How to Become a Fecal Transplant Super Donor

How to Become a Fecal Transplant Super Donor
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Below is an approximation of this video’s audio content. To see any graphs, charts, graphics, images, and quotes to which Dr. Greger may be referring, watch the above video.

“Virtually every day, we are all confronted with the activity of our intestine, and [it’s] no surprise that at least some of us have developed a fascination for our intestinal condition and its relation to health and disease.”

“Over the last years, the intestinal microbiota [our gut flora] have been identified as [like] a fascinating ‘new organ’” with all sorts of functions. Well, if the bacteria in our gut make up like a whole separate organ inside our body, what about doing an organ transplant?

What would happen if you transferred intestinal bacteria from lean people into obese people? Researchers figured that “rebalancing the [obesity-causing] bacteria” with an infusion of gut bacteria from a lean person might help. Now, they wanted this to be a placebo-controlled study, which for drugs is easy: give a sugar pill. But, when you’re sticking a tube down people’s throats and transplanting feces, I’m thinking, what do you use as a poop placebo—a poopcebo, if you will? Both the donors and the subjects brought in fresh stools, and the subjects were randomized to either get the donor stool, or get transplanted with their own collected feces. That was the placebo; you get your own back.

Okay. So, what happened? The insulin sensitivity of the skinny donors was up around 50; that’s a good thing. High insulin sensitivity means low insulin resistance—the cause of both type 2 diabetes and prediabetes. The obese subjects started out around 20, and after an infusion of their own feces, they stayed around 20. But, the group of obese donors getting the skinny similarly started out low, but shot up to near where the slim folks were.

It’s interesting; not all lean donor stools conveyed the same effect on insulin sensitivity, as some donors had very significant effects—the so-called super-fecal donor, whereas others had little or no effect. Turns out this “super-donor effect” is most probably conveyed by the amounts of short-chain fatty acid-producing intestinal bacteria in their feces, the food bacteria that thrive off of the fiber we eat. The short-chain fatty acids produced by fiber-eating bacteria may contribute to the release of gut hormones that may be the cause of this beneficial improved insulin sensitivity.

“The [successful] use of fecal transplantation has recently attracted considerable attention,” not only because of its success, but its capacity to prove the cause and effect relationship—that the bacteria we have in our gut can affect our metabolism. But, within a few months, the bacterial composition returned back to baseline; so, the effects on the obese subjects were temporary.

We can get similar benefits, though, by just feeding what few good gut bacteria we may already have. Say you have a shed full of bunny rabbits. Feed them pork rinds, and they all die. Yes, you can repopulate your shed by infusing new bunnies, but if you keep feeding them pork rinds, they’ll eventually die off as well. Whereas, even if you start off with just a few bunnies, if you feed them what they’re meant to eat, they’ll grow and multiply, and soon, you’ll be full of fiber-eating bunnies.

Fecal transplants and probiotics are only temporary fixes, if we keep putting the wrong fuel into our gut. But, by feeding prebiotics, such as fiber, which means “increasing whole plant food consumption,” we may select for, and foster the growth of, our own good bacteria.

However, such effects may abate once the high-fiber intake ceases. Therefore, our dietary habits should “include a continuous consumption of large quantities of high-fibre foods” to improve our health. And, if we don’t, we may be starving our microbial self.

Please consider volunteering to help out on the site.

Below is an approximation of this video’s audio content. To see any graphs, charts, graphics, images, and quotes to which Dr. Greger may be referring, watch the above video.

“Virtually every day, we are all confronted with the activity of our intestine, and [it’s] no surprise that at least some of us have developed a fascination for our intestinal condition and its relation to health and disease.”

“Over the last years, the intestinal microbiota [our gut flora] have been identified as [like] a fascinating ‘new organ’” with all sorts of functions. Well, if the bacteria in our gut make up like a whole separate organ inside our body, what about doing an organ transplant?

What would happen if you transferred intestinal bacteria from lean people into obese people? Researchers figured that “rebalancing the [obesity-causing] bacteria” with an infusion of gut bacteria from a lean person might help. Now, they wanted this to be a placebo-controlled study, which for drugs is easy: give a sugar pill. But, when you’re sticking a tube down people’s throats and transplanting feces, I’m thinking, what do you use as a poop placebo—a poopcebo, if you will? Both the donors and the subjects brought in fresh stools, and the subjects were randomized to either get the donor stool, or get transplanted with their own collected feces. That was the placebo; you get your own back.

Okay. So, what happened? The insulin sensitivity of the skinny donors was up around 50; that’s a good thing. High insulin sensitivity means low insulin resistance—the cause of both type 2 diabetes and prediabetes. The obese subjects started out around 20, and after an infusion of their own feces, they stayed around 20. But, the group of obese donors getting the skinny similarly started out low, but shot up to near where the slim folks were.

It’s interesting; not all lean donor stools conveyed the same effect on insulin sensitivity, as some donors had very significant effects—the so-called super-fecal donor, whereas others had little or no effect. Turns out this “super-donor effect” is most probably conveyed by the amounts of short-chain fatty acid-producing intestinal bacteria in their feces, the food bacteria that thrive off of the fiber we eat. The short-chain fatty acids produced by fiber-eating bacteria may contribute to the release of gut hormones that may be the cause of this beneficial improved insulin sensitivity.

“The [successful] use of fecal transplantation has recently attracted considerable attention,” not only because of its success, but its capacity to prove the cause and effect relationship—that the bacteria we have in our gut can affect our metabolism. But, within a few months, the bacterial composition returned back to baseline; so, the effects on the obese subjects were temporary.

We can get similar benefits, though, by just feeding what few good gut bacteria we may already have. Say you have a shed full of bunny rabbits. Feed them pork rinds, and they all die. Yes, you can repopulate your shed by infusing new bunnies, but if you keep feeding them pork rinds, they’ll eventually die off as well. Whereas, even if you start off with just a few bunnies, if you feed them what they’re meant to eat, they’ll grow and multiply, and soon, you’ll be full of fiber-eating bunnies.

Fecal transplants and probiotics are only temporary fixes, if we keep putting the wrong fuel into our gut. But, by feeding prebiotics, such as fiber, which means “increasing whole plant food consumption,” we may select for, and foster the growth of, our own good bacteria.

However, such effects may abate once the high-fiber intake ceases. Therefore, our dietary habits should “include a continuous consumption of large quantities of high-fibre foods” to improve our health. And, if we don’t, we may be starving our microbial self.

Please consider volunteering to help out on the site.

Icons created by Mourad Mokrane, Luis Prado, Renee Ramsey-Passmore, Alexander Smith, Creative Stall, Gan Khoon Lay, Jamison Wieser, and Gregor Črešnar from the The Noun Project.

Image credit: Newtown graffiti via flickr. Image has been modified.

Video credit: Avocado Video

Doctor's Note

We have shifted to a new look for our videos, pulling in motion graphics design specialists to help mix things up. This one was done by Avocado Video’s Lucas Kavanagh and Jesse Lupini. Lucas is a scientist passionate about finding innovative ways to communicate intricate concepts, who says he’s “excited to be working with NutritionFacts to help make peer-reviewed health information accessible to anyone.” Jesse is a director and producer with a love for science and education, who say she’s “thrilled to be working with NutritionFacts, a beacon of science-driven health information in a sea of online nutritional voodoo and pseudo-science.”

It’s up to you to tell us which team you like better. In the comments, please include your thoughts on the new look, and which format you like better.

In other words, which do you like better?

Please let me know!

And, if you or someone you know is an expert in motion graphics software, and would like to become team number five, please check out our Employment Opportunities page.

The microbiome is one of the most exciting research areas in medicine these days. For more, see, for example:

More on health sources of prebiotics in:

If you haven’t yet, you can subscribe to my videos for free by clicking here.

182 responses to “How to Become a Fecal Transplant Super Donor

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  1. YES!
    I like Lucas and Jesse’s style the best, by far.
    This I can show to my 91 year old parents, and to my university classes, and to community groups.
    (Suggestion: show the reference of each article all the time it is being discussed.)
    Especially great video topic today.
    Thanks for doing this work!




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  2. I like this (Lucas & Jesse) style the most. It is less visually distracting than the others which makes it easier to listen to the message.




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  3. While I liked a lot of the Lucas/Jesse style, rapid panning and zooming doesn’t help at all – IMO. Truthfully, I liked best the good old style from yesteryear.




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  4. In my opinion, this one is the best of the four experimental video styles shown recently, but only because it is similar to the old style that has been used successfully for the last several years. Although good, this one would not be a significant improvement over the old style, so not worth spending extra money on.

