Benefits of Rosemary for Brain Function

Benefits of Rosemary for Brain Function
4.41 (88.11%) 37 votes

A half-teaspoon of dried rosemary can improve cognitive function.

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Below is an approximation of this video’s audio content. To see any graphs, charts, graphics, images, and quotes to which Dr. Greger may be referring, watch the above video.

In Hamlet, act IV, scene V, Ophelia notes that rosemary is “for remembrance,” an idea that goes back at least a few thousand years to the ancient Greeks, who claimed that rosemary “comforts the brain,…sharpens understanding, restores lost memory, [and] awakens the mind.” After all, plants can be considered little “chemical factories” that manufacture all sorts of compounds that could have “neuroprotective benefits.”

So, let’s cut down on processed foods; eat lots of phytonutrient-rich whole plant foods, including, perhaps, a variety of herbs. Even the smell of certain herbs may affect how our brain works. Unfortunately, I’ve found much of the aromatherapy literature scientifically unsatisfying. Like, there will be studies like this, offering subjective impressions. And so, fine, sure, sniffing an herbal sachet is indeed “easy, inexpensive, and safe,” but is it effective? They didn’t compare test scores, or anything.

Even when there is a control group, where researchers had people do a battery of tests in a room that smelled like rosemary, lavender, or nothing, and even when they did compare test results, the lavender appeared to slow them down, impair their performance, whereas the rosemary group seemed to do better. But, maybe that’s just because of the mood effects. Maybe the rosemary group did better just because the aroma kind of pepped them up? And, not necessarily in a good way, maybe kind of overstimulating, in some circumstances?

Now, there have been studies that measured people’s brain waves, and were able to correlate the EEG findings with the changes in mood and performance, along with objective changes in stress hormone levels. But is this all just because pleasant smells improve people’s moods? Like, if you created some synthetic rosemary fragrance with a bunch of chemicals that had nothing to do with the rosemary plant, would it still have the same effect? We didn’t know, until now.

Aromatic herbs do have volatile compounds that theoretically could enter the bloodstream by way of the lining of the nose or lungs, and then potentially cross into the brain, and have direct effects. But, this was the first study to put it to the test. They had people do math in a cubicle infused with rosemary aroma. And so, yes, they got that same boost in performance, but for the first time, showed that how much better they did correlated with the amount of a rosemary compound that made it into their bloodstream, just from being in the room. And so, not only did this show that it gets absorbed, but that such natural aromatic plant compounds may be playing a direct effect on changes in brain function.

If that’s just what smelling it can do, what about eating rosemary? We have the studies on alertness and cognition and reduced stress hormone levels inhaling rosemary. However, there were no clinical studies on cognitive performance following ingestion of rosemary, until now. Older adults, average age 75, were given two cups of tomato juice, with either nothing, or a half-teaspoon of powdered rosemary, which is what one might use in a typical recipe, or a full teaspoon, two teaspoons, or over a tablespoon of rosemary powder. And, they even gave them some placebo pills to go with it, to even further eliminate any placebo effects.

“Speed of memory is a potentially useful predictor of cognitive function during aging.” And, what they found is that the lowest dose had a beneficial effect, accelerating their processing speed. But, the highest dose impaired their processing speed, maybe because the half-teaspoon dose improved alertness, while the four-teaspoon dose “decreased alertness.” So, “rosemary powder at the dose nearest to normal culinary consumption demonstrated positive effects on speed of memory”—the implicit take-home message being more isn’t necessarily better. Don’t take high-dose herbal supplements, extracts, tinctures; just cooking with spices is sufficient. A conclusion, no doubt, pleasing to the spice company that sponsored the study.

No side effects were reported, but that doesn’t mean you can eat the whole bush. This poor guy swallowed a rosemary twig, which punctured through the stomach into his liver, causing an abscess from which two cups of pus and a two-inch twig was removed. So, explore herbs and spices in your cooking. Branch out; just leave the branches out.

Please consider volunteering to help out on the site.

Image credit: Kristina DeMuth. Image has been modified.

Video credit: Tyler McReynolds, Teetotalin LLC.

