Benefits of Nutritional Yeast for Cancer

Benefits of Nutritional Yeast for Cancer
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How the beta glucan fiber in brewer’s, baker’s, and nutritional yeast can improve wound healing and, potentially, anti-cancer immunity.

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Below is an approximation of this video’s audio content. To see any graphs, charts, graphics, images, and quotes to which Dr. Greger may be referring, watch the above video.

In an article entitled “The Treatment of Inoperable Cancer”, it was noted that “200 years ago, it was observed that a certain number of malignant growths disappeared after an attack of [a type of strep infection]”—and that was 200 years before 1901, when this was published. A disproportionate number of cases of spontaneous tumor regressions have followed various infections. The thought is that an infection may kind of so rile up the immune system, the cancer may get caught in the cross-fire—a phenomenon that may have inspired healers dating back to the ancient Egyptians, thousands of years ago.

But, you don’t know until you put it to test—though it wasn’t formally studied until the 1800s, when doctors started intentionally infecting cancer patients. The most famous proponent was William Coley, the so-called “Father of Immunotherapy,” at what would eventually become Memorial Sloan Kettering. He “was convinced that having a severe infection could cause cancer to regress.” So, with “a great deal of courage,” he started injecting cancer patients. The problem, of course, is that causing infections is quite dangerous, and “two of his patients died.” However, their tumors did shrink!

If only there was a way we could boost the immune system without killing people. Well, that’s the theory behind therapeutic cancer vaccines—one of which has been in practice for decades: squirting a weakened bovine tuberculosis bacteria into the bladders of patients with bladder cancer, to make the immune system attack; boosting long-term survival up to 36%.

Okay, but is there something we can eat that can boost immune function? In my videos on countering stress-induced immune suppression and preventing common childhood infections, I reviewed evidence about a type of fiber in baker’s, brewer’s, and nutritional yeast, called “beta-glucans…[which] are considered immunomodulatory compounds suggested to enhance the defense against infections” and, potentially, cancer.

Beta-glucans themselves do not appear to have a direct cytotoxic effect in terms of killing cancer cells, but may boost anti-tumor immunity by activating our immune cells. For example, if you take freshly excised tumors of breast cancer patients, and let loose natural killer cells upon them, they can kill off a small percentage of the tumor cells. But, first prime them in vitro with some yeast beta-glucans, and they become five times more effective at killing cancer cells. What if you just eat it, though?

When twenty-three women with metastatic breast cancer were given just a 16th of a teaspoon of nutritional yeast worth of beta-glucans, they experienced a 50% increase in the number of monocyte white blood cells in their bloodstream (which are part of our natural defenses), as well as a significant increase in their activation. But, it was just a two-week study. The clinical significance of this finding is unclear. What we want to know is if they actually live longer.

The only English-language, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial of breast cancer patients and beta-glucans was more of a wound-healing study, where they found that the women taking beta-glucans healed so much faster after surgery that the tubes could be removed from their chests and armpits—in some cases, days earlier. This was the first clinical study to demonstrate improved wound healing using oral beta-glucans. The other two—showing benefits for pediatric burns and leg ulcers—were performed using topical beta-glucan preparations: putting it on the skin directly, something that did not appear to reverse precancerous skin lesions better than placebo. But, that’s because the placebo cream worked so well, too. “Both groups showed a…significant reduction.” They speculated that “[s]ince each patient…acted as their own control,” putting the beta-glucan cream on one arm, and the placebo cream on the other, that the application of beta-glucans on one arm may have been absorbed into the system, and helped on the other arm, given that systematic effects have been noted following topical administration.

But, what effect might oral beta-glucans have on the progression of internal cancers? Yeah, oral yeast beta-glucans can cause dramatic tumor shrinkage—in mice, but there appears to be only one human study published in English. Twenty patients with advanced cancer on chemo were given a beta-glucan supplement in an open label, uncontrolled trial. “Sixty percent of the patients [supposedly] reported a sense of well-being while taking the [beta]-glucan, and asked to remain on the treatment…after the completion of the study.” But, that just sounds like classic placebo effect. Same thing with reporting being less tired, but this is interesting: “one patient with lymphoma and [enlarged lymph nodes in the neck] who delayed his standard chemotherapy for 4 weeks during the study…noted a marked reduction in the size of the nodes while taking the [supplement] alone.” So, this, you know, one kind of anecdotal case is interesting, especially since there are no side effects, but not exactly revolutionary.

In Japan, there have been more than 20 randomized, controlled trials on the use of beta-glucans as an adjunct cancer treatment, which evidently show an enhancement of chemo or radiation therapy, resulting in “a positive effect on the survival and quality of life…” For example, there was evidently a study on taking a yeast beta-glucan supplement to help “cancer relapse after surgery. There were no relapses in the treated group compared to [about one in five] in the control group.” Even more intriguing, yeast beta-glucans for inoperable cancer patients—end-stage cancer, since only about one in 20 patients made it three months. And by six months, they were all dead, “whereas in the treated group, [most] survived for more than 3 months”—not one in 20, but most, “and 43% were still alive after 6 months.”

Now evidently, it’s not clear how patients were divvied up into treatment vs. control groups. If they weren’t randomly assigned, they may have inadvertently cherry-picked healthier patients for the treatment group, which could explain the results. Now, I’ve looked for this study everywhere so I could get it translated, but even the National Library of Medicine couldn’t find it. If anyone out there can, though, I’ll do a follow-up video. But, the amount of beta-glucan they used is what you’d find in a single pinch of nutritional yeast, which would cost less than a penny. And the only side effect would be tastier popcorn. So, why not give it a try?

Please consider volunteering to help out on the site.

Image credit: Alex Ex via Wikimedia. Image has been modified.

Motion graphics by Avocado Video

Below is an approximation of this video’s audio content. To see any graphs, charts, graphics, images, and quotes to which Dr. Greger may be referring, watch the above video.

In an article entitled “The Treatment of Inoperable Cancer”, it was noted that “200 years ago, it was observed that a certain number of malignant growths disappeared after an attack of [a type of strep infection]”—and that was 200 years before 1901, when this was published. A disproportionate number of cases of spontaneous tumor regressions have followed various infections. The thought is that an infection may kind of so rile up the immune system, the cancer may get caught in the cross-fire—a phenomenon that may have inspired healers dating back to the ancient Egyptians, thousands of years ago.

But, you don’t know until you put it to test—though it wasn’t formally studied until the 1800s, when doctors started intentionally infecting cancer patients. The most famous proponent was William Coley, the so-called “Father of Immunotherapy,” at what would eventually become Memorial Sloan Kettering. He “was convinced that having a severe infection could cause cancer to regress.” So, with “a great deal of courage,” he started injecting cancer patients. The problem, of course, is that causing infections is quite dangerous, and “two of his patients died.” However, their tumors did shrink!

If only there was a way we could boost the immune system without killing people. Well, that’s the theory behind therapeutic cancer vaccines—one of which has been in practice for decades: squirting a weakened bovine tuberculosis bacteria into the bladders of patients with bladder cancer, to make the immune system attack; boosting long-term survival up to 36%.

Okay, but is there something we can eat that can boost immune function? In my videos on countering stress-induced immune suppression and preventing common childhood infections, I reviewed evidence about a type of fiber in baker’s, brewer’s, and nutritional yeast, called “beta-glucans…[which] are considered immunomodulatory compounds suggested to enhance the defense against infections” and, potentially, cancer.

Beta-glucans themselves do not appear to have a direct cytotoxic effect in terms of killing cancer cells, but may boost anti-tumor immunity by activating our immune cells. For example, if you take freshly excised tumors of breast cancer patients, and let loose natural killer cells upon them, they can kill off a small percentage of the tumor cells. But, first prime them in vitro with some yeast beta-glucans, and they become five times more effective at killing cancer cells. What if you just eat it, though?

When twenty-three women with metastatic breast cancer were given just a 16th of a teaspoon of nutritional yeast worth of beta-glucans, they experienced a 50% increase in the number of monocyte white blood cells in their bloodstream (which are part of our natural defenses), as well as a significant increase in their activation. But, it was just a two-week study. The clinical significance of this finding is unclear. What we want to know is if they actually live longer.

The only English-language, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial of breast cancer patients and beta-glucans was more of a wound-healing study, where they found that the women taking beta-glucans healed so much faster after surgery that the tubes could be removed from their chests and armpits—in some cases, days earlier. This was the first clinical study to demonstrate improved wound healing using oral beta-glucans. The other two—showing benefits for pediatric burns and leg ulcers—were performed using topical beta-glucan preparations: putting it on the skin directly, something that did not appear to reverse precancerous skin lesions better than placebo. But, that’s because the placebo cream worked so well, too. “Both groups showed a…significant reduction.” They speculated that “[s]ince each patient…acted as their own control,” putting the beta-glucan cream on one arm, and the placebo cream on the other, that the application of beta-glucans on one arm may have been absorbed into the system, and helped on the other arm, given that systematic effects have been noted following topical administration.

But, what effect might oral beta-glucans have on the progression of internal cancers? Yeah, oral yeast beta-glucans can cause dramatic tumor shrinkage—in mice, but there appears to be only one human study published in English. Twenty patients with advanced cancer on chemo were given a beta-glucan supplement in an open label, uncontrolled trial. “Sixty percent of the patients [supposedly] reported a sense of well-being while taking the [beta]-glucan, and asked to remain on the treatment…after the completion of the study.” But, that just sounds like classic placebo effect. Same thing with reporting being less tired, but this is interesting: “one patient with lymphoma and [enlarged lymph nodes in the neck] who delayed his standard chemotherapy for 4 weeks during the study…noted a marked reduction in the size of the nodes while taking the [supplement] alone.” So, this, you know, one kind of anecdotal case is interesting, especially since there are no side effects, but not exactly revolutionary.

In Japan, there have been more than 20 randomized, controlled trials on the use of beta-glucans as an adjunct cancer treatment, which evidently show an enhancement of chemo or radiation therapy, resulting in “a positive effect on the survival and quality of life…” For example, there was evidently a study on taking a yeast beta-glucan supplement to help “cancer relapse after surgery. There were no relapses in the treated group compared to [about one in five] in the control group.” Even more intriguing, yeast beta-glucans for inoperable cancer patients—end-stage cancer, since only about one in 20 patients made it three months. And by six months, they were all dead, “whereas in the treated group, [most] survived for more than 3 months”—not one in 20, but most, “and 43% were still alive after 6 months.”

Now evidently, it’s not clear how patients were divvied up into treatment vs. control groups. If they weren’t randomly assigned, they may have inadvertently cherry-picked healthier patients for the treatment group, which could explain the results. Now, I’ve looked for this study everywhere so I could get it translated, but even the National Library of Medicine couldn’t find it. If anyone out there can, though, I’ll do a follow-up video. But, the amount of beta-glucan they used is what you’d find in a single pinch of nutritional yeast, which would cost less than a penny. And the only side effect would be tastier popcorn. So, why not give it a try?

Please consider volunteering to help out on the site.

Image credit: Alex Ex via Wikimedia. Image has been modified.

Motion graphics by Avocado Video

Doctor's Note

If beta glucans are really so powerful, might there be concern that it might overstimulate the immune system in certain autoimmune conditions? Yes; see Does Nutritional Yeast Trigger Crohn’s Disease? and Is Nutritional Yeast Healthy for Everyone?

What about just fighting off run-of-the mill infections? Glad you asked! Check out:

If you haven’t yet, you can subscribe to my videos for free by clicking here.

218 responses to “Benefits of Nutritional Yeast for Cancer

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      1. (courtesy of google translate) and I couldn’t do the tables…..

        Immune strengthening of β-1, 3-D-glucan and Its clinical application

        1.