    I do think the diagrams and graphs in past videos are helpful additions to the voice and text, such as in this older video on insulin resistance:
    http://nutritionfacts.org/video/what-causes-insulin-resistance-old/

    BTW, regarding the content of the current video, by eating a high fiber diet, I’m able to make a “Donation” to the local sewage treatment plant every morning :-)




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    1. I agree pretty much with everything said here. (Except I have my own septic system.) This was the most similar to the old format. Maybe this was a little easier to read. Either way, this or don’t fix what ain’t broke.




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  5. I also like this video best but only because it is closest to the old style. The fewer bits of quickly moving text the better, I think. Nice to see bunnies back in the videos; remember the old “fact or fiction” bunnies? Maybe I’m the only hopeless one who’s charmed by low production values!




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  6. This is much better than the last few, less distracting, not dizzying , didn’t feel like watching a video game. Suggestion: please pause the title of every paper a little longer so the viewer can remember the first few words if she/he wants to find the reference in “sources cited”. I still prefer the original format, but if NF. org wants to fix what is not broken, this is the best fix so far, in my opinion.




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  7. I was completely plant based for about 11 months, mostly motivated by mr. Greger, and ended recently. The funny thing is, I was eating (black) beans every day and had huge constipation. It hurt to poop and it was extremely difficult to get the poop out. Immediately after I quit eating beans and I went back to eating meat, my poop came back to being perfect as it is supposed to be. Not sure what was going on. I’m sure there’s a lot more to it than eating a lot of fiber.

    Also, my vegan diet consisted of a lot of fruit supplemented with veggies and various bean dishes. It was always craving more fruit, probably because of the sugar high it gave me. I hated always craving more fruit and it being so hard to control my food intake. Now I’m back to eating meat and I’m no longer craving all the time. Also I actually enjoy eating again.




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    1. Drema, Black beans and beans in general have a high insoluble to soluble fiber ration. You would do well to eat a goodly amount of veg, fruit and some whole grains along with them. I too find that beans can be constipating when eaten in relatively high quantities. You also may have faired better if you rotated the type of bean you used. Black beans one day, pinto another, Great Northern a third, etc. etc.

      I also felt meat hunger when I initially transitioned to a vegan diet. During years of meat consumption, one’s body may become down regulated for the synthesis of certain amino acids such as creatine as suggested in this NF video, “Creatine Brain Fuel Supplementation” http://nutritionfacts.org/video/creatine-brain-fuel-supplementation/

      If you decide to give a whole foods plant base diet another go, see if amino supplementation relives you cravings. Good luck…




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      1. Thanks for the reply. The cravings weren’t for meat, they were for an endless amount of fruit (ended up eating several kg a day) and I think it was mostly because of the sugar. Being able to eat meat is just an added benefit for not being plant-based. I really enjoy the taste and texture of it. Unlike pretty much everything I was eating as in my whole food plant based diet. I didn’t hate it, but didn’t enjoy the diet either. Health is only important if I am enjoying it.

        And oh yeah another thing, I had the strong urge to pee about every 30 minutes on a whole food plant based diet. Again probably the sugar from all the fruit. This is acceptable when at home, but anywhere else it is hugely annoying to have to always find somewhere to pee.




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        1. Drema, Your fruit/sugar cravings my very well be due to either a candida overgrowth or some nutritional deficiencies. The need for frequently urinate while on this diet is more troubling because it could very well indicate that you are diabetic or pre diabetic. Either way, you owe it to yourself to visit your healthcare professional for evaluation with an explanation of your symptoms.

          The fact that you find yourself unsatisfied by a heavily fructiferous diet is not especial surprising because of fruit’s high water and sugar content. Whole starchy vegetable provide longer lasting feelings of satiety and can easily server as a foundation for a healthy WFPB diet.

          Of course, it is not the only avenue to those who what to eat WFPB. The following video, “Lose Two Pounds in One Sitting: Taking the Mioscenic Route,” outlines a dietary plan that used primarily non-starchy vegetables with some fruit and nuts. It is not as easy to implement as a starch centered diet, but it is highly nutritious and satiating if not more difficult to implement. Give it a viewing. I think that you’ll find it interesting… http://nutritionfacts.org/video/lose-two-pounds-one-sitting-taking-mioscenic-route/

          BTW, If you do turn out to be diabetic or pre diabetic, a WFPB diet is an excellent approach for managing, reversing and even curing the condition. See the following for more details: http://nutritionfacts.org/topics/diabetes/




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          1. If I had diabetes, should I also experience those symptoms (very frequent peeing) when I am not on a high fruit diet? Because I don’t. Even if I drink a lot of water all day. I also don’t have any weight issues. And I was on a WFPB diet for 11 months, and it didn’t change anything.




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      2. JC – I, too, still have meat cravings even after 9 years wfpb vegan. I will try the amino suggestion and thank you for that. I also use seitan products if I happen to have a craving. It helps me get over the hump and maintain my commitment to this lifestyle – I don’t want to fall off the wagon!
        I have learned to make my own seitan recipes and recently made a seitan ‘corned beef’ and cabbage boiled dinner for St. Patricks Day. It had all of the wonderful flavors, no animal protein or fat, and was absolutely scrumptous! And it satisfied my craving for this meal. I make my own seitan meals because the ones you find in the store have added oils that are unnecessary and just add unhealthy ingredients.
        I loved eating meat when I ate it. And now that I fully understand the entire scope of all of the ramifications, . . . – never again!




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          1. Thea – I developed the recipe myself. It’s not perfect, but it’s pretty good. Is there a way to take this off line somehow so I can share it with you?




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            1. Guest: The public site is the way to communicate. That’s fine that you do not want to post your recipe on line. No problem. Have a good day. :-)




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              1. My question about taking it off line was because the recipe is somewhat large and involved and I did not want to take up unnecessary space or burden others who weren’t interested. Thank you.




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        1. Guest, I’m all over a corned seitan recipe myself. Please do share.

          Your cravings for meat may very well be a satiety issue. You simple may not be getting enough calories, or the calories that you are consuming are being digested too quickly because of a relatively low fiber content. Consider adding more high fiber whole starchy foods such as whole grains, potatoes and sweet potatoes to your diet. You may find that it will do the trick for you. Good Luck

          BTW, I too loved me some meat while it was a part of my diet, but my pleasure from eating it started wane as it effected my overall health. I feel so much better being WFPB. Stick with it. You’ll figure it out.




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          1. Joe,
            I can do without your analysis and critique. I mentioned I am WFPB for 9 years and am happy with that. I’ve got my diet “settled” and I am satisfied. I don’t need your suggestion – as I see you do with virtually everyone who posts here. If we need your input, we can ask for it. Why don’t you give us all a break?




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            1. Guest: Joe Canner was trying to be helpful. I have found his posts to be appropriate and helpful, and I thought his reply to you was particularly interesting. You do not speak for this site. A post on a public site like this invites comments from others. Either refrain from posting or ignore replies if you do not find them helpful. – volunteer moderator.




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              1. Thank you. No I absolutely do not speak for this site. But I was personally analyzed and critiqued by another who does not know me or my life on any level. To clarify, I simply made it known that I have my personal situation under control and I do not need personalized critiquing from another. Thank you.




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    2. I also transitioned to a mostly bean and veggie diet (i’ve always loved beans) … I have increased my fecal deposits since ……. being T1 tho, I drink plenty of water .. any increase of fiber needs water to “make it flow” …. lol
      edit to add: ….. I’ve also added kefir to my diet .. couple oz. every couple days or so .. mostly when I remember.




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  8. best new video yet. production folks understood what they were presenting, as shown by the clever placebo graphic (empty capsule next to full capsule).

    Also the motion effects were less vertiginous.

    thanks for all the good work.




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  9. Here is my ranking in order of best to worst:
    1. Tyler. Simple and straightforward. Does not suffer from the dizzying Ken Burns effect that is in Lucas/Jesse or Daniel.
    2. Lucas/Jesse. The use of graphics to supplement Dr. G’s discussion is terrific. If the creators could eliminate the Ken Burns effect applied to printed pages that should be stationary, then this would be my number 1 choice.
    3. Daniel. The Ken Burns effect is dizzying. Printed text was not meant to cause this health problem!
    4. Julien. While there is no Ken Burns effect here, the text splitting and zooming completely distracts from Dr. G’s discussion.




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    1. Good analysis and comparison to Ken Burns effect (ie, judicial use of zooms and pans). I agree, too much use of motion – the zoom and panning stuff.




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  10. In this video, the fast movements in the first 44 seconds actually made me feel nauseous. However, I did enjoy the rest of the video with the graphs and pictures (poop samples wrapped up in bows!). So if the pages moved in and out more gradually, and the camera panned more slowly, I’d be happy with this format. I still see nothing wrong with the original videos and have a fondness for them.




