Should Women at High Risk for Breast Cancer Avoid Soy?

Should Women at High Risk for Breast Cancer Avoid Soy?
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Which dietary changes could both reduce free radical damage and improve DNA repair in women with mutated BRCA genes?

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Below is an approximation of this video’s audio content. To see any graphs, charts, graphics, images, and quotes to which Dr. Greger may be referring, watch the above video.

Five studies have been performed on breast cancer survival and soy foods, involving more than 10,000 breast cancer patients. And, those who eat more soy live longer, and have a lower risk of the cancer coming back. But, what about women who carry breast cancer genes? Fewer than 10% of breast cancer cases run in families. But, when they do, it’s most likely mutations to one of the tumor suppressor genes—BRCA1 or BRCA2—that defend the integrity of our genes. They are involved in DNA repair, and so, if either one of them is damaged, or has mutations, chromosomal abnormalities can result, which can set us up for cancer.

This idea that we have tumor suppressor genes goes back to famous research in the 60s that showed that if you fuse together a normal cell with a cancer cell, the cancer cell doesn’t turn the normal cell malignant. Rather, the normal cell suppresses the cancerous one. Tumor suppressor genes are typically split up into two types. There are gatekeeper genes that keep cancer cells in check, and caretaker genes that keep the cell from going cancerous in the first place. And, BRCA genes appear able to do both—that’s why their function is so important.

Until recently, dietary recommendations for those with mutations focused on reducing DNA damage caused by free radicals, by eating lots of antioxidant-packed fruits and vegetables. If your DNA-repair capacity is low, you want to be extra careful about damaging your DNA in the first place. But, what if we could also boost BRCA function?

In my last video on the topic, I showed how, in vitro, soy phytoestrogens could turn back on BRCA protection suppressed by breast cancer, upregulating BRCA expression as much as 1,000% within 48 hours. But, does that translate out of the petri dish and into the person? Apparently so.

Soy intake was only associated with 27% breast cancer risk reduction in people with normal BRCA genes, but a 73% risk reduction in carriers of BRCA gene mutations. So, a healthy diet may be particularly important in those at high genetic risk. Meat consumption, for example, was linked to twice as much risk in those with BRCA mutations—97% increased risk, instead of just 41% increased risk of breast cancer in those with normal BRCA genes.

So, same dietary advice—just more important when there’s more risk.

Please consider volunteering to help out on the site.

Image credit: KOMUnews via flickr. Image has been modified.

Below is an approximation of this video’s audio content. To see any graphs, charts, graphics, images, and quotes to which Dr. Greger may be referring, watch the above video.

Five studies have been performed on breast cancer survival and soy foods, involving more than 10,000 breast cancer patients. And, those who eat more soy live longer, and have a lower risk of the cancer coming back. But, what about women who carry breast cancer genes? Fewer than 10% of breast cancer cases run in families. But, when they do, it’s most likely mutations to one of the tumor suppressor genes—BRCA1 or BRCA2—that defend the integrity of our genes. They are involved in DNA repair, and so, if either one of them is damaged, or has mutations, chromosomal abnormalities can result, which can set us up for cancer.

This idea that we have tumor suppressor genes goes back to famous research in the 60s that showed that if you fuse together a normal cell with a cancer cell, the cancer cell doesn’t turn the normal cell malignant. Rather, the normal cell suppresses the cancerous one. Tumor suppressor genes are typically split up into two types. There are gatekeeper genes that keep cancer cells in check, and caretaker genes that keep the cell from going cancerous in the first place. And, BRCA genes appear able to do both—that’s why their function is so important.

Until recently, dietary recommendations for those with mutations focused on reducing DNA damage caused by free radicals, by eating lots of antioxidant-packed fruits and vegetables. If your DNA-repair capacity is low, you want to be extra careful about damaging your DNA in the first place. But, what if we could also boost BRCA function?

In my last video on the topic, I showed how, in vitro, soy phytoestrogens could turn back on BRCA protection suppressed by breast cancer, upregulating BRCA expression as much as 1,000% within 48 hours. But, does that translate out of the petri dish and into the person? Apparently so.

Soy intake was only associated with 27% breast cancer risk reduction in people with normal BRCA genes, but a 73% risk reduction in carriers of BRCA gene mutations. So, a healthy diet may be particularly important in those at high genetic risk. Meat consumption, for example, was linked to twice as much risk in those with BRCA mutations—97% increased risk, instead of just 41% increased risk of breast cancer in those with normal BRCA genes.

So, same dietary advice—just more important when there’s more risk.

Please consider volunteering to help out on the site.

Image credit: KOMUnews via flickr. Image has been modified.

Doctor's Note

What about for women without breast cancer genes, or for women who have already been diagnosed? That was the subject of my last video, Is Soy Healthy for Breast Cancer Survivors?. The older video I referred to is BRCA Breast Cancer Genes & Soy.

What is in meat that may increase risk? See, for example:

If you haven’t yet, you can subscribe to my videos for free by clicking here.

69 responses to “Should Women at High Risk for Breast Cancer Avoid Soy?

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  1. I wanted to clarify something about today’s video, which just is so interesting! Could you specifically comment on the conventional wisdom that the estrogens in soy DO in fact create greater risk for cancer. The data above suggests the opposite… or at least the the estrogen in soy is not negatively impactful – whatever the variables contributing to the data in your video, it seems to suggest that soy actually is preventative whether for those with normal genetic make up or with cancer genes. Can you clarify that I am understanding this correctly and that the estrogens in soy are not harmful based on the outcome of the study provided? Thank you so much! And thanks for the amazing, wonderful website and videos… I have learned so much.

      1. Correctomundo James! In Dr. Greger’s, and associates, stated in “THow Much Soy Is Too Much?” dated October 5th 2012, in a Japanese study, that three (3) servings of SOY cleared the safety threshold. I also goes onto recommend that one should not eat more that 3 to 5 servings of Soy a day because of the possible stimulatory effect that it would have on IGF-1. The interesting thing is that Soy consumed in more moderate levels have been shown to have anti-angiogenic effects which both is anti-carcinogenic and anti-obesigenic so by all means, eat Soy, but do so responsibly…

      2. with over 90% of soybeans being GMO and sprayed with toxic Roundup I personally will not eat soy. There are others who say to only eat fermented organic soy. am also concerned about soy and the thyroid gland.
        This is still too controversial and I will not be taking this advice.

        1. I agree with Susan Myers …. GMO soy is a major issue. I use organic tempeh once in a while ( maybe once a month) and that’s it; and that small amount concerns me as it is.
          Off topic … commenting on this site is more difficult since it’s been changed; for what it’s worth :-|

          1. I, too, am very disappointed that you got rid of Disqus. Many of us who enjoy your website also benefit from the ability to follow many of the insightful commentators here, which Disqus allows us to do. In fact, Disqus opens up a wide free market of ideas by allowing us to follow commentators throughout cyberspace. Your website is fabulous, Dr. Greger, and brings together many perspicacious minds to parse the science that you so interestingly provide. Please reconsider your decision. In a world marred by authoritarian decisionmaking, Disqus is a pathway that allows us to seek truths through the exchange of ideas. Long live the First Amendment!

