Best Foods to Improve Sexual Function

Best Foods to Improve Sexual Function
4.5 (90%) 62 votes

Selecting foods to improve pelvic blood flow and decrease inflammation both long-term and immediately after a meal may improve sexual functioning in men and women.

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Below is an approximation of this video’s audio content. To see any graphs, charts, graphics, images, and quotes to which Dr. Greger may be referring, watch the above video.

What are some “[p]ill-free ways to improve your sex life”? “Exercise,…quit smoking,” don’t drink too much, don’t weigh too much, and “[e]at a healthy diet.” But, what does that mean? “[H]eart-healthy lifestyle changes” are sex-healthy lifestyle changes—as has been demonstrated in studies from around the world, including in women. “Sexual function in women is [also] significantly affected by [coronary artery disease],” atherosclerotic narrowing of blood flow through our arteries, including the arteries that supply our pelvis. So, high cholesterol may mean “lower arousal, orgasm, lubrication, and satisfaction,” and the same with high blood pressure.

So, putting women on a more plant-based diet may help with sexual functioning. Researchers found that improvements in Female Sexual Function Index scores were related to “an increased…intake of fruit, vegetables, nuts and [beans],” and a shift from animal to plant sources of fat. And, the same with men: a significant improvement in international Index of Erectile Function scores.

In fact, the largest study on diet and erectile dysfunction found that “each additional daily serving of fruit[s or] vegetable[s]” may reduce the risk by 10%. But, why? It may be due to the anti-inflammatory effects. Two years on a healthier diet resulted in “a significant reduction [in] systemic inflammation, as indicated by…reduced levels of C[-reactive protein].” Fiber itself may play an “anti-inflammatory role…” Those who eat the most fiber tend to have significantly lower levels of inflammation in their bodies. The opposite was found for saturated fat, associated with an “increased likelihood of elevated C[-reactive protein]” levels.

This is how we’re used to seeing changes in inflammatory markers—over weeks, months, or years. But, people don’t realize that the level of inflammation in our bodies can change after a single meal. For example, there’s a pro-inflammatory signaling molecule in our bodies called interleukin-18, thought to play a role in destabilizing atherosclerotic plaques. As such, the level of “Interleukin-18 [in the blood] is a Strong Predictor of Cardiovascular Death…”

What would happen if you fed people one of three different types of meals: sausage and egg-butter-olive oil sandwiches, or cheese-less pizza with a white flour crust, or the same cheese-less pizza, but with a whole wheat crust? Within hours of eating the sausage sandwich, interleukin-18 levels shot up about 20%—an effect not seen eating the plant-based pizza. And, those eating the whole food, plant-based pizza had about a 20% drop in IL-18 levels within hours—reinforcing dietary recommendations to eat a diet “high in fiber and [starches], and low in saturated fat, to prevent chronic diseases.”

But, the billions are in pills, not plants, which is why “[t]he pharmacology of the…female orgasm” has been studied ever since 1972, when a researcher at Tulane University implanted tubes deep within the brain of a woman, so he could inject drugs directly into her brain, and was able to induce “repetitive orgasms.” A man who had electrodes placed into similar parts of his brain was given a device for a few hours that allowed him to press the button himself to stimulate the electrode. He pressed the button up to “1,500 times.”

Please consider volunteering to help out on the site.

Image credit: Kristina DeMuth. Image has been modified.

Video credit: Julien Herman.

Below is an approximation of this video’s audio content. To see any graphs, charts, graphics, images, and quotes to which Dr. Greger may be referring, watch the above video.

What are some “[p]ill-free ways to improve your sex life”? “Exercise,…quit smoking,” don’t drink too much, don’t weigh too much, and “[e]at a healthy diet.” But, what does that mean? “[H]eart-healthy lifestyle changes” are sex-healthy lifestyle changes—as has been demonstrated in studies from around the world, including in women. “Sexual function in women is [also] significantly affected by [coronary artery disease],” atherosclerotic narrowing of blood flow through our arteries, including the arteries that supply our pelvis. So, high cholesterol may mean “lower arousal, orgasm, lubrication, and satisfaction,” and the same with high blood pressure.

So, putting women on a more plant-based diet may help with sexual functioning. Researchers found that improvements in Female Sexual Function Index scores were related to “an increased…intake of fruit, vegetables, nuts and [beans],” and a shift from animal to plant sources of fat. And, the same with men: a significant improvement in international Index of Erectile Function scores.

In fact, the largest study on diet and erectile dysfunction found that “each additional daily serving of fruit[s or] vegetable[s]” may reduce the risk by 10%. But, why? It may be due to the anti-inflammatory effects. Two years on a healthier diet resulted in “a significant reduction [in] systemic inflammation, as indicated by…reduced levels of C[-reactive protein].” Fiber itself may play an “anti-inflammatory role…” Those who eat the most fiber tend to have significantly lower levels of inflammation in their bodies. The opposite was found for saturated fat, associated with an “increased likelihood of elevated C[-reactive protein]” levels.

This is how we’re used to seeing changes in inflammatory markers—over weeks, months, or years. But, people don’t realize that the level of inflammation in our bodies can change after a single meal. For example, there’s a pro-inflammatory signaling molecule in our bodies called interleukin-18, thought to play a role in destabilizing atherosclerotic plaques. As such, the level of “Interleukin-18 [in the blood] is a Strong Predictor of Cardiovascular Death…”

What would happen if you fed people one of three different types of meals: sausage and egg-butter-olive oil sandwiches, or cheese-less pizza with a white flour crust, or the same cheese-less pizza, but with a whole wheat crust? Within hours of eating the sausage sandwich, interleukin-18 levels shot up about 20%—an effect not seen eating the plant-based pizza. And, those eating the whole food, plant-based pizza had about a 20% drop in IL-18 levels within hours—reinforcing dietary recommendations to eat a diet “high in fiber and [starches], and low in saturated fat, to prevent chronic diseases.”

But, the billions are in pills, not plants, which is why “[t]he pharmacology of the…female orgasm” has been studied ever since 1972, when a researcher at Tulane University implanted tubes deep within the brain of a woman, so he could inject drugs directly into her brain, and was able to induce “repetitive orgasms.” A man who had electrodes placed into similar parts of his brain was given a device for a few hours that allowed him to press the button himself to stimulate the electrode. He pressed the button up to “1,500 times.”

Please consider volunteering to help out on the site.

Image credit: Kristina DeMuth. Image has been modified.

Video credit: Julien Herman.

Doctor's Note

I previously touched on this topic in Survival of the Firmest: Erectile Dysfunction & Death and 50 Shades of Greens.

Might better sexual function lead to better health? Hasn’t been studied in women, but in my last video I reviewed the available evidence for men: Do Men Who Have More Sex Live Longer?

What effect might that inflammation directly following an unhealthy meal have on our artery function? Check out my 3-part endotoxins series starting with The Leaky Gut Theory of Why Animal Products Cause Inflammation.