Below is an approximation of this video’s audio content. To see any graphs, charts, graphics, images, and quotes to which Dr. Greger may be referring, watch the above video.

In Hamlet, act IV, scene V, Ophelia notes that rosemary is “for remembrance,” an idea that goes back at least a few thousand years to the ancient Greeks, who claimed that rosemary “comforts the brain,…sharpens understanding, restores lost memory, [and] awakens the mind.” After all, plants can be considered little “chemical factories” that manufacture all sorts of compounds that could have “neuroprotective benefits.”

So, let’s cut down on processed foods; eat lots of phytonutrient-rich whole plant foods, including, perhaps, a variety of herbs. Even the smell of certain herbs may affect how our brain works. Unfortunately, I’ve found much of the aromatherapy literature scientifically unsatisfying. Like, there will be studies like this, offering subjective impressions. And so, fine, sure, sniffing an herbal sachet is indeed “easy, inexpensive, and safe,” but is it effective? They didn’t compare test scores, or anything.

Even when there is a control group, where researchers had people do a battery of tests in a room that smelled like rosemary, lavender, or nothing, and even when they did compare test results, the lavender appeared to slow them down, impair their performance, whereas the rosemary group seemed to do better. But, maybe that’s just because of the mood effects. Maybe the rosemary group did better just because the aroma kind of pepped them up? And, not necessarily in a good way, maybe kind of overstimulating, in some circumstances?

Now, there have been studies that measured people’s brain waves, and were able to correlate the EEG findings with the changes in mood and performance, along with objective changes in stress hormone levels. But is this all just because pleasant smells improve people’s moods? Like, if you created some synthetic rosemary fragrance with a bunch of chemicals that had nothing to do with the rosemary plant, would it still have the same effect? We didn’t know, until now.

Aromatic herbs do have volatile compounds that theoretically could enter the bloodstream by way of the lining of the nose or lungs, and then potentially cross into the brain, and have direct effects. But, this was the first study to put it to the test. They had people do math in a cubicle infused with rosemary aroma. And so, yes, they got that same boost in performance, but for the first time, showed that how much better they did correlated with the amount of a rosemary compound that made it into their bloodstream, just from being in the room. And so, not only did this show that it gets absorbed, but that such natural aromatic plant compounds may be playing a direct effect on changes in brain function.

If that’s just what smelling it can do, what about eating rosemary? We have the studies on alertness and cognition and reduced stress hormone levels inhaling rosemary. However, there were no clinical studies on cognitive performance following ingestion of rosemary, until now. Older adults, average age 75, were given two cups of tomato juice, with either nothing, or a half-teaspoon of powdered rosemary, which is what one might use in a typical recipe, or a full teaspoon, two teaspoons, or over a tablespoon of rosemary powder. And, they even gave them some placebo pills to go with it, to even further eliminate any placebo effects.

“Speed of memory is a potentially useful predictor of cognitive function during aging.” And, what they found is that the lowest dose had a beneficial effect, accelerating their processing speed. But, the highest dose impaired their processing speed, maybe because the half-teaspoon dose improved alertness, while the four-teaspoon dose “decreased alertness.” So, “rosemary powder at the dose nearest to normal culinary consumption demonstrated positive effects on speed of memory”—the implicit take-home message being more isn’t necessarily better. Don’t take high-dose herbal supplements, extracts, tinctures; just cooking with spices is sufficient. A conclusion, no doubt, pleasing to the spice company that sponsored the study.

No side effects were reported, but that doesn’t mean you can eat the whole bush. This poor guy swallowed a rosemary twig, which punctured through the stomach into his liver, causing an abscess from which two cups of pus and a two-inch twig was removed. So, explore herbs and spices in your cooking. Branch out; just leave the branches out.

Please consider volunteering to help out on the site.

Image credit: Kristina DeMuth. Image has been modified.

Video credit: Tyler McReynolds, Teetotalin LLC.

Doctor's Note

That twig is like a plant-based equivalent of Migrating Fish Bones!