            1. I’ll second that motion.

              Had we remained on disqus, could have given you a thumbs up and not wasted time, mine and yours, to write this post, and been confronted with the annoyance of writing a response without being able to see the original post. Why is it that with the internet is one step forward and two 1/2 steps backward.

              1. I agree with the sentiment expressed in this “aside”. I think i mentioned it the other day. But also, as much as I did like the previous state of commenting, I don’t have a “dog in the fight” when it comes to how things are done here. The current situation will certainly take getting used to, and does feel like a step backwards.

                Thank you just the same to Dr. G and all participants, volunteers, and $ supporters who make this thing happen.

        2. most GMO soy is fed to animals. Most soy used in tofu is not GMO. But just to be safe buy only organic or tofu or other soy products labeled non-gmo.

        3. Understand that 90% of GMO soy is going into the feed for Animals, and not the human consumer market. Nevertheless, it’s very easy to purchase NON-GMO soy by simply looking at the package. So to say “I will not eat soy” based on your misunderstanding is a bit foolish, and you’re missing out on the great benefits (especially for women) of consuming Soy products.

      3. @ susan myers, over 90% of soy grown is for animal feed. As I understand it, soy grown for himan consumption is non gmo.. and is labelled as such in the marketplace. Look for non-gmo or organic labels on each product. This topic has been discussed in the comment section of virtually each soy video/article. The benefit of soy consumption is clear from Dr Greger’s videos. Too good to miss out on

        1. Yes, I was about post the same thing. Most soy grown is fed to animals that is then fed to humans. And that soy is mostly GMO. After years of avoiding soy and worrying about it, I’ve come to the conclusion that there are far worse foods to worry about. So consuming a little non-gmo (organic if you wish) soy is fine and indeed healthy as reported in numerous videos/articles by Dr Greger’s.

    1. Does tofu contain lectins?

      Google search brings contridactory answers, i.e.:
      http://www.freefitguy.com/2011/04/11/reader-submitted-question-what-about-tofu/
      says “tofu does contain a high-concentration of anti-nutrients (otherwise known as lectins and phytates)”
      AND
      http://coolinginflammation.blogspot.com/2008/12/lectins-heatem-and-eatem.html
      says “Tofu is free of digestion inhibitors and lectin activity”

      Nice conundrum…

      It would be great to have an authoritative answer, get to the bottom of this, find the correct research paper or something…

    2. This recent rat study relating to post-diagnosed breast cancer has recommended:

      1. post-diagnosed breast cancer patients should continue consuming soy foods after diagnosis, unless they are being treated with tamoxifin.

      2. in post-diagnosis, soy boosts the effect of tamoxifen, but nonetheless reduces its effectiveness and leads to relapse

      3. post-diagnosis breast cancer patients should not commence consuming soy genistein if they have not consumed it previously.

      Please obtain medical advice before acting on any of this information.

      http://clincancerres.aacrjournals.org/content/23/3/814

    3. Thanks for your comment Sheryl.

      In regards to estrogen and it’s negative effects, Dr Greger has a fantastic video that you can watch here.

      Your understating of the video is correct and you can access the full study here. In here, they state that:

      “soy product consumption is associated with a lower breast cancer risk in BRCA mutation carriers than in unaffected familial members. In breast cancer cases only, the intake of soybean products was associated with BRCA mutation risk, which suggests that soybean product consumption had a joint effect with BRCA mutation on breast cancer risk. This joint effect means that the combination of the intake of soybean products and BRCA mutation decreased breast cancer risk 47% more than the expected combined risk, which was the independent effect of BRCA mutation multiplied by the independent effect of soybean products.

      (…) In conclusion, our study suggests that the intake of vegetables, soy products, and meat were associated with breast cancer, specifically for BRCA-related breast cancer. The identification of a positive association of soybean product consumption with BRCA-related breast cancer suggests a possible role for lifestyle modification in BRCA mutation carriers. It is necessary to verify the modifier effect of soybean consumption in BRCA mutation carriers through intervention studies.”

      Hope this answer helps.

    4. Most of the Soy that’s saturating an enormous amount of our foods now, is genetically modified, and is anendochcine disrupt or, and has a very negative on many women, that they don’t suspect….
      It’s a scary plant and I for one, won’t have anything with it in….

      1. I am sorry but this statement just simply is not accurate. GMO soy is fed to animals. Our farm, which has grown soy since I was a baby – and I am 64 – has grown it only for feed.
        If you look at the packaging on soy containers you will see “Made from non-GMO soy” or “Organic”, both of which are not GMO. I eat tofu regularly and I always look for the above statements as to its GMO content and have never seen GMO soy made into tofu.
        This site is about science and accuracy. It’s important to know what we’re talking about. Thank you.

  2. I am not a nutrition specialist, but do academic research and am familiar with reading and interpreting journal articles.

    Yes, the studies cited show soy decreases risk for cancer. This is in alignment with every study on soy I have ever come across.

    Many years ago it was proposed that the phytoestrogens in soy might create problems. This was researched and the answer has been a resounding “no.” In fact the only significant results showed that soy actually lowers cancer. Especially breast cancer.

    I think the only reason people attack soy is because of the media. Take this article for example. Many could just read the title and think it is bad based on the wording of the question. They could have also said “How much better is soy for high risk genes for breat cancer?” This implies it is better.

    The end of the video isn’t also vague. They compare to meat and say follow usual diet, but the fact is that many diets are misinformed and actually say to lower soy intake where the studies show to increase soy intake. This can be confusing for people.

  3. Love the video and shared through my FB with commentary.

    But this commenting is now somewhat cumbersome and slow.

    So the log in with social media thing is gone permanently? Part of the dis cuss thing? I would like to know before I mess around and load up an avatar specifically for this site, etc. Cheers!

    1. I was particularly distraught by the lack of “reply” options. Glad to see the return of such.

      Now I need the “edit” button and can’t find it. Oh well. Other things to accomplish this day.

      1. Yeah Wade! It seemed to be a lot easier before to make a comment before. I don’t know if it’s just my demographic bias against what appears to be an ever accelerating rate of change with just about everything that I interact with, or do I dislike this new commenting format because it is truly represents a step backward in terms of friendly ease of this websites discussion board.

        I’m thinking the latter…

  4. xyiltol…. Should we be using it. This is a substance that apparently hardens the enamel of the teeth plus other things according to a list of science items, however, it is a from corn or birch trees which is an alchol and can stay in the gut and cause problems. So do you have any science on this. Thanks.

