The Role of Burger Viruses in Cancer

The Role of Burger Viruses in Cancer
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Polyoma viruses discovered in meat can survive cooking and pasteurization.

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Below is an approximation of this video’s audio content. To see any graphs, charts, graphics, images, and quotes to which Dr. Greger may be referring, watch the above video.

“Nearly 20% of cancer[s]…can be linked to infectious agents,” such as viruses. There are seven viruses now conclusively tied to human cancer, and as new viruses enter into human populations, the incidence and causes of cancer will likely change accordingly.

The foundation of modern tumor virology was laid over a century ago, with the discovery of a cancer-causing chicken virus, for which a Nobel Prize was awarded.  Another Nobel went to the guy that discovered the HPV virus was causing cervical cancer. And in his acceptance speech, he mused that there may be a bovine polyomavirus, a multiple tumor virus, in cattle, that could be playing a role in human colon cancer, lung cancer, and breast cancer. But, no polyomavirus had ever been discovered in meat—until now.

Polyomaviruses are a particular concern, not only because they are “known to be carcinogenic,” but because they can survive cooking temperatures. Because single burgers these days can contain meat from “many dozens of animals,” they figured it would “present an ideal situation for virus-hunting.” So, researchers at the National Cancer Institute just walked into three supermarkets, and grabbed meat right off the shelf, and found three different polyomaviruses in ground beef. Now, just because three types of polyomaviruses are “commonly detectable in food-grade ground beef” doesn’t necessarily mean they are causing human disease.

What made this Nobel laureate suspect them? Well, for one thing, some people got cancer right where they were vaccinated for smallpox—a whole bunch of different cancers. The vaccine was harvested from “the…skin of calves.” And so, maybe there’s some cancer-causing cow virus?

“Many people are exposed to potentially virus-contaminated meat and dairy products” through their diet, but those in the industry would be even more exposed. So, it would be interesting to see if these groups have higher cancer incidence. And indeed, it now appears clear that those who work “in the meat industry are at increased risk of developing and dying” from a variety of cancers.

Another “reason…to suspect the involvement of [some kind of] bovine infectious factor…in colorectal cancer” is the fact that countries that don’t eat a lot of beef appear to have relatively low rates of colorectal cancer. And, countries that all of a sudden started eating lots of meat had their rates shoot up. Mongolia appears to be the exception. Lots of red meat, yet low colon cancer rates. But, “there they eat yak,” and maybe yaks don’t harbor the same viruses.

Can’t you just avoid steak tartare? Even steak cooked “medium” may not reach internal temperatures above 70 Celsius, and it takes temperatures above that to inactivate some of these viruses. So, we would expect viruses to survive both cooking and pasteurization. In fact, they followed up with a paper suggesting that consumption of dairy products may represent a “main risk factor for the development of [human] breast cancer.” The recent discovery of a larger number of presumably new viruses in the blood, meat, and milk of dairy cows should be investigated, since one might speculate that infectious “agents present in dairy products [might have a special] affinity for [breast cells],” since they came from breast cells.

The fact that people with lactose intolerance, who tend to avoid milk and dairy throughout their lives, have lower rates of breast cancer and other cancers could be seen as supporting this concept—though there are certainly other reasons dairy may increase cancer risk, such as increasing levels of the cancer-promoting growth hormone IGF-1, or adversely affecting our gut microbiome. Or, for that matter, maybe the plant-based milks they’re drinking instead could be protective. That’s the problem with population studies: you can’t tease out cause and effect. It doesn’t matter how many viruses are found in retail beef, pork, and chicken if we can’t connect the dots.  

Can’t you just look for the presence of these viruses within human tumors? They’ve tried, and found some. But, even if you don’t find any, that doesn’t necessarily mean viruses didn’t play a role. There’s this “viral hit-and-run” theory of cancer development that suggests that certain viruses can slip in and out of our DNA to initiate the cancer, but be long gone by the time the tumor matures. So, there’s still a lot of work to be done.

But, if the link between bovine polyomaviruses and human disease pans out, the National Cancer Institute researchers “envision the development of [a] high-potency…vaccine…” So, just like the HPV vaccine may prevent cervical cancer from unsafe sex, one day, perhaps, vaccines may prevent breast and colon cancer from unsafe sirloin.

Please consider volunteering to help out on the site.

Icons created by Gan Khoon Lay, Kokota and Andy Selimov from the Noun Project.

Image credit: Danielle Scott via Flickr. Image has been modified.

Below is an approximation of this video’s audio content. To see any graphs, charts, graphics, images, and quotes to which Dr. Greger may be referring, watch the above video.

“Nearly 20% of cancer[s]…can be linked to infectious agents,” such as viruses. There are seven viruses now conclusively tied to human cancer, and as new viruses enter into human populations, the incidence and causes of cancer will likely change accordingly.

The foundation of modern tumor virology was laid over a century ago, with the discovery of a cancer-causing chicken virus, for which a Nobel Prize was awarded.  Another Nobel went to the guy that discovered the HPV virus was causing cervical cancer. And in his acceptance speech, he mused that there may be a bovine polyomavirus, a multiple tumor virus, in cattle, that could be playing a role in human colon cancer, lung cancer, and breast cancer. But, no polyomavirus had ever been discovered in meat—until now.