For more on aromatherapy, see:

For more on spicing up your life, see videos such as:

And, more on improving cognition (or, at least, preventing age-related cognitive decline) in:

If you haven’t yet, you can subscribe to my videos for free by clicking here.

78 responses to “Benefits of Rosemary for Brain Function

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    1. When I read the ingredients lists of many supplements, I cant believe people actually pay good money for them! Nothing beats wfpb eating , with maybe B12 – though I test fine without it.




      2
    1. *sigh* our ADHD culture does not allow for anything longer than sound bites. Dr Greger and his team are just providing a format to reach the widest audience. I watch with my finger poised on the pause button.

      Transcripts might be more to your liking [ insert sympathetic emoticon]




      6
      1. Hey I’m certified ADHD and hate the ultra-bizzyness that they keep trying to run here. LOVE the longer videos from the Annual Conference (because they’re simpler and pack more “general info”).

        But then I’m older than the young kids these days. Maybe they like everything flying all around all the time. They must. The world appears to be hell-bent on delivering all messages that way.

        Screw that, slow down and enjoy the ride is my way.




        1
          1. On my system/browser the space bar works to pause the video. If I want to read something I can hit that. Also the right left arrow keys work to go back or advance the video in small increments (because the text went flying away much too quickly and we have to back up and THEN pause.) Your setup may be different, but I’d mash some buttons and see what does work.

            Sorry they’ve made it so aggravating. Hope this all blows over soon, like so many March thunderstorms and we can get back to regular information sharing and not video manipulations and critiques or concerns therewith.

            I really do.




            1
        1. #Wade Patton
          That’s true, the young people today like this hurry up news – because they are not able to think on minute longer on on thought, most of them aren’t able to think by them self…thank’s to computer, tv and so more… when I speak to my patients, most of them are overtaxed by the simples information. Hey Mr. Jurisch can you say it in one sentence what you like to say? Oh, Mr. Jurisch I understand nothing, so may be it’s better for me to have my lunch like always – I saw this very good advertising last night, that was good, they say meat is very good…
          May Dr. Greger tried to reach this generation and he hopes he can change the you people with this format… ;-)




          0
      2. Indeed…all those graphics go by way too fast! I don’t have any chance (other than the pause button) to read highlighted areas, and at the same time to comprehend his spoken words. Please slow these down so that the average brain can process!




        1
        1. Dear Dr. Greger: Please listen to (many of) us and slow down the speed of your presentation – the speed of your speech and the speed of presenting
          evidence. Having to click the pause button 5-10 times in a 3 minute video is no fun. Out of desperation I have developed the habit of reading the transcript first and only then will I try to listen to your high-speed video presentation … or I skip it altogether and go straight to the references/sources cited. Apparently I am not alone. Please think also of many older people with somewhat slower perception, and of those devoted followers who are not
          born English speakers.
          What is the reason for the unusually fast video presentation ?




          3
    2. I agree.
      To the administrators: please pause on the title of the paper so viewers can remember the first few words of the title so they can find the reference in the” Sources Cited”.




      0
      1. I agree with these points but it’s also worth noting that using either pause or clicking the speed setting and choosing a slower playback speed (settings icon in the lower right corner of the video) can be helpful too.




        4
    3. Over to the right of the video there is a menu where you can click sources sited. These are the studies that flash before your eyes in the video. You can read them at your leisure.




      2
    4. Use the pause button to stop the video in places where you wish to read the research, or look for the references to the quoted research in the resources.




      1
    5. Hello, I am relatively new here but I seem to be a rare case of “not fast enough”.

      The information density in these videos is higher than many other informative YouTube videos, in my opinion, but the more we can squeeze into one minute the more we can learn in one minute.

      As much as I enjoy reading a pleasant story slowly, I’d like to get my factual information in as quick as possible. It’s not always ADHD, some people get just bored quickly from a too slow input of new information.

      I speed up the videos :o) – Maybe you could slow it down a bit, that might help? – And of course space to pause for larger diagrams.