      1. Thank you. I looked up the videos, which I should have done in the first place, no more xylitol for my teeth. Thank you again. Renee Morris

  5. I would be so appreciative to hear an answer to the following. I am a weightlifter, not a professional at all but try to get a good amount of protein everyday I have switched to getting most of my protein from vegetable Whole Foods sources. One of those sources is soy protein. I get it from soy protein powder and soy milk I also get it from brown rice peas and hempand other plants I’ve heard that tempeh and soy beans themselves edamame are good sources of soy, but how much soy is okay to ingest in the form of organic soy milk that is non GMO (Costco brand) and organic soy protein powder? How much of these two things are okay to eat? I am 54 and very focused on longevity, and overall disease prevention, and health, so weightlifting is primarily serving those goals, but I do have some vanity and desire to build muscle to keep me active in all my later years so I definitely want to emphasize the protein in order to keep building and maintaining muscle. I target 150-180gms of protein a day which may be controversial as well. Thanks so much for people’s help, especially science based guidance. Dr Gregory, I Love your work – amazing! I think you deserve so many accolades for what you do. What an immense service to humanity! Quick request: I think studies/Videos on optimal health and athleticism especially in later years would be a great additional focus, especially holding onto strength, mobility, function, and energy in the 60-100+ year range. Thanks!!

  6. I would be so appreciative to hear an answer to the following. I am a weightlifter, not a professional at all but try to get a good amount of protein everyday I have switched to getting most of my protein from vegetable Whole Foods sources. One of those sources is soy protein. I get it from soy protein powder and soy milk I also get it from brown rice peas and hempand other plants I’ve heard that tempeh and soy beans themselves edamame are good sources of soy, but how much soy is okay to ingest in the form of organic soy milk that is non GMO (Costco brand) and organic soy protein powder? How much of these two things are okay to eat? I am 54 and very focused on longevity, and overall disease prevention, and health, so weightlifting is primarily serving those goals, but I do have some vanity and desire to build muscle to keep me active in all my later years so I definitely want to emphasize the protein in order to keep building and maintaining muscle. I target 150-180gms of protein a day which may be controversial as well. Thanks so much for people’s help, especially science based guidance.

    1. Blair: I’m happy to hear that health is your number one priority. Lifting weights goes right along with that goal, but some people want muscle development to the point of it being at the expense of their health. It’s good to hear that you are doing one to support the other.

      My understanding is that the problem with soy protein *powder* is that it has a strong link to high IGF-1 levels, which is linked to cancer. 2 to 3 servings of traditional soy products, like soy milk, is not a problem. The problem can come in when you are eating an unnatural product like isolated soy protein powder.

      Take heart! The good news is that you can support muscle growth and being athletic without all those powders. Here is a great web page that explains protein needs and being an athlete: http://www.nomeatathlete.com/vegetarian-protein-primer/ . Be sure to pay attention to the section, “Why the advice that “athletes need more protein” is misleading” I also want to refer you to my very favorite page on understanding protein. This is an eye-opening, must-read for everyone, whether you are an athlete or not: http://michaelbluejay.com/veg/protein.html .

      To give you some inspiration and additional resources, I copied below my list of vegan athletes who are breaking world records and winning awards at the highest levels. Great fun.