Polyomaviruses are a particular concern, not only because they are “known to be carcinogenic,” but because they can survive cooking temperatures. Because single burgers these days can contain meat from “many dozens of animals,” they figured it would “present an ideal situation for virus-hunting.” So, researchers at the National Cancer Institute just walked into three supermarkets, and grabbed meat right off the shelf, and found three different polyomaviruses in ground beef. Now, just because three types of polyomaviruses are “commonly detectable in food-grade ground beef” doesn’t necessarily mean they are causing human disease.

What made this Nobel laureate suspect them? Well, for one thing, some people got cancer right where they were vaccinated for smallpox—a whole bunch of different cancers. The vaccine was harvested from “the…skin of calves.” And so, maybe there’s some cancer-causing cow virus?

“Many people are exposed to potentially virus-contaminated meat and dairy products” through their diet, but those in the industry would be even more exposed. So, it would be interesting to see if these groups have higher cancer incidence. And indeed, it now appears clear that those who work “in the meat industry are at increased risk of developing and dying” from a variety of cancers.

Another “reason…to suspect the involvement of [some kind of] bovine infectious factor…in colorectal cancer” is the fact that countries that don’t eat a lot of beef appear to have relatively low rates of colorectal cancer. And, countries that all of a sudden started eating lots of meat had their rates shoot up. Mongolia appears to be the exception. Lots of red meat, yet low colon cancer rates. But, “there they eat yak,” and maybe yaks don’t harbor the same viruses.

Can’t you just avoid steak tartare? Even steak cooked “medium” may not reach internal temperatures above 70 Celsius, and it takes temperatures above that to inactivate some of these viruses. So, we would expect viruses to survive both cooking and pasteurization. In fact, they followed up with a paper suggesting that consumption of dairy products may represent a “main risk factor for the development of [human] breast cancer.” The recent discovery of a larger number of presumably new viruses in the blood, meat, and milk of dairy cows should be investigated, since one might speculate that infectious “agents present in dairy products [might have a special] affinity for [breast cells],” since they came from breast cells.

The fact that people with lactose intolerance, who tend to avoid milk and dairy throughout their lives, have lower rates of breast cancer and other cancers could be seen as supporting this concept—though there are certainly other reasons dairy may increase cancer risk, such as increasing levels of the cancer-promoting growth hormone IGF-1, or adversely affecting our gut microbiome. Or, for that matter, maybe the plant-based milks they’re drinking instead could be protective. That’s the problem with population studies: you can’t tease out cause and effect. It doesn’t matter how many viruses are found in retail beef, pork, and chicken if we can’t connect the dots.  

Can’t you just look for the presence of these viruses within human tumors? They’ve tried, and found some. But, even if you don’t find any, that doesn’t necessarily mean viruses didn’t play a role. There’s this “viral hit-and-run” theory of cancer development that suggests that certain viruses can slip in and out of our DNA to initiate the cancer, but be long gone by the time the tumor matures. So, there’s still a lot of work to be done.

But, if the link between bovine polyomaviruses and human disease pans out, the National Cancer Institute researchers “envision the development of [a] high-potency…vaccine…” So, just like the HPV vaccine may prevent cervical cancer from unsafe sex, one day, perhaps, vaccines may prevent breast and colon cancer from unsafe sirloin.

Please consider volunteering to help out on the site.

Icons created by Gan Khoon Lay, Kokota and Andy Selimov from the Noun Project.

Image credit: Danielle Scott via Flickr. Image has been modified.

Doctor's Note

This reminds me of the bovine leukemia virus story with breast cancer. Check that out at:

What about chicken? Check out The Role of Poultry Viruses in Human Cancers.

That’s one of the problems with eating other animals: we put ourselves at risk of animal diseases. Not once have I diagnosed anyone with Dutch elm disease, or a really bad case of aphids. More on this concept in Eating Outside our Kingdom.

If you haven’t yet, you can subscribe to my videos for free by clicking here.

79 responses to “The Role of Burger Viruses in Cancer

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  1. Off topic but real important to me right now: I was told to use toothpaste with fluoride in it by
    a dentist. He said it will help with my current tooth decay, and will help the kids teeth as well.

    I have watched and read your dental studies and such, and I am well aware of the opinions and
    literature on the internet claiming that the fluoride in toothpaste is toxic, but, Dr. Greger, is this
    actually true, that the fluoride in toothpaste when just brushed with and rinsed, has a detrimental
    effect on our brains, glands, bodies, organs, hormones, etc.? People talk about fluoride in toothpaste
    like it is poison. I’d think that as long as we rinse our mouth out after brushing, that most the
    fluoride will have washed out. Of note, my dentist said that the fluoride in toothpaste is actually the
    same fluoride in soil and food. Says that it is B.S. that the toothpaste flouride is different than the food
    based.

    Thanks for any insight and science.




    9
    1. I ate a pretty good vegan diet for 15 years but always had teeth problems. Nothing major but occasional cavities and sensitive teeth and gums. Then two years ago I switched to a WFPB diet and eliminated any refined oil or refined sugar. No more teeth problems. Quite amazing.