      Greetings from Vienna!
      Denis




      2
    1. I also had that question after watching the video, but the sponsored research is only one study in the long period of time covered by the numerous other studies presented in the video, which all support the benefits of rosemary for mental function. At first, these confusing and contradicting video endings were very frustrating, but the point is very clear: not all research should be trusted, nor should all researchers be trusted. Therefore, while I may be willing to scrap the research that was funded by McCormick for the possibilities of conclusion bias, I am willing to heed this sage advice and start cooking with rosemary (powdered rosemary only, not rosemary twigs). HOWEVER, the American capitalist pig in me sees the possibilities of marketing toothpicks made from rosemary twigs…

      Let’s see: “smart toothpicks”, “pick your brain”, “toothpick as a study aid”, “rosemary coffee stirrers”,




      1
    2. There’s a considerable body of research on the neuroprotective diterpenes carnosol and carnosic acid found in rosemary and sage, notable for their ability to cross the blood brain barrier. While nearly all the studies are in vitro or in rodents, it corroborates the one in humans.

      2003 Carnosic acid, a component of rosemary (Rosmarinus officinalis L.), promotes synthesis of nerve growth factor in T98G human glioblastoma cells
      2006 Carnosol, a component of rosemary (Rosmarinus officinalis L.) protects nigral dopaminergic neuronal cells
      2008 Carnosic acid, a catechol‐type electrophilic compound, protects neurons both in vitro and in vivo through activation of the Keap1/Nrf2 pathway via S‐alkylation of targeted cysteines on Keap1
      2008 Beneficial effects of carnosic acid on dieldrin-induced dopaminergic neuronal cell death
      2008 Carnosic acid protects neuronal HT22 Cells through activation of the antioxidant-responsive element in free carboxylic acid-and catechol hydroxyl moieties-dependent manners
      2009 Protective effect of supercritical fluid rosemary extract, Rosmarinus officinalis, on antioxidants of major organs of aged rats
      2011 Neuroprotective effects of carnosic acid in an experimental model of Alzheimer’s disease in rats
      2012 Short-term study on the effects of rosemary on cognitive function in an elderly population The sole human study.
      2012 The effects of acute administration of the hydroalcoholic extract of rosemary (Rosmarinus officinalis L.)(Lamiaceae) in animal models of memory
      2013 The protective role of carnosic acid against beta-amyloid toxicity in rats
      2013 Bioavailability of the major bioactive diterpenoids in a rosemary extract: metabolic profile in the intestine, liver, plasma, and brain of Zucker rats
      2016 Carnosic acid affords mitochondrial protection in chlorpyrifos-treated Sh-Sy5y cells a brain-damaging pesticide that Scott Pruitt recently decided to not ban, against scientific advice
      2016 review The therapeutic potential of rosemary (Rosmarinus officinalis) diterpenes for Alzheimer’s disease

      Personally, I add liberal amounts of rosemary powder to my vinaigrette dressing, but a couple years ago I searched and failed to find a source for the descented high carnosic acid extract used as an antioxidant in processed foods. I’d pay for a supplement, were it available.




      1
  1. BunnyC,
    Yes quick but you can always pause the video. On my mac I just hit the space bar. To continue I just hit it again.. Now where is my sachet of rosemary??
    m




    3
  2. Hello Dr Greger,
    I’ve been hearing lots of bad things about lectins. Causing leaky gut and inflammatory reactions etc.
    Thank you.




