Cadmium & Cancer: Plant vs. Animal Foods

Cadmium & Cancer: Plant vs. Animal Foods
4.71 (94.17%) 24 votes

Though the most concentrated sources of the toxic metal cadmium are cigarette smoke, seafood, and organ meats, does greater consumption from whole grains and vegetables present a concern?

Discuss
Republish

Below is an approximation of this video’s audio content. To see any graphs, charts, graphics, images, and quotes to which Dr. Greger may be referring, watch the above video.

“Cadmium is known as a highly toxic metal that represents a major hazard” to human health. It sticks around in our body for decades, because our body has no efficient way to get rid of it, and may contribute to a variety of illnesses, including “heart disease, cancer, and diabetes.” Most recently, data suggests that cadmium exposure may impair cognitive performance even at levels once thought to be safe.

Recent studies suggest “cadmium exposure may produce adverse health effects at lower exposure levels than previously predicted,” including increased risk of hormonal cancers. For example, researchers on Long Island estimated that about 40% of breast cancer in the U.S. may be associated with elevated cadmium levels.

“Inhalation of cigarette smoke is one of the major routes for human [exposure to cadmium].” Seafood consumption is another “dominant route” of human exposure in this study—even more so than from cigarette smoke. The highest levels, though, are found in organ meats. But, you know, how many horse kidneys can you eat? Because people eat so few organs, grains and vegetables actually end up contributing the largest amount.

But, wait a second. “…[w]hole grains and vegetable[s]…are among the major dietary sources of fiber, phytoestrogens, [and] antioxidants” that may protect against breast cancer. And, indeed, even though the risk of breast cancer goes up as women consume more and more cadmium, even though on paper, most cadmium comes from grains and vegetables, breast cancer risk goes down, the more and more whole grains and vegetables women eat.

So, maybe the animal-sourced cadmium is somehow worse? Or, the benefits of plant foods just overwhelm any adverse effects of the cadmium? This study may have helped solve the mystery. It’s not what we eat; it’s what we absorb.

“[Cadmium] bioavailability from animal-based foods [may be] higher than…from vegetable-based foods.” There appears to be something in plants that inhibits cadmium absorption. In fact, if you add kale to your boiled pig kidneys, you can cut down on the toxic exposure. Just one tablespoon of pig kidney, and we may exceed the daily safety limit—unless we eat kale, in which case we could eat a whole quarter-cup. “[T]he pronounced effects of the inhibitory factors in kale…point[s] out the importance of vegetable foods in terms of prevention of health hazard[s] from [cadmium] ingested as mixed diets in a real situation.”

“Even if a vegetarian diet contains more lead and cadmium than a mixed diet, it is not certain that it will give rise to higher uptake of the metals…because the absorption of lead and cadmium is inhibited by [plant compounds such as] fibre and phytate.” And, it’s not just in lab animals. Having whole grains in our stomach up to three hours before we swallow lead can eliminate 90% of absorption—thought to be due to phytates in whole grains, beans, and nuts grabbing onto it.

So, vegetarians may have lower levels, even though they have higher intakes. “In fact, a significant decrease in the hair concentrations of lead and cadmium [was seen] after the change from [an omnivorous] to [a] vegetarian diet…, indicating a lower [absorption] of the metals.”

Here’s that study. They took folks eating a standard Swedish diet, and put them on a vegetarian diet. Lots of whole unrefined plant foods; no meat, poultry, fish, eggs, and junk food that was discouraged.

Here’s where they started out: a measure of their mercury levels, cadmium level, and lead levels in their bodies. Within three months on a vegetarian diet, their levels significantly dropped, and stayed down for the rest of the year-long experiment. But then, they came back three years later—three years after they stopped eating vegetarian. And, what did they find? Their levels of mercury, cadmium, and lead shot back up.

Since the cadmium in plants is based on the cadmium in soil, plant-eaters that live in a really polluted area, like Slovakia, which has some of the highest levels, the so-called “black triangle” of pollution, thanks to the chemical and smelting industries. Those who eat lots of plants there can indeed build up higher cadmium levels, especially if you eat lots of plants. It’s interesting. “In spite of the significantly higher blood cadmium concentrations as a consequence of a greater cadmium intake from [polluted plants], all the antioxidants in those same plants were found to help “inhibit [the] harmful effects of higher free radical production” caused by [the] cadmium exposure.

Still, though, in highly polluted areas, it might be an especially good idea not to smoke, or eat too much seafood or organ meats. But, even if we live in the Slovak Republic’s black triangle of pollution, the benefits of whole plant foods would outweigh the risks. In highly polluted areas, zinc supplements may decrease cadmium absorption. But, I’d recommend against multi-mineral supplements, as they have been found to be contaminated with cadmium itself.