And why again, is fiber anti-inflammatory? Watch my video Prebiotics: Tending Our Inner Garden.

If you haven’t yet, you can subscribe to my videos for free by clicking here.

96 responses to “Best Foods to Improve Sexual Function

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    1. Wade: you’re not alone; I do exactly the same thing. I’ve found that in most videos, I lose nothing by not watching. When he explains a graph, watching becomes necessary. It’s funny; the video spends more time rolling open the page than displaying it.




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      1. I just listen now instead of watching. If you are on a mobile device and have a paid subscription to Google Play Music, you can turn off the screen during YouTube playback and just listen to videos. Or sometimes I read the transcript instead.

        I thought I would get used to them, but for me the new videos are still like nails on a chalkboard. I’m not trying to be mean, but for some reason I simply can’t watch them comfortably.

        Also, all the waiting around for the graphics to do their thing seems to add noticeable length to the videos, so the new ones seem to run a little long for the amount of content they have.

        Anyway, the information is still good, so I’m sure the die-hard fans like me will continue to pay attention.




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        1. I stopped watching the videos long before the new visual transitions. I wouldn’t even be aware of it if it wasn’t mentioned in the comments. I just read the transcripts.




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    2. Hi Wade,

      Sometimes, I just read the transcript. Below the video of the day, you can see a tab that reads “VIEW TRANSCRIPT”. That usually works for me!

      YAY for all of us ADHD types! Shiny objects, and distraction……




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    3. Wade, I’m with you (and the others) on this point. Hopefully the good doctor will get the message on what real fans of the website are looking for in a video. Until then…bring on those transcripts!




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    1. Hello WjM,
      You raise an excellent question. I am a family physician in private practice, and a volunteer moderator for this website. Flaxseed contains lots of lignans; and “lignan has been shown to reduce testosterone (total and free) and 5α-reductase, the enzyme that converts testosterone to its most active form, dihydrotestosterone.” (Quote is from the introduction to the 2nd article, below).

      Here are two studies from the same group of researchers.
      1) https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15134976: This was a small pilot study of 15 men comparing pre- and post-treatment of 6 months of flaxseed supplementation which found: “no statistically significant change was seen in total testosterone…. (but) statistically significant decreases in PSA and cholesterol were observed.”
      2) http://cebp.aacrjournals.org/content/17/12/3577.long — this was a large followup randomized controlled study of over 1000 men with confirmed prostate cancer who were randomized into 4 different “arms”: control, flaxseed, low-fat, or low-fat plus flaxseed. They found a clear beneficial effect of flaxseed in lowering the proliferation rate of prostate cancer. They also found lowered testosterone levels in all four arms of the study, and the flaxseed groups had no more testosterone lowering than did the control group (which did not eat flaxseed).

      My thoughts on flax are that it clearly reduces the risk of prostate cancer, and can even slow the progression of existing prostate cancer. It also has well known cholesterol-lowering properties. It also probably does lower testosterone levels, at least in humans, but not very much. In rats, there does not appear to be any testosterone lowering:
      A) https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/10722886 — study in rats showing that offspring of rats fed flaxseed during pregnancy had INCREASES in both testosterone and sperm production.
      B) https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22943974 — study of rats fed with diet containing flaxseed showed increased concentrations of 17β-estradiol but no changes in testosterone concentrations.

      Regarding oats, I could not find any studies looking at oat consumption and testosterone levels.

      However, there is lots of evidence that eating oats lowers both total and LDL-cholesterol. Here is an excellent article I found on PubMed (a free database of peer-reviewed medical literature):
      1) http://ajcn.nutrition.org/content/100/6/1413.long — This one is a recent (2014) meta-analysis of 28 randomized controlled trials. A “meta-analysis” means that they pooled data from all these studies, which makes the pooled analysis much more powerful (believable) than any one study by itself. “Randomized controlled trials” are the best type of medical study — i.e. there is very little chance for bias. So, this is a super great study. They looked at the effect of people eating at least 3 grams per day (not very much) of “oat beta-glucan”, which is the part of oats which has been shown to help lower cholesterol. The study participants had to eat that much for a minimum of 2 weeks. They could easily eat this much by eating oat-containing bread, Muesli, breakfast cereals, biscuits, cereal drinks, muffins, or cereal powders. They found a highly statistically significant reduction in both total and LDL cholesterol.

      I hope this helps.




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      1. This is very interesting, especially regarding flaxseed. What’s missing is how much flaxseed is a therapeutic amount.

        I add 1-2 tablespoons of freshly ground flaxseed to my cereal every morning but have no idea if this is an effective amount or not.




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    2. Carbs help raise testosterone, so oats are good. There was a study done that showed lower testosterone with flax but they used a lot. Dr. Gregor recommends one tablespoon of flax per day, that is much lower then what they used in the study.




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    3. WJM There is probably some truth in it. High saturated fat diets and possibly high monounsaturated fat diets tend to increase cholesterol. Oat bran is known to lower cholesterol and polyunsaturated fats also tend to lower it. Cholesterol is regarded as a precursor of testosterone and other steroidal hormones. Thus low fat high fibre diets tend to lower testosterone at least in Western men.
      https://academic.oup.com/jcem/article-lookup/doi/10.1210/jc.2004-1530

      Flax seeds are high in polyunsaturated omega 3 fats and have been shown to lower testosterone.
      https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11445478

      People tend to assume that this is a bad thing. However, as far as we know, lower testosterone levels are not associated with erectile dysfunction, lack of fecundity or lack of manliness. Average Western levels of testosterone tend to be higher than in non-Westernised populations. But then average Western levels of blood cholesterol, obesity, sedentary behaviour and cardiovascular disease are also higher. This cluster of higher normal (ie average) rates in Western counties may reflect diets higher in saturated fats and total calories, and lower in fibre. It is a stretch to assume that testosterone levels lower than the average rates found in Western countries are necessarily disadvantageous or unmanly.
      http://www.health.harvard.edu/heart-health/testosterone-and-the-heart
      https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/8979466
      https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24203318
      http://www.livescience.com/19312-tribal-testosterone-levels.html

      In sum, then, yes all other things being equal, oats and flax seeds lower cholesterol. But so what?




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      1. I meant to finish by saying “In sum, then, yes all other things being equal, oats and flax seeds lower TESTOSTERONE. But so what?”. However, there appears to be no edit button.




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  1. Off topic

    I got into a big hubbub on Facebook for pointing out that eggs are not healthy or safe (according to the USDA right?). The group came UNGLUED!

    I gave a few nice rebuttals (kids are so snappy these days) and then let the comments pile on, figuring that if I get one or two folks to consider re-thinking eggs as some sort of nectar from God (or a birds ass), then maybe that’s enough. One or two like-minded folks were nice, but 98% were apparently outraged. Whoops.