      8
        1. Same here. Gum health actually made the dentist and hygienist wonder what I’d done. Also, my teeth appeared stronger/harder to them.




          1
        1. WFPB is a subset of a vegan diet. There are many vegan foods that are highly processed like cookies or soft drinks with corn syrup. These may be plant based but they are not whole foods. Vegans avoid animal products. WFPB avoid animal products as well as highly processed foods. There is a huge overlap between the communities though.




          1
          1. Your definitions need some work. If WFPB means only avoiding animal and highly processed foods then a daily plate full of french fries should be good to go? How about ketchup is that highly processed or just processed?
            The focus on whole plant-based products needs to include a wide variety of whole plants and consider the ratio of nutrients/calories. That is why green leafy, beans and berries are consumed often along with onions and garlic. Many spices are better than white potatoes….
            It is just not as simple as you make it to eat healthy…




            0
            1. Richard, I would argue that while it is not easy to eat healthy in our society, it can be quite simple. Beans, for instance, are simple. Apples are simple. Leafy greens are simple. Mushrooms are simple. Broccoli is simple.

              French fries, in order to be french fries have to be fried in some sort of oil. Oil is usually highly processed.

              Here are the ingredients in McDonalds French Fries: Potatoes, Vegetable Oil (Canola Oil, Corn Oil, Soybean Oil, Hydrogenated Soybean Oil, Natural Beef Flavor [Wheat and Milk Derivatives]*), Dextrose, Sodium Acid Pyrophosphate (Maintain Color), Salt. *Natural beef flavor contains hydrolyzed wheat and hydrolyzed milk as starting ingredients

              Here are the ingredients in Heinz ketchup: tomato concentrate from red ripe tomatoes, distilled vinegar, high fructose corn syrup, corn syrup, salt, spice, onion powder, and natural flavoring.

              I understand what you mean about the degree of “processed.” Foods can be minimally processed, such as frozen vegetables (“processed” means any method that deliberately changes food before it is available to consumers). Most would say that frozen vegetables are a good thing to eat. I usually advise people to look at ingredient labels in order to tell how processed foods are. If they have lots of ingredients or ingredients that sound like they were made in a lab, I suggest that they avoid that food. “Natural flavors” are made in labs and are not real. The book “The Dorito Effect” is a nice one to read about this.




              3
              1. BTW, frozen vegetables are usually not the ideal way to get your vegetables because many are pre-cooked and unless you take the extra-ordinary means to activate them you are consuming dead vegetables.

                Richard




                0
                1. When we got to really living the wfpb diet, it really isn’t difficult. And tastes changed, developed to appreciate pure whole Foods. French fries and other greasy foods have lost their appeal. A splash of balsamic or squeeze of lemon juice is all that is needed on salads. When eating out now there are more often choices for plant based foods and wait help more inclined to be receptive or offer suggestions.
                  Frozen vegetables and fruits, though ‘processed’, are packaged quickly after harvest, and may retain more phytonutrients than fresh ones that have been shipped long distances between farm and consumer. The convenience factor also is important in the real world- for working mothers, a time saver in prepping, and for the rest of us, less waste when we can’t eat the fresh before it goes bad in the refrigerator.




                  2
                  1. Not sure if poor reading skills are the problem or people just only want to continue what they believe and do not bother researching what others put in their comment.

                    Let me repeat and if you do not believe do some research. Many frozen vegetables were blanched before being frozen. This is a process whereby they are placed in boiling water for a couple of minutes. Do some research on why many vegetables are healthy for you and why so many should be pressed or fine chopped and let to rest for time before cooking. It is for this reason I said unless you do something to activate these frozen blanched vegetables you are not getting the proper nutrition from them. There are several ways to activate them, for example mustard seed, raw purple cabbage and others.

                    You can tell me how simple it is to eat healthy till you are blue in the face, I do not believe you so do not waste your time. I eat healthy, I cook ahead items like beans and whole grains for a few days but it is still not simple to get a proper variety of the most nutritious whole plant-based foods especially when you eat out. That is my opinion and to be honest I do not care to hear yours or what you do that you think is so simple.




                    0
              2. No idea what you think I said to deserve so much blah, blah but I know how and do eat healthy.
                That is why at 76 I do not have even one prescription, at 5’11” I weigh less than 150 pounds and my BP normally around 95/65.

                Richard




                2
              3. Hi there,
                I can’t find a good place to ask this question and am hoping this one is a winner. I tried to find ‘Protein Isolate’ in the search area but nothing comes up. I’ve noticed ‘Protein Isolate’ in a lot of veggie burgers and am wondering if you can tell me where I can find reliable info about it becuse I’ like to know if it can cause cancer.

                Thank you.




                0
                1. Since you mentioned that you were looking for definition of Protein Isolate in veggie burgers, I’ll assume you would not find the most common type of protein isolate which is made from whey, a form of diary. Plant isolate proteins are made from rice, pea, hemp and soy. Now while these are preferable to animal protein isolates, they still are NOT whole foods, lacking fiber. WHy are you looking for protein in these added processed foods and not in your whole food plant based diet? You’ll find plenty of protein there. Many people think the more protein the better but we now know that’s wrong. Check out: https://nutritionfacts.org/video/the-great-protein-fiasco/ for reassurance that yu do’t need to look for Protein isolate. Just get your proteins from your healthy diet!