      Does this help?
      ********************************
      Here’s a NutritionFacts video about body building: http://nutritionfacts.org/video/plant-based-bodybuilding/ In case you are interested, there are also some NutritionFacts videos dealing with muscle soreness/relief: http://nutritionfacts.org/video/reducing-muscle-soreness-with-berries/ and http://nutritionfacts.org/video/watermelon-for-sore-muscle-relief/
      .
      For body building, I also recommend checking out the following article on Strength And Protein for Athletes: http://michaelbluejay.com/veg/protein-strength.html
      .
      Also, while the list below is just a set of anecdotes, I think they are inspirational stories for people interested in building muscle or simply improving athletic performance. I don’t know which particular links would have tips for you, but I expect that you would be able to find some ideas from the information below.
      .
      Hope this helps.
      .
      ********************************
      (article from meatout mondays)
      Vegan Bodybuilders Dominate Texas Competition
      .
      The Plant Built (PlantBuilt.com) team rolled into this year’s drug-free, steroid-free Naturally Fit Super Show competition in Austin, TX, and walked away with more trophies than even they could carry.
      .
      The Plant Built team of 15 vegan bodybuilders competed in seven divisions, taking first place in all but two. They also took several 2nd and 3rd place wins.
      .
      For More Info: http://www.plantbuilt.com/
      .
      ———————
      When Robert Cheeke started VeganBodybuilding.com in 2002, being the only vegan athlete he knew of, he may not have imagined that the website would quickly grow to have thousands of members. Robert says, “We’re discovering new vegan athletes all the time, from professional and elite levels… to weekend warriors and everyone in between.”
      For More Info: http://www.veganbodybuilding.com/
      .
      —————–
      Then there is that other guy who broke a world record in weight lifting. “Congratulations to Strongman Patrik Baboumian who yesterday took a ten metre walk carrying more than half a tonne on his shoulders, more than anyone has ever done before. After smashing the world record the Strongman let out a roar of ‘Vegan Power’…” For more info:
      http://www.onegreenplanet.org/news/vegan-strongman-patrik-babaoumain-breaks-world-record/
      another article on the same guy: http://www.thestar.com/news/gta/2013/09/08/vegan_strongman_shoulders_550_kg_a_record_perhaps_at_vegetarian_food_fest.html
      .
      And another article: “I got heavier, I got stronger, I won the European championship title in powerlifting, I broke three world records so everything was going perfect … my blood pressure went down, and my recovery time was so much faster so I could train more.” http://edition.cnn.com/2016/07/06/health/vegan-strongman-patrik-baboumian-germany-diet/
      .
      —————–
      Here’s a story about a bodybuilder who doesn’t use any supplements. Just eats whole plant foods:
      http://www.forksoverknives.com/vegan-bodybuilder-plant-based-diet/?mc_cid=b8b1865825&mc_eid=09aaf03269
      .
      —————–
      Mr Universe – “Since going vegan, he has actually gained even more mass, now at 107 Kilos…”
      http://www.thediscerningbrute.com/2015/07/14/mr-universe-goes-vegan/
      .
      —————–
      Bite Size Vegan has a youtube channel
      “In this video series, you’ll hear from various vegan athletes from all walks of life and athletic abilities speaking to such topics as vegan athletic performance, building muscle on a vegan diet, vegan endurance running, bodybuilding, body image, and more!”
      https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLmIqdlomtuSv9FQJgdj3Bwg9Nh9MNjKg4
      .
      —————–
      Here’s another site that I like, Great Vegan Athletes: http://www.greatveganathletes.com/
      .
      I found this story on the above site: “Pat Reeves has set a new world powerlifting record at the WDFPA World Single Lift Championships. The 66 year old lifter, who has been vegan for 46 years, lifted 94 kg to set a record for the under 50.5kg weight class while competing in France in June 2012. The lift was more than 1.85 times her bodyweight, which is exceptional for her division. Pat is now officially the oldest competing weightlifter in Europe.”
      .
      ————————
      from Meatout Mondays: Vegan Bodybuilder Bucks Stereotypes
      .
      Vegan bodybuilder Joshua Knox shares his game changing and inspiring vegan story during a TEDxFremont, California presentation.
      .
      In this five-minute long video, shared by Mercy for Animals, Knox talks of his ‘meat and potatoes’ upbringing and what led him to give veganism a try. The results were nothing short of wonderful.
      .
      “Not only was I able to continue increasing my strength and performance but also saw massive gains in endurance as well… [and] rather than feeling like I was missing out on foods I really felt that I was opening my mind to so many things I would have never put on my plate…” Knox said during his presentation. Joshua also noted a drop in his cholesterol, while experiencing mental and emotional health improvements as well. Rock on, Josh! Thank you for sharing your story
      .
      Watch the short video on Mercy for Animals’ youtube channel: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=43f2qWARXnA
      .
      ————————–
      from Meatout Mondays: Professional Bodybuilding Couple Celebrate Veganism
      .
      Named 2014 Mr Universe, Barny Du Plessis and his fiance, named UK’s strongest woman, Josie Keck are excited to share and to celebrate their one year vegan anniversary this month. In a comprehensive interview by British publication, Daily Mail, the vegan (literal) power couple are “…serious about [their] crusade to save the Earth, the animals, [themselves], and our dignity as a species,” said Barny. The articles noted that, “Barny is on a mission to destroy the idea that eating meat is associated with manliness.” He said, “I’m living proof that you simply don’t need to eat meat or animal products to make great gains, be strong, healthy, fit, and feeling mighty.” We couldn’t agree more, Barny. Congratulations to you both on your anniversary! We’re so jazzed you’re passionate about veganism.
      .
      “When training for competitions Barny eats up to 4,500 calories a day, while Josie consumes 2,200 of vegan food. While preparing for a competition their typical diet consists of a wide variety of vegetables; fruit such as apples, bananas, dates and berries; grains such as basmati rice, quinoa and tapioca, pulses like chickpeas and brown and red lentils; as well as powders such as rice protein, hemp protein and vegan protein blend.” And the article includes a sample daily menu for each of them. http://www.dailymail.co.uk/femail/article-3495676/Obese-woman-met-fiance-gym-vegan-bodybuilders.html
      .
      —————————
      from meetout Mondays
      .
      Weightlifting Record Set by Vegan
      .
      With a record-setting deadline of 452 pounds, Iceland native Hulda B. Waage says it was her vegan diet that helped her pull out the win. “You can be strong without eating meat and animal byproducts,” she said. “I’ve reached the age when the body produces more swelling. I believe my diet helps with this, and I recover more quickly after practices.” Hulda has her sights set on the 2023 World Weightlifting Championships. Awesome, Hulda! Way to represent vegan athletes in a most wonderful way. And thank you for all you do to help inspire and forward a cruelty-free world. http://org2.salsalabs.com/dia/track.jsp?v=2&c=FiCd30wCeTG%2FBmw0po%2FMQXpx0aVdsgbp
      .
      .
      ****************************************************************
      OTHER THAN BODY BUILDING, VEGAN ATHLETES HAVE BEEN TAKING TROPHIES AND SETTING RECORDS IN OTHER AREAS TOO
      .
      ————————-
      Rich Roll is an ultra-endurance athlete and quite an inspiration. From his bio page:
      .
      “… Rich is a 50-year old, accomplished vegan ultra-endurance athlete … In May 2010, Rich and his ultra-colleague Jason Lester accomplished an unprecedented feat of staggering endurance many said was not possible. Something they call the EPIC5 CHALLENGE- a odyssey that entailed completing 5 ironman-distance triathlons on 5 islands of Hawaii in under a week. Commencing on Kauai, they travelled to Oahu, Molokai and Maui before finishing on the Big Island, following the course of the Ironman World Championships on the Kona coast.”
      .
      And that was just for starters. Then: “But what makes Rich truly remarkable is that less than two years prior to his first Ultraman, he didn’t even own a bike, let alone race one. … Everything came to head on the eve of his 40th birthday. Defeated by a mere flight of stairs that left him buckled over in pain, he foresaw the almost certain heart attack looming in his near future. … The day immediately following his staircase epiphany, Rich overhauled his diet, became a dedicated vegan, put on his running shoes and jumped back into the pool.”
      .
      To learn more: http://www.richroll.com/bio/
      .
      ————————-
      Story of Mac Denzig, winner of season six of The Ultimate Fighter
      http://www.ufc.com/news/Mac-Danzig-Diet-The-Truth-About-Vegan
      http://www.sherdog.com/fighter/Mac-Danzig-3396
      http://www.mikemahler.com/online-library/articles/mma-training/ufc-fighter-mac-danzig-vegan-diet.html
      .
      ————————–
      Another article from Meetout Mondays: Vegan Figure Skater Takes Silver
      .
      Canadian Olympian Meagan Duhamel and her partner Eric Radford won a silver medal in pairs figure skating at this year’s Olympic games in Sochi, Russia.
      .
      Duhamel proudly took to Twitter announcing that she is an “Olympian, vegan, yogi and nutritionist.” Wonderful! Congratulations to Meagan for being an outspoken and shining example of what healthy vegan eating looks like. …
      .
      —————–
      from Meetout Mondays: Plant-Powered Athlete: Griff Whalen [NFL Player]
      .
      His teammates say he has the most enviable body on the team. They say he consumes an average of 6,000 calories and 200 grams of protein a day. They also say, he does it all by eating plants!
      .
      In a recent interview on IndyStar.com, Indianapolis Colts’ wide receiver Griff Whalen, talks about his vegan ways.
      .
      “I feel a lot lighter, faster, quicker on the field. There isn’t that heavy feeling, that groggy feeling after I eat,” says Whalen. Hooray for another plant-powered athlete for us to cheer on. w00t! w00t!
      .
      Read the full article on : org2.salsalabs.com/dia/track.jsp?v=2&c=X9u7eAG%2FDmVet3kwZgrmHD5TipkEhWa4
      .
      —————–
      from Meetout Mondays: NFL’s David Carter on Living Vegan
      .
      In an interview last month on Rich Roll’s podcast, 27 year old Chicago Bears’ defensive lineman, David Carter spoke of a day in the life of the NFL, what he eats daily, his vegan journey, and his commitment to animal advocacy.
      .
      “I can honestly say that being vegan is not only the most efficient way to be full-body strong, it’s also the most humane; everyone wins,” Carter said on the podcast.
      .
      Carter is also the founder of The 300 Pound Vegan, a lifestyle blog where the NFL player writes about his journey through veganism and shares plant-based recipes. If nothing else, Carter shows us that living on plants is not just for endurance athletes or yogis but can positively impact heavy hitters in terms of their size, speed, agility, power, and quickness. Aww, yeah! Thanks for being so rad, David. We love it!
      .
      Listen to the full interview on Rich Roll: http://www.richroll.com/podcast/david-carter-300-pound-vegan/
      Or for a written story with sample menu plan: http://www.gq.com/story/vegan-diet-of-nfl-player-david-carter
      .
      ——————————
      And another article from Meetout Mondays: Record Setting, 92 Yr Old Vegan Runner
      .
      Mike Fremont has been vegan for over 20 years, and has been setting single age marathon running records just as long.
      .
      “At age 88 [Mike] ran a 6H5M53S marathon in Cincinnati Ohio and at age 90 ran a 6H35M47S marathon in Huntington West Virginia. [He] also set a single age world record for 90 years old in the half marathon in Morrow Ohio in August 2012,” said Veg World Magazine.
      .
      According to an interview with Veg World Magazine, Fremont credits his vegan lifestyle for his continued record setting runs, at his age.
      .
      We love seeing vegans making positive media waves, and what better way to showcase the health benefits of plant-powered living than Mike’s awesome running career. Here’s to you Mike, and vegan athletes of all ages!
      .
      Learn more about Mike Fremont a VegWorldMag.com. http://www.vegworldmag.com/amazing-92-year-old-vegan-runs-another-half-marathon/
      .
      ——————————
      from Meatout Mondays: World’s First Vegan Pro Soccer Team
      .
      The Internet went wild last week as the news that English soccer (A.K.A football) team, the Forest Green Rovers, announced that the entire team and club is going completely vegan.
      .
      “We stopped serving meat to our players, fans and staff about four seasons ago,” said club owner Dale Vince (via a recent article on Edition.CNN.com). He continued, “We’ve been on a mission since then to introduce our fans to this new world.” The article explains that while the club has been vegetarian for the past few years, they’ve decided to take the next step in going fully vegan (including their beer and cider options). Also cool to know: the club’s field is organic and they collect rainwater to use for irrigation. This is seriously super cool, you guys. Keep it up!
      .
      Read the source article on: http://edition.cnn.com/2015/10/30/football/world-health-organization-meat-vegan-football/
      .
      ——————————–
      from Meatout Mondays: Vegan Arm Wrestler: Rob Bigwood
      .
      “Some of his opponents say that since going vegan Rob is stronger, his stamina grew, and he became more difficult to pin,” notes an interview-style Facebook post by ‘Starry N Ight.’
      .
      A competitive arm wrestler since 2000, Rob Bigwood has been making a name for himself in the arm wrestling community—not only as the one to beat but also as the guy who eats plants. Rob has said, “I was concerned at first [about not eating meat for strength] but didn’t care. I made a conscious and ethical decision to give up meat…It is more important to practice what I believe in than to worry about being a strength athlete. I have never felt better in my entire life and it was one of the smartest decisions I ever made.”
      .
      Check out one of Rob’s interviews on http://www.scribd.com/doc/39221267/Interview-with-a-Vegan-Arm-Wrestler
      .
      ——————————–
      from Meatout Mondays: Vegan Breaks World Record in Push-Ups
      .
      A vegan from Kerala (a South Indian state) has just broken the Guinness World Record for knuckle push-ups (press ups). K.J. Joseph—a manager of an ayurveda centre in Munnar—completed 82 push-ups in 60 seconds, beating out Ron Cooper from the US who held the record at 79 push-ups in 2015. “Joseph has already entered the Universal Record Forum by doing 2092 push-ups in an hour. He is currently the record holder in the India Book of Records,” notes OnManorama.com. Thanks for making us vegans look good, Joseph. And congrats on your win!
      .
      Check out the original story: http://english.manoramaonline.com/lifestyle/society/vegan-most-knuckle-push-up-guinness-world-record-joseph.html
      .
      ———————————
      From PCRM Weekly News Update:
      What do the world’s top male and female tennis players have in common? They love vegan food! In a new Huffington Post piece, Dr. Barnard talks about plant-powered Novak Djokovic’s recent win at the French Open. http://new.www.huffingtonpost.com/neal-barnard-md/plantpowered-novak-djokov_b_10282348.html
      .
      .
      **********************************************
      RESOURCES
      **********************************************
      .
      Book: Vegan Bodybuilding And Fitness by Robert Cheeke
      http://www.amazon.com/Vegan-Bodybuilding-Fitness-Robert-Cheeke/dp/0984391606/ref=sr_1_1_title_0_main?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1396982744&sr=1-1&keywords=vegan+bodybuilding
      .
      ————————–
      Comment from someone on Amazon: “For those who want a more thorough dietary guide, I suggest Thrive: The Vegan Nutrition Guide to Optimal Performance in Sports and Life by Brendan Brazier. His book is exclusively about vegan sports nutrition and contains a variety of great tasting recipes along with a 12-week daily meal plan.”
      .
      More about Thrive: Thrive Energy Cookbook
      Created by two-time Canadian 50km Ultra Marathon Champion, Brendan Brazier, Thrive Energy Cookbook dives into Brendan’s philosophy on plant-based nutrition, showcasing 150 easy, health-enhancing recipes.
      .
      An expert on how diet affects performance and how not to waste energy, Brazier explores how foods in their natural state maximizes energy and health, lowers body fat, improves sleep, and peaks conditioning and physical performance.
      .
      Thrive Energy Cookbook includes the use of leafy greens, hemp seeds, quinoa, brown rice, and nuts as staples in an alkaline-forming, plant protein-packed diet regime.
      .
      In addition to being a best selling author, Brendan Brazier is a former professional Ironman triathlete. He is the creator of the ZoN Thrive Fitness Program and the award winning, plant-based VEGA product line.