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  11. This is off topic – a question for the techies among you. I always get closed captioning with Dr G’s videos, and I don’t like it, and find the captions in the way of what’s in the background. But I don’t know how to turn it off. I use Google Chrome with a Chromebook. Can anybody tell me how to get rid of the pesky captioning?




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  12. In my opinion, this is the best video presentation among the most recent ones. Thank you for your good work, Doctor and your team.




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  13. The visuals in this video are very well done! Lucas and Jesse did a great job! No queasy feeling this time. Simple and easy to follow.




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  14. This is best of the lot. It has the cleanest representation of the cited studies as well as the most visually clear original graphics. Other animators used poor supplementary typography (green type in Julien’s), intrusive highlighting techniques, or overly animated animations. This one is better on all those fronts. And it shares has Dr. Greger’s sense of … whimsy?




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  15. Revisiting Tyle’s style, I found it on par with Lucas and Jesse’s (my favorite) with one exception. I don’t care for pieces of graphs, etc. coming in from multiple directions. This visual playfulness simply distracts me from thinking about the content. In a couple of places I found the movement too fast, which if done a lot makes me feel queasy. But the same thing happened in, as I recall, one place of the current one. I also like to be able to read the entire text surrounding a highlighted portion (not possible with Tyler’s style). Sometimes I pause the video at those points to read more than the highlighted parts.




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  16. I’m another fan of the old style. But whatever style you go with, please make the text elements of the videos stationary most of the time so that they’re easy to skim while watching.




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  17. I liked all the new video techniques, but I liked each one more than the previous, culminating in today’s. So in order from good to great, here is my ranking:

    good – Daniel’s style in Should Vitamin D Supplements Be Taken to Prevent Falls in the Elderly?
    better – Tyler’s style in Benefits of Green Tea for Boosting Antiviral Immune Function
    even better – Julien’s style in Dangers of Dietary Supplement Deregulation
    wow! – Lucas and Jesse’s




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  18. I liked todays videos out of the four styles the best. I enjoyed the little graphics along with the information.

    The most noticeable difference I found was the pace of the graphics in this were easier on the eyes. opposed to the other styles where too much time is spend on changing between slides. Before I could focus on the information being shown it was being enlarged and moving around then changed, so the other three styles made it difficult to focus. In todays video style the journals were stationary and the slides changed fast without stealing focus through graphics and the timing seemed to add up to a more comprehensible flow.

    Personally, I can’t sit through 3D movies or action scenes with too much movement, and I think there’s many people who feel similar. Now that these are 3D but comparing the 4 styles, I think less is more in terms of graphics so the science is the real focus.

    Keep up the great work!




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  19. Nice, new video format!

    Only criticism is when moving/sliding from text to another part of text it generates a nystagmus which starts the feeling of nausea within me, but this abates when text is not moving/sliding across the screen. This doesn’t occur when scanning from text to images or back only when scanning from text to text parts of the document being represented in the video.

    Newer eduVideo style keeps my interest but I found myself not able to follow your oration when the above movement/sliding occurred.

    Keep up the great work! Also thank you for the kind card and wildflower seeds! You are truly one of a kind. Thank you!
    Jim




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  20. This is the best one so far. However, the movement in all formats (including this one) is extremely distracting. Keep the yellow highlighting, underlining and other notations. Lose the movement. It does not add to the presentation and makes it very difficult to follow. Perhaps this is an age thing. I am 65 years old, and my eyes just can’t focus on the movement quickly enough to see the content. It’s just an annoying and distracting blur. I spend so much effort trying to focus on the ‘moving target’ that I miss both the screen content and the voice information. Please keep the old format. Thanks.




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  21. The video presentation today, March, 24 , 2017 was very effective at presenting the causality of Dr. Greggers message. Ans since the point is to get a lasting effective mins message to get people aware and possible change their eating habits. Lucca and Jessie Mastered that one!
    I eatch all the presentations l, or read them daily as Dr. Gs way of life has changed mine
    My vote is for today’s team. Tbe others are good but do not grab the attention like Lucca and Jessies




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  22. Also a fan of this one in particular. Long time graphic and instructional designer and former Adobe employee- super impressive quality here.

    A fave subject by the way! Well presented, easy to follow. Plus, rabbits.




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  23. I have a subject request for Dr. G and the team. Since today’s subject is on probiotics and gut information, could you please revisit the subject of fermented foods. The last video I remember is the one titled “Kimchee” which was a definite no, don’t consume. But when I checked the references on this video to read for myself, here’s what I found:
    “three items (salted mustard greens, salted fish and salted pork meat) showed significant mutagenic activity in cell micronucleus test (Yuan and Ding, 2003). ”
    Since this video was produced, the World Health Organization (WHO) has come out with a very strong statement that processed meats are cancer causing and should not be consumed. The salted fish and pork would qualify as processed meats since it contains salt (which we can epidemiologically connect with gut cancers) but also meat protein (which we can also epidemiologically connect with gut and other cancers). The kimchi video
    http://nutritionfacts.org/video/is-kimchi-good-for-you/ is now 7 years old.
    I’ve seen others on this site request a new look at fermented vegetables so I will join the refrain :-). The other refrain I will join is the relentless ‘Thank You’s’ that you so much deserve.




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  24. I have been a fan of the previous video style and I found the animation of the first three of the test video formats distracting. Within two minutes of this video I knew this was going to be an appropriate amount of animation. Overall this video was my favorite.

    My only concern was on the fairness of the topics and audio given to each graphic design specialist. Some topics and audio lend themselves to creating additional graphics (not included in the original articles) more than others. Despite this concern I still think this test adequately showed the capabilities of each graphic design specialist.




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  25. This presentation is the best! It gave enough time to process the info, and the highlighting was so helpful to spot the relevant text. Bunnies were a bonus. This style was enjoyable, especially for someone who has problems with the quick movement and pace of the others. Thanks for trying to get the messages out as best for the majority of viewers!




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  26. So far, I like this one best. In the old videos, there wasn’t enough time to focus on the cited articles, so in a sense, I was taking your word for it backing up your summaries. In this one, I was able to actually read the underlined/highlighted text. It will take a long time for me to forget those poor pork-rind eating bunnies….




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  27. I vote for THIS one! The original style was just fine, and I don’t know why you’re thinking of changing it–but less movement is better and easier to watch. I like that we can see information about the actual document before zooming in on the highlighted text. And holding the text still long enough for us to read it is nice but less movement is better and easier to watch. I like that we can see information about the actual document before zooming in on the highlighted text. And holding the text still long enough for us to read it is nice.




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  28. My favorite video format was the last one – Dangers of Dietary Supplement Deregulation. But I like this one, too. It seems like a lot of other people liked it as well, even those who prefer the old format.
    Another important topic that was made easy to understand and beautifully done. Thank you Dr. G!




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  29. I’ve recently taken to eating sauerkraut in hopes of bolstering my intestinal flora, but after experiencing a bout of diarrhea about that time decided to refrain from eating it. Even my regularly eating green bananas (an insoluble fiber) didn’t seem to help.

    Also, I had a milk based nutritional drink in my fridge that I quit drinking after watching one of Dr. Greger’s anti-milk videos. Remembering that in the past anything with milk in it firmed up my stool, I drank that and my diarrhea went away.

    I just finished eating while typing this and my meal included sauerkraut again, but this time mixed with cole slaw. I have eaten cole slaw in the past with no adverse affects.

    I also bought some non-fat yogurt to act as my milk-based stool expander if needed. I don’t eat it as a rule but by adding MCT oil and walnut oil to add fat to the yogurt, I feel I will at least get some benefit that may justify the occasional use of it.

    I’m hoping the main problem with the milk yogurt is the IGF-1 promotion, and if that is the case then the walnut oil should (hopefully) cancel out that undesirable trait of the milk.




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    1. Lonie: You have an interesting comment. I’ve never heard of the idea of an oil “cancelling out” the problems with over production of IGF-1 when one consumes animal products. NutritionFacts has a series of videos which explains that the problem is that our bodies react to the consumption of animal protein by producing too much IGF-1, which is linked to cancer growth. I didn’t see anything in that explanation that would make me think that adding oil to an animal product would make our bodies react differently to the animal protein. A fat-free animal product (like fat-free yogurt) would still have the animal protein that is the problem with the IGF-1.

      I had an idea for you: If you are thinking that the yogurt is important for its probiotic qualities, why not consume a plant based yogurt? There are several on the market with live cultures and various bases (almond, soy and coconut – the last one being my favorite). You could experiment until you found one that worked. Just an idea.




