Is Nutritional Yeast Healthy for Everyone?

Is Nutritional Yeast Healthy for Everyone?
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Those with certain autoimmune diseases such as Crohn’s disease should probably not eat nutritional yeast.

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Below is an approximation of this video’s audio content. To see any graphs, charts, graphics, images, and quotes to which Dr. Greger may be referring, watch the above video.

Thousands of years ago, some yeast floated down into our flour and drinks, and we were like, hmm; yummy, and we’ve been regularly exposed ever since. Not a problem for most people, but even non-disease-causing microbes could potentially trigger autoimmune diseases like Crohn’s disease in people who are susceptible, because their finely tuned immune balance is somehow off. Maybe that’s why bakers have the highest Crohn’s disease mortality, and, from a different data set, among the highest rates of Crohn’s disease. Perhaps a “hypersensitivity to…yeast” may be “play[ing] a role in Crohn’s disease.”

If you take people with Crohn’s, and remove from their diets the three foods to which they have the most antibodies to try to calm their disease, and then you add those foods back, you can “provoke the symptoms” back—restimulate the inflammation. So, anal fistula off those foods, nice and dry, but then starts oozing again once the foods are back. But then, the spigot’s turned back off once the foods are removed again—to which I say, “Why is that doctor not wearing gloves?”

Anyway, without a control group, you can’t exclude the possibility of a really powerful placebo effect. But there haven’t been any such randomized controlled trials—until now.

A brilliant design; they tested people with Crohn’s for antibodies to 16 different foods, and then randomized the people in two groups. Both groups were told to avoid four foods, but one group was told to avoid the four foods they most reacted to, and the other group told to avoid the foods they least reacted to. But, it was all done with “sealed envelope[s]”; so, no one knew who was in which group until the end. So, did it matter?

Yes, more than twice the probability of major clinical improvement in the group that was told to stay away from the things their blood reacted to. But, this wasn’t just yeast. In fact, it was the “exclusion of milk, pork, beef, and egg [that] was most strongly associated with [clinical] improvement”—leading the researchers to suggest that look, maybe instead of doing all the fancy blood tests, we should just tell our patients to cut out meat and eggs and see how they do, which would be consistent with both population studies that associate animal fat with an increased risk of inflammatory bowel diseases, as well as interventional studies, showing that a plant-based diet, in which you cut meat down to like one serving every two weeks, can drop relapse rates as low as an extraordinary 8% over two years.

Okay, but, what about the whole yeast question? Can’t you just stick some yeast up someone’s butt and see what happens? Why yes; yes, you can. They tested “rectal exposure to six” different foods in Crohn’s disease patients, including yeast. Kind of like a skin prick test, but instead of pricking the skin, they pricked the inside of people’s rectums with various foods. And, you can see in this example, the various prick sites—cabbage, milk, citrus, cereal, peanut, but whoa, yeast. Yeast gave the most significant reaction in Crohn’s patients.

So, it appears that baker’s yeast, which is the same yeast as brewer’s yeast and nutritional yeast, may indeed have disease-causing importance in Crohn’s disease. But the good news would then be hey, it “may [have] therapeutic relevance.” Maybe if you put Crohn’s patients on a yeast-free diet, they’d feel better. You don’t know until you put it to the test.

In fact, that’s exactly what the original study linking yeast and Crohn’s yeast suggested back in 1988. “A controlled trial of a yeast free diet for…Crohn’s disease [patients] may…be worthwhile.” So, why did it take years before such a study was done? Who’s going to fund it—Big Soda-Bread? Thankfully, there are charities, like the National Association for Colitis and Crohn’s disease, willing to put up the dough—the yeast-free dough, that is.

19 patients with Crohn’s disease ate their regular diet, and then switched to a yeast-exclusion diet. And, there was a significantly higher CDAI (Crohn’s disease activity index), assessing symptoms like abdominal pain and diarrhea during the period when they were eating yeast, compared to the yeast-free period. So, worse disease activity with yeast than without. Yeah, but what was this yeast-free diet? They didn’t just cut out bread and beer; they like switched people from dairy milk to soy milk, from white flour to whole wheat. Just cutting out milk can sometimes help with inflammatory bowel disease.

So, with so many dietary changes, how do we know what role the yeast played? This is how we know what role the yeast played. After placing them on the new yeast-free diet, they then challenged them with a placebo or a capsule of yeast. A tiny amount of yeast, like giving them a quarter-teaspoon of nutritional yeast a day, and that made them worse—suggesting “yeast may [indeed] be important in the [disease process] of Crohn’s disease.

Now, for the vast majority of people, yeast is not a problem, but “in susceptible individuals [it may trigger] an abnormal immune response” in the gut. But wait, I thought it was the paratuberculosis bug that was considered a trigger for Crohn’s disease. Well, hey, maybe infection with paraTB is what “induces [the] hypersensitivity response to dietary yeast.” Who knows? The bottom line is that people with Crohn’s disease should not go out of their way to add baker’s, brewer’s, or nutritional yeast to their diet.

Please consider volunteering to help out on the site.

Icons created by parkjisun, Milky, and Anna Hatzisavas from The Noun Project.

Image credit: Kristina DeMuth. Image has been modified.

Motion graphics by Avocado Video

Below is an approximation of this video’s audio content. To see any graphs, charts, graphics, images, and quotes to which Dr. Greger may be referring, watch the above video.

Thousands of years ago, some yeast floated down into our flour and drinks, and we were like, hmm; yummy, and we’ve been regularly exposed ever since. Not a problem for most people, but even non-disease-causing microbes could potentially trigger autoimmune diseases like Crohn’s disease in people who are susceptible, because their finely tuned immune balance is somehow off. Maybe that’s why bakers have the highest Crohn’s disease mortality, and, from a different data set, among the highest rates of Crohn’s disease. Perhaps a “hypersensitivity to…yeast” may be “play[ing] a role in Crohn’s disease.”