        It is well-known that it is susceptible to infection and severe in cases of malnutrition or nutrition. In recent years, the state of the immune function of the living body became an analyzable state, and the relationship between nutrients and immunity became to be recognized again. As the in vivo action of nutrients is elucidated in detail, it has been found that the action on nutrient immunity is related not only to infectious diseases and malignant tumors, but also to many diseases such as aging, allergy, and biological defense. Therefore, in treating diseases, it is necessary to increase not only nutrition and calorie supplementation from the standpoint of nutritional pharmacology but also to increase the healing power of living organisms by enhancing immunity by nutrients. It is said that humans are equipped with an immune system, which is weak after birth but rises to about 17 to 18 years old and then declines with age. Also, due to various causes, immunocompetence may decline secondarily (secondary immunodeficiency) in some cases. The main ones are malnutrition disorders, infectious diseases, malignant tumors, blood diseases, elderly people, after surgery, administration of anticancer agents, radiation therapy, use of immunosuppressants, and the like. Among these, nutritional factors are related to premature infants, gastrointestinal diseases, postoperative fasting, elderly people, nutritional disorders, malignant tumors, and the like. It is therapeutically meaningful to examine the immune function when in such a malnutritional state and to increase immunity if there is a decrease. There are various functional foods that activate immunity, but this time we picked up β-1, 3-D-glucan, investigated its immune potentiation action and applied it clinically, so we reported a part of it .

        2,

        The subject was 49 patients diagnosed as cancer, 20 patients with breast cancer, 8 cases with ovarian cancer, and 21 cases with cervical cancer, both of which are patients who can be operated until stage 2. For the administration method, β-1, 3-D-glucan (containing 2.5 mg in one capsule) was administered to 26 patients out of 49 cancer patients from 7 days before the operation and 3 days after the operation for a total of 15 months for a total of 15 months Taking 1 capsule three times a day one hour before meals. The presence or absence of recurrence of cancer was compared between these 26 administration groups and 23 non-administration groups. In addition, cancer was recurred and 54 patients with terminal cancer who had been declared within 3 months of life expectancy were orally administered 1 time before meals with 2 capsules of β 1 -1, 3-D-glucan 3 times a day, Comparison with 45 non-administered groups 0 The β 1,1, 3-D-glucan used this time is a product of Immyne Inc. which was discovered and extracted from the cell wall of baker’s yeast.

        3.

        1. Prevention of recurrence after β-1, 3-D-glucan after cancer surgery Following the recurrence after surgery by oral administration of β-1, 3-D-glucan, as shown in Table 1, Five of twenty-three patients (21.7%) had recurrence, whereas in the treatment group, after 15 months There was no recurrence in one case even if it became. The breakdown was as shown in Table 2, and the cancer recurrence occurred in 6 months, 2 months in 9 months, 2 months in 12 months, 5 cases in total (21.7% ) Recurrence was observed. No treatment group recurred after 15 months and after 20 months. 2. Survival benefit of administration of β-1, 3-D-glucan to end-stage cancer patients β-1, 3-D-glucan was administered to 54 patients with terminal cancer who underwent diagnosis at the general hospital for life expectancy within 3 months Thirty six people (65%) survived three months after administration, and 23 people (43%) survived after 6 months. On the other hand, in the non-administered group, there were 2 survivors (4.4%) after 3 months and 1 survivor after 6 months (Table 3).

        4.

        From ancient times, I knew that mushrooms had antitumor activity in China. β-1, 3-D-glucan is a polysaccharide which is a component of mushroom mycelium and has been shown to have immunopotentiating action such as antitumor property, anticomplementary activity, macrophage activating property, anti-inflammatory effect, antiviral effect There. Beta-1, 3-D-glucan found and extracted from the cell wall of baker’s yeast also has a strong immunopotentiating effect, and it is clinically widely used in the United States and Europe It is applied. In Macrophage, Joyce, Jonathan et al. Of Harvard University in 1986 discovered that receptors for β-1, 3-D-glucan are present and that macrophages are activated by the binding (Medical Journal, 173 No. 6). Many researchers have since revealed that β-1, 3-D-glucan is an excellent immunopotentiating substance. Furthermore, it was found that receptors for β-1, 3-D-glucan are CR 3 receptors and exist not only in macrophages but also in neutrophils, NK cells, B cells, etc., and these cells are also activated I came. Activated macrophages release cytokines such as IL-1, IL-12 and IFN-γ and activate T cells (helper T cells). Meanwhile, macrophages eat food pieces that are already dead cancer cells or apoptotic bodies, present their antigen information to naive T cells (TO cells), and further display killer T (Th1 cell) from helper T cells (Th1 cells) Transfer to the cell (CTL) and activate it. On the other hand, helper T cells (Th1 cells) are activated by IL-1 and produce IL-2 and IFN-γ. As IL-2 and IL-12 increase, other immune cells, NK Ralquillar) cells, killer T cells, NKT cells and so on to attack cancer. These cells cause cancer cells to undergo apoptosis. Macrophage eats the destroyed cellular pieces and apoptotic bodies and reduces or eliminates cancer tissue. As described above, the macrophage is the central existence of an immune mechanism that protects the body from cancer and pathogens and prevents the disease from occurring or cures. Therefore, by administering β-1, 3-D-glucan which increases immunity to cancer patients whose immunity is lowered, measuring the immunity before and after surgery, examining the recurrence rate of cancer after surgery, I examined the survival rate of cancer patients who were declared within 3 months. Firstly, examining changes in immune parameters and tumor markers before and after administration of β-1, 3-D-glucan, the immunity is also increased as shown in Tables 4 and 5, and the tumor markers are also improved. Recurrence after surgery happens even if the surgery succeeds successfully and there are times when I feel very sorry. In order to reduce this recurrence after surgery, it is important to keep reduced immunity at normal range I think that it is meaningful. When β – 1, 3 – D – glucan was administered, the recurrence rate clearly decreased as compared with the non – administered group, and the postoperative course was also good. In addition, a patient prolonged with a life expectancy of 3 months in cancer patients had obviously prolonged life prolonging effect as compared with non-administered group by oral administration of β-1, 3-D-glucan. β-1, 3-D-glucan increases the immunity of the human body, prevents the recurrence of cancer after surgery, and prolongs the life expectancy of terminal cancer patients who were declared within the remaining life expectancy of 3 months to be more than 6 months I also found that it works. This is presumed to be due to the positive influence on the autonomic nervous system and the endocrine system by increasing the immunity of the whole body, the appetite is also promoted, and the willingness to live is accelerated. We plan to continue the number of examples in the future and observe long-term effects.

        5.

        Beta-1, 3-D-glucan with immunopotentiating effect was administered to cancer patients and its effect was observed. When administered before and after surgical gynecologic cancer, 5 patients (22%) in 23 non-administered groups recurred in 15 months after administration, whereas in 1 treatment group there was no recurrence . In addition, there were 35 (65%) 3-month survivors and 23 survivors (43%) over 6 months who were administered to 54 patients with terminal cancer who were declared within 3 months of their remaining life. Compared with this, there were 2 (4.4%) 3-month survivors in the non-administered group and 1 survivor for 6 months. Both survivors for six months or more had increased immunity, cancer did not progress or shrinked, and quality of life was also improved. From the above, it was suggested that administration of β 1, 3-D monoglucan having an immunopotentiating effect to cancer patients with reduced immune power prevents recurrence after surgery and has a survival prolongation effect. Document

        1. Are the porta bella mushrooms that are so abundant in grocery stores good for supplying us with beta glucans? Paul Stamets who is a professional mycologist and has written extensively on the topic of medicinal mushrooms claims that his mother was healed of cancer by the administration of TURKEY TAIL mushrooms. So, what kind of mushrooms do all of you take? In my grocery store they sell porta bella mushrooms and shitake mushrooms. Here is a YouTube link of Paul Stamets talking about the power of mushrooms.
          HOWEVER, and I think Tom Goff will chime in on this — Paul Stamets SELLS dehydrated mushrooms in capsules. You can see all of his different kind of mushroom SUPPLEMENTS in the health food stores. AND THEY ARE NOT CHEAP.
          So, is his video on the benefits of mushrooms just a sales pitch. You can bet he is raking in millions of dollars selling his mushroom supplements in thousands of health food stores around the world. Here’s the LINK.

          https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uuL_faveAnw

          1. I buy powdered Turkey Tail and Reishi mushrooms by the pound. I combine them and take half a teaspoon twice a day. It cost pennies per dose.

              1. Try mountainroseherbs.com . They carry a variety of dried mushrooms. I get most of my dried herbs, spices, teas and berries from them. Never been disappointed.
                Mercola also sells mushroom capsules but is quite expensive.

          2. Paul Stamets has books about how to find free mushrooms in the forest, and how to cultivate them cheaply. Yes, he does have a business and he does make money. However, he makes very little off of turkey tail mushrooms (they don’t taste that good, so people don’t buy many.) Yet, he is an outspoken advocate of people using them. He doesn’t advocate the grocery store mushrooms as much (portabella, cremini, and button- all the same species), because they are almost entirely controlled by the mafia in Pennsylvania, and getting any real research out of that is very difficult, as well as physically dangerous. In addition, one gets joy and a more wide ranging nutritional basis out of a wide variety of mushrooms. Dr. G did a video years ago about how porcinis were the most nutritious mushroom in a study. You can’t buy those in a grocery store. Many of these mushrooms are available at farmer’s markets, and Paul Stamets makes nothing off of that.
            John S

            1. John Salvelt,

              Thank you John for that interesting comment on porta bella mushrooms. Your comment about the “Mafia” in Pennsylvania controlling porta bella mushrooms is very interesting. I know nothing about a mushroom cartel. Could you please explain further about the mushroom “mafia” in Pennsylvania. Is there a group of people who have a market on growing and selling porta bella mushrooms? Are they doing something to their product that might be injurious to consumers? What are they trying to hide? Please send links.

              1. John, I think what John S is talking about is the fact that Pennsylvania, and in particular in the Chester County Kennett Square region, is the largest producer of mushrooms in the US. We joke about it here in PA that mushroom workers are fed $hit & kept in the dark, but I am not aware of a cartel per se. And perhaps they control research the way a lot of big industries do? But again, I’m not aware of any of that. Maybe John S could enlighten us?

                I think China is the largest producer of mushrooms in the world, with the Netherlands and possibly Italy being high on that list as well.

                1. The mushrooms I get generally come from Canada, Wisconsin and I think California. I always make sure it says where they’re grown as I try to avoid things grown in China as much as possible. I did read how they were putting some kind of coating on their mushrooms, too… I’m not sure how long ago that was but who knows what they’ll (the Chinese government, not the people) do next.

            2. Here is the mushroom video you’re referring to, white button actually came in second place. They’re all healthy.

              https://nutritionfacts.org/video/the-best-mushroom-2/

              According to this, porcini mushrooms have the most ergothioneine but common mushrooms like the button mushroom still has significantly more than other foods: http://news.psu.edu/story/491477/2017/11/09/research/mushrooms-are-full-antioxidants-may-have-anti-aging-potential

              Here’s a video by Dr. Greger about ergothioneine: https://nutritionfacts.org/video/ergothioneine-a-new-vitamin/

              But there does seem to be significant research out there on the common button/cremini/porta bella mushroom. Here’s one video about the white button mushroom by Dr. Greger: https://nutritionfacts.org/video/boosting-immunity-while-reducing-inflammation/

          3. John

            I think there is a fair bit of evidence that mushrooms assist health and there is no downside to their consumption to my knowledge.
            https://www.cancer.gov/about-cancer/treatment/cam/hp/mushrooms-pdq
            https://www.scribd.com/document/348902451/The-Role-of-Edible-Mushrooms-in-Health-Evaluation-of-the-Evidence

            So, yes, eat mushrooms. My understanding is that even humble common, flat or garden cup or button mushrooms benefit health. in fact, I think those types are actually the juvenile (and cheaper) versions of portobello mushrooms If you have the space, grow-your-own kits are also available.

            If people want to consume mushroom supplements, iherb carries a range of reasonably priced I products. I imagine that Vitacost and other sites would do so also.

            1. Tom,

              Thank you for those links to the American Cancer Association concerning the use of medicinal mushrooms. This is very interesting information and it prompts me to start eating mushrooms. You and I and the others on this forum are really lucky to have this information because 99.99 percent of the people on this planet have no clue.

        2. Google seems to have done a decent job.

          If there’s anything that needs clarification, I’m a translator by trade. Contact me at rei at the fraser dot com.

        1. Hi Efrat,

          I am a volunteer for Dr. Greger. Thank you so much for your question.

          There isn’t conclusive evidence that brewers or nutritional yeast will effectively treat cancer. However, Dr. Greger has highlighted the promising results we have seen so far. Also important to note, is that there are no known negative side effects. Therefore, it can’t hurt for a cancer patient to try it out. At the very worst, it will do nothing. At best, it could aid in the treatment of cancer. We just don’t know clearly yet.

          I hope this helps to answer your question!