    This morning I get a message inquiring about my eating plan. Whoot. Tiny victory maybe.

    The ignorance out there is astounding. I think my last comment on the egg thing was to the effect that Doctors used to smoke and we all thought it was okay. Hope this helps someone else help some others find a better way to live. Cheers!




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    1. Wade, I had the same experience in the comment section of a YouTube video extolling the 12 amazing benefits of eggs.

      Some of the other commenters became unglued at my assertions otherwise, and behaved in a somewhat less than cordial manner. People can sure get passionate about their eggs. I was as about as popular as a gay Islamic gun control advocate at a combination Mississippi NRA rally and bible retreat.

      It made me homesick for Thea, one of our moderators here at NutritionFacts, to help restore some decorum to the conversation.




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    2. Wade,

      On the topic of eggs I think that you have a point. If you go to a fast food restaurant you are going to get some very unhealthy eggs produced by unhealthy chickens. I would not even think of eating something so unhealthy. If you are talking about organic pastured eggs, well then I think that is another story. I am a lacto ovo vegetarian and have been for 20 years, as time has gone by I have increasingly scrutinized labels and origins and this has eliminated many things from my diet or at least minimized them. I think in moderation and eaten with a healthy diet a quality egg has it’s place. Being vegan this might make you cringe the way dog eating in China makes me cringe. Still maybe time to take another look at the “Blue Zones” and see what the centenarians are eating. I know that the Seventh Day Adventists in Loma Linda are vegan, but most of the populations followed are not. Still, meat is limited to special occasions and it is not the bastardized version that we are producing in the US




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      1. The industrialized food production system in the US is harmful to our health (too much cheap corn fed protein), to the animals (the brutality of how ALL factory farmed animals are treated is inhumane), and to the environment. Under these conditions, why would anyone eat an egg?

        We are fortunate to know as much as we do about the benefits of WFPB nutrition to free us from the fantasy that we “need” beef, eggs, milk, or any other heavily lobbied, federally subsidized industrially produced food. URGH. Lead by example, and let your egg, meat, and dairy drinking “friends” know you’ll visit them when they have their first cardiac event. Or tenth.




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      2. Hi Debi,

        I’m no vegan. And just a few comments to follow up.

        I have access to free-range, home-grown eggs at zero cost to me. I ate them freely for most of my years (48 of 50).

        I now only eat them on holidays/occasions because I do agree with the evidence developed by nutritional researchers and doctors that indicates they offer nothing that we need and/or cannot obtain in better forms from plant sources, also that they offer much of what we do not want.

        I quite agree that the horrific practices of the meat making industry and their “slap on the wrist” regulation by our governmental agencies does produce an inferior product (pale and runny and surely contaminated in the case of eggs), but that I do not expect that to change any time soon. I have “defunded” the meat industry by not participating in the regular consumption of their products. That’s all the power I have, that any consumer has-that they understand. Most of the meat/fish I consume was never a part of any industry and is now a minor part of my diet.

        I yet recall that last time I had “breakfast style” eggs in a restaurant (about 14 years ago) and was shocked at how pathetic they looked on the plate. I hadn’t seen a store-bought egg up close in that many years.

        Anyway, I feel better without them. I see no net benefit in eating them. And the science I choose to believe supports my thoughts on this.

        Thank you for your comments. Cheers!




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      3. Debi

        Eggs are deleterious to ones health, so there’s no need to consume them if your health is important to you.

        https://nutritionfacts.org/topics/eggs/

        Make chicks are murdered within 72 hours of being hatched, by mincing/grinding up alive or gassing or suffocating in large bins. That’s cruel and immoral.

        https://youtu.be/utPkDP3T7R4

        It matters not if they’re “free range” or organic; it’s exploitation and abuse and is wrong.

        Yes, I’m a vegan. But if humans needed to consume animal flesh and their bodily secretions to survive then the argument against would be mute. Thankfully we do not need to though.




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      4. Debi Tucker. The problem with eggs isn’t how the chickens producing them were fed or housed, it is intrinsic with what is in all eggs. I went to cronometer and found an entry for generic eggs and one for “Vital Farms, Pasture Raised, Al Fresco Eggs”. Both contain 140 calories for 2 eggs. Of those calories 64% were from fat and about 30% of that fat was saturated fat. The pastured eggs contained slightly more cholesterol at 370 mg, but 2 eggs from either source will exceed the maximum upper limit of 300 mg/day with the healthy limit for dietary cholesterol being zero. Even the protein in eggs (supposedly their greatest asset) is a problem. 2 eggs provide 7% of my daily calories while supplying 22% of my protein, 29% of my leucine and 41% of my methionine. Sounds good but it isn’t really.

        Overconsumption of animal protein in general is hard on the body especially the kidneys since animal protein is very acid forming. Consumption of the two mentioned amino acids in excess of biological need is known to cause the amounts of IGF-1 and mTOR produced by the body to increase beyond healthy levels. IGF-1 in particular plays a central role in the promotion and spread of cancer. mTOR is a primary regulator of cell aging with higher levels causing cells in our body to age and die faster.

        Dairy, especially cheese, is just as bad with 74% of the calories in cheddar coming from fat with over half of that fat being saturated fat. Bovine milk is also high in protein relative to calories even in whole milk with all of its fat. Again it doesn’t matter if that came from happy grass fed cows or not. The very problem is the nature of bovine milk which is ill suited to serve as food for humans. Milk does no adult body any good especially the adult of an entirely different species.

        So adding eggs and dairy to an otherwise whole food plant based diet will degrade the healthfulness of that diet to degree they constitute the total diet. So you are right that a little only does a little damage, but why intentionally do any damage to your diet.

        And lastly both eggs and dairy have a “male problem”, the resolution of which makes a mockery of those who are ovo-lacto vegetarians for ethical reasons. I used to say (somewhat self-righteously) when I was an ovo-lacto vegetarian for over 10 years that I no longer ate anything that had a face or a mother. The trouble is that half of all chickens and cattle are males. The egg and dairy industries, including those who pasture their animals, simply can’t afford to feed and house those “useless” males and so they must be killed so their sisters can make the eggs and milk. The meat of male dairy calves can be sold as veal and so they are generally confined to tiny pens where they get no exercise that would toughen up the muscles for a couple of months before being slaughtered. Milk = veal. It is that simple.

        Egg laying breeds of chicken don’t grow fast enough to compete with breeds selected for meat, so males are completely useless and so are simply killed out of hand on the day they hatch. There are realtively painless ways to do that, but they are more expensive. So the industry standard methods used by hatcheries, which supply laying hens to all egg operations, caged, “free-range”, pastured, or even backyard hobbyists, is to stuff hundreds of male chicks into a black plastic bag and let them suffocate or they are fed live into large meat grinders which turns them into a paste.