    0
    1. Jeff Sheehan: I found one blog post on NutritionFacts which talks about lectins. Here is a quote:
      .
      “Modern paleo advocates claim that these foods weren’t part of Paleolithic-era diets, but new research challenges that assumption.5 They also argue that lectins naturally present in these starchy foods are harmful to human health. Consuming too many lectins can cause significant gastrointestinal distress. However, because legumes and grains are almost always consumed in a cooked form—and lectins are destroyed during cooking—eating beans and grains doesn’t result in lectin overload. Sprouting also reduces lectin levels in plants, although not as effectively as cooking. Generally, pea sprouts, lentil sprouts, and mung bean sprouts are safe to consume, as are sprouted grains, which are naturally low in lectins. Most larger legumes contain higher amounts and should be cooked.” from: http://nutritionfacts.org/2014/09/23/will-the-real-paleo-diet-please-stand-up/
      .
      Since I eat my grains and legumes cooked, I consider the lectin brouhaha to be much ado about nothing.
      .
      In the past, Tom Goff has posted some additional helpful takes on the subject. Here are some quotes from Tom Goff’s previous posts.
      .
      “…problem with such claims is that people in the past ate huge amounts of (whole) grains (compared to modern-day Americans). Some people still do. There is no record of such people suffering abnormally high rates of toxicity or inflammation-related diseases. If anything, the exact opposite is the case eg
      .
      “This meta-analysis provides further evidence that whole grain intake is associated with a reduced risk of coronary heart disease, cardiovascular disease, and total cancer, and mortality from all causes, respiratory diseases, infectious diseases, diabetes, and all non-cardiovascular, non-cancer causes. These findings support dietary guidelines that recommend increased intake of whole grain to reduce the risk of chronic diseases and premature mortality.”
      http://www.bmj.com/content/353/bmj.i2716
      .
      Further, reviews of the health effects of grain lectins do not support the wild claims found on the internet or sensational mass market “health ” books
      .
      “We conclude that there are many unsubstantiated assumptions made. Current data about health effects of dietary lectins, as consumed in cooked, baked, or extruded foods do not support negative health effects in humans. In contrast, consumption of WGA containing foods, such as cereals and whole grain products, has been shown to be associated with significantly reduced risks of type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease, some types of cancer, as well as a more favourable long-term weight management.”
      http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0733521014000228
      .
      Sure, it is possible to find toxic effects from grain lectins in the laboratory or in rat studies. You can find toxic effects from virtually anything if you design the study appropriately. Even water is toxic in high doses and specific circumstances. And you can turn such findings into sensational claims that garner a lot of publicity (and sales) – if you leave out all the evidence that does not suit your argument or book sales.”
      .
      And from another post:
      “The Paleo community attitude is certainly strange because there is evidence to show that humans in the Paleolithic period actually did eat legumes – and significant amounts at that – at least in certain locations and in the relevant season eg
      http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0305440304001694
      .
      However, it seems that once an idea becomes established in the Paleo canon it becomes sacrosanct and no mere inconvenient fact is powerfu l enough to overturn it.
      .
      On lectins and health specifically, blogger has summarised the (Paleo) argument like this:
      “There is evidence that legumes provide health benefits. There is speculation that lectins cause diseases. Unfortunately, the autoimmune diseases some speculate are caused by legume lectins appear to occur more frequently in nations like the U.S., where legume consumption is rather low, than in Asian nations, where legume consumption is higher.”
      http://donmatesz.blogspot.com/2011/08/legumes-neolithic-or-not.html




      1
  3. Hurrah! I’ve been in the practice of putting rosemary needles, along with ginger, sage, thyme, amla, turmeric, pepper, rose-hips, cloves, ashwaghanda, hibiscus petals and flax seed in my smoothie every day! The veggies and fruit cover up the taste and grind the needles to nothing. And I’m as healthy as can be! I hope this is the beginning of a series of videos on some of these other herbs that Dr. Greger hasn’t covered yet. That would spice up his videos!




    2
  4. Dr. Gregger
    Your Insightful info is refreshing as usual! My health has substantially improved from listening to your book, and your videos. I sincerely appreciate all you and your staff do. And, for all of you who cannot follow his videos, simply read his blogs he reproduces the same video info in his reading blogs if you would like a set down to a richer holiday type meal, grin.

    To your health




    0
  5. I’m not surprised about the lavender results. Years ago I used to drink lavender tea every once in a while, but I found it far too sedating and had to stop.