      1. Thea, questions on the vegetable protein chart http://michaelbluejay.com/veg/protein.html
        Vegetables average around 22% protein by calorie, beans 28%, and grains 13%.4.1
        1) How would you prepare a 20 gram protein salad? Please, list type of vegetable you would use and their quantity by weight. Seems to me it would be a very big salad and impractical, but I could be wrong.
        2) I’ve searched for vegetable protein products on the net and can not find any from vegetables?
        Some are made from pea and many from soy. Why, has no one produced a vegetable protein drink or drink mix if vegetable contain so much proteins?

        Abundant Light, Love, Joy, Money and Health to us all

        1. MAC: Percentages are based on calories, not weight or volume. The point is that as long as we get enough calories from whole plant foods, we get enough protein. No one recommends that you eat only lettuce all day. If you look at the PCRM Power Plate, you will see that at the very simplest level, the goal is to eat about 1/4 fruit, 1/4 legumes, 1/4 whole grains and 1/4 veggies. When you do that, you should be able to eat enough calories. And when you do that, you get enough protein.
          .
          I’ll leave it as an exercise for yourself if you want to try to a certain amount of protein from a salad.

  7. Is there any way to “up-vote” a comment using the new commenting system? I wanted to up-vote Thea’s nice thorough comment on bodybuilding, but didn’t see a way to dit.