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    3. Good for you Wade, I do the same thing! It pays to try! I think the most depressing episode though was when, after getting repeated emails from the American Diabetes Ass. pleading for contributions to “find the cure” (you know, those people who are supposed be on top of the latest science to actually HELP those with diabetes?), I was looking for a link to contact them and let them know they should know there is a cure, (for T2 of course), but no such link. So I went to their blog and was reading through some posts with the standard useless portion limiting, low carb, crap that kept me diabetic for 6 years, and wrote a short bio about my experience with diabetes and other illnesses, the futility of being stuck with them as related by my doctor, and then finding out about WFPB, becoming empowered, and reversing about all of them. I didn’t expect them to just accept or believe it considering all the bogus info out there, so I included lots of links to validate it all. I expected some rebuttal, doubt, lots of questions, but what I got was a vicious, ad hominem attack totally out of proportion to the message! It was so obvious these weren’t replies from ordinary people, but my guess is a staff of goons paid to maintain the status quo whose income was threatened by my post! I can’t think of another reason the reaction would have been so over the top. I’ve since heard from others who backed that up, but what a real wake up call to how things work with these bogus “health” agencies! There were only 2 replies that wanted more info, and the next day when I went to reply, they were gone. ???




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      1. All the “Find a Cure” groups I’ve seen appear to be money makers fueled by good intentions, and misguided by nutritional ignorance-which is largely due to Corporate/Industrial marketing of food-like products.

        The Cure is nutrition is my mantra. And “those convinced against their will are of the same opinion still.”

        Eventually, they epidemic will force wiser thinking and broader acceptance. ‘Tis very sad.




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    4. You might check out Dr. Doug Lisle, “getting along without going along” people don’t want to hear health info unless they sincerely are interested. It becomes an ego status thing otherwise… Dr. Lisle is brilliant.




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    5. I am very confused about what is healthy what is not healthy, low carb high fat, high carb low fat, there is just so much conflicting information being put out there it puts your mind in a spin. I have stumbled across this site and I am very open to any information that might help me make sense of all that is out there.




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      1. Janette, I think you have stumbled across the right place. Dr. Greger and his team review *all* of the peer reviewed literature. They then use their tremendous knowledge and experience in the subject of nutrition to winnow out the good studies with strong results from all the bad studies with weak results. The results of all the better studies are placed in context with all of the other studies. Decades of the best science has formed a mosaic that paints a clear picture, a diet is health to the degree that it gets its calories from a whole food, unprocessed and plant based sources and conversely unhealthy to the degree that it gets its calories from animal sources and highly processed plant sources. Thus the recommendation is that you get as many of your calories from whole unprocessed/minimally-processed plant foods and eliminate to the greatest extent you can manage getting your calories from meat, milk, eggs, fish, refined carbohydrates (sugar, white wheat flour products and white rice) and refined oils (even the mighty olive oil).

        If you want to read a rebuttal of the low-carb craze Dr. Greger has written a book “Carbophobia: The Scary Truth about America’s Low-Carb Craze”. You can buy a hard copy from this website, but you can also find the pdf version for free out on the web. For a really deep dive into all the mistakes, mischaracterizations and outright lies from all the low-carb/paleo pushers you can watch the videos created by Plant Positive. Like Dr. Greger, the nutrition researcher who put these videos together shows you the actual peer reviewed papers that prove his point. The really strange thing is that nearly all of the papers he shows are the papers cited by the low-carbers in their articles and books that they want you to think support their low-carb conclusions. So PlantPositive uses their own references to show that the diet ideology they are pushing isn’t even supported by the studies they cite. Then he adds in some other studies that the low-carbers don’t dare reference to show you even stronger evidence that a high-carbohydrate, low-fat, low-protein diet actually results in the best human health. You can find his videos on his website (www.plantpositive.com) or on his YouTube channel (https://www.youtube.com/user/PrimitiveNutrition/playlists)




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    6. In re: eggs, I’m on board of not eating them… unless they are deviled. I cannot/will not resist a deviled egg.

      The Devil(ed) made me do it. ‘-)




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      1. Lonie, you should try “Potato Angels”. Same basic idea as deviled eggs, but made with fingerling or small new potatoes. You can peel them or leave the skin on. Peeled they are closer to deviled eggs, but I prefer to leave the skins on for the extra nutrition as well as they help to keep the angel together. Cut the potatoes in half and roast the cut side down until soft but be careful to not overcook them or they will just fall apart. Allow them to cool and then scoop out a hole about the size of an egg yolk in each potato half leaving a good margin of potato. To the potato scooped out of the shells add all the same stuff you would to the yolks from the eggs, mash or whip until well combined and then spoon this back into the shells. Sprinkle with a little paprika and you have an angelic alternative to deviled eggs. If you want to get fancy, put the deviled “yoke” into a piping bag with a fancy scalloped tip and pipe them back into shells. If you don’t have a piping bag or don’t want to have to clean one up you can use a gallon sized plastic freezer bag with a tiny bit of one corner cut off and the piping tip pushed through the cut end (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8lxTweXx3Ao).

        Here are some links to a couple of recipes that take quite different approaches. Both look delicious.

        http://www.vegweb.com/recipes/my-husbands-deviled-egg-solution-potato-angels

        http://www.isachandra.com/2013/03/devilish-potatoes/




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        1. Papparocket, great find. And while I don’t actually make deviled eggs on my own, I will pass your potato suggestions on to those who do.

          OBTW, as it turns out I’ve got about three barrels of the little fingerling potatoes growing as we speak. Also some red potatoes so I should have many options come harvest time.

          But I’ve got to be honest… old deviled egg habits are hard to break. ‘-)




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    7. This is very interesting, especially regarding flaxseed. What’s missing is how much flaxseed is a therapeutic amount.

      I add 1-2 tablespoons of freshly ground flaxseed to my cereal every morning but have no idea if this is an effective amount or not.




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  2. I also find these new video formats difficult to watch. Too much distracting motion.
    It does help to listen for more of the time as suggested previously.
    I long for the previous format.
    The amazing and wonderful nutritional information does not need embellishment or enhancement.




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    1. Yes and too large for my monitor also, Besides which the videos are enlarged and the cited text becomes blurred and very difficult to read.
      Back to the old way, it was much better. New is not necessarily progress with computers, just as with diet.




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      1. Carl King – I agree with you and all the others who dislike this new format. The general display is so large that I can’t view the video without sccrolling up and down while watching as it is cut off either from the top or the bottom. Previously, “sources cited, transcripts, etc” was right next to the video. Now they’re front and center in a large format taking up large amounts of screen space. Unnecessary and uncomfortable.
        The whole of the format – including the comments section – is so large and spread out that lots and lots of scrolling needs to be done to try to see “where one is” on the page.
        I really, really miss seeing the little icon pictures next to the titles of the videos. It was these little pictures that I recognized when I was looking for a previous video. Now I can’t find anything. Now the site is gray, gray, gray . . . and I’m just being honest here . . .boring, boring boring.