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      1. Hi Thea, can’t remember where I read it but the data stated that Walnut Oil will block the body from producing IGF-1. Originally I learned the importance of stopping the production of IGF-1 from the writings and video of the work of Valter Luongo (IIRC, the head of Longevity studies department at either USC or UCLA… I think USC though. He also appeared in the PBS show “Eat, Fast, Live”) I’m convinced I’ve kept my IGF-1 to a minimum through periodic fasting and caloric restriction, in addition to consuming the Walnut Oil.

        But lately I’m in a quandary. I’ve recently enrolled in a patient funded study and have completed the designated treatment of being infused with 7 units of plasma from donors 16 to 25 years of age. As I’ve mentioned in one of my previous posts, the young person’s plasma replaces worn out proteins found in an older persons blood that instruct our free flowing stem cells in our own blood supply to go do their assigned tasks of resetting our bodies to a younger state.

        My problem arises because I do not know if the young proteins require growth factors like IGF-1 to better do their job as they would in a young person (who probably requires IGF-1 to reach their expected size from their genetic instruction)… or, if they can do that repair and protect work independent of something like IGF-1.

        I am currently leaning toward going back to eating chicken breast (no red meats however) for a month or two just in case, after which time I will revert to primarily eating plant based.

        As for the yogurt, not a priority… just chose that as the milk product to fight off occasional diarrhea while also using it as a vehicle for more MCT oil and Walnut oil intake (ketogenic diet.)

        Thank you Thea for your interest and response.

        Lonnie (aka Lonie for the purpose of internet obfuscation ‘-)

        One camera is a shoot… two or more is a production




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  30. Definitely Tyler (Green Tea). For those of us with motion issues, all that swooping to a screen makes it unwatchable. It’s like IMAX films. There’s always a certain part where I have to close my eyes tightly until my husband tells me it’s safe to open. Any type of film with “swooping” may seem more jazzy to many, but it is horrid for those of us with motion issues. It’s like the recent pale print in many vegan cookbooks and magazines – it may look “new”, but it makes reading rough (and my eyesight is great). Basic is often better.




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  31. Agree with those who prefer this set of graphics best. They are non-obtrusive and don’t feature pauses in the narrative when waiting for the graphics to catch up.

    Also, as usual, I appreciate the information. Clear, straightforward and relevant.




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  32. Would also like to see a video on goat’s milk. It seems everything I read suggests it is totally different from cow’s milk. It would be nice to be able to eat ice cream again (made with goat’s milk.)

    Also, would like to see the statement I’ve read on the internet addressed that camel’s milk is the closest thing there is to mother’s milk out there.




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    1. Even camels don’t drink camel’s milk after infancy……………….
      Cows don’t drink camel’s milk after infancy…………
      Dog’s don’t drink dog’s milk after infancy………….
      Whale’s don’t drink milk after infancy…………….
      Cat’s don’t drink milk after infancy……………………..
      Elk don’t drink milk after infancy………………….
      Rhinocerous don’t drink milk after infancy………………
      Giraffe’s don’t drink milk after infancy ……………….
      Gorilla’s don’t drink milk after infancy………………….

      THERE IS NO MAMMAL ON THIS EARTH THAT DRINKS MILK AFTER INFANCY BECAUSE IT IS UNNECESSARY.




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      1. Guest, I would ask you to look past the, um… past. You say no mammal drinks milk after infancy but that may be because it is not available to them in the wild.

        I have a momma cat that just had a litter of kittens. I fed her condensed goat’s milk before and after her giving birth. Sometimes I put an egg in it, sometimes I sprinkled garlic powder in it, even sifted a little activated charcoal in it occasionally. She never failed to clean the pan and both she and her kittens are thriving.

        Things change… WE are changing. Through the use of CRSPR/Cas9 DNA insertion/deletions using enzymes, we have the ability to remodel who we are.

        Evolution is happening in real time.




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  33. As a new monthly donor, I think you are wasting our money with these new video formats. But there are a lot of ways to make things better. Our money would be much better spent on any number of different enhancements, such as the following:

    1. Additional researchers.

    2. Additional translators, maybe making the content available in multiple languages.

    3. Additional social media specialists to leverage cross-platform marketing. Plant-based eating is unbelievably huge right now (I think bigger than most of us realize), so you are missing a massive opportunity, particularly among those under 30. It is turning into big, serious business, and there is no reason that you shouldn’t be getting more traffic easily and at very little cost.

    4. A “how to transition” section on the website. Most people have no idea what the basics are. According to an article I read recently, many millennials don’t even know how to use a stove, oven, and other basic kitchen appliances properly, which explains why the majority either eat out most of the time or only consume cold cereal (with cow’s milk!). I watched a video the other day where Dr. Klaper did an excellent job telling college kids IN UNDER FIVE MINUTES how they can go plant-based in their dorms with a rice cooker and crock pot.

    5. A recipe section, perhaps moderated with approved recipes being featured prominently on the site.

    6. An actual moderated forum rather than just comments sections for individual videos. It’s difficult to have conversations with people here, because once a video is a day old, everyone disappears and not everyone selects “Participate in this discussion via email.”

    7. A proper messaging or triage system where we can send you, Dr, Greger, ideas for videos based on papers we have seen. There are a number of papers I have come across in the past few months that I would love you to look at, but the only way to bring them to your attention is in the comments section of individual videos. As I said, the comments section turns into a graveyard after about 24 hours, which means there are no moderators available to forward our requests to you.

    8. More bandwidth. You seem to have bandwidth problems from time to time (I’m talking about the website, not YouTube), so that might be a more fruitful potential investment. It’s not as common as it was years ago, but there are occasionally some loading times that are unusually long and would make you lose potential viewers. Also, according to downforeveryoneorjustme.com, I have noticed that your site does occasionally go down for upward of five to ten minutes at a time, usually after business hours. Perhaps this is just maintenance, but if that’s the case, a maintenance message would be a good idea.

    Getting back to today’s video, I have to say that I couldn’t even watch the whole thing. All the added animation is just too much and detracts from everything you are saying. I still don’t understand what you are trying to “fix.” Everything was fine the way it was.

    Please, please, PLEASE just go back to the original format.

    I love this site and Dr. Greger, but in my view the focus should not be on making prettier videos, especially since the majority of viewers seem to dislike them more than the originals. Instead, there are four things that I think deserve more focus:

    1. The science.

    2. How to use it in your everyday life, e.g. how to make food.

    3. Getting the word out by driving traffic to the site, particularly through low-cost, cross-platform social media marketing.

    4. Keeping people on the site once they are here by setting up moderated forums in place of or in addition to video comments sections.

    As always, thank you for your hard work! :)




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    1. JOSH – Excellent points Josh!!! I 100% agree. There is so much more “meaty” things that could be done in terms of REAL interactivity between members who spend time and money on this site. More moderators would also be good…and knowing who they are in a profile would be fair to show us. I fear our man is lost in technology, thinking newer is better. Sad really.




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    2. Josh, what great ideas ! I agree with all that you wrote , including about the bandwidth. I know nothing of tech issues, but have experienced many down times for the site and wondered what could be the problem. I hope staffers take a good look at your suggestions.




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    3. I’m gonna re-post later two of your comments, they are so good!
      These one’s:
      6. An actual moderated forum rather than just comments sections for individual videos. It’s difficult to have conversations with people here, because once a video is a day old, everyone disappears and not everyone selects “Participate in this discussion via email.”

      7. A proper messaging or triage system where we can send you, Dr, Greger, ideas for videos based on papers we have seen. There are a number of papers I have come across in the past few months that I would love you to look at, but the only way to bring them to your attention is in the comments section of individual videos. As I said, the comments section turns into a graveyard after about 24 hours, which means there are no moderators available to forward our requests to you.




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  34. I find the style in this video to be the best of the latest group as it is also the most calm. However I prefer Dr. Greger’s original format. It is his personality and the charm of his unique quirkiness that has been so successful. The newer styles seem designed to be more corporate and slick taking away from the more personal message of Dr. Greger. For example the bunnies might have been color photos instead of dark silhouettes. I would also point out that the tiny image of Dr. Greger in the lower left corner reminds me of the Mini-Me character from Austin Powers movies.




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    1. Robert:

      You hit the nail on the head!

      Dr. Greger’s personality, passion, and comedy are what drew me to his talks and videos in the first place, and these are not shining through in the new videos.

      I just realized why I don’t like these new ones: It’s like watching television, especially the news. To me it’s more alienating, almost like reading the opening to Kafka’s Metamorphosis over and over again.

      I haven’t watched television in years, so that must be why the new experience makes me so queasy. If your mind has been softened by sitcoms and news broadcasts over time, this new format is probably fine, but if you’re unaccustomed to (American) television styles, the new videos are very difficult to watch.