                  0
        2. David,

          You could call a whole food plant based diet vegan, but many people are vegan only out of compassion for animals, and haven’t yet adopted HEALTHY vegan diets. Eating potato chips and drinking diet sodas is vegan, but people who eat whole foods do so out of a desire to eat the best diet for their own health as well as compassion for animals.




          4
    2. Fluoride in toothpaste may provide limited benefits by coating and protecting the teeth but it also is absorbed through the skin in the mouth prior to rinsing. The long term safety of ingesting fluoride has never been scientifically demonstrated and it is a known neurotoxin that may reduce cognitive functioning in children when added to drinking water. Consider the alternative of toothpaste with theobromine from the cacao bean, which coats the teeth better than fluoride and has no known toxicity when ingested. Indeed, ingesting theobromine in dark chocolate has a long and pleasing history.




      6
    3. Hi Brenda, Thanks for your question. I am one of the volunteer moderators on the website. Regarding your question about fluoride. I refer you to a review that looks into fluoride in different forms and its physiological actions based on the chemistry of it. This study mostly arguments about water fluoridation and its consequences.
      The study indicates that, the adverse consequences of adding fluoride lacking calcium into public water supplies include effects on man, animals, and the environment. Ingested industrial fluoride incorporates chiefly into bone with an ion exchange process that is irreversible and thus not physiologic. Normal biochemical effects of nutrient minerals are saturable and readily reversible. Fluorine leads all elements in electronegativity and is extremely reactive and not found in nature. But fluoride is permanent because the ion has no electronegativity, cannot be reduced further, or oxidized by any known substance. Fluoride instead associates with positive charged ions in particular aluminum, calcium, and iron. Thus its toxicity depends on the environment in which it resides.
      Soluble fluoride at 60 mg/kg single oral dose without calcium causes acute heart failure in research animals (CDC [5]) and caused lethal heart failure reported in a child after swallowing concentrated dental gel [13].
      Physiologic Conditions Affect Toxicity of Ingested Industrial Fluoride




      4
      1. Hi Spring,
        Fluoride ‘is’ found naturally in streams and rivers all over the world. Its also in natural mineral water. People have been drinking this water for thousands of years. Nothing to worry about




        1
        1. It’s found naturally in nature because of run-off from rivers/streams due to it being in water systems … Fluoride is TOXIC and does not belong in the water system or anywhere else. It is a waste product! Here are 10 facts about fluoride from Fluoride Action Network : http://fluoridealert.org/fan-tv/10-facts/. Read any toothpaste label that contains fluoride, and see the warning.




          1
          1. BChristie, natural floride isn’t toxic in streams and rivers, and its not a ‘toxic run off’, it comes from the natural leaching from rocks as water passes over and through them. Its totally natural. Some water supplies dont have enough fluoride to keep our teeth strong so its added to the water supply. I understand that could be an issue if the wrong amount is added, but that would be difficult to do because the amount needed to be toxic would cost councils and local water suppliers way too much. Besides many drink it themselves.
            As long as the levels are low the body utilises it for strong teeth, like it did for hundreds of thousands of years from naturally occurring fluoride in healthy rivers and streams… well before agriculture or pharmaceutical industries existed.




            0
            1. In one study, women who had thinning bones in their spines and necks who took strontium were 52% less likely to experience a compression fracture or any type of fracture.

              In another study, women who had already experienced slight bone loss in their spines took strontium for three years. At the end of that time period, more than HALF of the women had restored their bone density to NORMAL. They literally reversed their bone loss!

              In yet another study published in the prestigious New England Journal of Medicine, women with low bone density who had already suffered at least one compression fracture in their spines who took strontium slashed their risk of experiencing another fracture by nearly HALF in just one year. Not only that but they increased their bone density in their backs by 14.4% and in their necks by 8.3% on average. That’s the equivalent of restoring 10 or more years of bone loss!

              Even more research found that women over 80 years old who took strontium slashed their risk of fracture by up to 59% in just one year! That’s virtually unheard of!

              And it’s not just women who can benefit from strontium. In still more research, men with low bone density who took strontium had 30% fewer fractures and 80% less height loss, and less back pain.

              Dr. Janet Zand

              There are considerable variations in the quality of drinking water in Norway. The researchers studied variations in magnesium and calcium levels in drinking water between different areas, as these are assumed to have a role in the development of bone strength. They wanted to examine whether there was a correlation between magnesium and calcium concentrations in drinking water and the incidence of hip fracture.

              The study results show that magnesium protects against hip fracture for both men and women. The researchers found no independent protective effect of calcium. * no link




              0
              1. Hi Fred,
                I find your observations very interesting. I very much would like to see your sources.

                A few years ago my wife developed osteopenia. They had told her to exercise more even though she was teaching 10 Zumba fitness classes per week and running about 12 miles per week so exercising more was a bit out of the question.

                We were beginning a wfpbd and she was eating more beans and greens at the time but I did start to give her strontium. Well, two years later she showed a 13% increase in bone density. They said they had never seen anything like it.