    1. Can you take too much Nutritional Yeast? I put it on salads and many things (beans etc.) to get more protein in my plant based diet.

        1. Very few people on a plant based diet are in danger of getting too much protein. People who might want more protein could be over 65, athletes, or people who are recovering from an injury.
          John S

      1. Joanne, you can eat as much nutritional yeast as you want, of course no more than let say 6 tablespoons per day because too good of a good thing is not good.

        1. Way to come up with arbitrary numbers Jerry

          Also ‘you can’t eat too much but this amount is too much.’ You’re too funny Jerry

      2. Yes you can have too much of anything. Before giving blood as a teen I had too much pure water and realizing it, quickly the situation remedied. Nothing like this, created, will absolutely save you as you are now, and I do believe in everlasting life. Those who keep seeking will find! <3

        1. Before giving blood as a teen I had too much pure water

          Cassandra, can you elaborate on this? Were you drinking pure water as your daily water source or was this a one time thing just before giving blood? Was your pure water source distilled or ionized? Did the blood bank reject you for drinking the pure water?

      3. Hi I’m a moderator with NutritionFacts.org. I did some looking around and I did find any studies suggesting there is any known problems with having too much of it. If it begins to bother your stomach or you have any issues, by all means cut back. Of note, you really don’t need to go out of your way to add protein to a plant based diet. A lot of the research that supports plant based diets has shown the excess protein of the standard Western diet is quite dangerous. We really only need about 10%. Fortunately, the dangers of high animal protein have not been found to be true with plant based protein. But you really don’t need to add extra protein to the diet if you are eating a good healthy diet- like everything on Dr. Greger’s daily dozen-https://nutritionfacts.org/video/dr-gregers-daily-dozen-checklist/

        You might like some of the videos Dr. Greger has done on protein. I think they’ll be reassuring if you are concerned about protein.
        https://nutritionfacts.org/video/the-great-protein-fiasco/
        https://nutritionfacts.org/video/do-vegetarians-get-enough-protein/

        All the best,
        NurseKelly
        NutritonFacts Moderator

      4. I started nutritional yeast several months ago and am worried about all the B vitamins. Can I overdose on B vitamins? The label says a serving has 500% B12 and 700% B6. Is that okay? I am new at this.

  1. most nutritional yeast is grown with synthetic vitamins, things not meant to be consumed by humans (hello folic acid).
    Even the nutritional yeast that says “no added vitamins, not fortified” is still fortified. The synthetics are just not added
    to the finished product, yet they are added to the growth cycle early on of the yeast. This is a loophole that allows the
    makers of these products to get around having to claim their products are fortified. Very few yeast products are grown
    without synthetics. They are out there, available. But you have to get this stuff in writing, especially from people within
    the company who actually grow the yeast.

        1. Dr Greger advises omega 3 supplements for brain health. He recommends algal oil sources because of the contamination risk with fish oil.

          And let’s face, fish oil doesn’t seem to help your brain health ………… :)

      1. John has a good point. Also, too much worrying can be detrimental to one’s health. It’s easy enough to contact companies though. Sari Foods brand has awesome customer service and explains the way their’s is grown. They were kind enough to send me a chart of their testing results when I asked them about it.

    1. If this site emphasizes Whole Plant Food, why not talk about mushroom which you can buy as a whole plant whereas nutritional yeast is processed and depending on how it was done, it can be ineffective if not harmful. And beta glucan from mushroom is much more potent than beta glucan from nutritional yeast because it binds onto the cancer cells.

        1. Anna P, At the bottom of each email your have received is a link “Unsubscribe from this list”. Click on it and you can remove yourself from the list. Alternatively you can click the link at the bottom of the email “Update subscription preferences” to change how you receive the emails.

      1. Jerry – no one is saying you can’t or should consume mushroom rather than nutritional yeast. Feel free to do so.
        It’s just that this particular topic was about nutritional yeast.

        Is there anything you do not immediately attack?

      2. Nutritional yeast is not harmful Jerry. You just have to try to challenge anything on this website, it’s ridiculous. Dr. Greger could come out with a video stating that water is rain and not wood and you’d argue. And there are plenty of videos on here on mushrooms which Dr. Greger recommends adding as a regular part of the diet.

        1. Shaylen, you really have reading comprehension. I never said that nutritional yeast is not beneficial let alone harmful. In fact I eat it everyday with my salad.

          What I said is that when Dr G talks about beta glucan then he should talk about the top food which is mushroom. In particular he talks about beta glucan for cancer in this video then beta glucan from mushroom is more potent because it binds to the cancer cell.

          It’s like he talks about the best car and he talks about Ford Pinto.

          1. Yes Jerry, we all just have reading comprehension issues… First, you keep saying that beta-glucan in mushrooms is more effect but where are you getting this information? I guess people are just supposed to take your word for it?

            Here’s what I was referring to: “whereas nutritional yeast is processed and depending on how it was done, it can be ineffective if not harmful.”

            Where has there been ANY evidence that nutritional yeast could be harmful? Yet that is what you’re implying, that there is some evidence to suggest it can be harmful. People do have concerns about the folic acid used in fortified nutritional yeast, but I have never heard of or seen any evidence that fortified yeast poses a problem to people. Knowing what is known about folic acid though, most of us prefer to avoid it.
            Also, you make it sound like it’s a highly processed junk food whereas it’s actually very natural. The most processing is when it is fortified. It is deactivated through a level of heat as it should be because it is harmful to ingest active yeast.
            And your comment is one of a series of yours complaining about Dr. Greger talking about nutritional yeast. So yes, you seem to have some kind of issue with nutritional yeast, but then again, if he were talking about mushrooms, maybe you’d be complaining that he isn’t talking about nutritional yeast, lol.

            All that being said, there’s nothing wrong with bringing up mushrooms. But you say that they bega-glucan is more effect as if you have some authority on the subject! AT LEAST provide us with the source of this information you’re getting. However more often, YOU are the source of your own information.

            The reason Dr. Greger refers to nutritional yeast is because the beta-glucan done in these studies were from yeast, from what I understand. And as others have explained, there are different structures to beta-glucan from different sources, such as oatmeal for example, and so you can’t just assume it acts the same way without studying it.

            1. Oh and you’ve also implied that the beta-glucan in yeast can somehow be ineffective depending on factors you failed to mention… WHERE are you getting this stuff?!

    2. Apparently, we’re just going to endlessly skirt this issue here. Tons of videos from NF and yet mum is the word on Folic Acid. We would love to know.

      1. Jack, not sure what you are looking for in re: folic acid, but I found this in my email inbox that addresses folic acid in some instances.

        FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
        Orthomolecular Medicine News Service, January 15, 2018
        Multivitamin and folic acid use lowers autism rates
        by Terry Vanderheyden, ND, RH

        (OMNS Jan 15, 2018) Children of mothers who take multivitamins and/or folic acid supplements have a 60% lower autism risk, even if their moms take the supplements before getting pregnant. [1] The risk is lowered even in those who used the supplements before becoming pregnant but discontinued their use while pregnant.

        Dr. Stephen Z. Levine and his colleagues conducted a case-control cohort study in which they surveyed 45,300 children born between January 1, 2003 and December 31, 2007 for a diagnosis of autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Then they compared ASD incidence with patterns of maternal vitamin and folic acid usage. Notable is that the participants were Israeli women who were prescribed the vitamins by their doctors.

        What they found is striking: multivitamin and/or folic acid use lowered the risk for ASD by 61% in those who used the supplements before becoming pregnant (i.e. not within 9 months of pregnancy), while women who used them during pregnancy lowered their children’s risk for ASD by 73%!

        The study by Levine et al. confirms earlier findings by a Norwegian group, who also found that folic acid supplementation in mothers reduced ASD risk in their children.[2] The latter study showed a reduction in risk of 39% in mothers who used the vitamin for only a short period, from four weeks before to eight weeks after becoming pregnant.

        Levine and his fellow researchers concluded that, although “causality cannot be inferred,” the use of the observational type of study that they conducted is “more pragmatic and ethical” than a randomized, controlled clinical trial (RCT). A RCT where, for example, women would be prescribed the supplements and others denied it by giving placebo would be considered unethical, since it is already known that folic acid supplementation prevents neural tube defects that lead to spina bifida in children. [3]

        We now know that mutations that occurred in our ancestors’ genes have led to many individuals requiring higher levels of certain nutrients.[4] For example, all humans must derive vitamin C from their diet, because we and most other primates have a genetic mutation in the synthetic pathway for ascorbate, whereas most other mammals produce their own.[5] Similarly, genetic mutations may contribute to the root of the autism epidemic[6], even though the science of epigenetics apparently can explain the huge explosion in autism occurring today.[7]

        Epigenetics is the science of how our genes, which are unalterable, can be modulated by changing the cellular biochemical environment in which those genes are expressed.[8,9] In other words, diet, nutritional supplements, and lifestyle factors can modify the expression of existing genes, so that mutations or other genetic differences can be either expressed or repressed. Folate and other vitamins and nutrients are important in the biochemical pathways that methylate DNA base sequences that comprise genes. This can modulate how the DNA for a gene gets expressed into proteins. This epigenetic mechanism is not permanent but can be passed from one generation to the next.
        Conclusion

        As a naturopathic doctor, I have found autism in young children does indeed respond to naturopathic therapies, especially if treated as quickly as possible after diagnosis. The longer someone waits to be treated, the less likely that complete recovery is possible, though many cases even of long standing do improve. Nutritional deficiencies are common in the modern diet, and because of genetic differences, some individuals may need higher levels of essential nutrients. Nutritional therapies that comprise an excellent diet including fruits and vegetables along with vitamin and mineral supplements, as well as herbal medicines, are all indispensable to the recovery of these children. Especially helpful are supplements in adequate doses of the B vitamins including folate and biotin, vitamins C, D, E, essential omega-3 fatty acids found in walnuts, flax seeds, and fish oil, probiotics, and essential minerals including magnesium. [10,11] In conclusion, the cost of preventing autism is merely to give nature a gentle boost.

        (Terry Vanderheyden is a naturopathic physician in Barry’s Bay, Ontario.)

        References

        1. Levine SZ, Kodesh A, Viktorin A, Smith L, Uher R, Reichenberg A, and Sandin S. “Association of Maternal Use of Folic Acid and Multivitamin Supplements in the Periods Before and During Pregnancy With the Risk of Autism Spectrum Disorder in Offspring.” JAMA Psychiatry; Published online January 3, 2018. doi: 10.1001/jamapsychiatry.2017.4050. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/?term=29299606

        2. Surén P, Roth C, Bresnahan M, et al. “Association between maternal use of folic acid supplements and risk of autism spectrum disorders in children.” JAMA. 2013;309(6):570-577. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23403681

        3. De Wals P, Tairou F, Van Allen MI, et al. “Reduction in neural-tube defects after folic acid fortification in Canada.” N Engl J Med. 2007;357(2): 135-142. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17625125

        4. Williams RJ. Biochemical Individuality McGraw-Hill; (1998) ISBN-13: 978-0879838935

        5. Saul AW. Ascorbic Acid Vitamin C: What’s the Real Story? http://orthomolecular.org/resources/omns/v09n27.shtml

        6. Schmidt RJ, Hansen RL, Hartiala J et al. “Prenatal vitamins, one-carbon metabolism gene variants, and risk for autism.” Epidemiology. 2011 Jul; 22(4): 476-485. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21610500

        7. Miyake K, Hirasawa T, Koide T, and Kubota T. “Epigenetics in Autism and Other Neurodevelopmental Diseases.” In: Neurodegenerative Diseases, edited by Shamim Ahmad. Austin, Texas: Landes Bioscience and Springer Science+Business Media, 2012. Adv Exp Med Biol. 2012;724:91-8. doi: 10.1007/978-1-4614-0653-2_7 https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22411236

        8. Abdul QA, Yu BP, Chung HY, Jung HA, Choi JS. Epigenetic modifications of gene expression by lifestyle and environment.. Arch Pharm Res. 2017, 40:1219-1237. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/?term=29043603

        9. Friso S, Udali S, De Santis D, Choi SW. One-carbon metabolism and epigenetics. Mol Aspects Med. 2017;54:28-36. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27876555

        10. Case HS. Vitamins & Pregnancy: The Real Story: Your Orthomolecular Guide for Healthy Babies & Happy Moms. Basic Health Pub. (2016) ISBN-13: 978-1591203131

        11. Saul AW. Vitamins and Autism: The Real Story. http://orthomolecular.org/resources/omns/v13n13.shtml

        To find a naturopathic doctor in the USA: http://www.naturopathic.org

        To find a naturopathic doctor in Canada: https://www.cand.ca

        Nutritional Medicine is Orthomolecular Medicine

        Orthomolecular medicine uses safe, effective nutritional therapy to fight illness. For more information: http://www.orthomolecular.org

        Find a Doctor

        To locate an orthomolecular physician near you: http://orthomolecular.org/resources/omns/v06n09.shtml

        The peer-reviewed Orthomolecular Medicine News Service is a non-profit and non-commercial informational resource.