If you take people with Crohn’s, and remove from their diets the three foods to which they have the most antibodies to try to calm their disease, and then you add those foods back, you can “provoke the symptoms” back—restimulate the inflammation. So, anal fistula off those foods, nice and dry, but then starts oozing again once the foods are back. But then, the spigot’s turned back off once the foods are removed again—to which I say, “Why is that doctor not wearing gloves?”

Anyway, without a control group, you can’t exclude the possibility of a really powerful placebo effect. But there haven’t been any such randomized controlled trials—until now.

A brilliant design; they tested people with Crohn’s for antibodies to 16 different foods, and then randomized the people in two groups. Both groups were told to avoid four foods, but one group was told to avoid the four foods they most reacted to, and the other group told to avoid the foods they least reacted to. But, it was all done with “sealed envelope[s]”; so, no one knew who was in which group until the end. So, did it matter?

Yes, more than twice the probability of major clinical improvement in the group that was told to stay away from the things their blood reacted to. But, this wasn’t just yeast. In fact, it was the “exclusion of milk, pork, beef, and egg [that] was most strongly associated with [clinical] improvement”—leading the researchers to suggest that look, maybe instead of doing all the fancy blood tests, we should just tell our patients to cut out meat and eggs and see how they do, which would be consistent with both population studies that associate animal fat with an increased risk of inflammatory bowel diseases, as well as interventional studies, showing that a plant-based diet, in which you cut meat down to like one serving every two weeks, can drop relapse rates as low as an extraordinary 8% over two years.

Okay, but, what about the whole yeast question? Can’t you just stick some yeast up someone’s butt and see what happens? Why yes; yes, you can. They tested “rectal exposure to six” different foods in Crohn’s disease patients, including yeast. Kind of like a skin prick test, but instead of pricking the skin, they pricked the inside of people’s rectums with various foods. And, you can see in this example, the various prick sites—cabbage, milk, citrus, cereal, peanut, but whoa, yeast. Yeast gave the most significant reaction in Crohn’s patients.

So, it appears that baker’s yeast, which is the same yeast as brewer’s yeast and nutritional yeast, may indeed have disease-causing importance in Crohn’s disease. But the good news would then be hey, it “may [have] therapeutic relevance.” Maybe if you put Crohn’s patients on a yeast-free diet, they’d feel better. You don’t know until you put it to the test.

In fact, that’s exactly what the original study linking yeast and Crohn’s yeast suggested back in 1988. “A controlled trial of a yeast free diet for…Crohn’s disease [patients] may…be worthwhile.” So, why did it take years before such a study was done? Who’s going to fund it—Big Soda-Bread? Thankfully, there are charities, like the National Association for Colitis and Crohn’s disease, willing to put up the dough—the yeast-free dough, that is.

19 patients with Crohn’s disease ate their regular diet, and then switched to a yeast-exclusion diet. And, there was a significantly higher CDAI (Crohn’s disease activity index), assessing symptoms like abdominal pain and diarrhea during the period when they were eating yeast, compared to the yeast-free period. So, worse disease activity with yeast than without. Yeah, but what was this yeast-free diet? They didn’t just cut out bread and beer; they like switched people from dairy milk to soy milk, from white flour to whole wheat. Just cutting out milk can sometimes help with inflammatory bowel disease.

So, with so many dietary changes, how do we know what role the yeast played? This is how we know what role the yeast played. After placing them on the new yeast-free diet, they then challenged them with a placebo or a capsule of yeast. A tiny amount of yeast, like giving them a quarter-teaspoon of nutritional yeast a day, and that made them worse—suggesting “yeast may [indeed] be important in the [disease process] of Crohn’s disease.

Now, for the vast majority of people, yeast is not a problem, but “in susceptible individuals [it may trigger] an abnormal immune response” in the gut. But wait, I thought it was the paratuberculosis bug that was considered a trigger for Crohn’s disease. Well, hey, maybe infection with paraTB is what “induces [the] hypersensitivity response to dietary yeast.” Who knows? The bottom line is that people with Crohn’s disease should not go out of their way to add baker’s, brewer’s, or nutritional yeast to their diet.

Please consider volunteering to help out on the site.

Icons created by parkjisun, Milky, and Anna Hatzisavas from The Noun Project.

Image credit: Kristina DeMuth. Image has been modified.

Motion graphics by Avocado Video

Doctor's Note

I introduced this topic in Does Nutritional Yeast Trigger Crohn’s Disease?, then took a bit of a tangent with Is Candida Syndrome Real? Next, I finish up this series talking about another autoimmune disease that appears to be affected: Dietary Cure for Hidradenitis Suppurativa.

For more on Crohn’s, see Preventing Crohn’s Disease With Diet and Dietary Treatment of Crohn’s Disease.

And paratubercuwhat? See Does Paratuberculosis in Milk Trigger Type 1 Diabetes?

If you haven’t yet, you can subscribe to my videos for free by clicking here.

107 responses to “Is Nutritional Yeast Healthy for Everyone?

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    1. Antibodies to yeast are highly specific for Crohn’s disease and not ulcerative colitis, and can help diagnose Crohn’s when patients present inflammatory bowel disease (1
      2!
      3</a.
      4), and food containing raw yeast leads to more frequent problems in Crohn’s patients than with ulcerative colitis (5). There haven’t been trials of yeast free diets or yeast supplements in patients with ulcerative colitis, as there have been with Crohn’s.




      7
      1. Marko,

        There are indeed a number of tests available. The tests include both taking a look at the intestinal tract (endoscopy) and sampling (biopsy) to a number of the newer antibody assays and some common blood tests that may help with direction toward ruling out other disorders. Also the use of a CDSA test can be helpful. The CrohnsColitis foundation has a site with some additional info on diagnosis you might find useful.