        I will join those that find the gigandus!!! picture of Dr. Greger on the home page to be just all too much. I believe Dr. G knows that we all adore him and what he does for us, but this picture just says “self-aggrandizement, “look at me”, perhaps some narcissism (?), etc. One of the things that I really really liked about this site was Dr. Gregers gentle, understated humility and focus to be about the truth of nutrition, not the focus of “It’s ME! Dr. G”. Sure, put a picture of Dr. G on the site, but this large picture is . . .. uncomfortable somehow.

        Still love Dr. G though . . . :-)

        Count me with all who liked the other format much, much, better – I liked the color, the smaller more compact size for viewing. I, too, turn the video off now and just listen because the constant need to try to focus on the constant page turning and print getting larger, smaller, sliding right, sliding left left me distracted – I couldn’t hear anything trying to just focus.




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      2. Yep. Seems I’m looking at the vids thru a magnifying glass.

        Looks like a lot of controversial vids were saved up so most could comment on the vid techniques and eggs?




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      3. Hi Carl,

        With regards to the video size, I had this same experience at first and it’s a result of the default resolution settings on many computers.  If you have a Mac you can simply hit Command then the – sign key, and it will decrease the page size a bit so you can see more of the page (and the full video) in your browser. If you have another kind of computer, there should be a similar function available. I hope that helps!




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    1. mitch: I’m still here for now. :-) It’s been a lot harder to participate with all the changes the last few months. Still is. We shall see what happens…




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      1. Thea: I’m glad to see that you’re still here. The new videos are not viewer friendly at all. They seem to have been designed to showcase technology not nutrition research. This is not just my opinion. Many guests seem to think that way. If you can, please bring this to the attention of Dr. Greger. Thanks Thea.




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        1. George: I’m with you 100%. Here’s the thing: The videos are pre-recorded a chunk at a time. It’s done by “volume”. So, regardless of what everyone thinks, there are still several more weeks of videos with this new format, and there is nothing we can do about it. When this volume of videos was released, I was told that someone else would be gathering the feedback. So, it’s not up to me to communicate this information.

          My 2 cents: Hopefully the next volume of videos will go back to the original format regarding the text and general flow of the videos. There’s room for improvement on the old format (adding clarity to graphs, number system for the references, etc). The changes we have seen are for aesthetics only, hurting the purpose of the videos. We can fix that. There’s plenty of reason to believe things will get better if we are just patient for the next volume.




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      2. Thea: I hope you don’t decide to “resign” from being a commenter/moderator. Most all of us regular readers look forward to your knowledgeable and polite comments! I think you are the primary reason the comment section of this site has remained scientific and civil for so long.




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        1. WFPB-Hal: Thanks so much for your kind words! Things came to an unexpected head recently, and I made the decision to resign. I left a formal goodbye on the video of the day for today. The thing is: I just can’t do it any more. If the features improve enough in the future, who knows, I might come back. For now, I need to reclaim my sanity and literally *hours* every day. Take care. – Thea




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          1. I hear your frustration and can imagine. I posted a reply to you Thea on the flax seeds/chia video. Perhaps you can take a look and respond. I tried to be supportive. Hard talk is needed.




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  3. I ve been taking testosterone injections for “low T” for a few years. My blood test levels had been fairly consistent until my test taken 6 months after I went vegan. My testosterone levels nearly doubled even though the dose had remained constant. The Dr said my diet could be the reason for the change in levels. In any case I thought it was interesting enough to share.




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    1. in case you missed it….

      http://www.medpagetoday.com/Endocrinology/GeneralEndocrinology/43045

      3,690 men between the ages of 70 and 89 living in Perth, Western Australia.

      “Our results challenge the concept that lower T is associated with increased mortality in a linear fashion,” the researchers wrote. “Instead, an optimal range of circulating total T corresponding to a range of 9.8 to 15.8 nmol/L (282-455 ng/dL) exists for older men, which predicts survival independent of other risk factors.”

      http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2015/06/150604141903.htm

      Stanford University researchers Ben Dulken and Anne Brunet argue that it’s time to look at differences in regenerative decline between men and women. This line of research could open up new explanations for how the sex hormones estrogen and testosterone, or other factors, modify lifespan.

      It’s known that estrogen has direct effects on stem cell populations in female mice, from increasing the number of blood stem cells (which is very helpful during pregnancy) to enhancing the regenerative capacity of brain stem cells at the height of estrus. Whether these changes have a direct impact on lifespan is what’s yet to be explored. Recent studies have already found that estrogen supplements increase the lifespan of male mice, and that human eunuchs live about 14 years longer than non-castrated males.




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      1. Thanks. The Perth study is interesting.

        Testosterone is bionsynthesised from cholesterol and lab studies have found that increasing cholesterol increases testosterone production.
        https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/6271543

        On the other hand, low cholesterol levels may result in lowered testosterone.
        https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/9253519

        Declining cholesterol, which is not the result of lifestyle changes or statin or other drug use, may be symptomatic of underlying disease. It is known that many diseases and trauma cause cholesterol to decline often many years before a formal diagnosis is made. For example
        “Cholesterol levels in men with dementia and, in particular, those with Alzheimer disease had declined at least 15 years before the diagnosis and remained lower than cholesterol levels in men without dementia throughout that period. The difference in slopes was robust to adjustment for potential confounding factors, including vascular risk factors, weight change, alcohol intake, and use of lipid-lowering agents.”
        http://jamanetwork.com/journals/jamaneurology/fullarticle/793179

        This association of unexplained declining cholesterol with increased mortality risk is therefore explicable by the fact that disease and trauma both lower cholesterol and increase mortality risk. Even heart attacks lower cholesterol. Some people of course like to maintain that this association shows that high cholesterol is protective. However, countries like Japan which have lower average cholesterol levels do not have increased mortality compared with Western countries where average cholesterol levels are higher. Nor do people whose cholesterol levels have been lowered by statins experience higher mortality. They have lower mortality.

        The same association of low testosterone with increased mortality (in countries eating Western diets) can be explained the same way ie disease and poor lifestyle explain declining testosterone levels
        https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16042355/

        Japanese men for example have lower average testosterone than US men but do not have higher mortality than US men
        https://www.newscientist.com/article/mg20827824-900-men-beware-moving-country-could-affect-your-libido/

        It seems unlikely therefore that testerone lowering as a result of adopting a healthy diet and lifestyle is a mortality risk. The U-shaped curve found in Western countries is quite likely a result of confounding by disease induced testosterone lowering and does not necessarily indicate that testosterone levels lower than “normal” Western levels is of itself a risk factor.

        I am keen to increase my lifespan but I am not sure that I want to undergo castration to achieve it. Interesting though ….