        1. Hi Hal,

          Sorry but your response is confusing and unhelpful. Dr. Gregor has pointed out that Folic Acid can be dangerous, as the video you refer to clearly demonstrates. However, he has not addressed the issue that the vast majority of nutritional yeast available to (at least) American consumers is fortified with Folic Acid. This is the crux of the issue.

          1. Hi Jack, I don’t see that as an “issue” at all. When I learned from this website that Folic Acid could be dangerous, when I buy nutritional yeast, I look for a brand that doesn’t contain any. Simple. Dr Greger graciously shows us the research. But it up to each individual to take responsibility to use the information wisely.

            1. Feel free to tell us where you buy yours. Aside from expensive niche producers found through online retailers, I have never found a nutritional yeast producer sold in a common supermarket that does not contain Folic Acid.

              This is a common complaint, as the comments to this video show.

              1. Sorry, Maybe I misunderstood your question. Are you expecting Dr Greger to tell everyone where to buy nutritional yeast without Folic Acid at a cheap price?

                1. Hal, take a look at this thread. Your feigned humility hardly changes the fact that the vast majority if nutritional yeast available to consumers is fortified. You know perfectly well that I am not expecting Dr. G to “tell everyone where to buy nutritional yeast without Folic Acid at a cheap price” as you ridiculously claim.

                  I am expecting Dr. Greger to add a small caveat (a few sentences even) when recommending certain food products if an exceptionally high proportion of those products are fortified with synthetic vitamins that he has already raised concerns over. That is a very reasonable expectation, especially considering how many videos how now been released on this site recommending nutritional yeast.

                  1. Jack Hall

                    I am not convinced by your argument and I found your response to Hal’s polite comments to be unnecessarily rude.

                    Many foods in the US and Canada are fortified with folic acid. it is not solely an issue with nutritional yeast. Breads, cereals, pastas and rice are probably the biggest source of folic acid in the US diet. In any case, the issue is a complex one and the evidence seems to suggest that nutritional yeast fights cancer rather then promotes it, folic acid or no folic acid.

                    “These findings, combined with evidence from laboratory and animal studies indicating that high folate status promotes tumor progression, suggest that folate might play dual roles in the risk of colorectal cancer, and possibly other cancers, depending on the dosage and timing of the exposure. Modest doses of folic acid taken before preneoplastic lesions are established might suppress the development of cancer in normal tissues, whereas high doses taken after the establishment of preneoplastic lesions might promote cancer development and progression [37-39]. This hypothesis is supported by a 2011 prospective study that found an inverse association between folate intake and risk of colorectal cancer only during early preadenoma stages [40].

                    Additional research is needed to fully understand the role of dietary folate and supplemental folic acid in colorectal, prostate, and other cancers. Evidence to date indicates that adequate folate intake might reduce the risk of some forms of cancer. However, high doses of supplemental folic acid should be used with caution, especially by individuals with a history of colorectal adenomas.”
                    https://ods.od.nih.gov/factsheets/Folate-HealthProfessional/

                    1. Ishay

                      Perhaps it does deserve further attention but, as the ODS quote I posted explains, the issue is complex and there are as yet no hard-and-fast conclusions on this subject

                      Further, it is a topic that extends far beyond nutritional yeast to encompass very many fortified foods. I am all for constructive criticism but am less enthusiastic about destructive criticism. The wording of Jack’s original post didn’t seem particularly constructive to me..

                    2. Just weigh in here, I’ve never known Hal to ‘feign humility’. I did say that he may have misunderstood Jack’s question.

                    3. This is an interesting topic though.

                      Oregon State University’s Linus Pauling Institute collates and analyses a lot of information regarding the scientific evidence about vitamins and minerals. Their summary of the research findings on folate/folic acid is worth reading, including this intriguing comment

                      “Several clinical trials addressed the effect of folic acid supplementation in patients with a history of colorectal adenoma, with trials finding a risk reduction or no effect of supplemental folic acid (109-112). A recent meta-analysis of three large randomized controlled trials in high-risk subjects did not demonstrate any increase in colorectal adenoma recurrence in subjects supplemented with 500 or 1,000 μg/day of folic acid for 24 to 42 months when compared with placebo treatment (113).”
                      http://lpi.oregonstate.edu/mic/vitamins/folate

                    4. TG, Thanks for your elaboration on the Folic Acid topic. As you indicate, it’s a very broad topic and I hope more unbiased research is done on it in the future.

                  2. Jack Hall: Unfortunately, just like there are those who would always spread senseless negativity in the comment section, there might be a few who would become fanatics and take offence at even the slightest tone of criticism towards Dr. Greger.

                    On the other hand, I have no doubt that Dr. G will be happy to appropriately respond to your question – maybe you can post your question in one of his Q&A sessions on Facebook or YouTube. I think your question is a very good one. Perhaps a recommendation could be added to prefer nutritional yeast that hasn’t been fortified with folic acid, or maybe explain why it shouldn’t matter that much in that context. I honestly don’t know.

                    Thankfully, where I live (outside the US) most nutritional yeast isn’t fortified.

                    1. Ishay, I think it very rude for you to call me a “fanatic”. Yes, I am very appreciative of Dr Greger’s work presenting us with unbiased nutritional research information. I do understand that Dr greger is not perfect and each and every video cannot satisfy everyone, so when a video is not up to my expectations I do give him the benefit of the doubt that he is a very busy person and can’t cover everything in one video. And I don’t just accuse him for “skirting issues” in a two sentence comment.

                    2. I have tremendous respect for Dr. Greger and his work, but the sycophants that salivate all over these comment sections are not helpful. The issue I raise deserves some commentary from the NF team, if for no other reason than it is a widely held concern.

                    3. I definitely do not see TG or Hal as being fanatics in the slightest. That seemed needlessly passive aggressive. I didn’t think Hal was being rude at all, it seemed Jack took his comments wrong. This is communicating in text though, things are lost in translation and misunderstandings occur. No big deal.

                  3. Jack Hall, If you had stated your current second paragraph in your first post, there would have been no confusion and we wouldn’t be having this discussion.

                    “I am expecting Dr. Greger to add a small caveat (a few sentences even) when recommending certain food products if an exceptionally high proportion of those products are fortified with synthetic vitamins that he has already raised concerns over. That is a very reasonable expectation, especially considering how many videos how now been released on this site recommending nutritional yeast.”

                    Your very first comment sounded like you were unnecessarily critical of Dr Greger’s efforts implying he was purposely “skirting issues”.

                    “Apparently, we’re just going to endlessly skirt this issue here. Tons of videos from NF and yet mum is the word on Folic Acid.”

              2. Probably not going to find unfortified nutritional yeast at a regular store, but health food stores should have it and you can get it online easily.

          2. Jack Hall – One can find nutritional yeasts that have no added B vitamins, including Folic Acid. Just google it. They’re out there.

            Here’s one:
            https://www.amazon.com/s/?ie=UTF8&keywords=non-fortified+nutritional+yeast&tag=googhydr-20&index=aps&hvadid=178592653840&hvpos=1t1&hvnetw=g&hvrand=12346984845093401492&hvpone=&hvptwo=&hvqmt=b&hvdev=c&hvdvcmdl=&hvlocint=&hvlocphy=9028742&hvtargid=kwd-158557514918&ref=pd_sl_a2u7rc5tu_b

            If that’s you’re preference then have at it. I’m not sure why you think Dr. Greger has to address the minutae of issues that arise from any one of his subject matters. If you prefer unfortified, then just go do it. And perhaps share your discovery with the rest of us.

            I sometimes don’t understand the constant criticism of minutae of Dr. Greger. I am sincerely grateful for what he shares with us and his information has made a gigantic difference in my health for the last 10 years.

      1. Based on a post in the comments section of another video, I bought the Lewis Labs Brewer’s Yeast. Claims to be non-GMO, vegan, gluten free, and kosher/parve. Further states “non blended or fortified – nothing added.” Ingredients show no Folic Acid, but folate at 88% Daily Value.

        Bought it on Amazon I think, but went to the company’s website and learned this yeast is from sugar beets. The website is a wealth of information about Brewer’s Yeast from sugar beets. The link is:

        https://lewislabsdirect.com/products/new-brewers-yeast-12-35oz

      2. Rosa and Bean, the two I know of that sell good unfortified nutritional yeast is Kal’s and Sari. Really great stuff and you get a lot for your money. Sari seems exceptionally good, they’re an awesome company.

          1. Ruth, Kal’s sells an unfortified nutritional yeast as well. It has to say “unfortified” on the label. You can tell when you read the ingredients too, obviously.

      1. For those who decide to supplement with Nutritional Yeast, I recommend choosing a brand processed at lower temperatures, and to at least avoid any of the “toasted” varieties. Cooking foods at high temperatures creates glycotoxins ( https://nutritionfacts.org/video/reducing-glycotoxin-intake-to-prevent-alzheimers/ ) also known as AGEs, that have a wide range of toxic effects aside from the ones Dr. Greger touches on in his video. (see https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3257625/ )

        For my part, I use Lewis Labs Brewer’s Yeast 100% Pure Yeast Flakes. I chose them after contacting a half dozen companies some years ago, to find out about their processing methods. At the time, this brand used the lowest processing temperatures.

        If you feel curious about the levels of AGEs in foods, check out: Advanced Glycation End Products in Foods and a Practical Guide to Their Reduction in the Diet J Am Diet Assoc. 2010;110:911-916. at https://pdfs.semanticscholar.org/065b/64ec0a95e0263f94cc5f9a188409dc1b74c8.pdf

        What sort of a difference can cooking temperatures make?

        In one study, Dr. Vlassara’s group at Mt. Sinai found increased average and maximum lifespan for mice on a lower AGE/less cooked diet. When all of the animals eating the regular AGE diet had died, over 40% still survived of those who ate the lower AGE (50% the AGEs) diet. And the insulin levels of the lower AGE group only increased by 70% from young to old animals (.17 – .29) – less than one third the increase seen in mice eating the regular diet (.16 – .56) – where insulin levels increased 250%.

      2. Joanna, from my understanding, it’s all healthy. The main concern is when it is fortified synthetic b vitamins are added, namely folic acid, and there are problems with folic acid which Dr. Greger explains in at least one video here. Folic acid is the synthetic form of folate which is an essential b vitamin found in plants. That is why a lot of people prefer the unfortified nutritional yeasts. It’s also good to buy from a trusted company who tests for heavy metal contamination. Dr. Greger has an article here showing the results of several brands tested, they all came back with good results. You can contact companies to find out as well, which is what I did with Sari Foods brand and they showed me their test results and had the same good results as the other brands Dr. Greger and his team had tested.
        On the other hand, B12 is so important, so the fortified brands are a good source of B12. I prefer to supplement with B12 once a week at a high dose instead of regularly taking it and prefer to use a natural form which I get from Garden of Life’s My Kind Organics in a spray bottle. There is another form of B12 that is more synthetic, I can’t remember the different names for the more natural vs. synthetic form. I don’t know all that much about the differences of B12 supplements other than that.

    1. D.A., I’d appreciate knowing the brand and where you find it. I, too, have a very common genetic problem that makes folic acid a negative for me.

      Also, I’d like to know if the yeasts grown with artificial vitamins turn those vitamins into something that is natural. Is that possible?

      Estimates run as high as 70% of the population having one or two genes for the genetic defect, MTHFR, which makes it imperative to avoid artificial folic acid in favor of the natural folate. Actually, we all should.

      1. The nutritional yeast from Whole Foods found in the supplements section is not fortified. It comes in a 450 gram can and costs around $15.

    2. D.A, easy to avoid. Just get unfortified nutritional yeast. I only know of Kal’s unfortified (I think they also sell fortified) and Sari which only sells unfortified. Both of these companies are non-GMO and I also like that Dr. Greger tested Kal’s brand for lead among other brands, and results came back good. I actually contacted Sari foods asking about this, they were so helpful and sent me a copy of their reports, they test regularly and they also had good results.