        Dr. Alan Kadish moderator for Dr. Greger http://www.Centerofhealth.com




        0
  1. On a related note, there are anecdotal reports that legumes can also trigger auto-immune diseases (not necessarily Crohn’s). I’d like to hear Dr. Gregor’s comments on this.

    Thanks.




    4
  2. Would you please, at some time in the future, talk about dietary factors that may have an effect on psoriasis. This is something that I ‘believe been dealing with since I was 15 years old (now just shy of 64). The only thing that has truly worked is Humera, which is now not available to me.




    5
    1. Hi Marc, as a nutritionist who specializes in skin disorders and also as someone who used to have severe psoriasis, this skin condition tends to be a gut and liver issue. I also test for food sensitivities. Topical creams do not address the root issue. Hope that helps.




      4
      1. Actually, topical mTOR inhibitors, which suppress a cellular regulatory hub for growth signalling, do help (1, 2, 3). Alas topical rapamycin (Sirolimus) isn’t approved, but Google tells me some dermatologists have prescribed it through compounding pharmacies for more severe skin disorders.

        As for diet, I’d suspect other dietary anti-inflammatories (like turmeric and green tea) might help, but I haven’t found trials. Clinical trials seem to have focused on weight loss (4) and fish oil, vitamin D, B12, and selenium supplementation (5).




        7
    2. Marc, I am not a doctor but you mention Humera which is an arthritis drug, and so I guess that you have psoriasis arthritis. I suggest you to try to avoid the drug Humera if you can as it has tons of side effects but eat foods that counter arthritis, among them is turmeric, lot of vegetables, good fish oil with a lot of DHA, coconut oil.

      https://www.psoriasis.org/about-psoriasis

      https://coconutoil.com/coconut-oil-proven-beneficial-for-healing-rheumatoid-arthritis-and-other-autoimmune-diseases/

      https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3650498/

      http://www.arthritis.org/living-with-arthritis/treatments/natural/supplements-herbs/guide/fish-oil.php




      4
        1. It’s an obsolete theory from the 70s that never died. Read the following to educate yourself on new findings.

          https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3650498/

          I don’t know how many people had died of CHD because of this obsolete SA and cholesterol theory and taking statin drug or consuming vegetable oil and PUFA fat in nuts.

          In fact SA is safer because it is the oxidation of fats that cause CHD.

          “Short-chain SFAs, such as those in dairy fat and coconut oil, can also influence gene expression via interactions with various G protein–coupled receptors that are linked to several hormonal responses, including insulin and leptin, that regulate overall energy metabolism in the body (19).”

          “Because dietary saturated fats do not promote inflammation, it may be wiser to minimize ω6 PUFAs and consume more SFAs to reduce various types of inflammation; most sources of MUFAs contain significant amounts of PUFAs as well. There have been few scientific studies along these lines because of the misguided concern that saturated fats, even those from vegetable sources such as palm and coconut oil, would be detrimental to one’s health.”




          2
          1. Jerry Lewis, You are well intentioned and are simply trying, like the rest of us, to discover what the healthiest diet is for you to eat. You are correct that there is no direct relationship between sat fat and mortality. To see how misleading this is, as revealed in many other studies, you need to look at Dr. Gregor’s recent videos citing the rest of the research on saturated fat as well as looking carefully at who is conducting and/or funding studies recommending that we can all eat the sat fat in cheese and meat with impunity. I will not take all the time to explain it here. May I suggest that, before you post on this site, you familiarize yourself with the well researched positions that Dr Gregor has taken. If you disagree with any of his positions, please, first, familiarized yourself with the research that he has sited instead of linking to research that has already been contradicted by the studies he talks about.

            To better health for us all, David P.




            10
      1. @Celia–

        So glad to hear of your dramatic results !

        Now, if you are curious and want to be sure exactly what foods were involved, try reintroducing the food(s) you suspect, but only one-at-a-time– the offending food will rear its ugly head promptly enough. Record that in a journal, with the specific brand of product and all other details of the recurrence. That record will help you isolate the problem, if ever you suffer the same symptoms again.

        If that procedure seems familiar, the same method of isolating factors to establish experimental findings was used in several immune-issue studies mentioned by Dr. Greger.




        1
  3. So adding nutritional yeast to food is not recommended for Crohn’s patients but does this exclude bread too? Yeast in bread is dead, right? Can it still cause harm in Crohn’s patients? How about regular bread vs. sourdough?




    2
    1. Just anecdotal I know, but I had severe IBD for years and going plant based helped enormously, and adding cultured (fermented) food was the final puzzle piece. I also was amazed that sourdough bread (which is fermented for a long period with a variety of wild yeasts) gives me no issues at all, but regular bread, even home made yeast bread, is not as forgiving. A celiac friend bravely had a bite of my sourdough and found she can actually have small amounts without noticing symptoms, when regular bread would send her into a tailspin. I know Dr G has had some negative videos about some ferments, but I am a huge fan of them because so many people benefit directly. Even my mental health and mood improved dramatically, and I was able to get off the nasty drugs after a very unpleasant withdrawal. Those drugs are horrid, the longer you take them the worse and more prolonged the withdrawal symptoms, but so liberating to finally be free of them.




      6
    2. I’m not completely sure of this answer, but I would think that even dead yeast might provoke a response, being as it’s the proteins in the yeast that our bodies have a reaction too, and dead or alive, those proteins are still there. As for sourdough, I would think that’s a highly individual thing, and the only way you will know whether or not it’s a problem for you, would be to try a small amount and observe your reaction. If nothing comes of it, slowly increase the amount.




