace cows milk with soy milk in their diet.




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        1. I agree that a lot of work needs to be done before the mechanisms are known. By the way, something in biology can be a trigger (perhaps one among many possible triggers) without being the main or initial cause of a disease. For example, under the hygiene hypothesis too much “clean living” can lead to a hyper-responsive immune system that could respond inappropriately to a foreign protein (a trigger) such as casein.




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          1. its a very good point gatherer. But it still does not explain the huge differential in type 1 diabetes incidence between countries and regions and races which (on face value) has nothing to do with the consumption of milk.
            Another possibility is that antibiotics in milk are passed-on to infants during a stage when their immune system is immature. Clearly, this is potentially problematic, but again, the broader demographics are not suggesting it is a significant problem.




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        1. Many people here are curious and enjoy the story of how biomedical knowledge is gained. Others have a scientific background and are just naturally curious. Hypotheses are interesting to us, and at times Dr Greger does a series of videos on one topic and the real mechanism of a biological process (at least as it is currently known) is not revealed until the final video.

          People who require absolutes are often uncomfortable with the scientific process.




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  15. This video is very confusing and Dr Greger is stretching things quite a
    bit, First of all, diabetes type 1 is genetic and has nothing to do
    with any diseases and what we eat. And secondly, the results are
    inconsistent at best. It happens in mice but not in rat, or it happens in
    some countries that drink milk but does not happen in other countries
    that also drink milk.




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    1. I suggest that you watch the video again and listen to what Dr G says. Your comment is confused. It seems to me that you have not understood what is being said.




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  16. This is so interesting. I was looking for a meta-analysis about dietary risk factors for IDDM, and all of the papers I skimmed through more or less conclude that even though there are several hypotheses, there isn’t strong enough evidence implicating one thing or another. The increase in bovine serum albumin (BSA) antibodies in children with newly diagnosed IDDM is suggestive, but not conclusive. I wonder if anyone has looked at the incidence of IDDM among childhood vegans?




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    1. Hi Sharon,
      I am a volunteer moderator for Dr. Greger and am happy to help. Great question! Specifically this video talks about type 1 diabetes in general, and the correlation with ingestion of casein at a younger age potentially harming the pancreas later in life (individuals may have different onset time for their diabetes diagnosis regardless of them all having casein as an infant, for example). With adult onset type 1, this is considering ‘latent’ or a delayed autoimmune reaction. The reason why the body can deal with the trigger early but only show symptoms later is not exactly known. Individuals have different genetic makeups to deal with harmful triggers (such as viruses, casein or other proteins, vitamin deficiencies, etc.) I hope this helps!




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    1. frank: Please review the video again. You missed some important information at the end comparing breastfed babies to formula fed including the cows milk proteins.
      .
      Dr. Greger is reporting on the studies available. There’s no agenda here. You may not make baseless accusations on this site.




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        1. frank: That’s a different topic than your post above. I’ll let someone else engage with you on the point you are trying to make now if they are interested.




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  17. Please discuss Lectins in one of your upcoming videos. This is a big talking point among Paleo pushers. It is being used as a justification for avoiding grains and legumes.

    Thank you NutritionFacts.org team for all of your important work.




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    1. Jack Hall: This post is not to take away from your request for a video from Dr. Greger. I think such a video would be a great idea. In the meantime, I hope the information below proves useful.