Please consider volunteering to help out on the site.

Images thanks to NASA via Wikimedia

Below is an approximation of this video’s audio content. To see any graphs, charts, graphics, images, and quotes to which Dr. Greger may be referring, watch the above video.

“Cadmium is known as a highly toxic metal that represents a major hazard” to human health. It sticks around in our body for decades, because our body has no efficient way to get rid of it, and may contribute to a variety of illnesses, including “heart disease, cancer, and diabetes.” Most recently, data suggests that cadmium exposure may impair cognitive performance even at levels once thought to be safe.

Recent studies suggest “cadmium exposure may produce adverse health effects at lower exposure levels than previously predicted,” including increased risk of hormonal cancers. For example, researchers on Long Island estimated that about 40% of breast cancer in the U.S. may be associated with elevated cadmium levels.

“Inhalation of cigarette smoke is one of the major routes for human [exposure to cadmium].” Seafood consumption is another “dominant route” of human exposure in this study—even more so than from cigarette smoke. The highest levels, though, are found in organ meats. But, you know, how many horse kidneys can you eat? Because people eat so few organs, grains and vegetables actually end up contributing the largest amount.

But, wait a second. “…[w]hole grains and vegetable[s]…are among the major dietary sources of fiber, phytoestrogens, [and] antioxidants” that may protect against breast cancer. And, indeed, even though the risk of breast cancer goes up as women consume more and more cadmium, even though on paper, most cadmium comes from grains and vegetables, breast cancer risk goes down, the more and more whole grains and vegetables women eat.

So, maybe the animal-sourced cadmium is somehow worse? Or, the benefits of plant foods just overwhelm any adverse effects of the cadmium? This study may have helped solve the mystery. It’s not what we eat; it’s what we absorb.

“[Cadmium] bioavailability from animal-based foods [may be] higher than…from vegetable-based foods.” There appears to be something in plants that inhibits cadmium absorption. In fact, if you add kale to your boiled pig kidneys, you can cut down on the toxic exposure. Just one tablespoon of pig kidney, and we may exceed the daily safety limit—unless we eat kale, in which case we could eat a whole quarter-cup. “[T]he pronounced effects of the inhibitory factors in kale…point[s] out the importance of vegetable foods in terms of prevention of health hazard[s] from [cadmium] ingested as mixed diets in a real situation.”

“Even if a vegetarian diet contains more lead and cadmium than a mixed diet, it is not certain that it will give rise to higher uptake of the metals…because the absorption of lead and cadmium is inhibited by [plant compounds such as] fibre and phytate.” And, it’s not just in lab animals. Having whole grains in our stomach up to three hours before we swallow lead can eliminate 90% of absorption—thought to be due to phytates in whole grains, beans, and nuts grabbing onto it.

So, vegetarians may have lower levels, even though they have higher intakes. “In fact, a significant decrease in the hair concentrations of lead and cadmium [was seen] after the change from [an omnivorous] to [a] vegetarian diet…, indicating a lower [absorption] of the metals.”

Here’s that study. They took folks eating a standard Swedish diet, and put them on a vegetarian diet. Lots of whole unrefined plant foods; no meat, poultry, fish, eggs, and junk food that was discouraged.

Here’s where they started out: a measure of their mercury levels, cadmium level, and lead levels in their bodies. Within three months on a vegetarian diet, their levels significantly dropped, and stayed down for the rest of the year-long experiment. But then, they came back three years later—three years after they stopped eating vegetarian. And, what did they find? Their levels of mercury, cadmium, and lead shot back up.

Since the cadmium in plants is based on the cadmium in soil, plant-eaters that live in a really polluted area, like Slovakia, which has some of the highest levels, the so-called “black triangle” of pollution, thanks to the chemical and smelting industries. Those who eat lots of plants there can indeed build up higher cadmium levels, especially if you eat lots of plants. It’s interesting. “In spite of the significantly higher blood cadmium concentrations as a consequence of a greater cadmium intake from [polluted plants], all the antioxidants in those same plants were found to help “inhibit [the] harmful effects of higher free radical production” caused by [the] cadmium exposure.

Still, though, in highly polluted areas, it might be an especially good idea not to smoke, or eat too much seafood or organ meats. But, even if we live in the Slovak Republic’s black triangle of pollution, the benefits of whole plant foods would outweigh the risks. In highly polluted areas, zinc supplements may decrease cadmium absorption. But, I’d recommend against multi-mineral supplements, as they have been found to be contaminated with cadmium itself.

Please consider volunteering to help out on the site.

Images thanks to NASA via Wikimedia

Pin It on Pinterest

Share This