      4
    3. Good morning Marc.
      I developed psoriasis at age 17 and about a decade later developed psoriatic nails. Topical treatments helped but of course did not cure anything. Then some 10 years ago I developed psoriatic arthritis. They wanted to put me on methotrexate which I thought would be good for a 10-20 year life reduction so I started to look at nutrition. I came across a large survey that showed a large number of food allergies could cause this and number one was gluten. A gluten free diet did result in almost complete remission. But I continued to have flair ups any time I consumed anything “contaminated” with gluten.

      Then I came across this web site and after a month of studying all the inflammatory factors in animal products, I changed to a whole food plant based diet. In a few weeks the residual swelling in my toes disappeared. Then 6 months later I tried eating a slice of bread. (The association with pain was so strong I broke out in a sweat.) And,,, no problem!

      There have been many mechanism in animal that could be the factor(s) including “molecular mimicry”. But there are too many to enumerate. The bottom line; it helps. In my case the arthritis is now a bad memory. The plaque psoriasis has improved but not been eliminated. The psoriatic nails have significantly improved. I do suspect that were I to continue to eat gluten free that it would help more but I do love good bread. I do get in the sun frequently and this does help.

      The list I saw included gluten, citrus, nightshade, dairy, and many more possibilities. I have a sister with celiac disease so gluten was obvious for me to try. I now have little enough difficulty that it is not an issue. So my recommendation is to start exclusively plant based and then eliminate factor after factor. And make sure you get the photo therapy, i.e. get out in the sun.




      7
      1. Might check out a vit D supplement?

        https://www.vitamindcouncil.org/?s=psoriasis+&submit=Submit

        Vitamin D analogues are popular treatments for psoriasis.

        A common topical vitamin D analogue for psoriasis is calcipotriol. Here is a study from 2013 that compared the efficacy of calcipotriol to other popular treatments for psoriasis. It found the calcipotriol was the most successful.

        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23986159

        Dr. Holick mentions calcipotriol as well as Galderma Laboratories’ Vectical (AKA calcitriol). Here is an open-label study that evaluated the safety and efficacy of topical calcitriol for psoriasis. They found that it was a safe and effective treatment.

        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22106730




        1
    4. Anyways you do it very wrong if you eat any gluten/dairy with a crohn diagnosis…or any significant digestive gut problem imo, a glue cant be good on injured digestive system…




      1
  4. Very interesting. I do not suffer from Crohn’s but I can’t eat even a tiny amount of nutritional yeast without it really hurting my insides.




    2
  5. I would like to hear your Views on The Fiu Shot ? In other words are you Pro Immunization or otherwise ? There is so much said negative about the ingredients in the Vaccine ?




    1
    1. While this site focuses primarily on nutrition, because Dr. Greger has publicly commented on childhood vaccine (citing the science demonstrating the benefits), he may comment on flu vaccine. I will forward your question as you requested. He has commented about ingredients of vaccines, putting the risks of mercury and aluminum in perspective:
      https://nutritionfacts.org/video/aluminum-in-vaccines-vs-food/
      https://nutritionfacts.org/video/mercury-in-vaccinations-vs-tuna-2/

      For consideration however, do remember that as Dr. Greger repeatedly reminds us, rather than focusing on his opinion, we need to look to the science and at this point, I believe these two resources provide solid scientific research:
      https://www.cdc.gov/flu/protect/keyfacts.htm
      https://www.cdc.gov/flu/about/qa/vaccineeffect.htm
      I hope this helps.




      6
      1. “For consideration however, do remember that as Dr. Greger repeatedly reminds us, rather than focusing on his opinion, we need to look to the science “.

        Thanks for reminding people on this board.




        2
      2. As Joan suggests, we need to look at the science. While the CDC is clearly advocating a policy of flu shots for the general population and citing individual studies to support their claims there is considerably more doubt regarding the efficacy of flu vaccinations based on this comprehensive report from Cochrane Review March 2014: http://www.cochrane.org/CD001269/ARI_vaccines-to-prevent-influenza-in-healthy-adults

        From 2014 Cochrane Review, “Influenza vaccines have a very modest effect in reducing influenza symptoms and working days lost in the general population, including pregnant women. No evidence of association between influenza vaccination and serious adverse events was found in the comparative studies considered in the review. This review includes 90 studies, 24 of which (26.7%) were funded totally or partially by industry. Out of the 48 RCTs, 17 were industry-funded (35.4%). Just under 10% had good methodological quality.”

        From the February 2015 European Journal of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases: Influenza vaccination: a summary of Cochrane Reviews :

        “The Cochrane Library was systematically searched for meta-analyses regarding influenza vaccination of various populations, both healthy and sick. An effect in reducing the number of cases of influenza , influenza-like illness or complications to influenza was found in some studies, but, generally, the quality of the studies was low, and several studies lacked hard clinical endpoints. Data on adverse effects were scarce. More randomised controlled trials investigating the effects of influenza vaccination are warranted. Most evidence for the efficacy of influenza vaccination stems from observational studies…(the benefits are) largely attributed to a confounder known as the “healthy vaccine recipient effect”: healthy individuals are more likely to get vaccinated, and have better outcomes.”

        Dr. John McDougall gives an unqualified ‘no’ to flu vaccines and as usual provides his reasoning and cites evidence. McDougall is not an anti-vaxxer and supports immunizations for many other diseases. https://www.drmcdougall.com/2014/11/30/i-say-no-to-flu-vaccines/

        After reading the above studies (including those cited by McDougall) I stopped getting annual flu vaccinations 3 years ago. I hope this helps others as they consider whether to get a flu shot or not.




        3
    1. Diane Jones, according to the Nutritional Yeast video Dr. Greger states that nutritional yeast, baker’s yeast and brewer’s yeast are all the same.




      1
      1. The yeasts (brewers, bakers and nutritional) are all yeasts and thus may need to be avoided by some people (me included) but the yeasts serve different purposes. You make alcoholic beverages with brewers yeast, bake bread with bakers yeast and add nutritional yeast to recipes.