      —————————–
      I found one blog post on NutritionFacts which talks about lectins. Here is a quote:
      .
      “Modern paleo advocates claim that these foods weren’t part of Paleolithic-era diets, but new research challenges that assumption.5 They also argue that lectins naturally present in these starchy foods are harmful to human health. Consuming too many lectins can cause significant gastrointestinal distress. However, because legumes and grains are almost always consumed in a cooked form—and lectins are destroyed during cooking—eating beans and grains doesn’t result in lectin overload. Sprouting also reduces lectin levels in plants, although not as effectively as cooking. Generally, pea sprouts, lentil sprouts, and mung bean sprouts are safe to consume, as are sprouted grains, which are naturally low in lectins. Most larger legumes contain higher amounts and should be cooked.” from: http://nutritionfacts.org/2014/09/23/will-the-real-paleo-diet-please-stand-up/
      .
      Since I eat my grains and legumes cooked, I consider the lectin brouhaha to be much ado about nothing.
      .
      In the past, Tom Goff has posted some additional helpful takes on the subject. Here are some quotes from Tom Goff’s previous posts.
      .
      “…problem with such claims is that people in the past ate huge amounts of (whole) grains (compared to modern-day Americans). Some people still do. There is no record of such people suffering abnormally high rates of toxicity or inflammation-related diseases. If anything, the exact opposite is the case eg
      .
      “This meta-analysis provides further evidence that whole grain intake is associated with a reduced risk of coronary heart disease, cardiovascular disease, and total cancer, and mortality from all causes, respiratory diseases, infectious diseases, diabetes, and all non-cardiovascular, non-cancer causes. These findings support dietary guidelines that recommend increased intake of whole grain to reduce the risk of chronic diseases and premature mortality.”
      http://www.bmj.com/content/353/bmj.i2716
      .
      Further, reviews of the health effects of grain lectins do not support the wild claims found on the internet or sensational mass market “health ” books
      .
      “We conclude that there are many unsubstantiated assumptions made. Current data about health effects of dietary lectins, as consumed in cooked, baked, or extruded foods do not support negative health effects in humans. In contrast, consumption of WGA containing foods, such as cereals and whole grain products, has been shown to be associated with significantly reduced risks of type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease, some types of cancer, as well as a more favourable long-term weight management.”
      http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0733521014000228
      .
      Sure, it is possible to find toxic effects from grain lectins in the laboratory or in rat studies. You can find toxic effects from virtually anything if you design the study appropriately. Even water is toxic in high doses and specific circumstances. And you can turn such findings into sensational claims that garner a lot of publicity (and sales) – if you leave out all the evidence that does not suit your argument or book sales.”
      .
      And from another post:
      “The Paleo community attitude is certainly strange because there is evidence to show that humans in the Paleolithic period actually did eat legumes – and significant amounts at that – at least in certain locations and in the relevant season eg
      http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0305440304001694
      .
      However, it seems that once an idea becomes established in the Paleo canon it becomes sacrosanct and no mere inconvenient fact is powerfu l enough to overturn it.
      .
      On lectins and health specifically, blogger has summarised the (Paleo) argument like this:
      “There is evidence that legumes provide health benefits. There is speculation that lectins cause diseases. Unfortunately, the autoimmune diseases some speculate are caused by legume lectins appear to occur more frequently in nations like the U.S., where legume consumption is rather low, than in Asian nations, where legume consumption is higher.”
      http://donmatesz.blogspot.com/2011/08/legumes-neolithic-or-not.html




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      1. What an amazing response! Thank you so much for taking the time to put that together! Wow, I’m blown away.

        Again, the work you all do is so important. Thanks so much.




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  18. One example of observation not being the cause is Alzheimer. So it is observed that Alzheimer patients have a lot of amyloid in their brain (plaque and tangle). So drug companies spent billions of dollars developing drugs that can remove these amyloid and they succeed. Problem is that Alzheimer is still there. So the plaque is the consequence of Alzheimer but not the cause.

    Likewise in this video, Dr Greger said that diabetes type 1 kids have a lot of bovine protein antibodies and so milk must be the cause. There are a lot of may be this, may be that in this video.

    How can Dr Greger turned an observation and speculation into a fact? If it is just a speculation then why make this video? Unless this web site will change its name to nutrition speculation.




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    1. You confuse the notion of research hypothesis with research results– amyloid beta plaque was hypothesized as a possible cause. The obvious method was to remove the amyloid beta, but that did not remove the condition of Alzheimer’s symptoms.