  2. Does the source of beta-glucan matter? My wife suffers from Crohn’s disease, and based on previous videos we’d prefer to stay away from the yeast. Would oatmeal offer the same benefits?

    1. Rob: Beta glucans are a class of compounds, not one compound. Beta glucans from different sources are different structurally and functionally. For example, beta glucans in oats evidently lower cholesterol whereas those in mushrooms improve immunity.

    2. Yes. Beta glucan from mushroom is more potent. If you are allergic to mushroom and nutritional yeast then consider taking a beta glucan supplement because you may not be allergic to the beta glucan if it is isolated. If a supplement cures your Crohn issue then take it and don’t listen to the anti supplement ignorant crowd.

    3. Hi I’m a moderator with NutritionFacts.org. Thanks for your great question. I think that’s a great idea to look for other sources of beta-glucan, like oats and barely if nutritional yeast is not an option. Whole grains are healthy regardless so there is no reason to shy away from them.

      NurseKelly
      Moderator

        1. Jerry,

          You are on this forum 24/7. That means you don’t have time to go to the gym and work out, or spend time in the garden, or enjoy life in general.

    1. Anna, nutritional yeast is inactive yeast containing high amounts of nutrients and is exceptionally high in b vitamins. These are naturally occurring although some are fortified with two B vitamins that do not naturally occur in the yeast, which are folate and B12. But unfortunately, when they fortify it, they add the synthetic folic acid as opposed to folate which is naturally found in plant foods. This is why I personally prefer unfortified nutritional yeast and I also find it tastes better.
      What it’s used for is an amazing food additive that is known for having a cheesy flavor and is even used in many vegan cheese recipes and other recipes because of it. It’s also incredible sprinkled on popcorn and other foods. For example, this amazing recipe uses nutritional yeast to create a vegan version of alfredo sauce (and it is outstanding!): http://thevegan8.com/2013/12/28/vegan-garlic-alfredo-sauce/

      You can find it in health food stores or even regular grocery stores depending on the store. I used to use Braggs which is fortified but recently switched to Kal’s unfortified nutritional yeast and Sari’s unfortified nutritional yeast. Both are amazing but Sari’s is my favorite, however I think you can only get their’s online from their website.
      The unfortified stuff is about 14-15 dollars (the ones I use, but they’re also non-gmo) for a large amount, so it goes a long way.

    1. Salttrap, you are in for a treat. I’ve always loved nutritional yeast and also used Braggs but recently switched to unfortified and the taste is so much better! I love Kal brand but I just got my Sari order in today and I have to say, it’s my favorite.

  3. But elephants almost never get cancer.

    Researchers believe the answer lies in a rare gene that provides elephants with special genetic protection against cancer. And it may explain why elephants have only a 4% rate of cancer compared to a 20% rate in humans.

    Scientists believe elephants have a “zombie” gene that helps them avoid cancer. Over the course of evolution, the animals resurrected a gene that was functionally dead.

    They call LIF6 the “zombie” gene because the other 10 LIF genes are inactive. Only LIF6 seems to wake from the dead to protect against cancer.

    Humans actually have their own “zombie” defenses against cancer. We just have to wake them up and activate more of them.

    I’m talking about natural killer (NK) cells. NK cells are a type of lymphocytes. They are formed in your bone marrow, lymph nodes, spleen, tonsils, and thymus. They remain in a resting phase until they are needed. Then they wake to become the most aggressive killer cells in your body.

    About two billion NK cells flow through your blood looking for bacteria, fungi, viruses and cancer cells. They are also present in all tissues throughout your body, waiting to deal with any threats.

    If you have high NK levels, you don’t get sick. Studies show healthy seniors and centenarians have thriving populations of NK cells. But younger people with chronic diseases are low in NK cells.1

    When NK cells find a cancer cell they squirt out a toxic substance called performin. That pierces the cancer cell membrane to cause cell death. Studies show NK cells can control both local tumor growth and metastases.2

    But your store of NK cells drops as you get older. They also get depleted with a diet of processed foods, chronic stress, environmental toxins, smoking, and excess alcohol. Eventually you may not have enough NK cells to beat back cancer and other diseases.

    The good news is that you can rebuild your supply of NK cells. Here are three things I recommend to my patients to wake up their own “zombie” cancer fighters.

    Wake up your own zombie cells

    1. Boost your body’s master antioxidant. Glutathione is an essential antioxidant found in all cells. It optimizes the killing power of NK cells. Low glutathione reduces the function of NK cells.

    But you can’t just take a glutathione supplement. It would get destroyed in your digestive system long before it got to your cells.3 Instead look for N-Acetyl-Cysteine (NAC). It’s a precursor to glutathione. Studies show it can stop DNA damage linked to the development of cancer cells. It also reduces the harmful effects from chemo and radiation treatments.

    Food sources of NAC include poultry, yogurt, red peppers, garlic, egg yolks, onions, and broccoli. But to protect against cancer you’ll want to supplement. Take at least 250 mg per day up to 1,500 mg.

    2. Eat this ancient superfood. Cordycep mushrooms have been used in Chinese medicine for 5,000 years. They are grown on the backs of special caterpillars in the Himalayas.

    Studies show cordyceps stimulate NK cells and other white blood cells. They’ve been shown to have anti-tumor powers. And they increase the effect of chemo drugs against lung cancer cells.

    You can find cordyceps tablets, powders and capsules from most health food stores. Use the powder in teas, soups and stews. Take two to three grams once or twice a day. Cordycep are generally considered safe. But if you are pregnant or breast-feeding or take blood thinners or diabetes meds, talk to your doctor first.

    3. Take this unique herb. Ashwagandha is an adaptogen. Animal studies show that it decreases the incidence and progression of ovarian cancer by boosting NK cells.5

    Look for ashwagandha powder that’s 100% organic with no artificial flavors or colors. I like to mix ¼ teaspoon up to a full teaspoon of the powder with a cup of warm milk and a teaspoon of honey. Drink a cup just before bed. You can also drink another cup during the day.

    You can also supplement. I recommend 300 to 500 mg twice a day. But don’t overdo it. Too much can cause abdominal discomfort and diarrhea.

    Al Sears, MD

    1. Dr. Sears,
      What you say sounds very interesting, but Dr. Greger and Tom Goff recommend that we stay away from supplements because most of them are made in China and might be contaminated, and they have fillers, and other stuff in them. Dr. Greger once showed a study that people who take supplements have shorter life spans. However, if what you are doing WORKS for your patients, then who am I to say what is right or wrong. I know a lot of people on this forum take supplements. Even Tom Goff has admitted to taking vitamin C supplements. So, I don’t know. It’s kind of like a roll of the dice.

      1. Dr. Greger once showed a study that people who take supplements have shorter life spans.

        John, I’ve never seen such a study but I can only guess that if that be true, the supplement takers would likely be people in bad health to start with. Not only that but I would guess they were taking run-of-the-mill supplements. That is, probably no NAC or Ashwagandha class supplements as mentioned in the Bugs post.

        Science based supplementation of today is not just taking a multi-vitamin… it is as specific in its scope as a WFPB diet is to the practitioners of that regimen.

        One of the things that Jerry said in another comments section that makes sense is that supplements are just concentrated food, or something like that.

        And yes, many of the powders do come from China in bulk, but China has grown to understand that the world expects quality from their exports, and they’ve been doing the supplement manufacturing for a long enough time to have corrected any inclusion of impurities. Remember the milk (or was it baby formula?) scandal in China of a few years back? I think the person responsible for that was punished harshly for that, as he should have been.

        Just sayin’ that what was true before, once identified, may no longer be true.

        1. Lonie, I don’t trust anything coming out of China because they cheat and lie all the time. I have nothing against the Chinese, Taiwan and Hong Kong are OK, but the Chinese commies are something else. I know that a lot of foods and supplements and spices come from China but I avoid it like a pest if I know.

          As for supplements, whole food is always the first choice but sometimes you cannot find it or eat enough of it, or your body cannot even adsorb if you don’t do some processing, and so you have to resort to supplements.

          1. China refused to import pork products from the US because our pork producers feed the pigs Ractopamine, a dangerous growth hormone banned by 160 nations.
            That’s pretty bad when China won’t buy our unhealthy pigs…lol

        2. I don’t buy into the concept that supplements are just concentrated food.
          When I look at an orange or an apple I see live activated enzymes. I see vitamins that have not been destroyed by heat, pulverization, or by chemical titration. The produce I get from my garden is “live food”. It is fresh food with all of the total molecules in place that work in synergy to bring me nutrition and health. When I look at a supplement, I see a dead bunch of “whatever” that has been processed, heated, pulverized, and titrated by going through a reductionist process that eliminates all other supporting molecules. Supplements are concentrated dead foods.

          1. John, do you know that the kale or apple that you pick from your yard, have been genetically modified and it’s not the same as what you see in nature in the forest? And your nut (if you have one) and rice and wheat have been processed?

              1. I am just exaggerating when I said “genetically modified”. It is actually domestically grown to get rid of its bitterness. Kale is a descendent of a wild cabbage plant. So are a lot of vegetables and fruits we eat today, they don’t grow in the wild like this.

          2. John,
            There are supplements that are just concentrated food. I make many supplements for my own use. Artichoke leaf is nearly impossible to eat on its own, but if I make an extract with glycerine, I actually eat it. I gather local horsetail and dry it, then put it into my hummus for the nutrients. It’s just dried horsetail. I also made extract out of an ashwaganda plant, after I made tea out of the leaves. Oregon grape root has lots of berberine, but it’s nearly impossible to eat. I make extract out of that too.

            1. John Salvelt,

              Thank you for that reply. I just learned something new by your comments about supplements. But, your homemade supplements are more like whole foods because you are grinding up leaves, roots, and other components of the plants and just mixing them in your foods. And as far as tinctures go, you are extracting molecules out of the whole plant, which may or may not be a reductionists procedure. But, commercial companies probably don’t use the same care and attention that you use, they probably just throw the herbs and “stuff” into a huge mixing machine, pulverizing machine, heating machine, then distill it, then titrate it, then evaporate it, and so on. Then the commercial companies have to throw in some preservatives like magnesium sterate, and throw in some fillers, and throw in some other things that prevent clumping. I can live with your home made brews and concotions, but I am not going to take the commercial capsules, and tablets that we see in the health food store. There are hundreds and hundreds of foods which we vegans don’t ever eat because we are stuck on eating black beans and rice.
              But, if vegans started eating everything that is safe and edible, they wouldn’t have to make home made brews and concoctions. However, I applaud you for your work, skill set, and initiative….and I believe you are benefiting from your home made nutrients. I would rather eat a huge variety of plants. I don’t have time to make concoctions.

      2. If someone is choosing to take a supplement, it’s important they buy from a trusted brand. If the company doesn’t supply the information, it’s good to contact them and ask questions such as where are their supplements manufactured, where are the ingredients used for them grown, what kind of tests they perform, if ingredients are imported do they do their own separate inspections for metals and pesticides and other contaminants, etc. A few brands I trust are Garden of Life (I take their B12 spray… they actually water extract from organic whole plant foods, it’s kind of amazing), Solaray, and Blue Bonnet.

        1. Oh I should specify that not all Garden of Life supplements do the water extraction, only the My Kind line. Unfortunately, like with many supplements, they do use a palm oil, but I only take their B12 which does not contain any palm oil.

            1. What does that have to do with the harm in supplementing with antioxidants? That was a study where they applied the antioxidant onto cells in culture, totally different than ingestion and how consuming the isolated antioxidant would act in the body. I don’t doubt that resveratrol found in actual food is beneficial to us, but supplements can actually act as pro-oxidants for reasons explained in the article I posted. Resveratrol supplements undermine some of the benefits of exercise as explained in a video here and I’ve read this from other sources as well. When antioxidants are within a piece of fruit, for example, that antioxidant comes in a brilliant package containing more compounds than humans have even discovered, all design by nature herself to work synergistically. Better to eat grapes, eat cacao, etc. in which case not only will you receive only benefits from resveratrol with no negative side effects, but it will come in a package filled with other nutrients and antioxidants as well so you’ll get even more.