        Yeast is also found in many multivitamin and probiotic supplements so check those labels if your situation warrants that.




        2
    2. Hey Diane,
      I was curious also and all three contain Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Some bread like sour dough us a lacto bacillius type of yeast… Bakers yeast is an active form where Brewers and nutritional get hit with a high temp and give up the ghost. The geek in me had to look up the origin of the words
      Saccharomyces is the latinized Greek meaning sugar mold or sugar fungus. Saccharo sugar and myces mold/fungus. Cerevisiae comes from latin for “of beer”..
      So brewers/bakers and nutritional yeasts are sugar fungus from making beer!!!
      I love the internets.. So much info so quick…
      mitch




      5
    3. Brewer’s Yeast prepared for food consumption, Nutritional Yeast, Baker’s Yeast are all Sacchromyces cerevisiae, but different strains of the same yeast. Bakers yeast is different from commercially prepared Brewers and Nutritional yeast, in that Baker’s is alive. Brewer’s tends to be bitter, Nutritional Yeast has a nutty umami flavor.

      Additionally home brewers use other types of yeast to vary the taste and brew a variety of beers, lagers and wine. That yeast is viable, unlike Nutritional and Brewers prepared for consumption.




      1
  6. nutritionfacts.org is the best source of information for people wanting to something positive for their own health . which makes me wonder why has the comment section been hijacked by one or more persons , who in his own words is not a Doctor and gives very specific advice that is completely opposite of the findings from nutritionfacts.org findings? not only that but almost daily he mentions other sites and gives links to those sites , for the most part they are sites that are totally opposite to findings on here.
    when you add up all his comments , they exceed the material presented in most videos . who’s site is this?




    20
    1. I think that your insecurity and ignorance and lack of desire to learn new things show when you are afraid of any discussions. Most people, unlike you can get info from various sources, and make their own decision.

      I think Dr G himself like people to discuss what he posted and not be just a yes person who repeats what he said like a parakeet. And he is not unique as other popular nutrition doctors also open their forums to people to freely discuss what they want and even dissent with what the doctor said. They don’t kick out anyone unless somebody is very abusive. And of course their forums attract a lot of readers.

      Another thing too is that I think Dr G wants now to expand his audiences, not just for vegans but to meat eaters as well. Because nobody can deny that WFPB is essential and the only thing that differ between the 2 groups is the other foods that the meat eaters eat on top of WFPB. I don’t know of any pure Paleo type of doctors or forums who talk exclusively about eating animal foods. If you look at other so called meat eater doctors, they talk about plant foods most of the time about 60% or more and about 25% for the environment, and only rarely tell you to eat your burger.

      http://articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2017/09/02/sewage-contaminates-food-supply.aspx




      3
    2. Ignatius, he or she more than likely a paid shill from one or all of those sites he posts. But look at the bright side: It means that NF’s growing notoriety has threatened some of those other sites to the point of sending people to this site to try to disrupt & spread misinformation. They all have products to sell & have a vested interest in trying to discredit & suppress any evidence, especially scientifically proven evidence, that might threaten their bottom line.

      All of us NF regulars here have been to Mercola’s site et al. & were not impressed by their lack of scientific evidence as well as the selling of products, especially supplements.

      That’s what I love about this site – they’re not pushing products & supplements. It’s all about the science. Period.




      12
      1. “Ignatius, he or she more than likely a paid shill from one or all of those sites he posts. But look at the bright side: It means that NF’s growing notoriety has threatened some of those other sites to the point of sending people to this site to try to disrupt & spread misinformation. They all have products to sell & have a vested interest in trying to discredit & suppress any evidence, especially scientifically proven evidence, that might threaten their bottom line.

        All of us NF regulars here have been to Mercola’s site et al. & were not impressed by their lack of scientific evidence as well as the selling of products, especially supplements.

        That’s what I love about this site – they’re not pushing products & supplements. It’s all about the science. Period.”

        Well said … WFPB Nancy




        11
      2. Ignatius, he or she more than likely a paid shill from one or all of those sites he posts. But look at the bright side: It means that NF’s growing notoriety has threatened some of those other sites to the point of sending people to this site to try to disrupt & spread misinformation. They all have products to sell & have a vested interest in trying to discredit & suppress any evidence, especially scientifically proven evidence, that might threaten their bottom line.

        Reading the above “tweet” leaves me thinking you could get a job with Trump as a “tweeter of innuendo.”

        So interesting how we as a people condemn an action that we condone if it fits our belief system.




        2
        1. “Ignatius, he or she more than likely a paid shill from one or all of those sites he posts. But look at the bright side: It means that NF’s growing notoriety has threatened some of those other sites to the point of sending people to this site to try to disrupt & spread misinformation.”

          It’s so funny and I wish that I get paid but have not received even a penny.

          All of the other sites are now shaking in their boot in fear of this nutrition(-fact) site.




          1
        2. Right back at you, Lonnie. At least your ‘innuendo’ about me & mine about Jerry doesn’t disseminate misinformation regarding the science of nutrition.




          5
    3. Yes Ignatius, this entire site is dedicated to presenting the evidence for eating plants and eliminating animal foods from the diet – not to hearing inaccurate info and bad medical advice from from unqualified persons. those of us who have been here for years need no convincing, but I agree with you that NF is not what it used to be unfortunately. Comments were made the other day that might interest you.. scroll to almost the end of comment section https://nutritionfacts.org/video/does-nutritional-yeast-trigger-crohns-disease/
      All the best,




      8
      1. If you ignore trolls you don’t feed them? Every time you acknowledge a troll post…you feed the troll.

        Even well meaning attempts to re-educate a troll…feeds the troll.

        Disruption is it’s game.