    1. HaltheVegan: Here’s what I wrote to another poster recently: re: missing up-vote. You and me both!! In addition to giving quick feedback, it is a wonderful positive reinforcement tool for moderators. From what I have been told, this new forum simply does not have an upvote feature at this time. That doesn’t mean that we won’t get the feature in the future. I’m hoping that NutrtionFacts will ask for an up-vote and that wordpress will add the feature in the not too distant future. I’m missing it sorely.

      And thank you for the feedback on my bodybuilding comment! :-)

      1. Thanks for the explanation, Thea. Disqus was not free of problems, either, so I hope this new wordpress system works out. I’ve heard some good things about wordpress. No matter which comments tool is used, I’m still going to be a loyal fan of NutritionFacts since the content of the research is so fantastic!

  8. Each time I eat soy I regret it, and I don’t know if I am the only one here. My breasts swell up as if I am on my menstral cycle, and my breasts become so painful I can barely wear a shirt absolutely no bra either, this symtom lasts about ten full days to dissipate. I have small normal breasts without any other complications. I know for certain it is the soy. Does anyone know anything about this?

    1. Maria, you probably have a sensitivity to soy. I get the same reaction you do, not with soy, but to wheat. Sensitivities to foods can turn up as just about any symptom imaginable. If you eat a food and consistently notice a negative symptom, best to avoid it. The way I see it, if your breasts become extremely sore after eating soy, what’s soy doing to the rest of your body (that you may not be aware of)?

      1. Hi Julie, Yes I agree,  and thank you for your comment too. (smile) I do avoid it both in bulk and in as an additive for example at Asian food restaurants, and in packaged foods, and salad dressings, ect.  But being a vegan I miss out on the protein. I first became aware of it years ago when I ate a slice of Torfuky at a Thanksgiving party and I was so ill from that.  Then the next time was about six months later I  ate a  tofu kind of meat patty and that was when I was able to connect the dots. My reaction to soy is very scary though because it is very painful, dehabilitating,  and just weird.

        1. Maria
          http://www.tofurky.com/what-we-make/holiday/feast/
          INGREDIENTS: Roast: Water, vital wheat gluten, organic tofu (water, organic soybeans, magnesium chloride, calcium chloride), shoyu soy sauce (water, non-GMO soybeans, wheat, salt, culture), expeller pressed non-GMO canola oil, vegan natural flavors, non-GMO corn starch, garbanzo bean flour, white bean flour, lemon juice from concentrate, onion, carrot, celery, vegan sugar, calcium lactate (from beets), sea salt. Contains: Soy, wheat

          Have you tried soybeans or tofu instead of fake meat products?

  9. Interesting report on soy. If true, those with BRCA genetic mutations may benefit.

    However, full cream cows milk (or yoghurt) derived from grass has a far more profound impact. Whilst it may possibly increase the risk of prostate cancer, it reduces the risk of atherosclerosis, cardiovascular disease, stroke, diabetes, colorectal cancer, and combats obesity. References provided if requested. Here are a few:

    Atherosclerosis
    These results suggest that milk-derived bioactive peptides work as anti-atherogenic agents through the inhibition of endothelial-dependent adhesive interactions with monocytes by inhibiting the NF-κB pathway through a PPAR-γ dependent mechanism.
    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25632270
    Milk-derived bioactive peptides can be released during gastrointestinal digestion, food processing or by enzymatic and bacterial fermentation and are considered to promote diverse beneficial effects such as lipid lowering, antihypertensive, immunomodulating, anti-inflammatory and antithrombotic effect
    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27151091
    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26877644
    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21773582

    Cardiovascular Disease/Heart Attack – Harvard University research. ‘A higher intake of dairy saturated fat was associated with lower CVD risk’
    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22760560

    Metabolic Syndrome
    ‘Another recent study, published this February in British Journal of Nutrition claims the nutrient combination of calcium and milk fat in dairy products can help to reduce fat absorption, maintain good cholesterol and minimise bad cholesterol.’
    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3064033/

    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20534409

    Colorectal Cancer – ‘high dietary intake of CLA (conjugated linoleic acid) from full-fat dairy foods has been associated with a reduction of colorectal cancer by up to 39% in women’ Consumerlab,

    https://www.consumerlab.com/reviews/Review_B_Vitamins_B-Complexes_Energy-Shots_Thiamin_Niacin_B-6_B-12_Biotin_and_Folic_Acid/bvitamins

    Obesity
    ‘Recent evidence suggests an inverse relationship among calcium, vitamin D status, and dairy intake, specifically with the development of the insulin resistance syndrome and T2DM. It has been found that there is a decrease in dairy intake in the past three decades, which runs parallel with an increase in the incidence of obesity and diabetes (T2DM.’
    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20534409

    I have selected all independent (non-dairy industry) research projects.

    1. The saturated fat, cholesterol and IGF-1 increasing properties found in cows milk (which is meant for baby cows) appears to be very deleterious to ones health. Something that this website has shown time and again.

      Are you involved in the dairy industry as you sure like promoting dairy despite the overwhelming research showing its ill effects on humans.

      1. Hi Scott. Thanks for the reply.

        On the contrary. The overwhelming evidence indicates that dairy is probably the healthiest food on the planet. Obviously, you have not studied the many research references provided.

        As previously indicated on this forum, I am an agricultural science graduate. I was involved in the dairy industry for a couple of years in my home home country (Australia) in the late 1970’s. I have not been involved with agriculture or the dairy industry in any capacity since then. I am now retired. For the past 10 years I have taken a great interest in nutritional science – as a hobby. Of particular interest has been the nutritional effect of dairy. I have spent a good deal of time studying the research, particularly given the sensationalist criticism of dairy on various websites. I have been interested in establishing the truth. Some of the dairy-negativity has its genesis in animal-welfare issues, which I completely understand and respect. Others come from those with an extreme, at times paranoid aversion to anything mainstream. This is partially understandable. The latter have become jaded with commercial exploitation (birth, consume, die) and are drawn to ‘alternative’ solutions. As long as I have the freedom to choose, I dont judge how other people respond to these challenges. However, if the exhortations of the dairy-haters were to be fully realised, it would result in the mass extinction of the dairy species from our planet. I am confident cows would not willingly select the mass-extinction option in place of the status-quo. That aside, this particular website purports to be evidence-based ‘nutrition facts’. It is not ‘animal welfare’ facts – or the like, albeit that may be the (worthy) indirect objective.
        I mostly ignore pseudo-science except when it purports to be the absolute truth, purely scientific, and ‘evidence-based’. Then I challenge it. In the main, it is often intentionally selective and exaggerated. It misleads by presenting exclusively favorable research and completely ignoring unfavourable research. This may be compelling for those who find respite in an imaginary ‘belief’ rather than the relatively more mundane realities of life. Those who are attracted to unfounded ‘belief’ systems constitute about 50% of the worlds population. So much for the progress of mankind. If you start from a religious-like belief that dairy is bad, and abandon all objectivity, you will only filter the information you want to hear – and ignore the rest.