              I hadn’t read this article though and I did like it, it makes me feel even better about the resveratrol-rich foods I consume. Also probably a good ingredient in skin care which my all natural moisturizer contains from natural plant sources, so I did enjoy the article.

              1. That was a study where they applied the antioxidant onto cells in culture, totally different than ingestion and how consuming the isolated antioxidant would act in the body. I don’t doubt that resveratrol found in actual food is beneficial to us, but supplements can actually act as pro-oxidants for reasons explained in the article I posted. Resveratrol supplements undermine some of the benefits of exercise as explained in a video here and I’ve read this from other sources as well.
                Yes, and the excitement exhibited by the researcher was enough to convince me that she had discovered something significant even in a petri dish. But they were human cells as I recall and I have no doubt the result will be proved in vivo in time. And while I acknowledge that there were analogues of resveratrol in the study, there was also just plain resveratrol in there as well. Unfortunately the study didn’t break down which analogues worked best on the splicing gene that restores senescent cells to a youthful state and/or how effective resveratrol alone was in the process, but I gotta believe it was substantial. And I’m no scientist (although I some times play one on the Internet ‘-) I think the effect on the senescent cells is separate from any anti-oxidant activity of resveratrol.

                When antioxidants are within a piece of fruit, for example, that antioxidant comes in a brilliant package containing more compounds than humans have even discovered, all design by nature herself to work synergistically. Better to eat grapes, eat cacao, etc. in which case not only will you receive only benefits from resveratrol with no negative side effects, but it will come in a package filled with other nutrients and antioxidants as well so you’ll get even more.

                I hadn’t read this article though and I did like it, it makes me feel even better about the resveratrol-rich foods I consume. Also probably a good ingredient in skin care which my all natural moisturizer contains from natural plant sources, so I did enjoy the article.

                I’ve stated before that “Nature” is just a compilation of plate techtonics, weather, mutations and epigenetics… but I get your meaning and am glad you at least “eat” your resveratrol.

                And I also eat cacao/chocolate, and drink green tea plus other things I don’t know that may have resveratrol within… but by the way you write I’m guessing you are a mature 20 something or a serious minded 30 something, and if correct, you probably don’t have many senescent cells.

                I on the other hand could harbor many of that ilk. ITBT, then I’ll be wanting to wake the little buggers up as soon as possible and get them back to doing their job.

                That’s why I’ll be taking a lot of resveratrol for the foreseeable future, with the expectation that in higher amounts, there will be enough getting through to recover the function of those cells gone senescent. ‘-)

                1. Well I have to say nature most certainly isn’t “just” anything summed up by any man or group of men. The complexities within food (plant foods) alone are so grand that they far exceed our understanding despite our best efforts. Nature is far beyond what we can grasp and should approach it with humility.

                  Now to step off my “nature is awesome” soapbox…

                  Since you’re taking resveratrol, have you taken any “before” photos, started a journal, etc.? Might as well experiment on yourself while you’re taking it. Aren’t you worried about it interfering with benefits of exercise though? https://nutritionfacts.org/video/resveratrol-impairs-exercise-benefits/

                  While I am thoroughly against taking resveratrol as a supplement, it’s easy to observe that some of the healthiest foods on the planet contain resveratrol and while that doesn’t necessarily mean anything, I find it hard to believe that it isn’t in some way, beneficial to humans as part of a whole food. I’ve also read about its topical use being good for the skin.

                  1. Now to step off my “nature is awesome” soapbox

                    “Nature” is awesome when it behaves… when it doesn’t (Mother) Nature is a bitch! ‘-)

                    Since you’re taking resveratrol, have you taken any “before” photos, started a journal, etc.? Might as well experiment on yourself while you’re taking it. Aren’t you worried about it interfering with benefits of exercise though? https://nutritionfacts.org/video/resveratrol-impairs-exercise-benefits/

                    Since you mention it, I can’t remember the last photo I took of myself… not really a selfie person. (Besides, ATM I am intentionally going scruffy as I may need to play a homeless person in a low-budget shoot I’m hoping to make late spring or early summer.)

                    But though I can’t definitively attribute anything to one specific supplement, I am able to wear pants (denims) I wore 30 years ago. Maybe 2 inches off the waist but I’m thinking it is visceral fat which is the best to lose. That’s about as close as I come to a journal. ‘-)

                    Still, I’m happy to share my health experience in these comments sections knowing all the time that many if not most already have their own workable health experience. But there may be a few out there that find my regimen resonates and they may pick something I do that’s useful.

                    As for resveratrol interfering with exercise, I don’t do that… well, except for some occasional push-ups off the window sill while boarding. But no walking or jogging as the road in front of my house is often busy with oil field traffic and there’s just no other good place to walk.

                    “Exercise” just consists of going from place to place doing outside chores or projects, and I notice no interference with that while on resveratrol.

                    While I am thoroughly against taking resveratrol as a supplement, it’s easy to observe that some of the healthiest foods on the planet contain resveratrol and while that doesn’t necessarily mean anything, I find it hard to believe that it isn’t in some way, beneficial to humans as part of a whole food. I’ve also read about its topical use being good for the skin.

                    I don’t disagree with your approach, however even if it were proven that I could eat just one or two things and get the results I need to achieve the restoration of senescent cells, I would probably continue with the resveratrol supplement. Reason is… time.

                    I’m afraid I’m wired as an Executive thinker. That is, I come up with new and varied interests and not enough time to finish them all… unless I live a long, long, long time. ‘-)

                  2. O.K. I confess to posting before going to watch the video you posted. I’m probably coming over as obstinate, but this doesn’t change my mind on resveratrol. Reason is, I think the senescent cell research trumps all other research. Not only that but the video mentioned no research on resveratrol and its role in affecting SIRT1. I’ve come to believe that SIRT1 (along with the FOX03 gene et al) are players on our gene board that will greatly affect longevity and is favorably affected by astaxanthan.

                    https://jabsom.hawaii.edu/research-university-of-hawaii-reports-ability-of-astaxanthin-to-significantly-activate-fox03-longevity-gene-in-mammals/

                    1. I respect your decision. I think the important thing is getting all the information in order to make as much of an informed decision as possible. The problem lies in people trusting the supplement industry and various internet hype and making their decisions from there. At least you started taking them based on a scientific study.

                      As far as the general public goes, I think people should be taught that the supplement industry should be taken with a supplemental grain of salt, and do their research before deciding.

                      Who knows, maybe Dr. Greger will hit on the subject of senescent cells.

                    2. As far as the general public goes, I think people should be taught that the supplement industry should be taken with a supplemental grain of salt, and do their research before deciding.

                      Agreed. And I also think anyone new to NF.o or not good at researching a product should observe and define who is a poster in these comments sections they can depend on to have researched safety and efficacy of a supplement before going down that path.

                      I have been paying attention to these things for many years, yet I am making a choice based on a post by alef1. And based on a post by you about yeast based beta glucans and your follow up research on how a company creates their product, I think you fall into that category along with many others.

                      Who knows, maybe Dr. Greger will hit on the subject of senescent cells.

                      I don’t think that subject is old enough… he seems to avoid anything so new and cutting edge. Maybe he would give it a line or two in an updated video on resveratrol.

                    3. I absolutely agree with you and I like your approach. Also thanks for the confidence! It’s important to me to never mislead anyone especially in terms of health. I don’t understand how some people do not share that same concern, though luckily the majority here do. I love the intelligence you can find in the comments on this site! I’ve found it helpful as well.

        1. Didn’t know that… but I guess he has to pay for that MD somehow.

          Anyway, whoever he is, I find it somewhat refreshing that an MD actually promotes supplementation.

          My doctors have some sort of app that tells them if any of the (many) supplements I take would interfere with medications they might try to prescribe.

        2. The Google founders found out that a search engine will be very useful and so they made it and started a company named Google to sell it. What a bunch of crooks. And they even rip off Liisa who uses the search engine several times a day.

      1. Lonie, I actually take ashwagandha for thyroid support (prior to going vegan and WFPB I had a mild thyroid issue due to severe poor health at one time and I chose to get off the harmful medication which makes your thyroid dependent). I wouldn’t just get it from any company though, I like Organic India best but also trust Gaia, both are pretty transparent and test for heavy metal contamination.
        NAC, along with other antioxidants supplementation, can counteract the benefits of exercise (it’s in one of the the videos here, I don’t think Dr. Greger verbally references it, but it’s in the writing in the video along with the names of other supplements tested), however I know there are studies on the effects it can have on mental health along with other positive attributes and I will actually take one if drinking (in which case I use solaray (veg caps) because it isn’t from wool or feathers and it’s a trusted brand). I would for Dr. Greger to look into NAC more. I’ve read that it can help protect your brain from anesthesia but according to what I remember from one of Dr. Greger’s videos, it can interfere with the increase of antioxidant activity one’s body does after undergoing stress. So I would wonder if the benefits of being protective to the brain would outweigh that after surgery. I would just like to understand more.
        I’d also love a video on adaptogen herbs such as ashwagandha and holy basil, and natural thyroid support.

        1. S, I find it interesting that we take some of the same supplements but for different reasons.

          That is, I take the NAC to protect my lungs and keep my airways clear. I also recall it being the precursor to glutathione, a powerful anti-oxidant. And yes, I do seem to remember reading that it is good to prevent hangovers. ‘-)

          The Ashwagandha I have taken for a long time based on it being a sleep aid, but recently learned it is a mimetic for both Metformin and Rapamycin. Both of those are prescription only, IIRC. Since learning this I have increased my dosage. I would go to my kitchen and check the brand but my kitchen is a cool 40ish degrees while my computer room where I make my distilled water is a toasty 56.5 degrees ATM. I’m pretty sure it is organic however, as I look for that when possible before I buy. It is identified as withaferin A in the data in the link below:

          https://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2017-11/brf-sfn112817.php

    2. Bugs, you should know that there are a lot of anti supplement morons on this board like the John above. And Dr Sears is regarded by the readers on this board as “meat doctor” and they will ignore his advices to their detriment.

        1. Cecibeck, Jerry Lewis is a notorious troll on this webiste. He is infamous for making false claims in the face of sound scientific evidence. His logic is he knows best despite having no credentials or real understanding of a subject. He advises people consume saturated fat and other harmful tips. And he’s above citing his sources, we should just take his word his outrageous claims.
          I only comment because some of his misinformation can be very dangerous and he has no problem shamelessly misleading people, and not everyone knows about his history and behavior here, so someone could take him seriously and possibly be misled.

      1. Jerry, no need to call people names. Please don’t comment if you cannot be respectful. There are valid reasons for and against supplementation. I myself supplement. But I see why others don’t. Sounds like you are eating a lot of plant food. Good job!

    3. Bugs

      Dr Sears is very well known and has written a number of popular books. However, like many other internet health entrepeneurs, his analyses and advice may be compromised by financial conflicts of interest. Each to their own, but I wouldn’t trust anybody selling stuff on the internet to provide expert, unbiased advice.

      A website I had not come across before, offers what seems to be some some pretty reasonable comments on Dr Sears

      “while Dr. Al Sears MD is a board-certified physician, this doesn’t mean that any of the therapies he provides or the supplements he sells are rooted in solid clinical science. Instead, like so many other supplements manufacturers, it seems that Dr. Sears takes 1 or 2 studies that:

      May not have been peer reviewed.
      May conflict with the wealth of other clinical studies already completed.
      May not ever have been repeated.
      May not have even been performed on humans, or in some instances, were performed only in a Petri dish.
      …and then extrapolates this to reach some conclusion that’s far outside the scope of the trials he’s referencing.

      Because of this lack of evidence, along with the very high prices associated with Dr. Al Sears’s therapies and supplements, we might recommend making a purchase only after thoughtful consideration and thorough research.”
      https://www.highya.com/dr-al-sears-md-reviews

    1. I speak English and French, though I am not fluent in French, so I’ve used google translate. Does not work very well for accurate translation in my experience. Sometimes it gets it right but sometimes it is way off.

    1. Eileen, it’s totally different than monosodium glutamate. Glutamic acid is actually a good thing and is naturally occurring in whole plant foods such as tomatoes, soy, and mushrooms. MSG is a synthetic additive that reacts entirely different.

      1. Thank you, S, for responding. I do understand the difference, however I avoid excess glutamate due to its effect on cancer (growth promotion) and am wondering how the glutamate in nutritional yeast has a favorable result on cancer while glutamate promotes its growth.