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    1. Interesting james, but I did not see claims of a permanent fix in your link. I did read that after 8 weeks from the conclusion of the trial period, improvements were sustained ie a lessening of “gut woes”. Looks like researchers are wanting larger clinical trials .




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  35. I am a long-term subscriber to, and great fan of, NutritionFacts.org and have become total vegan as a consquence. In the past year, I have lost over 100 lbs., and my doctor says I am in excellent health for a man my age (75).

    I write this to compliment Avocado Video’s Lucas Kavanagh and Jesse Lupini on their style for the latest video. Without any hesitation, I can say, this style is the best I seen so far!

    Keep up the great work folks. And thank you! )))




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  36. Prefer (most to least) 1) Lucas and Jesse’s style 2) Julien’s 3) old style 4) Tyler’s 5) Daniel’s. Don’t know if it was coincidental or due to enhanced graphics or a problem on my end, but these seemed to take longer to load and would occasionally freeze (viewing on my Ipad.) Love this website and your dedication to sharing the latest evidence-based infomation. My high blood pressure was poorly controlled despite taking 4 medications, and thanks to changing to a plant-based diet, I’m off all medication and my blood pressure is in normal range.




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  37. I enjoyed this video, kudos to Lucas and Jesse.
    Ahh, high fiber healthy diet, I wish more people understood this!
    As a practitioner, I recommend foods according to a persons dosha,
    which include wholesome, non gmo, organic foods.
    When clients change what they eat, towards better foods,
    it goes a long way to improving their undesired symptoms.
    Keep up your great work, I recommend your site to all of my clients, friends and family.
    Brian Langston Eastern Medical Herbalist




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  38. 3. Daniel’s style in Should Vitamin D Supplements Be Taken to Prevent Falls in the Elderly?
    2. Tyler’s style in Benefits of Green Tea for Boosting Antiviral Immune Function
    1. Julien’s style in Dangers of Dietary Supplement Deregulation
    3. Or Lucas and Jesse’s style in this one?

    1 = best




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  39. I like this style the best. Love the bunny graphic! Agree with Nicholas that the pans and any other motion need to be slow and gentle (too much or too fast motion is unpleasant and can trigger migraine).




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  40. Well!! Are we there yet? We’re getting there! Here goes…
    This one has pros and cons IMO. It is not the best – none of them are better than the older and simpler style (why? because they do not add anything informative and only new distractions like a mobile phone while driving). But as you seem intent on change, careful reading of all the previous peoples’ comments should clearly point out the good bits and the bad bits of all four attempts (eg, Daniel’s may had some good bits but the perspectival distortion ruined them all). I may be verbose but that’s because I care and have a professional background in visualization, IT, and psychology. I may use these videos to help in teaching human-computer interaction design – they provide great examples of the do’s and dont’s of audio-visual communication.
    Lucas+Jesse’s:
    1. Titles. Need to leave title pages with journal title up longer – esp. at start of video! This is very important for the many serious students of your message. Title and journal says a lot.
    2. Zooms. I am like most on here and I simply do not like the pan and zoom at all. it is so much better in the old style where you ZOOM OUT the TEXTBOX from a motionless FIXED background – do not zoom into the whole page! This creates the motion sickness (due to a form of “vection”) that many report! It is AMAZING how many have reported “feeling sick”; astounding! Come on Doctor, surely you can appreciate that? People feel sick! This is all about text for reading/understanding – reading likes stability not motion!! This is what folks are complaining about.
    TYLER did this better – he just highlighted the textbox.
    3. Highlighting. In yellow – I suggested this, to use yellow marker in the last video – but not like this – I would suggest highlight the textbox in yellow (the whole are, not marker lines) at full page level…then ZOOM OUT the BOX ONLY without the yellow – just black and white text. They could try this to see how it looks. I do not like the yellow constantly shown – it decreases contrast. Every loss of contrast makes text harder to read.
    Tyler’s highlighting was better – no zoom in, just highlight. Better if he highlighted (in yellow?) and then zoomed out the text box – then it could be perfect.
    4. Graphs. Is this a re-plotted graph?? Is so I don’t believe it. I mean, I need to see the ORIGINAL GRAPHS. Nobody knows the exact numbers that are used for a graph unless one has the spreadsheet data, so do not try to pretty-up a graph by re-drawing. Just zoom OUT the graph alone (do not zoom in) – like in your old videos! We don’t want the “motion graphics” zoom in stuff! I repeat, do not re-draw the graphs! USe the original!
    TYLER “built” the original graphs nicely – it was flashy, but okay. He made the graphs slide from stage right and exit left – don’t do this – too much motion. Your old vids just made the graph appear nicely – don’t “fly” them around the page, motion sickness-inducing, annoying, yuck…
    5. Illustrations. Excellent. The placebo and bunny story was synched to what you were saying; always a plus.
    6. Page turns. Good. Nice and swift.
    7. Vection. Example: 2:39 – The slow page crawling off to right is horrible. And then followed by a page zoom into the text…immediately followed by a page turn!?! Wholly Healthfood Batman!! What was that! This has all the bad signs of “motion graphics gone wild”…couldn’t focus on a single thing there – what just happened?? (Six seconds I’ll never get back again!). Inattentional blindness strikes again.
    Verdict: Has good points and stuff to drop. They all do. I think you have plenty of comments now to work with. No single style is the best and whoever you choose, tney need to incorporate the best bits from all four. You may be be enamoured with new “motion graphics” technology but…I would emphasize most people seem to dislike that aspect FOR SYMBOLIC INFORMATION VIDEOS (they get physically annoyed/sick!), so eliminating all the whole page motion and only zoom text boxes, graphs, etc. is still my advice.
    Hope this helps. And yes, your old videos were the best so replicating their quality is your goal. No distractions! I fear that unless these videos improve, I will simply lose all interest in them. I have actually absorbed very little INFO from the last videos due to inattentional blindness…it’s an epidemic. Anyway, try to keep up the good work.




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  41. Lucas and Jesse’s style is well done and more in sync with the narrator’s audio, so it is easier to follow and more pleasant for the eyes and the brain.

    Syncing correctly with the audio is the most important thing in graphic motions. It is the basis. Once you mastered that point, then you can get more fancy with the design, but if you do not master syncing with the audio, then going fancy with the graphic motions will only give a somehow unpleasant experience for the watcher, and it will be difficult to follow what is being said.

    Daniel, your style is giving vertigos, please consider not abusing the tilts and moving effects, even in slow motion.
    Tyler, as someone said above, one has to be careful with too many effects or too fast motions which are not in sync with the rythm of the audio.
    Julien, the style is original, but the green font for the highlights doesn’t work: it has the opposite effect and make the highlighted quotations “unreadable”, which distracts one from what is being said.




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  42. Graphics are nice but the pan and scan to text highlights is not snappy, it’s slow and jittery, which I find a little distracting. I appreciate the paper texture but it’s a little overdone (med journals do not use parchment), and if you want to get technical it’s the *edge* of the print (far too sharp with modern tech) that needs some organic variations. Ultra sharp identical print over parchment looks more artificial.

    Still, I can live with this or most other late editing work.

    I should mention that some of the most compelling graphics I have seen were hand animated, rough but stylish cartoons. That’s cool stuff.




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  43. Regarding the video styles, record my vote for Tyler’s. I judged the others to be too gimmicky, visually-disorienting, or amateurish. (Even Tyler’s first ripple transition was a bit cringe-worthy, but he recovered in the rest of the video).

    Dr. Greger, your videos are exceptional resources for millions of people. The often opaque medical research content that you distill in lay terms is invaluable. The videos should be clear, not distracting. In this, as in so many things, the best advice is to “Keep it Simple”.

    Cheers.




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  44. Still prefer the old style but if you must change, Licas and Jesse are better than the rest. Please, keep it simple and thanks for all you do.




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  45. I really like Lucas and Jesse’s style in this video. Nothing was distracting. The text moved at just the right pace so I could read and process titles and other bits of information. I did not like the other team’s videos for the above outlined reasons.




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  46. I think I liked this one by Lucas and Jesse the best, especially the graphic illustrations, the bunnies were great and add interest and clarity to the presentation, and were nicely in sync with the audio. I agree that all the panning and zooming of text are more distracting and disorienting than helpful. Text transitions can fade, but should not involve motion, and need to be gentle. When trying to focus on the words when reading, motion does not add anything besides vertigo. I liked the highlighting of the text that correlated to what you were speaking, I am a visual learner so I find that doubles my retention, but it also eliminated the need for the dreaded text movement. The information you present in the videos is the key element, and anything graphical should be purposeful to highlight, clarify, emphasize, and reinforce the subject matter, not just add superficial glitz. No harm to entertain a bit as you educate, as with the bunnies, and I always appreciate your humor, because they are integrated into and add to the value of the whole, not distract from it. Thanks for all you do!