        The world, especially the developed world is awash with junk food. From a purely nutritional point of view, dairy should be the very last food one would want to eliminate from the planet. There are far more worthy candidates. Dairy detractors would be doing mankind a big favour if they just concentrated on the mountain of trash-food out there.

        The overwhelming scientific evidence clearly indicates dairy products are health-beneficial. I have provided any amount of scientific evidence if you are interested in establishing the truth of the matter. In particular, meta-analyses dont lie.

        IGF-1. Not all IGF-1 is bad:

        Dairy is not the only food that increases IGF-1 levels:

        ‘Increased soy protein intake may lead to small, but significant, increases in IGF-1 and IGFBP-3. Soy consumption also led to a significant decrease in SHBG, which has been hypothesized to promote, rather than prevent, cancer growth. Previous epidemiological studies, however, have confirmed soy’s protective effect on breast cancer’.

        https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3837570/

        ‘Our findings demonstrate that both low and high serum IGF-I levels are risk markers for increased cancer mortality in older men. Moreover, low IGF-I levels associate with increased CVD mortality.’

        https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23015658

        IGF-1 has been shown to correlate with greater telomere length in healthy subjects of all ages and in elderly men. The length of telomeres in the DNA have shown to be important predictors of longevity https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19913048 https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19846733?dopt=Abstract

        Greater levels of IGF-1 were associated with decreased risk of dying in the next 2 years (Framingham Heart Study of 525 people between the ages of 72 and 92) https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/14563498/

        IGF-1 helps prevent age-related cognitive decline by promoting new cell growth in the brain (in rats) https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11720784/

        Aging (R), and its associated frailties, such as lowered muscle strength, slower walking, and less mobility are associated with lower levels of IGF-1 in older women.
        http://translational-medicine.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/1479-5876-10-224#Sec12_1361

        Critically ill patients tend to have lower IGF-1 levels https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11549640/

        IGF-1 increases glutathione peroxidase, an important antioxidant enzyme.
        This protects cells exposed to radiation, by preventing cell death and increasing the antioxidant status.
        https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3557755/ https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22843358

        Too many other health benefits to list for IGF-1, but it is very extensive.

        Low IGF-1 levels cause a 1.27x increased risk of dying from all causes, while higher levels produce a 1.18x increased risk.
        http://www.endocrine-abstracts.org/ea/0026/ea0026p134.htm.

        So, it is essential to have adequate levels of IGF-1. Higher levels may assist in protecting against autoimmunity conditions and chronic inflammation.

        IGF-1 in milk does not directly or significantly increase IGF-1 levels in humans. However, it does increase IGF-1 production within the human liver.
        Theoretically, this could increase the risk of colon, pancreas, endometrium, breast and prostate tumours. However, other studies demonstrate that milk protects against these cancers – so it appears there is something in milk which counteracts this possibility. In the case of colon cancer, calcium may be protective. Conversely, in the case of prostate cancer, calcium in excess may be harmful. In regards breast cancer, some studies suggest high milk consumption is harmful, whilst others indicate milk is non-carcinogenic and has an inverse association with the incidence of cancer.
        https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/8605108 https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11519053

        Obviously, these are very complex issues. Given that low IGF-1 levels are just as damaging as high levels, perhaps one should not abandon milk altogether. Indeed, those with naturally low levels of IGF-1 may significantly improve their health by consuming milk. Conversely, those with naturally high levels of IGF-1 may be better advised to minimise their milk consumption.
        Personally, I consume a lot of cruciferous vegetables, tomatoes/ tomato products to help protect the prostate, but I cant accurately asses the protective effect.
        http://www.fda.gov/ohrms/dockets/dockets/04q0201/04q-0201-qhc0002-04-Section-B-02-vol1.pdf

        Unfortunately, US manufacturers use a synthetic bovine growth hormone (as well as naturally occurring hormones) to increase milk production. This practice is banned in Australia, New Zealand and the European Union. It is yet another reason to stick to grass-based organic milk in the US.

        Finally, not all saturated fat is harmful. Indeed not all trans fats are harmful. Unlike vegetable trans-fats, dairy trans-fats (CLA) are health-beneficial – big time. They compensate for any deleterious effect of saturated fat. Milk provides us calcium, crucial saturated-fat vitamins (A.D.E.K), plus CLA to protect against any negative aspects of saturated fat – eg weight gain. Nature in balance. Its a beautiful thing. CLA is at high levels in full-cream milk as well as high-fat butter and full-fat cheeses.
        CLA protects against inflammation, cardiovascular disease, certain cancers, diabetes, and a host of other conditions. There are three provisos. 1. Milk should be derived from cows that eat grass. CLA is much less prevalent in grain-fed cows. 2. CLA should not be consumed as a supplement. It may be harmful. 3. Also ensure there is adequate vitamin D and especially vitamin K in the diet. The richest source of vit K is parsley and natto, but it is available in many greens. In short, drink your full cream milk/dairy (preferably organic), eat your greens and get your safe (morning or evening) sun. If you have a high risk of cancer, check out your IGF-1 levels and adjust your diet accordingly.

        Atherosclerosis

        http://www.atherosclerosis-journal.com/article/S0021-9150(04)00103-0/abstract http://advances.nutrition.org/content/2/4/332.abstract http://advances.nutrition.org/content/2/4/332.long https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2846864/

        CLA and Diabetes

        ‘We provide evidence that certain CLA isomers are able to improve glucose tolerance, insulin-stimulated glucose transport into skeletal muscle, and insulin-stimulated glycogen synthase activity. In addition, dietary supplementation with CLA resulted in an upregulation in UCP2 gene expression in skeletal muscle and adipose tissue, suggesting a role in the regulation of lipid metabolism and perhaps thermogenesis in these tissues.
        Finally, we show that the antidiabetic effects of CLA could not be explained entirely by treatment-induced changes in food intake’.

        http://diabetes.diabetesjournals.org/content/50/5/1149.long

        ‘CLA may reduce hyperinsulinemia by increasing the production of adiponectin, a hormone that can lead to enhanced insulin action and improve insulin sensitivity’.

        http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0006291X03018266

        ‘The observed inverse association between the cis-9, trans-11 CLA in adipose tissue and diabetes risk is consistent with the hypothesis that CLA may be involved in insulin regulation’.

        https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22648724

        CLA and Cancer

        http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0271531702003937

        https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/14976130

        ‘Our data suggest that there is a protective effect, dietary or habitual, associated with consumption of milk that overwhelms the associations between different other factors and risk of breast cancer.’

        https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2074353/

        ‘These prospective data suggest that high intakes of high-fat dairy foods and CLA may reduce the risk of colorectal cancer.’

        https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16210722

        ‘Higher consumption of milk and calcium is associated with a lower risk of colorectal cancer’.

        https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15240785

        ‘Our data suggest that there is a protective effect, dietary or habitual, associated with consumption of milk that overwhelms the associations between different other factors and risk of breast cancer.’