    2. Hi I’m a moderator with NutritionFacts. Thanks for your great question. Yeast products naturally contain glutamic acid. This is not the same as glutamate as an additive. From what I can tell, we may not know the exact mechanism of how beta glucan helps, but we do have the research to suggest the positive correlation. MSG is found in a lot of processed foods. There may be other issues with those foods besides just the MSG.

      NurseKelly

      1. Nurse Kelly,

        This is a very old memory so correct me if you know different.

        As I recall, I used to take glutamic acid because I believed it entered the Krebs Cycle and was converted into glutamate which had a beneficial effect of transporting something in the Krebs Cycle to perhaps be removed from the body somehow?

        As you stated, glutamate was not a good supplement to take but glutamic acid was acceptable.

  4. I crused through the Japanese article and in the graphs there were a few English words. Oddly, all the technical references at the end were in English.

  5. Thank you for this video. I was a devout plant-based eater for 5 years using a lot of nutritional yeast. I was recently diagnosed with Stage IV Colon Cancer with over 2 dozen tumors on liver. I stopped cooking during surgery recovery and ready to cook again. So glad to know the yeast is beneficial. I believe my plant based lifestyle has me in the best possible scenario for recovery. Undergoing the chemo now, but have added in many alternative treatments as well, marrying western and eastern remedies.

  6. Again when talking about beta glucan, why does the good doctor keep zooming on nutritional yeast and not mushroom? Beta glucan from mushroom is more potent and can bind to cancer cells. And mushroom is a whole food while nutritional yeast is a processed food. Don’t get me wrong, I consume both nutritional yeast and mushroom everyday.

    And if you google for “beta glucan mushroom cancer”, you will find plenty of papers and trials and you don’t have to look for a Japanese paper.

    Luckily Dr G does not sell supplement or otherwise the TAT TG guy will accuse him of snake oil salesman peddling his supplements.

    http://www.superbetaglucan.com/faq

    What is Mushroom Beta Glucan?

    Mushroom Beta Glucan is the beta 1,3;1,6 D-glucan extracted from the medicinal mushrooms. Structure wise, mushroom beta glucan is a carbohydrate polymer with chain of glucose molecules bonded by beta-glycosidic linkages. It is one of the main components of the cell wall in most mushrooms. These polymers have a diverse structural variability including molecular weight, linkage patterns, and degree of branching, triple helical conformation and water solubility. In terms of application, mushroom derived beta glucan have been claimed to be more versatile due to the water solubility nature that can be isolated without any organic/inorganic solvent such as ethanol.

    What are the differences between mycelial biomass and mushroom beta glucan?

    Mycelial biomasses are alternative, label dressing terms for grind-down mushroom powder which contains approximately 40% fiber and 60% protein content when moisture is taken off the equation. On the other hand, mushroom beta glucan is the unique carbohydrate component within the mushrooms that are bioavailable by binding the the receptors of the innate immune cells. The composition of the mushroom beta glucan within a mushroom is approximately <0.1%.

    1. Jerry

      I know that your purpose here is to disparage Dr G and nf.org but this is video about nutritional yeast and cancer. The title says so. Why would it discuss beta glucans in mushrooms?

      In any case, some evidence seems to suggest yeast beta glucan has a superior anti-cancer effect compared to mushroom beta glucan whatever somebody selling mushroom beta glucan may claim. Your apparent willingness to believe any and all health claims by people selling stuff on the internet is only matched by your unwillingness to believe the evidence summaries produced by expert scientists on a whole range of issues.

      1. Tom – the point about Jerry Lewis is that he never wants to miss an opportunity to attack anyone and everyone for anything whenever possible. He’s so dumb he doesn’t get that Greger has already done mushroom videos and recommends them heartily. He’s so dumb that he doesn’t get that this particular topic just happens to be about nutritional yeast. He’s so dumb he doesn’t get that a 5-7 minute video can’t cover all side topics or even one topic in it entirety. He’s so dumb that he doesn’t get that his nastiness just serves to shoot himself in the foot. He’s so dumb that he can’t follow perfectly rational conversations.
        Jerry Lewis is just simply dumb.
        Dumb, dumb, and dumber than dumb. :-).

        Ah! now I feel better !! :-).

  7. In light of the flu epidemic that is going on now, I don’t want to not recommend flu vaccine although myself and my family are not taking it. So why taking flu vaccine when it is only 30% effective? Because it will trigger people immune system although it is not the vaccine for the correct flu strain. Some people immune system is so weak that they need a booster from a vaccine.

    Alternatively, you can eat a lot of nutritional yeast and/or mushroom to boost your immune system. I consume a lot of mushrooms as well as taking a supplement and I don’t even have a minor cold or headache for like 5 years.

    http://time.com/5105929/why-is-the-flu-so-bad-2018/

    1. Jerry,
      What kind of mushrooms do you eat? In my grocery store the only ones available are porta bella and shitake. I heard David Wolfe on one of his lectures on YouTube say that Porta Bella mushrooms have no nutritional value. Paul Stamets the famous mycologist sells dehydrated mushroom dust in capsule form in thousands of health food stores around the world. Paul Stamets has also lectured and written many articles and a few books on the subject of medicinal mushrooms. However, after listening to Paul Stamets lectures on YouTube, I can’t recall him ever mentioning anything about Porta Bella mushrooms. He goes into detail about all kinds of exotic mushrooms such as turkey tail mushrooms, cordyceps, and so on. So, my question to you is do you eat the whole food mushroom or the dust in a capsule manufactured by Paul Stamets and company? And which mushrooms do you consume? By the way, I thought it was funny about the wise crack one of the forum users said that you should start a Jerry Lewis nutrion facts.org webpage. No offense. It was just funny. I think all of us are starting to get use to you. One user told me to stop feeding the troll. Well, I hope I don’t feed you to much with this forum comment. Ha ha ha

      1. Funny that now you ask me for my advice after calling me a troll and trashing me. All mushrooms are beneficial more or less and each one of them upregulates your gene expression in a different way and so it is important that you eat a variety of them. The theory is that you were born with certain gene, let say cancer, but the disease can sleep for the rest of your life if you upregulate it with foods. It all well researched if you look under mushroom or beta glucan while the poor Dr G is looking for “nutritional yeast cancer” and he found just one study written in Japanese.

        https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15134902

        I eat whole mushrooms every day with my bone broth soup, mind you. I rarely eat Porta Bella simply because it is more expensive and secondly I have a hunch it is not a good mushroom to fight diseases just based of the look. Porta Bella is a nice looking and big mushroom and my intuition says that any food that is big and nice looking is no good.

        I also take a supplement which is a cocktail of mushrooms including cordyceps. It’s not made and sold by Paul Stamets.

      2. Shiitake mushrooms are excellent for boosting the immune system, and Dr. Gregor has a video on white mushrooms and their benefits.

      3. John, Dr. Greger has some great videos on mushrooms here. In one, he says which is the healthiest. The one that comes in second place is white button which is the same as cremini/baby bella. White button turns into cremini/baby bell which eventually grows into portabella. Portabella most certainly isn’t void of nutrients but I believe that white button and cremini have more. According to cronometer, 1 portabella mushroom cooked from fresh at 55 grams contains the following based on %DV: 9% fiber, 8% B1, 30% B2, 52% B3, 33% B5, 15% B6, 2% B12 (though growing methods vary so mushrooms aren’t a reliable source of B12), 8% folate, 3% vitamin D (again, not a reliable source, from my understanding it depends on if the mushrooms were exposed to sunlight on whether or not there will be any vit. d), 50% copper (copper is good and safe when from whole plant foods), 3% iron, 5% magnesium, 5% manganese, 24% phosphorus, 12% potassium (more than a banana, correct?), 50% selenium, 10% zinc, and 8% protein containing some amounts of every single essential amino acid. Not bad for a single mushroom!

        1. Oh no I’m sorry, that was for 1 cooked and 1 raw. Here is what a single cooked one has (god I wish there were an edit button!):

          5% fiber, 4% B1, 20% B2, 25% B3, 14% B5, 5% B6, 3% folate, 1% vit. d, 24% copper, 1% iron, 2% magnesium, 2% manganese, 11% phosphorus, 5% potassium, 22% selenium, 4% zinc, 4% protein containing some amounts of every single essential amino acid. And only 18 calories.

          Here are a couple great videos on mushrooms including the one where he says which is healthiest:

          https://nutritionfacts.org/video/boosting-immunity-while-reducing-inflammation/

          https://nutritionfacts.org/video/the-best-mushroom-2/

        2. Shaylen,

          Thank you for that encouraging information on porta bella mushrooms. I’ll continue eating them. As a matter of fact I had some today for lunch.

  8. Hello doctor Greger and collaborators, I know this is off topic, but it would be interesting if you can make a video about mycotoxins in nuts. It worries me since I eat a handful of them everyday. Thank you!

    1. I was taught at Optimum Health Institute in San Diego to soak all nuts and seeds overnight and then dehydrate them to release them of toxins. I have been doing that for 3 years now. Not sure if it has helped but I do it because it makes some sense to me (I’m not a doctor or nutritionist though).

      1. Hi Joanna, thanks a lot for the quick reply, yes I have just read that too. Well in my case I’ve never soaked any nuts or seeds, I consume ground flax seeds which come in a sealed pack so I assume it should be safe. As for walnuts and almonds, I buy them fresh at a local store and they look just fine, no visible mold or anything like that. I keep them in a closed glass container and so far never had any problem in these 3 years. In my opinion soaking is complicated because without proper dehydration later, fungus may appear. And by dehydration I think you mean heating them in the oven, something that may change the structure of the fatty acids, which I’m not sure if its healthy, I think Dr Greger said that raw nuts are much better in one of his videos.

        1. Hi Federico, the health institute I went to is very up on the most healthy way to do things that seem to agree with almost everything Dr. Greger says. That is why I follow Dr. Greger. I soak overnight no matter how great the nuts are. Then I drain them and put them in my dehydrator (an excelsior, which I believe to be one of the best) at only 105 degrees. Nothing any higher than 105 or nutrients are lost. 105 degrees keeps the nutrients. Some nuts take one day but most take 2-4 days. I think it is worth the effort so I do it. :)

      2. @Joanna- Did they ever say what toxins are being removed? I’m always very skeptical when I hear either ‘toxin’ or ‘cleanse’ being thrown around. If they didn’t elaborate then I would be concerned about the water soluble components of the nuts being lost in the soaking and draining process…

  9. Been taking Beta Glucans for years. Since before I knew about Dr. Greger or the importance of a plant based diet.

    The studies I’m familiar with all use supplements. My current supplement is 100mg. That’s quite a bit lower than many recommendations. For maintenance it’s probably plenty. If you’re sick you may need a lot more.

    Beta Glucans is apparently frequently given to post operative patients to help with healing and reduce infection. So even the medical community recognizes the efficacy of Beta Glucans supplementation.

  10. White button mushrooms, portobello mushrooms, raw, cooked, or dried and ground?. Are these helpful, if so– what format is best? Meaning is raw better then cooked? They are available in every grocery store. Does it have to be a fancy name mushroom from a foreign country, or in a capsule that has been processed. I’m interested in a serious helpful answer. (I’m way too old for some of the remarks that pop up– I’m in my 80’s–WFPB. ). I personally have raw and/or steamed mushrooms listed everyday because I love them and easily obtainable. Maybe that’s one of the reasons I feel well. (And oatmeal every morning, with blueberries and ground Flax — just dump this in a bowl with homemade almond milk–let set and eat. No cooking oatmeal). Be well friends.

    1. Pat, all mushrooms have some toxins which are deactivated by cooking. So raw is not a good idea.
      Of course, there are some so toxic that even cooking won’t help. But everyone is aware of that.
      Dr. Weil, for instance, has an article discussing why mushrooms need to be cooked.

      1. Dr. Greger does have a video explaining the toxin in raw mushrooms that is deactivated during mild cooking. But it’s my understanding that the way they studied this toxin and its effects was by extracting and isolating the toxin and testing it directly. But you could do that with any negative compound from any food, take for example cyanide in flax… obviously pure cyanide from the flax would be harmful, but the flax itself containing some amount is not harmful. Based on my knowledge on the subject, there doesn’t seem to be any justifiable reason to assume raw mushroom consumption would be harmful, but Dr. Greger does advise cooking them. I had read that they have a hard cell wall that isn’t easy to digest when raw though, but I don’t know how true that is nor do I remember where I read it… probably a blog somewhere.
        I eat mushrooms both cooked and raw, mostly cooked but sometimes I blend a raw one or two (or three…) in a smoothie which isn’t as disgusting as it sounds (at least not to me) so long as it’s mixed with other fruits and veggies.