      At that point, researchers checked their methodology– (1) was enough amyloid beta removed? (the body continually generates amyloid plaque) (2) were these genuine Alzheimer’s symptoms? (cognitive deficit is not necessarily a sign of Alzheimer’s) (3) was the experiment of sufficient duration to yield accurate results? (4) Is there still another factor, which in combination with amyloid beta, produces Alzheimer’s– but neither amyloid beta nor the X-factor is necessary and sufficient, in itself?

      Researchers wanted to be sure they had the phenomenon they wanted to study as isolated and subject to experimental manipulation as they needed to reach their conclusion. The sequel is still more, continued study, to replicate their cautious finding, and if possible, further isolate other factors testable by experimental hypothesis.

      The same approach was used with medical research on causes of T1D, and bovine proteins popped up, not with a marginal influence, but with an astoundingly high correlation– in one study, an almost model linear correlation. To a researcher, this is a sign of a very promising direction, with much greater confidence in the validity of the research hypothesis. Based on study data, the correlation is not only strong, but very likely to be replicated easily.

      Dr. Greger merely reported the research, but clearly and accurately– he turned nothing into fact, as you put it. Nor are the studies, themselves, mere speculation, as you put it, but based on solid, scientific method. That you suggest the study is idle speculation, please permit the rest of us the idle speculation you have an agenda to push. If so, let us hear what it is.




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  19. Ah — you left a cliff hanger! Do title the second half, ‘The Icelandic Paradox’, so that those of us hanging on can quickly identify part two. Thank you again – great presentation and as always, excellently researched.




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  20. Would someone please post a link to the Icelandic Paradox that the good doctor alludes to at the very end of this video? Thanks in advance.




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  21. What about soy formula and type 1 and other autoimmune diseases in children? Is it possible that it’s all formulas, and not just cow’s milk, that set children up for these diseases?




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  22. I have to tell you , you are all gravely mistaken. Milk is a miracle gift from God and is mentioned some 50 times in the Bible. Our race would be non existent if it were not for the whole food of milk. The problem is, only ONE lifetimes ago (which seems like forever to us, but is just a blink of an eye in reality of time), the medical industry decided to pasteurize it which changed it into the devastating substance you find in grocery store today-I refuse to call it milk as it is a toxic white substance you all have come to know. The whole food is destroyed and you are left with indigestible, inflammation-causing poison.

    In the 1920’s (not long after pasteurization became the “thing”) Dr. Charles Porter wrote the 12th edition of the Milk cure for chronic Diseases. He healed 100’s of people with a fresh raw milk diet and rest alone. It has been digitalized to read from Cornell University. If anyone would like it, email me and I’d be happy to send it your way.

    Another good book is “The Untold story of Milk” which explains well what happened to our most precious food.

    The Milk Diet is still practiced in Germany and it is the basis for which the Mayo Clinic was founded.

    Visit realmilk.com to read more and find local dairies near you preserving the benefits of raw milk from non-gmo grass fed cows.

    Raw milk is being studied as it is a CURE for cancer..look up nagalase and GcMAF.

    I have no ties to the dairy industry whatsoever, just spend my life researching total health for my family.

    God bless, and may you all find good health!




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  23. any new information on type 1 diabetes? my nephew is 14 and has been diagnosed. all I know that the pancreatic cells are still growing in his age so is there something we can do? how to stop autoimmune system from killing the cells?




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  24. So i have a family friend that recently got diagnosed with type 1 diabetes. She is in her forties, and generally very healthy. Her doctor says she got is as a result of an autoimmune response to the flu vaccine she had 4 weeks earlier, and that if everybody got a vaccine that both type 1 diabetes and MS rates would skyrocket, because they are becoming more and more comon after getting flu shots. Is there any research on this?




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  25. My grandchildren of 11 months was diagnosed recently with type 1 diabetes. Please send me more articles on how to manage it. Thank you so much in advance.Dr Greger I will really appreciate it very much if you can email it to me as soon as possible. My email address is drvbarangan@gmail.com. thanks again. Victor Barangan MD




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