    0
  6. According to the energetics of of Rosemary it is warming and drying, stimulating, restoring, astringing and dissolving.
    Aroma therapy says it stimulates memory and opens the conscious mind.
    Ayurveda states it is good for Vata and Kapha constitutions but not Pita. This is because it is warming. Vata and Kapha constitutions are more cool or cold constitutions where Pita is warm to hot.
    I enjoy watching, reading and hearing how new information is confirming ancient knowledge. It is too bad we do not start with what is already known, like Ayurvedic information, and build on that.
    I recommend food guidelines for clients all the time according to their constitution (dosha) and imbalance (Vikruti). Food is our medicine.
    Thank you for your continued research.
    Brian Langston Eastern Medical Herbalist




    0
  7. I found this video unpleasant to watch and difficult to follow. The quotes move too fast. Sure, pausing is an option, but this vid just seems poorly made and less professional. Of the styles presented so far, my preference is still for your original format. Of course I’m old and may need more rosemary…or perhaps some adderall would help ;)




    0
  8. The video format is great! It may take time for some people to get used to, but I think they’re easy to follow and flow nicely. The pause button is always an option. I used it frequently on the old format as well.
    I hope to see more information in the future on the benefits of herbs & spices.




    0
  9. I eat fresh Rosemary sprigs almost every day. And I have noticed the difference. Also sniff the fresh sprig before I consume it. You get a mini head clearing, I have access to lots of fresh Rosemary so I am lucky. I also eat fresh Turmeric, Ginger and Cloves every day. Wonderful.




    0
  10. I too like Shakespeare, but Ophelia probably isn’t the best exemplar of rosemary’s power. When she mentions this herb in “Hamlet,” Ophelia is literally losing her mind and soon to commit suicide.




    3
  11. Many years ago I had read that essential oil of Rosemary was good for hair growth. Si I bought some and rubbed it into my scalp undiluted, that evening I was bouncing off the walls with energy and couldn’t sleep at all! This kind of explains why.




    0
  12. On rosemary: Great topic. Only yesterday I posted a comment asking for Dr G to consider the issue of how we might treat toxoplasmosis infection which apparently targets brain and behavior, attention and memory. Rosemary seems it would help. A specific video on it would still be of great interest.

    On video style: I see in the acknowledgements that this one is by Tyler. It seemed better than the recent four test cases probably because it is closer to the old style with simple text box highlighting and only a few full page zooms. But those sliding exits – whole page vection – are still not welcome. As others say, leave titles up a little longer to at least have some chance of reading the topic. With cramming so many papers and info into 5 mins, it is a challenge, I know! I guess we just need to use space bar more and left arrow to go back a few seconds. One always needs to watch a good video several times anyway to actually let it sink in. Impossible to do on one viewing. So just don’t make them “unwatchable” with the whole page zoom vection nonsense…




    1
    1. Going back and comparing video styles, this is , for me, the least distracting and least nausea-inducing (no whole page inward zooms) of all the new styles. The text highlighting is okay too. Incorporating the best of the rest could still be done (eg, illustrative cartoons, for those who like such entertainment) but the main technical focus should be on direct perception of the text info.




      0
  13. I have been following you for quite a while and wanted to finally reach out and ask a question that I have been waiting for you to discuss.

    What are your thoughts on keto diet? Are there any true benefits towards personal health? Any athletic performance advantage for long distance athletes?

    I also follow Rich Roll and Scott Jurek so I know that vegan can improve performance for long distance, but with the studies coming out with keto diet and long distance athletes, special ops soldiers, and many others gaining performance I thought it would be great for you to cover it.




    0
    1. Chris: I believe that this is already on Dr. Greger’s to-do list.

      In the meantime, it’s worth noting that a keto diet is either a starvation diet or a diet extremely high in fat and low in carbs. You might look up high fat and low carb as topics on this site which are already covered in general.




      0
    2. Hi Chris.

      Dr. Garth Davis talked about this in an interview he recently did with Jeff Morgan. I’ll do my best to summarize it quickly.

      To put it briefly, he said that almost any dietary change will be an improvement over the Standard American Diet, especially one that emphasizes vegetables. So technically speaking, nearly any keto diet (there’s more than one) can be an improvement over the SAD.

      Depending on whether you include French fries as a vegetable, almost no Americans actually consume the bare minimum recommendation of vegetables or fruits per day. On the keto diet, which is just any variation of Atkins, paleo, Dukan, etc., you are generally encouraged to consume non-starchy yellow and green vegetables in great quantities due to their extremely low carbohydrate but high nutrient content.