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  47. Jane, I initially had a similar reaction, but if you read below the video, Dr Greger is specifically asking for feedback in regard to these different styles of videos using a variety of talents and techniques.




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  48. I like this one best, for all the reasons previously mentioned by other subscribers.
    btw, thanks to your encouraging videos, I now eat organic, AND vegan…not an easy feat for an elderly woman who has eaten (a lot of) meat all her life.
    Thank you!




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  49. This Lucas and Jesse is far and away the best . Easy on the eyes, easy to read, superb graphics, and the right amount of holding pattern. Just perfect. It made the subject of fecal transplant almost bearable. Almost.

    And since we now know the benefit’s are only temporary, let’s not subject anyone to that again. Ever.




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  50. Of the new styles I liked the Lucas & Jessie the best. I still like the old style fine, though. The graphical philosophy should be to keep things as simple as possible, and no graphics without a “useful” purpose (e.g.., better clarity is a useful purpose, making something look “snazzier’ is not a useful purpose)




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  51. So far, I like the style in Lucas’s and Jesse’s Fecal Donor video best. Many times, I like to pause a video to read around in the articles, myself. This style makes that easier than the original style plus, by showing where the quoted text is in the actual articles, the context is clearer. The motion is smooth. The techniques of circling, highlighting and underlining are very familiar and preserve context within the article.




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  52. Jane, Your comment is far too judgmental of others who are simply doing what Dr G has asked – to give him feedback. I believe everone, myself included, have provided CONSTRUCTIVE CRITICISM. There is nothing to be ashamed of in that. Indeed, the only way to improve is to try and try again. There is an overwhelming opinion by the majority that his old videos were the best and these new innovations, while apparently “cool”, have serious issues regarding the transfer of complex information from one (complex) mind (his) to another (yours and mine). As an educator I appreciate the challenge of that. have you ever tried to teach using Powerpoint? If so you will know there are good and bad approaches. Dr. G’s videos are the best on the web. We just want them to be superb. They were previously. so don’t be harsh on us critics. He asked for it and we have politely obliged with our time, consideration, and effort. You and any others here or in his team who think we are “merely” complaining miss the point. Hope you can understand that.




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  53. Optic flow.
    I wanted to try and explain, from the viewpoint of technical perceptual psychology, why so many are saying the full page zooms and slides are inducing a mild form of motion sickness. When a background moves and you don’t, you have a case of “apparent motion”, or “vection”. Zooming a text box out is okay because the background is stable and the local zoom provides optical information that makes it look like something is coming towards you – the text. Fine so far. But…if the WHOLE visual field moves, such as when whole page is zoomed INWARDS to the text area of interest, then you have what is called “global OPTIC FLOW” information (or stimulation) – and this is the kind of optic flow that one gets when one is moving through the world! Like in a car, the optic flow field is global (not local). If your whole visual field and you have “optical expansion” it is saying “I am moving Forwards. If you zoom the page out, you have optical contraction, and this specifies that you are moving backwards. BUT…you are not moving! You are sitting or stationary. hence the “conflict” as they say. This is the source of the feeling of nausea. You must avoid global optic flow because that specifies thsat YOU are moving! It is a very compelling illusion. Here are two fascinating videos that explain the well-known aspect of how visual perception controls your balance and stability (Gibsonian theory).
    In sum, local optic flows (box zooms out) are okay (ie, something is moving); global flows (whole page zooms in or out) must be avoided (ie, YOU are moving)! Likewise perspectival distortions or slants of any kind are awful gimmicks. You graphics techies may be great at coding up a snazzy graphics video using the options in some package. But they may not fully appreciate the fundamental visual perception issues of what to avoid…and why (if you like I can help more!).
    I hope this explains it. it’s not just complaining or someone’s mere opinion. It’s science facts.
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=F4xenIulg_8&list=PLtoX6L88vjkfWv2F4XN0RnSMPL_8zyzsy&index=11
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PwM0mFVqIuE&list=PLtoX6L88vjkfWv2F4XN0RnSMPL_8zyzsy&index=12




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    1. I also meant to say, my comments on these videos are provided in response to Dr G’s explicit request for feedback as written at the top of the page under each of the recent videos. They should, I hope, be seen, taken, and appreciated as constructive feedback, as he has requested. I hope the whole team at NF not just him appreciates that. I see my comment is “awaiting moderation”. Am I on some kind of watchlist then? Why does it not immediately post? Kindly explain.




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    2. Allisfood: To my knowledge, there is no such thing as a watch list on this site. Certain comments are put in pending status by the *automated* system. I think the automated system is more likely to pend a comment if the comment contains links, but I have no inside knowledge of the algorithms behind the automated system. Being put in pending status happens all day long to all sorts of people/legitimate comments, including the moderators own comments. Comments which abide by the rules of the site will eventually get approved manually by a moderator.




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      1. Thanks for that explanation Thea. I see another person’s, Jane’s, comment was deleted which I had replied to. Or is it hidden somewhere again?! She had complained about the “complainers” (I guess she would count me as one but I don’t mind). I see my reply to her and another person’s reply to her were deleted. I have a record of them. I put a bit of effort into my reply to her explaining that we are not complaining but providing constructive feedback, as requested. So when comments go missing or get deleted, I ask why! Darn.




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    3. I corrected and improved the explanation I wrote above. Please see the edit I re-posted. It is currently “awaiting moderation” maybe because it has video links in it that describe how strange visual stimulation can affect your balance and well-being. See above for video links.

      Explanation for WHY people feel somewhat sick.
      Optic flow.
      I wanted to try and explain better, from the viewpoint of perceptual psychology, why so many are saying the FULL PAGE ZOOMS and moving page entry/exit are inducing a mild form of motion sickness. When a background moves and you don’t, you have a case of “apparent motion” (vection”) – it’s as if YOU move.
      Zooming a small area text box OUT is okay because the background is stable and the local zoom area provides you with optical information that makes it look like something is coming towards you – the text box. Fine so far. Now comes the problem…
      But if the WHOLE visual field moves, such as when the whole page is ZOOMED INWARDS to the text area of interest, then your WHOLE VISUAL FIELD IS MOVING! You get what is called “GLOBAL OPTIC FLOW information” (or stimulation). Importantly, this is the kind of optic flow stimulation your eyes and brain gets when one is moving (eg, walking, driving) through the world! Like in a car, the optic flow field is global (not local) – everything is flowing meaning you are moving!
      Two important cases:

      1. If you walk FORWARDS, your whole visual field has optical EXPANSION; this specifies and MEANS “I am moving FORWARDS”. The visual information lawfully specifies this – a law of optics.
      2. If you walk BACKWARDS, your whole visual field has optical CONTRACTION; this specifies and MEANS “I am moving BACKWARDS”.

      Now, if you are looking at a page on a PC, especially if it fills your field of view, and the animation ZOOMS IN, you have global optical EXPANSION, and this specifies a situation that NORMALLY would mean you are MOVING…forwards! BUT…you are NOT moving! You are sitting or stationary. Hence the “sensory conflict” as they say. Optics and vestibular system are in “disagreement” saying different things (I’m moving versus I’m not moving). This is the source of the feeling of nausea.
      You should avoid global optic flow – whole page zooms or whole page motion of ANY kind – because that specifies that YOU are moving in some way, when you are not!
      Vection is a very compelling illusion. You can get it at the movies or just on a train when the outside train starts moving and yours is not.
      Here are two old but still fascinating videos that explain the well-known aspect of how visual perception controls your balance and stability (Gibsonian theory). They show that optic expansion can KNOCK YOU OVER!
      In sum, local optic flows (box zooms out) are FINE (ie, something is moving); global flows (whole page zooms in or out) must be avoided (ie, YOU are moving)! Likewise perspectival distortions or slants of any kind are awful gimmicks (video #1). You graphics techies may be great at coding up a snazzy graphics video using the options in some package. But they may not fully appreciate the fundamental visual perception psychology issues of what to avoid…and why.
      If you like I can advise you further on good design principles.
      I hope this explains why people are getting sick. it’s not just complaining or someone’s mere opinion. It’s science facts.
      Hope this makes sense to you…




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  54. Dear Dr Greger,
    I couldn’t find anything about kefir drinks in NutritionFacts.org.
    What do you think about these Caucasian probiotic drinks ?
    I’m doing my kefir drink of fruits (not milk) myself, and I wanted to know if it is really healthy as people say here in France.
    Thank you




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    1. Yesss!!! I would love to hear too! My wife is a big fan of kefir. We are veggie but she makes it from ORGANIC RAW milk that we are lucky to be able to find where we live. Do others drink kefir?? Would like to interact on a video if he makes one. There was a paper but I no longer can find it where it was shown that the IGF-1 in fermented foods like kefir is dramatically reduced, like 20-30% remaining. IGF-1 is a concern as we have a health battle that requires little IGF-1 growth hormone. Great suggestion! Let’s have a separate comments page for threads and interaction…




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      1. Yes, I also think that a dedicated video or article about kefir would be a good idea. Here in France, many people use to make and drink kefir (fruits or milk) as it is supposed to be good for gut, and I am quite surprised that Dr Greger does not address this issue in his video.