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  4. My ‘essential location kit’ working around Washington DC always includes water and plenty of fresh fruit, mostly bananas. This has led to more than one humorous comment. My favorite is from a CBS crew member, with heavy Vietnamese accent, while we were in the Senate TV Gallery. Observing my layout – “Aah, you like bananas, good for boom-boom”.

    I don’t think I’ll ever forget that one!




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    1. Hi Leslie, you can still pause the videos at any time, the same way as before. I that for some people, video is as large as the browser screen, so you may have to just scroll down slightly to access the pause option. Hope that helps!




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      1. Actually, there’s no need to click on the pause button with YouTube videos like these, simply click anywhere on the video or click on your spacebar to toggle the video on or off.




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  5. Off topic:
    Can someone point me to an app/website/book that offers a road map (4-week menu/meal plan) to better eating tailered to my gender/age/weight loss objectives? The last thing I need is another cookbook (Vegan or not). I want to be sure that I’m getting all required nutrients, protein, vitamines,etc… to confort me (and the rest of the family) that the vegan way is a SAFE way.

    Sorry. All the studies and videos are great, but there’s too much push back from all kinds of sources that scare people away from this lifestyle. Free protein enhanced/meat based meal plans are readily available by the hundreds, but not for the vegan life style ones…

    PS: The Daily Dozen app is not a meal plan. Been there, done that.
    PS2: What i’m looking for is the Vegan equivalent of Haylie Pomroy’s Fast Metabolism Diet approach.
    PS3: I did share this video with my wife..

    Dr. Jon?




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    1. Hello Pierre,

      I am a volunteer medical moderator who helps Dr. Greger answer questions posted to Nutritionfacts.org. I am a whole foods plant based dietitian located in Scottsdale, Arizona. I certainly am no Dr. Jon, but I’ll try my best :-)
      One of the most helpful sites I direct my private practice clients to are the resources from PCRM.org. Dr. Neal Barnard is a leading voice in plant based nutrition, and has an impressive website with helpful tools. In particular, there is a vegan and vegetarian resources page with an incredible guide written by my friend and vegan chef Jason Wyrick. Designed to help people make the shift to a vegan diet, it is filled with tips and recipes that are very helpful to make the shift.

      Another amazing resource is the Plantrician Project. There is a very deep online plant based resources page that is worth poking around. I have found a number of very accessible sites that provide free recipe support as well as ideas on plant based eating. If you wish to take the plunge, Rouxbe on line cooking school offers a reasonably priced online cooking course called Culinary RX that supports you taking control over your own food preparation while getting expert instruction on plant based cooking.

      Finally, my colleague and friend Kristie Middleton is the National Director for Food Policy for the Humane Society of the United States. Her lovely and accessible book called MeatLESS came out recently, and it is filled with practical ideas for making the shift to vegan eating. I heard her speak yesterday to my class of enthusiastic students at Arizona State University and she is great! So is the book.

      Good luck – please let me know if I can help you with other ideas. Thanks for your question.

      Lisa Schmidt, MS, CN
      The Mindful Nutritionist
      http://www.mindfulbenefits.com




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      1. Lisa, off topic, but… Is there any credible data you are aware of finding coconut or olive oi as anti-inflammatory? Had a conversation with someone with some plant-based knowledge who believed this but I am not aware of this data.




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    2. “Sorry. All the studies and videos are great, but there’s too much push back from all kinds of sources that scare people away from this lifestyle. Free protein enhanced/meat based meal plans are readily available by the hundreds, but not for the vegan life style ones…”

      And 2/3 of Americans are overweight, 1/3 obese, and cardio is the leading killer. So what does that tell you?

      Read “The Starch Solution” by Dr. John McDougall. Whole foods , plant based eating couldn’t be easier, cheaper, or healthier.




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    3. Hi Pierre.

      As someone else mentioned, Neal Barnard’s organization, The Physicians Committee for Responsible Medicine, PCRM.org, has historically offered the most robust transition program with meal plans, plenty of recipes, and helpful tips, especially for beginners. Neal Barnard and his team have gone out of their way to make it as easy as possible to make huge dietary changes, so this is the best place to start.

      I would also second a comment from below recommending The Starch Solution by John McDougall. Most public libraries have it, so you shouldn’t even need to pay for it. It’s compatible with everything Dr. Greger teaches and is in my opinion the best book for people just getting started. There is also a forum at drmcdougall.com, which is well moderated, and Dr. McDougall still replies to emails sent to him personally. Overall it is a very supportive and helpful place. Check out his numerous YouTube videos if you have a chance. He also runs weekly webinars that are informative, and his moderator, Gustavo Tolosa, sometimes offers cooking demonstrations. In fact, I think Gustavo has some cooking videos on his own YouTube channel, so you may want to check that out, too.

      Dr. T. Colin Campbell’s organization NutritionStudies.org should still be running a private Facebook group. It had an excellent reputation. There were no trolls since you had to ask for membership (no prerequisites: just ask). It used to be free and probably still is. It was a small, active group and would be worth checking out. Again, it’s not publicly accessible, so you have to ask for access.

      While I’m on the subject, I’ll mention that there are a number of other private Facebook groups that I have heard good things about. I won’t mention them by name, since a few of them cost some money, but the fee is tiny and imposed simply to keep out the trolls. I don’t recommend any one in particular, but if you ask around, you should be able to find a good one that might even be local.

      Also, check out Instagram. I know this sounds odd, but my wife and I have met dozens of people within biking distance who have been eating a whole-food, plant-based diet for years. Depending on what type of area you live in, you may find more or fewer people, but for us it has been a very pleasant surprise. Unlike most other social networks, Instagram is in our experience a very positive, supportive place. I know it sounds unbelievable, but I highly recommend trying it out.

      If you need advice on how to eat a plant-based diet while traveling, the absolute best resource is Chef AJ. She is very generous with her advice and time and has posted many videos on YouTube (some were posted by others so look outside her channel, too). She is also an excellent chef in her own right and has a number of great recipes available. She is additionally one of the few people who actually knows how to write a good InstantPot recipe. Beyond that, she’s a great interviewer and has featured all the big names in plant-based living on her shows.

      I would like to add a few notes on some differences you may notice between the different doctors and organizations just so you’re not surprised or turned off by some of the heated arguments you will no doubt encounter, especially the ones between the doctors themselves. When I first got started years ago, I was turned off and discouraged by some of the fiery disagreements and wish I had known two things: 1. All plant-based doctors have access to the same research, and unlike most other doctors, they actually read it. 2. Some of them interpret the study data differently.

      Keep in mind, though, that at its core the whole-food, plant-based diet is generally the same for everyone.

      The two biggest areas of controversy where you will see radically divergent opinions are fatty plant foods (like nuts, seeds, and avocados) and smoothies. Dr. Neal Barnard of PCRM, for example, just hardened his stance against fatty plant foods in his most recent book, The Cheese Trap, claiming that nuts, seeds, and avocados may worsen diabetes. Other doctors don’t recommend limitations.