                So, when N= 1, it is certainly not definitive but we might just have some at least suggestive evidence when the results come. Was it the strontium or was it the diet? Well, I stopped giving her the strontium betting that it was the diet. She just had another bone density test and I am nervously awaiting the answer. I really do not like buying and taking over the counter supplements but I will buy more strontium immediately if the results are negative.




                0
      2. Spring03: Does boiling tap water to which fluoride has been added by the municipal water supply authorities, remove the fluoride?




        0
        1. WFPB-Hal,

          The Berkey filter removes fluoride, even bromine, a smaller halogen molecule. It’s easy and you don’t have to change the filters very often.




          1
      3. spring O3,

        Thank you so much for your thoughtful reply and references. I knew there were chemical differences in the fluoride added to drinking water and that found in nature. I’m not scientist enough to find the answers, so I really appreciate your speaking up to explain them.




        0
  2. I was surprised when Dr G ended this video with the discussion of a new vaccine:

    “But, if the link between bovine polyomaviruses and human disease pans out, the National Cancer Institute researchers “envision the development of [a] high-potency…vaccine…” So, just like the HPV vaccine may prevent cervical cancer from unsafe sex, one day, perhaps, vaccines may prevent breast and colon cancer from unsafe sirloin.”

    I was expecting a statement along the lines of: “Why eat sirloin, or any meat, eggs, or dairy in the first place.” :-)




    13
    1. Hal, Why indeed? He does not have too. You already know the words and the tune, and can sing it A’cappella.

      This is the typical high technology, pharmacological response one has come to expect from medical industry.




      6
    2. WFPB-Hal: Did you miss the part where people got cancer right where they were vaccinated for small pox? It’s at 2:08 in the video. There’s a pretty gross close-up on some tumors.




      2
      1. ha-ha.
        That’s all about our “official” medicine:
        – you can get a cancer from meat?
        Hey we’ve got a new vaccine! it gives you a smaller cancer (because of a weakened virus) and … a cancer as a side effect of substrate this vaccine grown up ;)

        Waiting for this furiously…




        0
    3. Since he often gets accused of “cherrypicking” or having a “vegan agenda”, maybe he is just leaving that obvious conclusion up to the sensible folk?




      6
    1. Taylor, I can’t help wondering about the studies cited in that study. So much “research” is actually paid for by the diary or meat industries and cannot be trusted. T Colin Campbell proved over 40 years ago that animal protein (at the time he used casein, a prevalent milk protein) stimulated cancer growth. He was able to turn cancer growth on and off based on the levels of animal proteins fed rats and mice. Later he verified the same findings in humans eating more or less meat, described in his book, The China Study. Obviously his work was not included in their analysis, though their wording implies they looked at ALL research on the subject.

      After being treated for cancer, including a mostly raw whole foods vegan diet, I resumed eating cheese and the cancer quickly regrew. Coincidence? Maybe, but I’m not taking that chance again.

      I find that at some point, unless you’re a scientist who can read and understand the research papers, you have to decide who to trust. With many years of experience behind my choices, with learning a lot of incorrect information about nutrition, and with looking at the character of those espousing WFPB eating, and the way they are aging, my choice became to trust the “rock stars” of the plant based movement – including, but not limited to – Drs Greger, Goldhamer, McDougall, Esselstyn, Campbell, Popper, etc. It’s a personal choice I’m happy I made and the results have all been much more positive than my previous many years of efforts to be healthy while eating animal protein.




      13
    2. Hi Taylor, I followed your link further and found conflict of interest with several of the researchers (in the study you found). One is a recipient of research funding from the Dairy Research Institute, Rosemont, IL, Another is a recipient of research grants from the Danish Dairy Research Foundation and the Dairy Research Institute, Rosemont, IL.
      Yet another received funding from the Global Dairy Platform, Dairy Research Institute and Dairy Australia.




      7
    1. Hi John, Dr Gregor isn’t in favour of vaccines to enable eating , He is merely pointing out the irony and absurdity that some people will go to to sell and eat animal products, when there’s plenty of healthy plant based alternatives.




      2
  3. Dr Greger,

    Thank you for this informative video. The viruses you speak about are found in commercial beef. I am assuming they would also be found in organic, grass-fed beef but has anyone actually looked for these viruses in the organic beef? I am a breast cancer survivor and I eat a few grass fed burgers a year and would greatly appreciate to know what you think they would be found in grass-fed beef.

    Thank you!




    1
    1. Thanks for your question Irene,

      I could not find a specific study that answers your question and therefore in regards to this I will not be able to answer. However, please know that the carcinogenic effect of red meat or processed meat is unrelated to its origin or farming method, because as per the IARC 2015 report, carcinogenic chemicals, including N-nitroso-compounds (NOC) and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) will still be present in the meat. On the other hand, irrespective of grass-fed or not, cooking meat produces known or suspected carcinogens, including heterocyclic aromatic amines (HAA) and PAH.

      Furthermore, I highly encourage you to read this article by NF.

      Hope this answer helps.




      1
  4. Ah, I may be wrong here, but I think Dr. Greger is actually pointing to the absurdity of the development of vaccines to enable us to eat toxic food.