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  55. This site is my number 1 goto site for keeping up with nutritional information, and the impact on my health has been nothing short of spectacular. I am a big fan! I am however concerned that the sources cited in this video all date back to a 2012 and 2014 time frame. There has been enormous progress in prebiotics since then, some nicely summarized here (2017)
    http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/19490976.2017.1290756
    I am a little worried that the shear volume of information is becoming a bit much for your staff and volunteers.




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  56. Lucas and Jesse’s style is really great. This is my favorite but honestly I come here for the content so I’ll continue to be a daily viewer no matter the format!




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  57. This is the best of the new styles for me. Still the classic design works just as good, although I have to admit that the bunny animations look more modern.




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  58. Sadly, I can no longer access these new enhanced videos on my old equipment. In fact, the whole site has become problematic. My great loss. Thanks for all the good information in past years — it has made a difference in the way I eat and take care of myself.




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    1. Elizabeth: Idea: If you want help problem-solving, you could submit a help ticket. This page has a ‘Help Center’ link at the bottom. Once the Help Center page comes up, click the ‘Submit a Request’ link in the upper right corner. Good luck.




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  59. I really liked comment Josh’s analysis earlier of how to improve the vidoes and as well, the WHOLE site. I repeat these two here:

    “6. An actual moderated forum rather than just comments sections for individual videos. It’s difficult to have conversations with people here, because once a video is a day old, everyone disappears and not everyone selects “Participate in this discussion via email.”
    7. A proper messaging or triage system where we can send you, Dr, Greger, ideas for videos based on papers we have seen. There are a number of papers I have come across in the past few months that I would love you to look at, but the only way to bring them to your attention is in the comments section of individual videos. As I said, the comments section turns into a graveyard after about 24 hours, which means there are no moderators available to forward our requests to you.”

    After the video is replaced, nobody returns to comments. There is no interaction b/w members. A forum is a VERY GOOD IDEA with topics, threads, and so on. It can be as casual or as formal as we like (ideally, very informal with humor).

    Comment?




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  60. Explanation for WHY people feel somewhat sick.
    Optic flow.
    I wanted to try and explain better, from the viewpoint of perceptual psychology, why so many are saying the FULL PAGE ZOOMS and moving page entry/exit are inducing a mild form of motion sickness. When a background moves and you don’t, you have a case of “apparent motion” (vection”) – it’s as if YOU move.
    Zooming a small area text box OUT is okay because the background is stable and the local zoom area provides you with optical information that makes it look like something is coming towards you – the text box. Fine so far. Now comes the problem…
    But if the WHOLE visual field moves, such as when the whole page is ZOOMED INWARDS to the text area of interest, then your WHOLE VISUAL FIELD IS MOVING! You get what is called “GLOBAL OPTIC FLOW information” (or stimulation). Importantly, this is the kind of optic flow stimulation your eyes and brain gets when one is moving (eg, walking, driving) through the world! Like in a car, the optic flow field is global (not local) – everything is flowing meaning you are moving!
    Two important cases:

    1. If you walk FORWARDS, your whole visual field has optical EXPANSION; this specifies and MEANS “I am moving FORWARDS”. The visual information lawfully specifies this – a law of optics.
    2. If you walk BACKWARDS, your whole visual field has optical CONTRACTION; this specifies and MEANS “I am moving BACKWARDS”.

    Now, if you are looking at a page on a PC, especially if it fills your field of view, and the animation ZOOMS IN, you have global optical EXPANSION, and this specifies a situation that NORMALLY would mean you are MOVING…forwards! BUT…you are NOT moving! You are sitting or stationary. Hence the “sensory conflict” as they say. Optics and vestibular system are in “disagreement” saying different things (I’m moving versus I’m not moving). This is the source of the feeling of nausea.
    You should avoid global optic flow – whole page zooms or whole page motion of ANY kind – because that specifies that YOU are moving in some way, when you are not!
    Vection is a very compelling illusion. You can get it at the movies or just on a train when the outside train starts moving and yours is not.
    Here are two old but still fascinating videos that explain the well-known aspect of how visual perception controls your balance and stability (Gibsonian theory). They show that optic expansion can KNOCK YOU OVER!
    In sum, local optic flows (box zooms out) are FINE (ie, something is moving); global flows (whole page zooms in or out) must be avoided (ie, YOU are moving)! Likewise perspectival distortions or slants of any kind are awful gimmicks (video #1). You graphics techies may be great at coding up a snazzy graphics video using the options in some package. But they may not fully appreciate the fundamental visual perception psychology issues of what to avoid…and why.
    If you like I can advise you further on good design principles.
    I hope this explains why people are getting sick. it’s not just complaining or someone’s mere opinion. It’s science facts.
    Hope this makes sense to you…
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=F4xenIulg_8&list=PLtoX6L88vjkfWv2F4XN0RnSMPL_8zyzsy&index=11
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PwM0mFVqIuE&list=PLtoX6L88vjkfWv2F4XN0RnSMPL_8zyzsy&index=12




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    1. Wow!

      Not sure if you’ll see this comment, but I wanted to say thank you for the brilliant explanation. I was trying to figure out why it felt so strange.




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      1. Thanks Josh. I hope it’s understood by people. It’s one thing to feel sick, another to know why, and it’s amazing how many do feel uncomfortable from watching these innovations.
        I very much liked your comments too – I even re-posted a couple of them which you may have seen. Many of your suggestions could be actioned.
        I always tick the “email” box when posting so that I get an email notification when others add to a thread. Otherwise one would never know who’s saying what without scrolling through the whole affair.




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  61. Dr. Greger, I really do love the original videos best!! I appreciate you trying to upgrade the style but, why mess with perfection? As someone who is susceptible to motion sickness, some of the rapid motions in video #4 actually made me nauseous. My husband, who has never watched a nutritionfacts video, but has overheard many, put it this way, “He has such an interesting voice and sense of humor, there’s no need for a video”.




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  62. Of the new video styles we’ve seen so far, I like this one the best for sure, although I still think less movement of the papers is better (some of us actually feel nauseated from it). I liked the variations, though, of highlighting, circling, underlining, to emphasize text, and also the fact that most things were left on the screen long enough to actually read. What I didn’t like about this video was the panning over the page to move from one part of the text to another (slightly nausea inducing)…an example is from 0:47 to 0:52 in the video.

    From best to worst:
    1. Lucas and Jesse
    2. Julian
    3. Tyler
    4. Daniel




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    1. I also liked this new style and can also state that the oversized fonts movement was making me uncomfortable too.
      But the new style is really really nice!




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  63. I was voting original videos until this one by Jesse and Lucas. The others had too much movement. This one showed the titles, dates, then the highlighted section being talked about. The type was also increased and highlighted…a plus. There was just one place where it showed one page, moved to a second page, then moved down to a highlighted section which was too much unnecessary movement. Overall, this was the best. This was more what I recommended…title, date, section being discussed, all the rest is unnecessary.




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  64. As per your request: I really like the content and some of the new display attributes. Such as circling, underlining and especially progressively displaying graph information.
    I do not like the page turning and the slow zoom, in or out, or zooming to a different place on a static page.

    Keep up the good work.




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  65. The straight poop…
    Love the new look. I would watch these videos (even about fecal matter while I’m eating my daily oatmeal) without the animations. But I have to say, this one was easier to stomach!




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  66. This video was excellent.. good combo of written, graphic and whatever the bunny-splanation can be called. At once informative, visual and humorous. Well done Lucas and Jesse… although the best, I do have one minor recommendation – I got a little seasick sailing to one of the first written sections..the other voyages were less disorienting… not sure how but if you can adjust that, it would be awesome.




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  67. I can’t really say one was better than the other: I enjoyed them all. I found myself so interested in the content that I forgot to pay attention to the graphics. I thought they flowed very nicely and I like the highlights and bringing forward the important points.