      Furthermore, keto diets generally restrict or eliminate processed junk food like potato chips and cookies, and paleo eliminates dairy entirely. Either one of those changes alone can make you feel and perform better, according to Dr. Davis.

      If you go from eating no servings of vegetables per day to suddenly eating five or ten or more, you are going to feel and perform better than before. If you get rid of processed junk and dairy, you will feel and perform even better still. But does that mean you’ll actually be healthy and perform at optimum levels? Probably not, said Dr. Davis. You are only feeling and performing better by comparison to the worst diet in human history.

      The science on keto hasn’t really changed, as far as I have read. Check out Dr. Greger’s book Carbophobia, which is available for free at atkinsexposed.org. There’s a PDF download link on the right of the page. If you prefer physical books, many public libraries still have it available in print. Dr. John McDougall has also devoted a lot of resources to the topic and has lectured on the effects of prolonged ketosis on the body, which, outside of controlled water fasting, are generally unfavorable.




      2
      1. Thank you for the info and link to the book. Have spent many years in a paleo type diet and have found recently the more animal product I take out the better I feel. Still have the “carbophobia” mentality to some degree.




        0
  14. I’ve grown weary of the video fights. I listened only to this one and thought it was okay. Then i saw the comments and tried to watch it. Couldn’t. Not going to.

    Sure I’m an “old guy” at 50, but have been using computers since the 5.25 floppy and have probably seen 100,000 videos in all those years. I DON’T GET what all the mess is about here. Be happy when it settles down or I’ll just have to never _watch_ or share any more. Call me when it’s over, it’s gotten ridiculous. Sorry.




    0
    1. Wade Patton: Remember the popups? Those were pre-recorded for the entire volume. The same is true here. We are only on video #8 for volume 35. I don’t know what will happen for the next volume. What I can say is that there will be more of the same of these problematic special effects for the next 18 videos. People can decide how they want to deal with that.

      I just want to let people know the situation. There’s no point in getting frustrated with each video. “It is what it is” for another 6 weeks. Let’s all be patient please.




      1
      1. The issues are barely discussed. Everybody talks about the dodgy videos.

        When you are dealing with rational thought and concepts….all the video “games” are mostly distracting. And I’m someone who plays VR video games…probably too much. But when it comes to factual info all the video tricks aren’t adding up to much? Just confusing. Usually when I read…the page stays mostly still. Except if I’m trying to read while riding a bicycle.

        I’m not sure whom you are trying to attract…but if someone can’t understand the concepts…how is attracting them going to make a difference?




        0
        1. Fred: To clarify: I am a *volunteer* moderator. I personally am not trying to attract anyone with these changes. I wasn’t in favor of these changes, and you are preaching to the choir on all accounts. As a moderator, it is especially troubling to see how congested the comments area is with comments that have nothing to do with the content/purpose of the site. I’m totally with you on that.

          What I was trying to do with my post was to calm people down and lower frustration levels as much as possible. If someone did not understand that videos are pre-recorded far in advance, that person might think that NutritionFacts staff were not listening to the feedback. The point I’m making is that we have what we have for several more weeks. It’s a done deal. I’m expecting that staff will listen to the feedback and respond accordingly for the *next* “volume” of videos.

          In the meantime, as users who love this site, we would be wise to be patient. Hopefully we can have more productive conversations under the videos if people understand that the videos are pre-recorded and feedback has already been strongly given and (hopefully) received.

          Make sense? Does that help?




          2
          1. Mods: You need to say this in a shortened form up front in comments at the start of each video for next 6 weeks or whatever or comments will be the same old same old complaints of new and old members getting sick and/or annoyed – the reason for which I explained at length in my comments to the March 24 video experiment.




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            1. Allisfood: This is not a moderator’s decision to make. It is up to staff to make this decision, and they have seen all your posts. So, your recommendation is out there. For what it’s worth, I agree with you…




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          2. Hi Thea,
            I personally like the less cluttered layout of this new set up.
            I happen to grow a lot of Rosemary, which could be dried and used.
            This video came just in time, as I was wondering what to do with the rest of it after trimming a few for cooking.
            The excess nearly went into the compost.