    15
  5. I agree with Bobbi. It reminds me of the old joke about the lecturer who came to the schoolhouse and gave a talk about the evils of consuming alcohol. He demonstrated with a glass jar containing some live earthworms. The lecturer then added an ounce of alcohol to the jar, while the students watched. When the worms died, the lecturer asked the class: “Now, can anyone tell me what this demonstration shows?” A voice from the back of the room said: “Yes! If you have worms, better drink lots of whiskey!”




    4
  6. This is so typical of our western healthcare industry: ‘here, we’ll give you this vaccine loaded with adjuvants, antibiotics, stabilizers & preservatives, so that you can continue to eat this other stuff that could otherwise one day kill you.’ Not eating the stuff that could kill you doesn’t even come into question. That’s how crazy our culture has become.

    BTW, I watched this video on my lunch break. That close-up of the animal coming out of the grinder was really gross. Made me appreciate my veggie juice & big salad all the more!




    6
  7. yes, I get that sometimes too – kinda sneaks up on me and then I have to “Reality”-focus on good things. All started when I changed to WFPB




    1
  8. Hello
    I am confused about the research session. You state that there is a “suggested donation”. Then you state that “once the donation is received” then further sign up can be accomplished.

    Is this a donation or is this a fee? Could you please clarify and make clear what the expectations are?
    Thank you.




    0
      1. Thank you so much for your help! And for the wonderful site you created.
        Now I’m looking into more beneficial things from there. You’re very kind to share such great things.




        0
  9. -This is unrelated to the video- I’m starting to learn all the negative effects of high cholesterol concentrations in blood. Now, I read a lot of studies regarding this topic but something that I can’t really understand is the regulation of cholesterol in the body. So basically I stumbled across a page of a doctor called Chris Kresser, and I read this: “The body tightly regulates the amount of cholesterol in the blood by controlling internal production; when cholesterol intake in the diet goes down, the body makes more. When cholesterol intake in the diet goes up, the body makes less” (without any study linked to back up his claim) Now, I am very confused because this notion (if true) go in conflict with the fact that I read that most people that eat meat, eggs and dairy have high levels of cholesterol and therefore high risk of developing heart diseases. So what is the truth ? Because if it is true that, like Chris Kresser said, when cholesterol intake in the diet goes up the body makes less why does someone even die of heart disease ? I mean, if the body makes for example 1000 mg a day of cholesterol but from the day after I start to ingest 400 mg of cholesterol does this mean (like kresser says) that my body is now producing 600 mg of endogenous cholesterol because of the fact that I am now ingesting 400 mg of dietary cholesterol ? And if this is case how can cholesterol be involved in circulatory problems and heart disease if the first place ? Please respond if you know because I would like to know




    0
    1. Claudio 1996,

      As you mentioned, Chris Kresser didn’t back up his *opinion* with researched facts. Even had he done so, the “research” may have been simply marketing by the animal protein industry masquerading as research. It’s a slippery world out there on the internet.

      As Dr McDougall is fond of saying, “People love hearing good news about their bad habits.” Kresser is simply appealing to those who aren’t ready to do what is needed to prevent heart disease, diabetes, autoimmune conditions, cancer, etc. He has a large audience.

      The only published studies on reversing heart disease are by doctors who have put people on low fat diets filled with a variety of vegetables, fruits, whole grains, beans and a few nuts and seeds. No animal protein, or in Dr Ornish’s case, tiny bits of very low fat animal protein.

      Please go to Youtube and you’ll find many videos by doctors who can explain this. You could start with Dr Esselstyn, Dr John McDougall, Dr Dean Ornish, Dr Goldhamer, Dr Pam Popper, and of course, many videos by our hero here, Dr Greger. These people have done or studied the research and/or worked with patients who actually got well using this healthy plant only diet.

      Be well,




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      1. Thank you for the reply, and yes there is compelling evidence that shows that cholesterol is bad for your health; there is no doubt at this point that dietary cholesterol does raise serum cholesterol; the problem i had is that I really wanted to know in depths info about the regulation of cholesterol. Finally, i found what I was searching. Again thank you for you time




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    2. Thanks for your question Claudio.

      A lot of information displayed by Chris Kresser is questionable and not to mention he has no background on medicine or nutrition, so information he presents should be subject to rigorous analysis.

      In this case, from a biological perspective, he argues that dietary cholesterol does not have a significant effect on cholesterol levels in the blood because our liver can regulate this process (1). This is partially true – when an individual consumes high amounts of dietary cholesterol, the body will reduce the internal production of cholesterol, but it will also shut its LDL receptors, which prevents cholesterol in blood from entering through cells and as a consequence, it raises cholesterol levels, which initiates the process of atherosclerosis(1, 2, 3).

      There is no question that dietary cholesterol raises blood cholesterol, according to the latest 2016 review, “about 50 % of dietary cholesterol is absorbed, According to available data, the aggregate of these factors, including dietary cholesterol, will on average raise serum cholesterol levels about 25%”. A lifetime of high-cholesterol intake could raise risk for atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (ASCVD) up to 15 %. (1).

      Hope this answer helps.