      I will also mention briefly that, outside of NutritionFacts.org, smoothies are a hugely controversial subject, like unbelievably so. I saw someone almost quit her job over it, so don’t be surprised if you find strong opinions and strongly worded language on this topic. Some doctors claim smoothies damage the endothelium as badly as free oils, while others say they’re fine.

      If you come across these or other differences in opinion, try not to be disheartened. As I said, at its core most of it is the same. And don’t be afraid to ask questions!

      Good luck!




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    4. Pierre, there are at least 2 that I can think of off the top of my head: Lindsay Nixon (Happy Herbivore series of cookbooks author) Meal Mentor at http://www.getmealplans.com and The Purple Carrot at http://www.purplecarrot.com. I believe that The Physicians Committee for Responsible Medicine at http://www.pcrm.org/health has a 21-day vegan kickstart. And Forks Over Knives also offers a meal planner at http://www.forksmealplanner.com. I personally subscribe to Meal Mentor.




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    5. Pierre, A good site for the kind of help you’re seeking is drmcdougall.com. There is a free 10-day meal plan complete with recipes, here:
      https://www.drmcdougall.com/health/education/free-mcdougall-program/before-you-begin/.

      While you’re there you can read testimonials by dozens of people who have turned their health around, lost weight, reversed heart disease, MS, diabetes, rheumatoid arthritis and other autoimmune conditions, and have maintained their improved health for many years.

      A good resource for transitioning and shopping is Jeff Novick. You’ll find his videos on Youtube. http://www.jeffnovick.com/RD/Fast_Food_Vol_1.html. He is into quick and easy meals that don’t cost an arm and a leg, and he’s very entertaining as well.

      As for talking with people about your new adventure, I highly recommend videos by Doug Lisle. He is a psychologist with excellent credentials and experience. His website, where you can watch his videos is at http://esteemdynamics.org/video/. They aren’t in order. However, specific for helping with talking to others, try Getting Along Without Going Along.

      Good luck with this. I wish I’d known what Dr Lisle had to say before we made the change, but better late than never, right?




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  6. The prestigious Oxford Martin School recently reported on a study relevant to us all, especially to egg-eaters and others. Do Google them, they are senior researchers who work on inter-disciplinary projects addressing major problems facing the world. Here is the opening paragraph of an introduction:

    “A global switch to diets that rely less on meat and more on fruit and vegetables could save up to 8 million lives by 2050, reduce greenhouse gas emissions by two thirds, and lead to healthcare-related savings and avoided climate damages of $1.5 trillion (US)” , Oxford Martin School researchers have found.




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  7. The information in this video is common sense, plain & simple. Unfortunately, our culture doesn’t have too much common sense when it comes to eating.

    BTW, love the new video format. And although I haven’t finished poking around the new website yet, so far it looks really beautiful & easy to navigate, especially for newcomers.




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  8. So, I am cooking my dandelion greens, chard and dahl for breakfast just chuckling about this delightful video.

    Who knew? The power of plants to turn up the heat in bed. Well done, Dr. Greger. With all the media saturated with sex and money, it seems strange to me that few talk about optimizing our sex lives in such healthy way and I am so glad to see you not sticking your head in the sand.
    I remember the Asian man in the Forks over Knives video who said that he could, “raise the flag again” at that stage in his life- and he looked in his 70s. Maybe rabbits are just the mascot a Vegan cohort could use!

    Just loved it, going to continue to chuckle about this delicious little vegan secret all day!




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  9. These videos have good info, but this new format is awful. All that page flipping is just too annoying. I know there was page flipping in the old format as well, but somehow it has gotten much more annoying in the new. Now it’s quite unwatchable.




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  10. If this is indicative of how future videos will be presented, I can’t be here much longer–my mental and physical health are viscerally affected by such digital visual overload. The bloated presentation with its flipping (pardon my language) pages and non-stop empty action are anathema to me as they seem to be for others commenting heretofore. If some video games are dangerous to those with epilepsy, this new attempt to draw in the “smartphone” addicted generation to the website, should have a similar warning, with a very appropriate skull-and-crossbones added.

    I can’t believe that Dr. Greger would approve of such a thing. I’m confident that, in time, 17 federal agencies will agree that it was Putin and the Russians who have done this, all in the effort to keep the US fat, dumb and multi-tasking. Think of the Children!




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  11. Thanks Doc! Great news that our bedrooms may be so much more fun now that we are eating correctly!
    I am so glad that this applies to all of us, not just men, yay!

    Perhaps this could be the way to get the world to change its addiction to eating animal products and processed nasties?
    Sex sells! And this message could be a great tool to get everyone to take notice.

    I wonder what all of those paleo people would think, if they realised that their sex lives are being harmed by all of that animal protein and so little fibre in their diet? Wow, I bet that would surely change quite a few converstions over the barbecue pit!

    Thanks for the new format, I like it and find it easy to navigate. Cheers!




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  12. I’ve been a veggie for about 30 years, eat at least 7 a day and eat loads of pulses – fibre. I’m 72 now and haven’t had an erection in 2 years, despite having a younger, attractive partner. What’s going on?? Some people have ONE proper meal and suddenly get stiff? Come on; this must be rubbish. What am I doing wrong?
    PS, can’t follow the new style video. Like others I just listen now.




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    1. Hi Will.

      I am not a doctor or expert on the matter, but my first thought is prescription drugs.

      In my experience it generally takes about six months to three years to recover from prescription drug use, so if you are now taking or have taken anything in the past three years, that’s where I would look. Many, many prescription drugs can cause erectile dysfunction, not just the usual suspects (e.g. antidepressants and antihypertensives). Check out NIH.gov or Mayo Clinic’s website for a more honest list of side effects. Over-the-counter drugs and supplements can also cause these problems, and just like with prescription drugs, the effects can persist for some time after discontinuing them.

      There is a growing number of doctors who actually recognize this persistent-side-effect phenomenon, but it is still not very widely accepted. You will generally not read about it in the medical journals, since it hurts pharmaceutical sales. To get straight answers about it, you have to talk to the patients themselves instead.

      There’s also a story in Dr. Caldwell B. Esselstyn, Jr.’s book Prevent and Reverse Heart Disease, a story you may have heard. He was treating a man with disabling angina who followed Dr. Esselstyn’s diet to the letter and saw miraculous results. Not long after, though, the angina came back with a vengeance. Dr. Esselstyn asked the patient multiple times to describe everything he was eating and simply could not believe the diet was not working. After giving the same list over and over again, the patient finally added, “Oh, and of course I’m adding plenty of that heart-healthy olive oil to my food!”

      And that was the problem. As soon as he removed the oil from his diet, the angina went away again.

      So maybe it’s oil.




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    2. I’ve been eating lots of veggies for maybe 4-5 years…am over 70…and can still raise the flag several times a week. I’m something like the guy pushing the button too many times? LOL.