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            1. Vegank: My post above was referring to the new video special effects, not the layout of the site.

              Glad you like the new site layout.

              Rosemary grows well where I live also. Glad this video came at the right time! :-)




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    1. I just start the video and then open other tabs/windows over it. Actual viewing has become a chore.

      Also thanks Thea. I’m just going to put that here because you know…Word Press.

      Methinks all the money and effort spent on this video fiasco could/would be more effective if we’d just give away stacks of the books to young folks and folks interested in becoming healthier. Stock up the libraries too. Folks yet read.

      Have a lovely healthy day!




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  15. Sort of off topic:

    What Gave Some Primates Bigger Brains? A Fruit-Filled Diet
    http://wamu.org/story/17/03/28/what-gave-some-primates-bigger-brains-a-fruit-filled-diet/

    Primate brains may have grown larger and more complex thanks to a fruit-filled diet, a new study suggests.

    The researchers analyzed the brain sizes and diets of over 140 primate species spanning apes, monkeys, lemurs and lorises and found that those who munched on fruit instead of leaves had 25 percent more brain tissue, even when controlling for body size and species relatedness.

    Original research article:
    Primate brain size is predicted by diet but not sociality
    http://www.nature.com/articles/s41559-017-0112




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    1. CD: This topic is of particular interest to me. I’ve heard the theories before concerning social groups and cooking. I hadn’t heard the theory before concerning fruit. Thanks for sharing the article!




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  16. I found this video to be easier to follow perhaps because the message is simpler without involving too much medical terms. Thank you so much for your genuine effort to improve the delivery format of the message which is as important of the messages themselves sometimes.
    with much appreciation,
    Jackelyn




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  17. I was wanting to get some advice on how to lower troponin levels. If you could please help with that I would greatly appreciate it!




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    1. Hi Rachael, I am one of the site moderators. It would be good to know why you are concerned about elevated troponin. Typically the only time one would see elevated troponin is when there has been damage to the heart muscle, most often when a heart attack has been diagnosed. This protein is usually inside the unique cells of the heart and that is why if there is any level detectable in the blood stream it indicates that there has been some degree of heart muscle damage. If you have elevated levels it should have been as part of a chest pain work up and the treatment once the markers are seen is to stop the damage to the heart muscle which usually entails increasing the blood flow to the heart – either via medications or an intervention. Once that is done the levels will gradually lessen back to nearly zero indicating there is no further ongoing damage. I hope that answers your question.




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  18. I just tried watching this video on Rosemary. It was so fuzzy as to be essentially completely unwatchable. The sound quality was fine, the video of text from studies totally out of focus. In case it is useful, I’m on an HP Pavilion dv2000 laptop using Linux Mint 17.3 Rosa 32-bit and Firefox 52.02 (32 bit) with resolution set at 1280 x 800 and a refresh rate of 60.




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  19. I HATE the loss of the search by food or disorder function that used to be on the 1st page opened. Now it’s completely gone and makes the site at least 95% less useful. It’s also was the way I have recommended the site to newbies. PLEASE BRING IT BACK ASAP!




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  20. I have heard that rosemary causes increased blood pressure and should be used with caution. I have noticed that it seems to give me a headache. Can you comment on this potential side-effect of rosemary?




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  21. I like how some people are complaining about how they can’t keep up with the fast pace of the video and it’s a video about improving cognitive function…Maybe you guys should try eating some rosemary :)




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  22. But why wasn’t it mentioned in this video that lavender seems to produce better cognitive results than rosemary as was presented in another video? That while the in the groups either sniffing rosemary or lavender, both increased the speed in which they were able to do math problems, but only in the lavender group did accuracy improve.




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  23. My there are a lot of people nit picking site features on these new videos… Back to rosemary, I read about the effects of sniffing rosemary and memory a while ago (though it was more new age-y literature) so I tried it out when I couldn’t remember a poem I’d written but lost, and it actually worked amazingly! I wasn’t sure it was going to but it was like a light bulb. I was skeptical when trying so I don’t THINK it was the placebo effect, but it worked either way and I was impressed.




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