        As we’ve all seen in the political arena…you can’t beat ignorance with a stick.




        7
        1. I read Mercola’s articles everyday…plus some other stuff from different providers. I have paid subscriptions to several health newsletters. I take a lot of supplements. I eat mostly veggies and some fish.

          The way it works is this…you study HEALTH…you try to learn a complex subject…you try to be honest with yourself about it….you try to apply the best you know.

          Anything you read about you need to authenticate it as best you can….if you apply something you need to watch to determine the results.

          You NEVER think you know it all…because you never will. I have yet to reconcile Mercola vs Greger…as far as oils and protein. I eat mostly veggies and some fish…plus MCT oil now and then. Do take some amino acid supplements.




          3
    4. Yes, and I think we have to ban the testimonial givers as well, since their findings are based on anecdotal evidence rather than empirical. They may be worse than the “troll” who offers scientific evidence of a diverse opinion.

      (for those with some degree of autism, the above is an example of sarcasm)




      2
          1. Jerry, I do eat fat… it is my main fuel in the form of mostly MCT oils in a 2:1 ratio with cold pressed Walnut Oil.

            That said and in the interest of being fair and somewhat balanced, I do think you “contest too much.”

            That is, you appear to contest every pro-vegan post on here and it does make it sound like you are proselytizing for meat. I think the posters who object to you being here are really protesting that you do not accept that their way is a way that is proven to work. Obviously we are different and seldom does one size (diet) fit all.

            Sometimes it is o.k. to let a statement you don’t agree with to just slide by. For the most part, judging by the numbers who post here often and in favor of a plant based diet, there are many here who afford you that courtesy.

            Otherwise, the forum could turn in to a flame contest.

            That said, I do think you are a valued member of the forum as you occasionally provide a gem (not from your links… I don’t read links as they are put up to validate a position, probably meant to sway my beliefs) that I search for actively rather than passively have them delivered.

            Here’s hoping I have only temporarily offended any of the dogs in this howling session.




            4
            1. Hi Lonie,

              Thanks for your advise. I read you loud and clear and I will tone down my “challenge” to other people diet. Problem is that sometimes I got carried away due to my dark sense of humor when I see something outrageous and I cannot resist not to poke fun at it.




              2
      1. The point being is that I too could continually post opinions on many issues and Google the crap out of everything and post links…but I don’t for the most part.

        I could post a boatload of links giving supporting evidence for what I do or believe…but I don’t….cause it isn’t supportive of what this site is about.

        At least “testimonial givers” are posting what they consider real info rather than Googled stuff.




        2
        1. It’s good you have that restraint, especially if you have nothing of value to offer.

          But I think many others don’t post because they are readers moreso than writers. Someone complained that the number of posters go down when a less popular poster posts (at least less popular for the ones who post with raised pitchforks.)

          It may be they are not speaking for the “Silent Majority” who are reading the opposing views and forming their own opinions rather than posting the kumbaya thing.




          1
    1. hi Clyde newton, if your question is about ‘lectins’, then you’re in luck! A week from today a new DVD will start with videos talking about Dr Gundry’s book, then two videos specifically addressing lectins.
      On the current DVD there is a video I am looking forward to scheduled for this friday (?) about how to reduce our tmao levels – should be good ! hope this helps

      https://nutritionfacts.org/2017/08/31/dr-greger-on-avocados-and-lectins/




      2
  7. I have multiple food intolerances, including to yeast. I tested nutritional yeast this past summer, using just a very small amount (I think 1/16th tsp–I’d have to go back and check my notes). It just didn’t work. I got itchy and headache-y each time I tried it. So I gave it away.

    A similar thing happened when I tested a multiple vitamin that was made with whole foods, since in that case, many of the vitamins are sourced from yeast.

    If you are sensitive to yeast, be aware that some multivitamins and probiotics can also contain yeast.




    3
  8. Beans and grains (and eggs,dairy) bring on fatigue, hip/foot/eye pain. Would love to see more research on food sensitivity. I can turn up or down my anti nuclear antibodies with diet. I feel best with large amounts of fruits and veggies but protein is an issue while trying to stay plant based.




    0
    1. What about nuts and seeds, Lee? I know there are a lot of raw food vegans who never eat beans, legumes or grains (I am not one of them), and they seem to be doing amazingly and swear by their diets. I’ve watched Bite Size Vegan’s youtube channel and she has to be one of the fittest people I’ve ever seen (she has a video on her workout and her abs are insane) and she seems to live off of fruits and veggies from the “what I eat in a day” video and other videos of her’s I’ve seen. Also you could maybe try sprouting beans and legumes and see if that makes a difference for you if you want to include them in your diet. Good luck!




      1
    2. Lee~ Interesting that your ANA are affected by diet. I can eat legumes (thankfully) but it seems that most grains (except rice) are not tolerated by my body. Nuts and seeds also seem to be problematic. I will retesting some of these foods again…..

      S has a good suggestion of trying nuts and seeds if you can tolerate those….

      Do legumes affect you negatively???

      I know (because of personal experience) that it is super frustrating to not be able to eat foods most people can eat. I tested buckwheat recently. The first tablespoon went okay. The next morning I had another tablespoon and got a headache within an hour. But it went away before lunch so I ate another tablespoon at lunch. I got a headache within 10 minutes that lasted 24 hours. SO, no buckwheat for me…..

      But legumes….seems I can eat those.

      Not yeast though (to get back on topic). :-)




      1
    1. Interesting article for a researcher? I take several supplements that are plant-based. For the avg person that kind of info is a bit thick and complex??

      These videos are informative in a way most people could understand and use.

      Two herbs that might almost reverse alzheimers?

      nutritionfacts.org/video/treating-alzheimers-with-turmeric

      nutritionfacts.org/video/saffron-for-the-treatment-of-alzheimers/

      Good idea to read the original studies or at least the abstracts.