      Maybe your pardner is stressing you out? Practice by yourself for a while?

      try….

      maca…..http://www.swansonvitamins.com/swanson-passion-maca-500-mg-60-caps

      fenegreek….

      freeze-dried balls….http://www.swansonvitamins.com/swanson-premium-raw-orchic-glandular-1-gram-30-tabs

      etc…..just remember…supplements are evil….I also take a lot of other supplements…the devil makes me do it….

      http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/03/110328092423.htm

      They found that panax ginseng, saffron and yohimbine, a natural chemical from yohimbe trees in West Africa, improved human sexual function.

      Nutmeg, cloves, garlic, ginger, and ambergris, formed in the intestinal tract of the sperm whale, are among substances linked to increased sexual behaviour in animals.

      PEOPLE REPORT increased sexual desire after eating muira puama, a flowering plant found in Brazil; maca root, a mustard plant in the Andes; and chocolate. Despite its purported aphrodisiac effect, chocolate was not linked to sexual arousal or satisfaction, the study said.




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  13. I have few comments related to the book ” How not to die “by Dr. Greger. Very educational and very informative. A must reading for everyone and particularly those who are over sixty. Second comment relates to referring Aspirin as Salicylic Acid in the book. It is not. It is Acetylsalicylic Acid or Salicylic Acid Acetate. Thirdly the book talks about the Healthy nature of the Indian Vegetarian food. But if you look at the data the middle class Indians who are vegetarian have the same health issues that you find in the west. High blood pressure, Diabetes , Heart diseases, Digestive track disorders, and obesity are as common as these are in the west. The reason for that is the heavy consumption of Dairy products by the Indians. Clarified Butter is used in frying. Almost all sweets are made with diary products. Cottage cheese, diary based sweets, yogurt and milk consumption are the highest in the world. My point being that vegetarianism alone is not sufficient for a healthy life. As the book points out that you have to be a Vegan. Finally for those of you who can not stand boiled food. Using a combination of Indian spices you can jazz up your vegetables, lentils, beans and soups. You can find the specific spice combination for a particular food at any Indian grocery store. If you can not find an Indian store I will be more than happy to share what I know about combining different spices for a particular application.




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    1. Ashok, I would be deeply appreciative if you might know a good WFPB version of yellow dal I could make. This has always been my favorite dish to order in Indian restaurants. I have not yet succeeded at home making a dal that has a similar taste. I keep wondering if a major reason is I am not adding the oil for the spices or much salt either. I have a veggie Indian cookbook but their dal didn’t turn out like what I would order either. Could you help? Do you have a heart healthy version you love that you could share with me? Hoping….




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      1. Denise, you might want to give The Vegan Corner’s recipe for Indian (inspired) dal a try: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dNbo4xsoRHo

        Since I’m anything but an expert on Indian food, I don’t know if this is similar to what they usually serve in restaurants, but The Vegan Corner provides, in my opinion, the most perfected WFPB recipes out there. They are basically conducting culinary research to achieve the best possible result without using oil or large amounts of salt.

        So, although they’re not Indian, I thought I’d share their recipe with you, just in case. Besides, I have been wanting to make this dish for a while and your post has been a welcome reminder of that.




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    2. As you sound like you are Indian, do you use you AMLA as a food? I know it’s popular for hair color. How do you find it? There are some good vids by MG on here that alerted me to it. My wife, primarily, uses it in powder form for it’s miraculous powers…




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  14. cut it out with the videos!!! you are dumbing down America! fewer and fewer people read these days! Besides, I read much faster than anyone can talk (coherently!) and give a list of the referenced articles that I may actually download and read them separately….

    thank you

    Tony




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  15. For me, the scanning format I see with amplification of the most important statements and facts works just fine. I kind of imagine that we are seeing how Dr. Greger is reading the data- scanning, highlighting etc. and it feels smooth and natural to me even though I am not an academic researcher. I simply use the pause button on information that I want to focus on.
    I would have no problem in these formats for his videos as one of the many formats used by Dr. Greger.




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  16. I miss the old way of interacting via the comments even more than I miss the old videos, because we can still read the transcript if we can’t watch the video. Nothing replaces what we used to get out of the comments, though.




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  17. Reading text in a narrow vertical column is too uncomfortable for me, also. I’m not trying to be negative, but honestly, this website has lost at least 50% of its usefulness for me.




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  18. Does anyone know of any videos pertaining to androgenic alopecia? I am interested to hear if Dr.Greger has done any research on the topic?




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  19. The graphics on this video literally give me vertigo, and do nothing to highlight or reinforce the
    Information being displayed. Whenever this format is used, I have to close my eyes and just listen to the audio. Which is a shame, bc I tend to remember info much better, with both visual and auditory clues. Please consider using the other video formats, as the visuals in this style are terribly distracting. Thanks!




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    1. Please, let’s not waist time with the new video format and let’s remind ourselfs that life is short. I can only congratulate Dr. Greger for keeping us so well informed on the latest scientific information about food and lifestyle. I try to be empathetic about this. This a free service offered by Dr, “Greger. Let’s celebrate the fact that he is still with us and that he tries to make efforts, from time to time, to improve the end product. Cheers to all!




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    1. Thank you for the feedback. We changed the way the videos are being made due to the very large amount of time they took using our old way. This is much faster and allows for a lot more creativity. We are monitoring feedback, though! It just takes some time for new changes to come through, since we record 2.5 months of videos at a time.




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  20. Could the techies move the icons for Facebook, Twitter and G+ to the top or bottom of the page? Where they are now positioned is on the left side in the middle of the page. It interferes with text reading. Wondering if anyone else has this issue or is it just my computer?




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  21. My first comment here which I will preface by saying how massively I appreciate Dr Gregor, NF.org’s researchers, and the depth and detail of information presented – for many years now. This video? Ummm.. IMH, better titled ‘Plant Based Diet Improves UR Health and By The Way Orgasms’. Then I wouldn’t have been disappointed by little more than an anecdote about vegan pizza and dudes diddling the orgasmatron. Although kinda funny, and even though I don’t yet tire of being reminded of the anti-inflammatory/synergistic effects of the plant kingdom, this was fluffy, time waste-y, and almost content-less. I don’t think there’s enough vegan meat to even make it to a Dr Oz spot. A real surprise given the amazing detailed content of past vlogs. Current title, btw, implies one will at the very least learn which specific fruits/veg/herbs have targeted and or greater effect on vascular health, other than a slice of vegan junk food.. Given your record of excellence, I don’t feel this one serves you or us – whole lotta energy for a few random asides ending in “plants good 4 U”. If that was the first ever vlog I watched on NF – I’d likely go elsewhere in search of real information.. Of course, I remain a listener to – and promoter of – NF.org, and hope you will keep your highest standards and go higher.




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