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      1. Thank you for your reply. I ignored the fact that LDL-receptors even existed (i wasn’t able to find any valuable information about cholesterol regulation). Now I have no doubts that Kriss Kresser is outright lying about the fact that eating cholesterol rich foods won’t raise serum cholesterol. Thank you for your time




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  10. As one of the moderators for NutritionFacts.org, Claudio1996, I can understand your confusion and frustration getting mixed messages especially when the “expert” makes provocative but authoritative-sounding pronouncements. I echo what livewire advised about being wary of internet experts who lack the credentials to be giving advice, especially when not backed up with solid science. When an expert cannot provide the evidence and touts expensive supplements, the red flags go up. When the issue is complex, like cholesterol, you really need to go with evidence-based research, such as what you find here or the other doctors livewire mentions who base their advice on research, the preponderance of which is clearly demonstrating the cardiovascular risks associated with cholesterol and animal fats. Because it IS a complicated issue, I’d encourage you to review the several videos Dr. Greger has produced to grasp the involved way our bodies handle cholesterol. You could start just checking the general topic “Cholesterol” and then going into the many detailed videos of different aspects of this topic One you may find especially helpful in clearing up the confusion is: https://nutritionfacts.org/video/how-do-we-know-that-cholesterol-causes-heart-disease/
    I’m glad you commented and hope you continue to follow NutritionFacts.org so you can continue to be a discriminating judge of nutrition information.




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    1. Thank you for your reply. I must say that now that I looked into it more is obvious he is lying. But before being sure of that I had to do my research and ask others if they knew something concerning this topic. The evidence that heart disease and a lot of other problems is largely caused by cholesterol is really strong and who says the contrary is “obliged” to back his claim with strong evidence otherwise how can such claim have any credibility whatsoever. Thank you for your insight




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  11. I am very intrigued with your research. I have been unsuccessful with finding any research about freezing meat for a period of time before eating it. I have been told that through freezing meat for longer than 3 months, it is safer to eat due to that time period killing off any bacteria and viruses. Do you find any truth with freezing meat before eating it for a period of time to make it safer?




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    1. Chad,

      Please read or watch on Youtube to see what T Colin Campbell says about animal protein. Here’s one link: nutritionstudies.org/animal-protein-carcinogen/ He did a lot of very telling original research, mostly at Cornell, over something like 60 years, on animal protein, and in his 80s he’s still out there on the road speaking on the subject frequently. His starting position was that we all needed more of it, but his research, and that of others, changed his mind.

      Freezing meat may kill some bacteria or something, but animal protein is still animal protein, and it contributes to heart disease and cancer, and a host of other chronic diseases.




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    2. I am not sure that Chris is a medical doctor, or even any kind of doctor. I gave up on his site and the Paleo Diet that he supports never interested me. However, I find too many things he said does not match my thinking in many areas like cholesterol, eggs, meat and fish.




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    3. Thanks for your question Chad.

      According to a 2012 review in the Journal of Meat Science:

      “Beef, lamb/mutton and chicken are the meat products that are produced world-wide in the greatest quantities and hence the majority of the research to date in the meat science discipline has focussed on these species. The effects of the freezing rate have been studied in detail and the link between the rate of freezing and moisture loss is well documented. Nonetheless, many inconsistencies exist in the literature regarding the combined effect of freezing and thawing on the colour, oxidation susceptibility, tenderness and the microbiologi- cal shelf-life post freeze/thaw. More research into the combined effect of freezing and thawing is thus essential.
      In recent years, the main focus of research into freezing and thawing mitigation mechanisms has been concentrated on the development of high-pressure freezing and thawing methods. The com- mercial application of these processes is still disputed, however, even though scientific research indicates that they lead to an increase in the quality of meat. Ante mortem supplementation with anti-freeze proteins and vitamin E appears promising in reducing the effects of freeze/thaw on meat quality, especially vitamin E in retarding myoglobin, lipid and protein oxidation during long term frozen storage. The use of brine injection has also been shown to decrease moisture losses in frozen/thawed meat, likely due to the fact that the salts in the brine aid in improved binding of water. Similarly MAP could mitigate the colour deterioration of frozen/thawed meat, but a balance is necessary to minimise the rate of oxidation envisaged with such treatments. More research into these areas is necessary, especially relative to the application of these to the more exotic meat species such as ostrich, crocodile, kangaroo and African antelope species as these are increasingly being exported from their native countries to Europe and the United States.”

      Nevertheless, like someone has already stated and according to the 2015 IARC report, all the carcinogenic chemicals, including N-nitroso-compounds (NOC) and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) will still be present in the meat. On the other hand, irrespective of whether it was frozen or not, cooking meat produces known or suspected carcinogens, including heterocyclic aromatic amines (HAA) and PAH.

      Hope this answer helps.




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    4. Hi Chad,

      I am a volunteer for Dr. Greger. Thanks for your question.

      Freezing does not kill bacteria or viruses. It simply inactivates bacteria from replicating. So while frozen, the bacteria that is already in the meat will not increase until you begin to thaw the meat out. Freezing meat does not make it safer to eat; the cooking time and temperature are the most important considerations to prevent sickness from eating meat.

      However, given the known health concerns attributed to eating animal products, the safety of meat is always a concern, with or without bacteria.

      I hope this helps to answer your question, Chad.