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  68. This in very interesting since I am having a gut problem now for about 8 weeks. I am researching leaky gut syndrome but my issue has become ‘leaky butt syndrome’ to coin a new phrase. Seems I have a fistula and pile in combo. And will not take antibiotics or have surgery like the MD suggested I should have. So doing stietz baths three times a day and bunches of probiotic/ supplements/homeopathic things just liquid fasted around five days and now doing raw vegan diet for some days to try and speed up healing.




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  69. My preference on graphics is this one by Lucas and Jesse: I like reading well-lit type in a larger point size on a flat surface. Trying to read type on an angled, moving page was challenging as were pullout quotes in green type. Appreciate meaningful graphics, too. Your videos work because they are evidence-based with journal citations and NOT gimmicky: let the info stand on its own.




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  70. Here is an interesting demonstration: watch one of his “old style” videos BEFORE all these recent “motion graphics” experiments and compare. I just watched a recent one WITHOUT sound. Even without his voice, the graphics were SUPERB! Everything was good…the pace, the clarity, the highlighted text box. So tell us the reason, WHY do you need to mess with what is not broken and works so very well?? You do not need to “mix it up” as you say in your opening sentence to recent videos; we do not want to be “mixed up”. Really, the old style is GREAT – nobody else does it so well.
    I watched this one from last week: how-to-develop-a-healthy-gut-ecosystem




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  71. Out of the four styles, my favorite was the Fecal Super Donor Video. I think less is more when it comes to the movement. I did not like the moving text in the supplement video. Dizzy. Ditto on the angled pages in the other one. Your videos are already amazing! So please no major changes. Thank you so much for what you do, it has been life changing for my family!! I watch your videos every week and show them to my husband. And your book is amazing too, we eat your daily dozen recommendations, used a white board at first just like you said. :) I have lost 14 pounds in 9 months without even trying to lose weight (just wanting to be healthy). I can’t wait till I return to the doctor for my yearly and see how all my numbers look! Thankful for you!




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  72. Love your work! Thank you so much for everything you do :)
    As for the graphics: really enjoyed this video (probiotics vs probiotics) – the graphics were really helpful to understanding and the overall look was easy, professional looking and enjoyable. I didn’t like the ‘Green Tea’ vid – articles moved too fast and it was just dull to look at. The ‘Vit D and Falls’ vid was also pretty good. Overall, so far, I like Lucas and Jesse’s style the most. Thanks for the opportunity to comment!




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  73. Poop: On a related topic, it would be good to see the topic of TOXOPLASMOSIS covered – what it is, how you get it (eg, uncooked meat, home grown vegetables contamination from neighbor’s cat crap, etc), what it does to your mind, and how to treat yourself/de-toxify if you are positive for it (most humans are infected!).
    Where on this website are such topic suggestions to Dr G to be made? As said by others, new innovations such as this are needed more than motion sickness graphics experiments.




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  74. This was by far my favorite layout for video-1) the still photo before you hit play is vibrant and gripping, 2) the angles (or lack there of) and highlights make the text easy to read and show context within the rest of the article (a little more time, like a second longer, on the titles of [the first two] articles would be nice though), love the clean/concise visualizations of set up for experiments (i.e. poop gift boxes that go in subjects tummies, which are color coded). This video, however, does have an upper hand in that they get a chance to animate bunnies–a markedly easier job than animating tea bags or supplements. Even that considered, this was the most visually appealing, easy to read, and highlighted Dr. Gregor’s points most effectively.




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  75. It’s not about the visual effects, it’s all about information.
    I prefer 3 videos with interesting info and without any graphic at all, then 2 videos for kids, but less information.




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  76. I very much appreciate everything your are doing. I really love it!!!
    1st Choice: Leave things the way they were. Your remarkable content needs no further embellishment or enhancement.
    2nd Choice: If you absolutely have to make a change, Tyler’s is the least distracting.
    3rd Choice: Daniel’s is not too bad.
    4th Choice: Julien’s has too much motion and is too distracting.
    5th Choice: Lucas & Jesse’s is very hard on the eyes. Difficult to watch. Too much motion.




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  77. I’ll vote for Lucas & Jesse. I like the pictures, especially the bunny rabbits. These kind of graphics help me remember the point being stated. They stay in my mind more than printed words.




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  78. Avocado Video’s submission has by far the best sense of timing. I always have time to read the highlights and graphs. The other videos don’t seem to consider the viewer’s experience, and rip text and graphics away before I’m finished, like one of those-nausea inducing video+motion theme park rides (like the one in Jurassic Park, that the scientists had to escape from because they were still interested).

    Moving too fast in the visuals creates poor See-Say harmony, where what viewers see doesn’t match what the presenter is saying. This means the viewer has to mentally process both separate things at once – so they remember nothing. Your original videos had good harmony, and Avocado Video does a good job of harmonizing See-Say with strong vignetting for selective focus and by carefully matching the pacing of the visuals to the viewer’s attention (which does not always mean cutting at the exact moment a new sentence has started, it’s more complicated than that.) The other videos, particularly the first two submissions, were too choppy and had poor see-say harmony.

    I really like the real-printed paper metaphor, and the natural pace of page flipping, showing landmarks to help keep track of what page we’re on, it helps make the motion seem comfortable rather than motion-sickness inducing.

    Finally, the animation during your explanation is a really nice improvement, and will improve recollection for your viewers.

    This video is the best.




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  79. Loving the graphics, in my opinion they do convey much better the information, that you already kindly make very available to us :) Graphics like such are a great add on, in my particular case, it’s always much more didatic this way.




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  80. I really prefer the old format to any of the new ones in terms of presenting text. I never needed to keep hitting pause or actually *look away* from the screen to be able to stay focused on (and comprehend) what was being said. (There is a difference between entertainment and education. They are certainly not mutually exclusive, but presentation styles do need to be adjusted to suit the goal.) I also think it is really important to more clearly present the titles of the papers, whether that means leaving them up on the screen longer or doing something else. The ability to readily identify sources and look them up in the Sources Cited section is one of the things that makes nutritionfacts.org so unique and valuable. That all being said, I think the animated vignettes are a nice new touch (e.g. the bunnies). Perhaps a mix of the old format for text presentation with the new animated vignettes thrown in here and there would be perfect. Thanks so much for all you do!




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  81. I really liked Tyler’s video. The movements were fast, leaving more time to look at the text while you are speaking so it is easier to read along (which I have to do to retain anything!). Some of the other videos with slower movements (i.e., page turning) would put me to sleep if I was to watch more than one at a time. My second favourite video was Julien’s because it was also easy to read the highlighted text since he made it bigger (although green may not be the best colour to choose for anyone who is colour blind).

    Overall, I dislike seeing text zooming or moving across the page because it looks fuzzy until the animation it done, and I dislike slow animations because they put me to sleep and take away from the time available to read the highlights. Like some of your previous commentators, I had no problem with your own earlier videos…they are just great!

    Focus on clarity and not fancy graphics or animations please. :) I love the work you do!




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  82. After watching the 4 videos one after the other I ended up liking this presentation the best, for many of the same reasons as Kirsten and BunnyChomps above. There were no pauses between Dr. Gregor’s verbal comments, and the faster movements were also helpful. Some of the movements could even be faster, perhaps a “jump-to” movement would be better than the scroll down a page motion, as extensive motion can be a strain on the eyes (or even “nausea-inducing” as put in one comment). Also liked the yellow highlighing and markups in the actual text, and the graphics were very helpful and, perhaps more importantly, memorable.




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  83. I found the graphics today by Lucas and Jesse kept me engaged in the logical development of your discussion. They helped me much more than the one that had pauses through the talk.




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  84. Tyler’s style in Benefits of Green Tea is the easiest to read – the quicker the text is clearly displayed as a whole, the quicker I’m engaged and reading – have been finding trying to read moving objects more difficult… love the videos – have watched every one and have come back to a few… thank you for your work!




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  85. Lucas and Jessie: My favorite. Clear graphics were uncluttered and easy to follow. I like the yellow highlighting and the increase in font size for points that are emphasized. The bunnies were entertaining and engaging.
    Daniel: I dislike the pages that are on a slant. They are much harder to read, which is distracting. I liked how sections popped out slowly.
    Tyler: The page turns bothered me somewhat, but I’m not sure why. Maybe it was the speed?
    Julien: I liked the green print in the expanded sections, but it was very distracting to have different words expand at different times.




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  86. I still find the older format the best – the least distracting, the least gimmicky and glitzy, giving the most attention to the very important information, and not partaking of our over-stimulated, fast-paced media culture. But of the several new ones so far, I think this is the least problematic. It’s less speedy and over-filled, and I actually like some of the highlighting. Still, I think you should save money and just keep the old format – it was working well.




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  87. I said before that Daniel’s style was my favourite but after watching Lucas and Jesse’s I definitely prefer their style a lot more – it the best one so far.




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