      0
      1. My understanding, after talking with a couple of allergists, is that they can test for IgE reactions to food in blood and via skin prick test. However, that picks up just one kind of food allergy. A person can have lots of issues with a food and it NOT show up on that kind of test. In that case, the best thing to do is eliminate the suspected food(s) and reintroduce them. I found it necessary to eliminate the food(s) for 30 days….

        Good luck!




        1
  9. But isn’t there a major difference between inactive and active yeast? I know yeast is destroyed or rendered “inactive” when reaching a certain temperature which is why it’s safe to consume in baked goods, and that nutritional yeast is an inactive yeast (I don’t know that much about brewer’s yeast)… So wouldn’t this difference mean something? I also noticed, from what I saw in the video, that they didn’t talk about trying out people on inactive yeast like nutritional yeast, but rather it said “baker’s yeast” which, not to be repetitive, is an active yeast unless cooked to a certain temperature. Why isn’t this addressed? Or is it another aspect of yeast that may cause the problem and has nothing to do whether it’s inactive or active? Sounds like they haven’t pinpointed the part of yeast that causes the problem so the inactive vs. active, I would imagine, would be of relevance. So I’m a bit confused and curious.




    0
  10. So, for those of us without Crohn’s disease or any known sensitivities, is nutritional yeast beneficial to use in diet? After many years learning about all the benefits of nutritional yeast, I purchased some nutritional yeast flakes. It is natural, non fortified and touted as a good source of protein, fiber, and contains all 18 amino acids, many minerals, Vit B complex etc., etc.

    I have yet to incorporate it into my diet with any regularity.




    1
    1. According to other videos on this website by Dr. Greger, yes, nutritional yeast is very beneficial! I’d check out his other videos which explain some of the benefits of nutritional yeast apart from its incredible nutritional profile.




      0
  11. I tested positive for ASCA (both IGG and IGA) but haven’t been diagnosed with Crohn’s (yet). My family includes several with Celiac Disease, however. Hopefully that’s what I have instead of the awful alternative. :(




    0
  12. I have a history of DVT and pulmonary embolism and have been taking warfarin for many years. I am a vegetarian almost vegan and think of myself as being quite healthy except for this issue. I find the whole monitoring of the INR frustrating and would love to go off this drug. I am on 11 mg and my INR is normally around 3. Is it possible to control my blood thickness through food alone? I guess I am frightened to go off the drug in fear of another embolism but I am also in fear of being on this drug any longer.




    2
    1. Maree, I hesitate to respond to your post as your problem sounds like it could be dangerous if you went off your meds.

      So I will simply offer what I’ve learned over the years and you can do further research if it sounds interesting to you.

      I have read that certain types of cinnamon… Cassia being the main one, works like Warfarin to keep the blood thin. I’ve actually read warnings to not eat this type of cinnamon if thinning the blood is not warranted, and to instead use Ceylon cinnamon as it does not result in the Warfarin effect.

      Cassia cinnamon is the one you will likely find on your grocer’s shelves. It is less expensive than the Ceylon cinnamon.

      And while my next subject to explore is not a Warfarin-like commodity, I think it does help to keep the blood thin. Reason for my thinking this way is that I recently opened up a small wound on my hand while working with a 1″ thin walled piece of pipe that slipped. Nothing serious, but my wound did bleed and the blood ran easily from the cut. The good news is after wiping the cut with a brown paper towel, it soon closed off and clotted.

      Since I no longer eat Cassia cinnamon, the thing I do take that I believe keeps my blood thin and still allows a proper clotting time is White Willow Bark. If you are familiar, then you know that White Willow contains some of the same medicine as aspirin, as aspirin came about after copying White Willow being used medicinally.

      One more thing (actually two) that I suggest you follow up on… Dark chocolate and Beet Juice. Assuming this in beneficial in re: an embolism, each of these help to keep blood vessels open with dark chocolate working quicker and beet juice taking longer to act, but working very well. (A good way to tell is to take your blood pressure and then taking it again about an hour or so later… your BP should be lower, all things other than the beet juice, being equal.)

      Hope what I’ve suggested has given you a starting place to begin your research.




      3
      1. Thanks Lonie, this is definitely a good start, have read many different things on the internet. I don’t want to put myself at risk, I think I would like to be more in control.




        1
        1. I wrote that I used cassia cinnamon innocently to make a pack for my hair.
          Slept with it on under a plastic shower cap overnight. It nearly shut down my kidneys and it was a long time recovering. I now only use Ceylon. Please research cassia and put it on the internet about the dangers of using it.
          Dr. Flora Mason Van Orden, member of PCRM




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      2. Dr. Flora here, member of PCRM. I used cassia cinnamon innocently to make a pack to treat my hair and it about shut down my kidneys. I now use Ceylon only. It might be helpful for people to research how dangerous cassia is for kidneys. When I did, I was horrified that this info was not on the label!




        1
        1. First of all, I’ve never heard of using cinnamon on the skin as you’ve related. I would have never thought of doing that but if I had, thanks for the warning.

          However, Cassia cinnamon has been used internally for centuries and other than the thinning of the blood when not needed, I’ve heard of nothing but good things about cinnamon, including cassia cinnamon.




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    2. Maree, to add to what Lonie is saying, i.e. thinning your blood and lower your BP, there are 2 more things that you can do:

      – Take Vitamin K2 – not the same as K1 in kale. K2 is in fermented food such as the Japanese natto, or you take a vit K2 (or MK7) pill.