        Here’s a great video on the benefits of mushrooms you might like if you haven’t already seen it:

        https://nutritionfacts.org/video/boosting-immunity-while-reducing-inflammation/

          1. Shaylen,

            Yes, that is the first time I have ever seen this video on mushrooms and Ergothioneine. I have never heard of Ergotioneine untl watching this video by Dr. Greger. As I was watching this video I started thinking about how much knowledge Dr. Greger must have in the area of nutrition. I think he must be number ONE because he is the only person that I know who is daily searching the research and then teaching it back to thousands of people on the internet. But, getting back to ergothioneine….Dr Greger did not specify what mushrooms contain it. He simply said that mushrooms in general have the highest amount of Ergotioneine….so I am going to assume that one of my favorite maligned mushrooms, PORTA BELLA, must also have a lot of ergothioneine. Knowing that gives me the motivation to continue to eat porta bella mushrooms despite what David Wolfe has negatively said about them, and Paul Stamets lack of information on porta bella mushrooms.

            1. Hi John. I agree, I often refer to Dr. Greger as one of the most well researched M.D’s on nutritional science, but honestly I wouldn’t be surprised if he was the number one. He is definitely my most trusted… He doesn’t just give you the information, he teaches you and teaches you what to look for in a study.
              According to the video it looks as though ergothioneine is high in all mushrooms, as I was browsing the comments section just now, I noticed someone say that it wasn’t as high in all mushrooms but was highest in oyster mushrooms and another mushroom which I’m unfamiliar with. However, I just found this article that states porticini mushrooms have the highest content while more common mushrooms like white button have less but still significantly higher than other foods: http://news.psu.edu/story/491477/2017/11/09/research/mushrooms-are-full-antioxidants-may-have-anti-aging-potential
              There are many reasons to continue eating them. The portablella mushroom essentially came in second place in Dr. Greger’s rating of healthiest mushrooms (specifically it was white button, but white button is the young version of a portabella as Dr. Greger explains). Mushrooms in general are amazing for the immune system and also contain glutathione as the article above explains.
              And they’re such a great source of important nutrients such as selenium and b vitamins. I’m sure even more will be discovered about mushrooms, but just based on what is known, it’s insane to me that anyone would try to state they didn’t have nutrition! A portabella contains less than 20 calories yet packs an impressive amount of b vitamins and essential minerals.

              1. Shaylen,

                Thank you for that information. I am going to go to the grocery store and buy some white button mushrooms tomorrow. Also, I am going to go over to YouTube to figure out how to cook them, because in the past I would only eat them raw.

                1. If I’m not adding them to a recipe I’m cooking, my preferred way of cooking them is by lightly steaming them. I don’t use much water because when cooked, mushrooms make their own juices. White button and baby bella are sooo good steamed. The juice they produce is amazing as well, even on its own, it just tastes like really good soup.

                1. John, see my simple rice and mushroom recipe following. (Broth is both vegan and non-vegan, meat or vegg based, but way too salty. Available in all grocery establishments.) (Just take a pile of washed, clean vegetables of your choice, cook for a long time then strain, — this is veggie broth without the added items that some manufacturers include. Keep it simple. I love the rice recipe that is just too easy to pass by. Be well– it’s so important. Pat

                2. thanks for the link John. Not all broth is vegan, but vegetable broth usually is. Just read the ingredients and make sure it’s only veggies and herbs. I like low sodium veg broth by Pacific Foods. A lot of broth has quite a lot of salt so I’d always get the low sodium. I think just a tiny amount of plain water does just fine myself, and there is zero salt in that. It’s also pretty easy to make your own vegetable broth too, which is my favorite. I don’t often make it, but when I do I just throw in celery, carrots, garlic, onions, parsley, mushrooms, green onions, etc. I also like using a collard leaf or two, and have always used a bay leaf as per traditional recommendations though I’m not sure if it makes a difference in flavor, then I let cook and eventually, it is broth.

      2. Marilyn, thank you. I am aware of the toxins. One of my favorite ways to consume/cook them (after washing, of course). Is to slice them and place them in my rice cooker with short grain organic brown rice, add a few pieces of garlic ,(peeled and diced– not put of a jar), and that’s it. The moisture released from the mushrooms is absorbed into the rice instead of into the atmosphere when steaming on the range top. I’ve shared this old timer recipe with many who have learned to enjoy this. Have some cooked beans (your choice)(yes, I cook them myself) on hand (beans& grains) , a nice sprinkle of nutritional yeast on top–a salad to go with it with greens of your choice. Depending on the mood, a dash of vinegar on the salad and maybe a pepper sauce (Tab) judiciously used. It’s just so simple. Be well friends. Health is wealth.

  11. Every time Dr. Greger brings up nutritional yeast and popcorn, it makes me want to go make some popcorn with nutritional yeast!! Lol.

    Coincidentally, just before seeing this new video, I received my Sari foods unfortified nutritional yeast. The unfortified tastes so much better to me! I also liked Kal’s unfortified a lot, but I have to say Sari’s is the best nutritional yeast I’ve ever tasted. The nutritional value of this stuff is amazing, too, so the title couldn’t be more fitting. Some brands seem to have more of certain nutrients than others even in the unfortified, I’m going to have to learn why that is. I used to only use this stuff when treating myself because I was worried about the synthetic folic acid, so now that I have the unfortified I’ll be able to enjoy it more often – love it on beans! If anyone reading has never tried it, I highly suggest sprinkling it on beans, especially black beans. Black beans with chopped green onions and nutritional yeast is one of my favorite dishes.

    1. Sari and Kal brands are non-gmo. BRAGG’s, when I contacted them, told me they used something that was gmo in the process but it did not show up in the final product when tested. I really don’t remember their full explanation, I actually believe their container does say non-gmo though.

  12. “…for cancer”? I believe we should be doing things against cancer, not for cancer. “For cancer patients” would be better. Love the content, but gotcha on the exact wording. I understood what you intended to say, and so did everybody else. I just thought I would be picky and unreasonable.

  13. Totally off subject, but I tried searching all over for an answer and I can’t seem to find anything on it and thought someone here might be able to help. My question is, how long does it take for the harmful smoke from cooking meat (specifically, fish) to clear out out of the oven before it’s safe to cook plant foods in the same oven? My concern is the food getting the harmful smoke on or in it. Unfortunately my oven is not solely used by plant based eaters or vegans :(

  14. Are there any restrictions regarding combining nutritional yeast with other foods or cooking methods relating to its efficacy? For instance preparing in a hot tea, soup, or an oil and vinegar dressing?

    1. There shouldn’t be. The idea of certain foods needing to be eaten separately or only combined with certain foods is a myth. There’s actually benefits to combining different foods together. Since Dr. Greger talks about sprinkling it over this and that, I think that implies that you can consume it in any way you’d prefer.

      I’ve also used it in vinegar and oil dressings and love it. Another one of my favorite things to do is blend it with cashews or seeds (sunflower, pumpkin and hemp are my favorites to use) or both, which makes a great vegan parmesan and I often use it in salads which makes a creamy dressing when mixed with a touch of vinegar, no oil needed.

  15. Dear Dr. Greger, I read the whole Japanse paper and while searching a bit further and according to
    “nutramunity, http://www.nutramunity.com/what-is-nutramunity/compare-beta-glucans/” there is a difference between Beta 1,3/1,4 Glucans and 1,3/1,6 glucans, the former apparently just improves cholesterol levels and the latter is effective for prevention of cancer recurrence and or improved cancer survival rates. So if your followup video could cover the quality of the various Beta glucan extracts to determine if simple bakers or instant (dry)yeast is indeed the one to help the immune system against cancer that would be fantastic. It is now 8 years ago that I started reading up on how to survive cancer once I get it (because it seemed everybody will get it some day), these days and since two years ago I found your website I no longer think that of course and am highly informed about what nutrition to take. Now I mostly research for friends and people in general to help them make informed choices as the medical institutions only advice pills and chemicals and have no knowledge of nutrition at all. My friends wife just had her both breasts removed and is about to chemo herself coming Monday as that is the only “best” option the medical community has for her.

  16. Have you done anything on leg cramps or Charlie horses. I seem to get these every night while sleeping and sometimes throughout the day. Please let me know.

    1. jocelyn, I would definitely take Dr. Ben’s advice but wanted to share that I actually used to have the same issue. I would wake up sometimes and my calves would have such tight knots it would be cripplingly painful until they finally went away after about 30 seconds maybe. I have no idea what the cause was for me, but ever sense switching to a WFPB diet and regularly incorporating all the foods Dr. Greger recommends in his Daily Dozen, that just doesn’t happen to me anymore. That was just one among many issues I used to have. Knowing what I know now, I probably had an electrolyte imbalance and all kinds of deficiencies prior to switching my diet. I also contribute it to consistent daily exercise and in particular I’ve found regular yoga and stretching to make a huge difference in regards to charlie horses, “knots,” and stiffness in my ankles. I suspect I was not getting good blood flow either, prior to going vegan and then WFPB vegan. Diet is the most important but stretching and exercise is really helpful in addition to a proper diet.

  17. You could have an electrolyte imbalance that may be corrected with a WFPB diet. Have you tried this? Also, have you seen your doctor for blood studies to make sure there is no other underlying cause of the problem? If not, you should.

    Dr. Ben

  18. Is Bragg’s Nutritional Yeast Seasoning the same as a product labeled just Nutritional Yeast. Does the seasoning have the beta glucans?

  19. Dudley,

    Great question….. short answer is yes….. the seasoning is nutritional yeast grown on their proprietary media. Their site does claim beta glucans are present.

    For a bit more on some of the differences in nutritional yeast see the wiki post.

    Dr. Alan Kadish Health Support Volunteer
    for Dr. Greger

  20. Most nutritional yeast has folic acid (i.e., artificial folate). Is it correct that folic acid promotes tumor growth? If so, then is it important to buy nutritional yeast that it not “fortified” with folic acid?

  21. Hi, ehansen. The short answer to your question is yes, folic acid can be harmful, and it would be better to use products that are not fortified with it. For more on that subject, you may want to see this video, if you have not already done so. That said, because it is a slow enzyme issue that is involved in conversion of folic acid to folate in the liver, it seems likely the negative effects are dose-dependent. The amount of folic acid in a typical serving of fortified nutritional yeast is about 160 micrograms, less than half the Daily Value of 400 mcg for adults, whereas folic acid supplements often provide a 1 mg/1000 mcg dose, which is more than double the Daily Value. You would have to eat a lot of nutritional yeast to get that much folic acid. The smaller the dose, the less likely it is to cause a problem, in my opinion. If you can find nutritional yeast that is fortified with folate and not folic acid, that is great, but if not, it may not be a concern due to the low dose. I hope that helps!

  22. Hi, I am so grateful to you. I think that following your advice has prolonged my life.
    I have a question regarding the safety of nutricianal yeast. I ordered some nutricianal yeast and wanted to see if it could still be alive. So a took flower, sugar, water rolled it into two patties, put the nutricianal yeast in one patty and did not in the other patty. The patty with nutricianal yeast puffed up while the one without did not. So I realised the nutricianal yeast I had bought was still alive.
    This brings me to my question. I read somewhere (I don’t know how credible they were) that if you eat live nutricianal yeast that is alive, it eats the food in your digestive track and steals from your nourishment. Is there any truth to this? They made it sound quite concerning.
    With deepest respect

  23. Nutritional yeast is treated with heat, then washed and dried specifically to kill off the yeast. Although your meal puffed up, there is not much life left in nutritional yeast. I think the best approach when there is a theory like this is to sort out whether there is evidence of harm to specific outcomes. So, in this example, if we’re worried that nutritional yeast could consume nutrients, we’d look to see if there’s evidence of nutritional deficiencies related to consuming nutritional yeast. There is not, thankfully. Nutritional yeast has a variety of helpful micronutrients and is safe to eat. Best to you! -Dr Anderson, Health Support Volunteer

    1. Thank you so much Dr. Anderson, I am so grateful for your time. Part of the problem is that I don’t live in the USA so I am not sure if what I am buying is the same product. If it does turn out to be live are their any studies you can share show I don’t have much to worry about?
      Respectfully,
      Lale

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