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  12. Hello doctor,

    Can you please address the high instances of HPV vaccines being ineffective? I received the Gardasil vaccine as a child and still tested HPV positive at age 19 with warts invading all areas of my genitals. Furthermore, besides your advice for green tea topical treatments, do you believe veganism and mushrooms (particularly shiitake which are in phase 2 clinical human trials) are an effective treatment for expelling the virus entirely? Do you have any further specific recommendations for both treatment of warts and cancer prevention? It seems unlikely to me that the strains which cause warts and cancer do not overlap, which conventional doctors like to suggest to their patients with the wart-causing strains.




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    1. I’m not a doctor, but it is my understanding that Gardasil only treats two of the lesser HPV strains, and that those two are not the main ones that cause either warts or cancer.




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    2. Hello Alex,
      Thank you for your question. I am a family doctor with a private practice in lifestyle medicine, and also a volunteer moderator for this website. I just looked on PubMed (a free database of medical articles). I found an interesting recent review article about dietary polyphenols for the prevention and treatment of cervical cancer. Here is a link to the full text: http://www.mdpi.com/1420-3049/21/8/1055/htm#B47-molecules-21-01055

      There are over 200 related human papilloma viruses (HPV), over 40 of which are easily spread by sexual contact. 70% of cervical cancer cases are caused by just two of the strains: 16 and 18. There are two different types of Gardasil vaccine, as you might know: regular Gardasil (4 strains: 6,11,16,18) and Gardasil 9 (also prevents strains #31,33,45,52). Gardasil is extremely effective in preventing those particular strains — close to 100%.

      You are correct that there are strains which cause warts as well as cervical cancer; but there are certainly strains which cause warts but do not cause cancer. For you own genital warts, there is an easy way to find out if they are the kind which can cause cancer: get a biopsy done, and the doctor will send it to a lab and they can identify which strain(s) you have. You can also get all of your visible warts: either by getting them cut off, or by treating with a topical agent that “burns” them off.

      Sorry you have to deal with this. I hope you get effectively treated.
      Dr. Jon
      PhysicianAssistedWellness.com
      Volunteer moderator for NutritionFacts.org




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  13. This video mentions cancer at the site of the smallpox vaccination site and that the vaccination was harvested from cattle. Can you provide a title or PDF where this information was taken from? I received the smallpox vaccine in the Army and I would like research this topic further. Also (a little off topic), is there much written about the anthrax vaccine and its long-term effects?




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    1. All of the healthy, long-living populations that I have read about consumed over 80% of their daily calories with whole plant-based products and a limited amount of animal products which means they were on a high carb, low fat diet.
      The Eskimos changed their diet by importing foods a long time ago so it is important to use obtainable facts from when they were on their traditional diet which by the way included large amounts of meat, not only fish, so I doubt their Omega 6 to 3 ratio was as ideal as the author indicates even the meat was of wild animals. The traditional diet also included plants from berries and plants.
      However, their health on the traditional diet was not as stated in the article. 300 years ago, long before imported food, a women died at the age of around 53 and her body was well preserved by ice. Investigation of her arteries indicated she had clogged arteries and at risk for a heart attack. Further study of the Eskimos on a traditional diet has indicated that they have a higher rate of strokes than those on a Western Diet and about the same rate of heart attacks.
      Why not look at populations that contain many more validated elements like the Okinawans and Seventh Day Adventists of CA?




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  14. If ISIS infected the meat industry with these viruses there would be millions of Americans demanding that the Government to remove the pathogens from the food chain and millions more would stop eating animal products forever. But since is occurs naturally few will ever hear of these studies and act on it.




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  15. I am an avid exerciser and body builder. How can I get enough complete protein in my diet without eating animal protein or yogurt? Also, is venison that I have harvested just as bad as beef?




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    1. Tom,

      You can get lots of good tasting protein from dry beans. I take a cup of dry beans which is usually a mix of about 15 different types, put them in a crock pot with a can of Italian tomatoes and a can of Rotel add water and cook for 4-6 hours. I also add other items for taste such as vegetarian bullion and pepper oil to spice it up.

      Try it. Delicious and more protein than you will ever need.




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      1. As a moderator for NutritionFacts.org, I wanted to first congratulate you for being an avid exerciser. One very good way to take care of your health.
        As it seems you are also becoming aware that following a whole food plant based diet is another especially important maintenance plan for your health, I want to encourage you to take advantage of the advice you already have received to increase bean intake for more protein. (Dr. Greger has several videos on the benefits of beans which you can find using the search button.) As far as whether your self harvested venison is better for you than beef- perhaps from a cleaner meat (not avoiding slaughterhouse contamination nor potentially harmful additives.) Still, venison is red meat and we have much research on why avoiding this is important for your health. (Check out https://nutritionfacts.org/video/why-is-meat-a-risk-factor-for-diabetes/ ) Bottom line veneson is still an animal protein with all the health hazards associated with it: Animal Protein Compared to Cigarette Smoking | NutritionFacts.org (You may want to check out a few of the sources for more cautionary reserach).
        Hope this helps and you continue focusing on how you can enhance all that good exercise with great nutrition!




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      2. buttonhut, I’m guessing you’re a guy, or a woman who doesn’t like spending too much time in the kitchen. I love hearing from people who have figured out how to eat healthy meals without spending hours prepping and cooking. I do a lot of the latter by choice, but it’s great to know it can be quick, easy and pretty much effortless.




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