      – Move frequently. Don’t sit for more than one hour. Studies have shown that if people sit for too long, no matter how much they exercise at the end of the day, their CHD risk is still high and their longevity is shorten. In addition, DVT is the number one risk by sitting in one place for too long. DVT can happen even to perfectly healthy people by long inactivity. If you have an Apple iWatch, it will remind you to move every hour. Since you have a pre condition then I would say that you move every half an hour or ideally every 15 minutes. By moving, I don’t mean that you have to exercise or anything but just walk to get water or coffee or even just stand up if you are in a meeting and you cannot leave.

      I know that people over here hate Mercola but what the heck, for somebody health reason, I post it anyway.

      http://articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2015/01/11/vitamin-k1-k2.aspx

      http://fitness.mercola.com/sites/fitness/archive/2015/10/16/excessive-sitting-damages-blood-vessels.aspx




      2
    3. Maree, here is a story with video about others who have experienced clots in their legs that can move up to the lungs. It seems men are more at risk than women, by and large.

      I’m sure you are aware of the things covered in the CNN story, but for others it may sound a warning if they experience the same thing for the first time.

      The link is here:




      1
      1. Lonie and Maree, I saw the news of the death of an American idol a few years back due to DVT and I started to collect info on it. Here are some other links that I collected (pay attention to the symptoms and the cause (immobility is one)). One thing that surprised me from the link you posted is that tall women are more susceptible (and unfortunately my wife is tall :(

        http://www.dailymail.co.uk/tvshowbiz/article-2714344/American-Idol-contestant-Michael-Johns-dies-35-suffering-blood-clot-ankle.html

        https://www.theatlantic.com/health/archive/2014/02/when-a-cramp-is-actually-a-clot/283623/

        https://www.cbsnews.com/news/deep-vein-thrombosis-dont-ignore-symptoms-of-silent-killer/




        1
    4. Another thing and it is not very scientific and it is not a cure, is that everyone and every family should keep a bottle of aspirin handy because aspirin will dissolve any blood clot and can be used temporarily while waiting for emergency personnel to arrive. But do go to a hospital after such an incident and don’t think that aspirin can fix any problem for the long term.




      2
    5. Good stuff Jerry.

      Also triggered a thought. As one of your links suggested sitting for long stretches at a time can be a contributing factor. I bought a foot massager for my Mother when she was alive, that would vibrate your feet. I remembered reading some time ago that Astronauts could keep from losing bone mass while in space if the stood on a vibrating pad.

      Seems like a good office product would be a foot massager under the desk to turn on from time to time in order to keep the blood moving.




      2
    6. Maree, Talk to your doctor if you are frustrated with the weekly monitoring of Warfarin. I experienced the same frustration and was given the choice of another blood thinner. I chose Eliquis, which requires no monitoring or food restrictions and I am doing fine. I would be careful about assuming that any food will thin the blood sufficiently to avoid a stroke or embolism. David




      0
  13. WHAT IS THE BENEFIT OF SACCHAROMYCES CEREVISIAE?
    This yeast is found everywhere– in the wild, and in food production, and has been with us “thousands of years”, according to Dr. Greger. However, his review of research on nutritional yeast finds relatively little of obvious, undeniable benefit.

    My own reading has found anecdotes about yeast benefits, such as nutritional yeast aiding energy production and promoting long-term health, but no controlled, interventional study of yeast benefit to the general population, so far. I welcome Dr. Greger and anybody else who can find one.

    Methinks this body of research with auto-immune disease and yeast, but in the context of the general population, suggests nutritional yeast (at best) is a mild immune system response conditioner– just as the mild stress of daily exercise tones the immune system for better response to pathogens. Whether s. cerevisiae has any other, intrinsic value remains an open question.




    0
    1. POSTSCRIPT–
      Dr. Greger’s video on “https://nutritionfacts.org/video/preserving-immune-function-in-athletes-with-nutritional-yeast/” does mention the Carlsbad Marathon study data (Journal of Sports Science and Medicine, 2009) on the benefit of beta glucan fiber vs. placebo on self-report of upper-respiratory tract symptoms, and that is the kind of study I am trying to find.

      Sniffling, runny nose, coughing, sneezing, etc., are overt and physical symptoms and can be counted and compared. Likewise, a British Journal of Nutrition study (2013) has splendid methodology using direct serum measures of immune system activity, but I could not access the full report.

      Yet, too many other beta glucan studies report on subjective states-of-health and self-reporting scales, with measures like improved mood and vigor. This material is still valuable, but direct, countable physical measures are the most helpful.




      0
  14. I have MS. And have had frequent yeast infections.
    Is nutritional yeast okay for Multiple Sclerosis patients/or
    someone with my background? I’m following Dr. John McDougall’s MS
    diet, modified Swank. He does not discuss ‘nooch’ to my knowledge.




    0
  15. But according to what was first said, it sounds like yeast could be the cause of almost ANY autoimmune inflammatory disorder, correct?
    Since the only one studied was Crohn’s, seems that if you suffer from Arthritis or other autoimmune disorder you might want to drop the yeast.

    That said, I’ve been told there’s just trillions of yeast particles floating around everywhere, and covering our food and we breathe in, etc.

    I hope that cutting it from our food is good enough to help cool the autoimmune response.




    0
  16. Hello. Have anyone had rashes after using nutritional yeast?
    I noticed bad rashes behind my arm and legs a day after I introduced nutritional yeast into my diet, which spread to about 10in wide in some areas. It’s deactivated yeast, so I am not sure how it could mess with my system but I do not have anything else I can think of that I took or did, that could cause such rashes.

    I had allergy test and was negative for gluten allergy so I believe I do not have Chrone’s disease nor other allergies I can think of.
    Any advice or comments will be greatly appreciated.




    0
  17. Does anyone know how long one has to try yeast free to know if it is going to help? After watching the videos I am trying yeast free. On day 16 with no improvement noticed. Doctor thinks I might have mild crohns, but the biopsy of the inflammation at the ileum was inconclusive… so maybe IBS or something else?




    0

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