        https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/8605108

        ‘In conclusion, findings of the present meta-analysis indicate that increased consumption of total dairy food, but not milk, may be associated with a reduced risk of breast cancer’.

        https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21442197

        ‘The odds ratio for breast cancer in the highest quintile vs. the lowest was 0.4 [95% confidence interval (CI) = 0.2-0.9]for CLA, 0.3 (95% CI = 0.1-0.7) for myristic acid, and 0.3 (95% CI = 0.1-0.7) for trans-vaccenic acid in serum. The odds ratios remained similar after adjustment for known risk factors of breast cancer. A diet composed of CLA-rich foods, particularly cheese, may protect against breast cancer in postmenopausal women’

        https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11525591

        CLA and Obesity

        ‘Long-term supplementation with CLA-FFA or CLA-triacylglycerol reduces BFM in healthy overweight adults’.

        http://ajcn.nutrition.org/content/79/6/1118.long

        ‘The data suggest that conjugated linoleic acid may reduce bodt fat mass (BFM) in humans and that no additional effect on BFM is achieved with doses > 3.4 g CLA/d.’

        http://jn.nutrition.org/content/130/12/2943.full

  10. The more recent Sloan Kettering study was a randomized controlled study that seemed to suggest that soy increased another proliferative gene for breast cancer. Also, in the study, they said that studies on WESTERN women showed bad results. Anyone have any idea?

    1. Neal Greenberg: I have not looked at the study so I don’t know anything. Just to speculate on the difference on why western women might show bad results: It could be a situation of what counts as soy and what is being eaten with the soy. Sort of like the difference between a plain potato being good for one, but a potato loaded with butter, sour cream and/or cheese being bad for one. I might guess that say American women are more likely to be eating processed soy foods like foods with isolated soy protein, veggie burgers (which are also loaded with tons of oils etc), fried tofu (one of my personal favorites…) from a restaurant, etc. Again, I’m just speculating on what the difference might be. This makes sense to me.

      When Dr. Greger talks about the health benefits of soy, he’s talking about “traditional” soy foods such as soy milk, tofu, tempeh, edamame and miso–ie, those foods more likely to be eaten in healthy forms with other healthy foods in non-wester countries.

      What do you think? (Note: I’m not getting e-mails from the new forum. So, I don’t know if I’ll see your reply or not.)

  11. And what about soy products and pregnant and breastfeeding mums? Is soy ok? I normally very sensitive to legumes family, I can only ingest them when sprouted first and only lentils and mungbeans. I eat some soy in tiny amounts like soy yoghurt or tempeh, but never more than a couple tablespoons at a time. My newborn has some gas and colic so I try to figure out what could bother her from my diet ( I’m vegan since many years!). Are there any studies that cover mums diet and baby colics, reflux, etc? Soy included. Please help

    1. Joe: People experienced lots of problems with disqus. The final blow was a few days ago when disqus added ads to the forum without permission or ability to block. NutritionFacts is an ad-free site. As problematic as disqus was, I too am mourning its loss. At this point, though, I’m guessing we are stuck. Hopefully the new application, wordpress, will add features in a reasonable time frame to give us back some of the functionality we lost with this change.

      1. The reason for the change was ads, seriously?!

        That’s what browser ad-blockers are for! uBlock Origin for Firefox is my preferred addon.

        One need not ever subject themself to ads online.

        1. nd4spd: That was the reason for the sudden change. But the change had been planned for some time due to various problems we have had with disqus. The timeline for the change just got moved up.

  12. I hope someone on the staff either already knows about this program in LA or maybe reads this comment, http://modernfarmer.com/2017/01/fvrv-wholesome-wave-target-produce-program/?inf_contact_key=a6e31c21a03ae06dffd87cf97de123d34bb14996bd5253648aa19030ef46c1ba

    This is a program in L.A . for some of the people on food stamps where doctors can write prescriptions for vegetables that gives them extra credit towards the purchase of fresh fruits and vegetables.

    They say this may take the nation by storm, but knowing big pharma it will likely face an uphill battle if it starts to really get people healthy, so as many people are aware of this program and supporting it, the faster it will move–of course education of mds is still a big issue, but I believe this initiative has started focusing on obesity in children, which may be an easier place for doctors to start their paradigm shift.

  13. This comment is not related to the video, but i was wondering if there’s a video describing CHD as caused by atherosclerosis with science literature to refer to. I do know it’s a basic and almost silly question, but for a project in my school I need to motivate this fact with scientific articles and not just wikipedia.

  14. hi Alexander, Dr Greger has made many videos and written many articles on incidence of heart disease (artherosclerosis) in the west , why the increase , what causes it, how to prevent it, comparison of different diets and different features of popular diets, how we can reverse it, how we can address the risk factors for heart disease and comparing various medications to plant based diets for treatment and prevention. Im sure there are many more topics relating to atherosclerosis to choose from. Here’s a place to start http://nutritionfacts.org/?fwp_search=heart%20disease&fwp_content_type=video The studies referred to in the videos are listed under the video if you click the sources button. Good luck on your project Alexander, Im sure it will be great !

  15. Hello, NutrientFacts.org is fantastic. I regularly read it and, I’ve read Dr. Greger’s book twice (audible and hardback).

    One suggestion: Please don’t descend into the journalistic fad of entitling articles in a way that implies the opposite of the results being reported upon in the article/video. Questioning titles create cognitive dissonance and actually prevent getting the accurate message across. The title should be a nutshell of the research results.

    The whole arena of diet and health education is enough of a circus already; just continue to be the best source of nutrition advice anywhere.

  16. Hello, guys,

    I read a few articles about what research has been done concerning B12 supplements: is it or is it not linked to increased cancer risk? What do you know about this subject?
    And also: do former cancerc patients have a higher risk of cancer cells growth when taking B12 supplements?

    Thank you!

  17. Is maca root (powder form added to smoothies) beneficial or unsafe? I have read mixed reviews concerning its effects on breast cancer.

  18. Hi LeAnne, I just did a quick search on Maca Root and most of the studies I found were in relation to it’s hormonal effects in treating sexual dysfunction in both men and women, as well as other hormonal conditions such as menopause. I didn’t find any studies that found it harmful. I did find one study that looked at the effects of certain flavonolignans and other compounds in Maca root. They looked at effects these substances had on inflammation and cancer and found that a few of them were anti-inflammatory and were selectively active against certain cancer cells.

    I’ve linked the study here https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25667964 I didn’t take the time to read in in full but I wouldn’t necessarily translate those results to mean that the maca root powder you have would have the same effect, as there may be differences in where it was sourced and how it is processed that may impact the effectiveness.

    In any case hopefully you’ll glean some useful information and from what I could see there is no harm in trying it.

  19. Really wish a text version of the audios would be made available. Sometimes I don’t have time to stop and listen for several minutes when I can read the info in a fraction of that.

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