Can Green Tea Help Treat Cancer?

Can Green Tea Help Treat Cancer?
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A mixture of results have been reported using green tea to try to stop or reverse the progression of oral cancer, lung cancer, cervical cancer, and colon cancer.

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Below is an approximation of this video’s audio content. To see any graphs, charts, graphics, images, and quotes to which Dr. Greger may be referring, watch the above video.

Tea consumption may reduce the risk of getting oral cancer. Not only may the consumption of tea boost the antioxidant power of our bloodstream within minutes of consumption, and decrease the amount of free radical DNA damage throughout our systems over time, it can also increase the antioxidant power of our saliva, and decrease the DNA damage within the inner cheek cells of smokers—though not as much as stopping smoking altogether.

So, might this help precancerous oral lesions from turning into cancerous oral lesions? “More than [100,000] people develop oral cancer annually worldwide,” [with a] 5-year overall survival rate of less than” the flip of a coin. “Oral cancer frequently arises from” precancerous lesions in the mouth, with each have a few percent chance every year of turning cancerous. So, what a perfect opportunity to see if green tea can help.

“Fifty-nine…patients” with precancerous oral lesions were randomized into a tea group, in which capsules of powdered tea extract were given, as well as having the lesions painted with the green tea powder, versus a control group that essentially got sugar pills, and were painted with nothing. Within six months, lesions in 11 of the 29 in the tea group shrunk, compared to only 3 out of 30 in the placebo group. “The results indicate that tea treatment can improve the clinical manifestations of the oral lesions.”

The important question, though, is, did it prevent them from turning cancerous? But, because the trial only lasted a few months, they couldn’t tell. But, when they scraped some cells off of the lesions, there was a significant drop in DNA-damaged cells within three months in the treatment group—suggesting that things were going in the right direction. Ideally, though, we’d do a longer study, to see if they ended up with less cancer. And, while we’re at it, how about a study where they just used swallowed tea components, since most people don’t fingerpaint with tea in their mouths. We didn’t have such a study, though—until, we did.

Same extraordinary clinical results, with some precancerous lesions shrinking away. And, the study lasted long enough to see if fewer people actually got cancer. But, there was just as much new cancer in the green tea group as the placebo group. So, a higher response rate—I mean, the lesions looked better—but “no improvement in…cancer-free survival,” which is the whole point.

Now, these studies were done mostly on smokers and former smokers. What about lung cancer? Population studies suggest tea may be protective, but, let’s put it to the test.  Seventeen patients with advanced lung cancer given up to the equivalent of 30 cups of green tea a day, but “[n]o objective responses were seen.” Another study of 49 cancer patients—21 with lung cancer—who got between 4 and 25 cups worth of green tea compounds a day, and again, no benefits were found. The only benefit green tea may be able to offer lung cancer patients is to help lessen the burns from the radiation treatments when applied on the skin, as green tea compresses may be able to shorten the duration of the burns.

The protective effects of green tea applied topically were also seen in precancerous cervical lesions, where the twice-a-day direct application of a green tea ointment showed a beneficial response in nearly three-quarters of the patients, compared to only about a 10% response in the untreated control group, which is consistent with the anticancer effects of green tea compounds on cervical cancer cells in a petri dish. But, when women just got green tea extract pills to take, the pills didn’t seem to help.

I’ve talked about the potential benefit of green tea wraps for skin cancer. Is there any other cancer where green tea actually comes in direct contact? Yes, colon cancer, which grows from the inner surface of the colon that comes in contact with food and drink. In the colon, tea compounds are fermented by our good gut bacteria into compounds like 3,4DHPA, which appears to wipe out colon cancer cells, while leaving normal colon cells relatively intact in vitro.

So, 136 patients with a history of polyps were randomized to get green tea extract pills, or not. Now, this was a study in Japan; so, everyone was already drinking green tea. So, effectively, this was comparing those who drank three cups a day to four cups a day. But, a year later on colonoscopy, the added green tea group had only half the polyp recurrence, and the polyps that did grow were 25% smaller. That’s pretty exciting. Why hasn’t a larger follow-up study been done since? Perhaps due to the difficulty in raising funds for the study, because green tea is a cheap beverage, not a pharmaceutical.

But, the good news is that, thanks to a major cancer charity in Germany, researchers are currently recruiting for the largest green tea cancer trial to date, in which more than 2,000 patients will be randomized. I look forward to presenting the results when they come in.

Please consider volunteering to help out on the site.

Image credit: Samout3 via flickr. Image has been modified.

Below is an approximation of this video’s audio content. To see any graphs, charts, graphics, images, and quotes to which Dr. Greger may be referring, watch the above video.

Tea consumption may reduce the risk of getting oral cancer. Not only may the consumption of tea boost the antioxidant power of our bloodstream within minutes of consumption, and decrease the amount of free radical DNA damage throughout our systems over time, it can also increase the antioxidant power of our saliva, and decrease the DNA damage within the inner cheek cells of smokers—though not as much as stopping smoking altogether.

So, might this help precancerous oral lesions from turning into cancerous oral lesions? “More than [100,000] people develop oral cancer annually worldwide,” [with a] 5-year overall survival rate of less than” the flip of a coin. “Oral cancer frequently arises from” precancerous lesions in the mouth, with each have a few percent chance every year of turning cancerous. So, what a perfect opportunity to see if green tea can help.

“Fifty-nine…patients” with precancerous oral lesions were randomized into a tea group, in which capsules of powdered tea extract were given, as well as having the lesions painted with the green tea powder, versus a control group that essentially got sugar pills, and were painted with nothing. Within six months, lesions in 11 of the 29 in the tea group shrunk, compared to only 3 out of 30 in the placebo group. “The results indicate that tea treatment can improve the clinical manifestations of the oral lesions.”

The important question, though, is, did it prevent them from turning cancerous? But, because the trial only lasted a few months, they couldn’t tell. But, when they scraped some cells off of the lesions, there was a significant drop in DNA-damaged cells within three months in the treatment group—suggesting that things were going in the right direction. Ideally, though, we’d do a longer study, to see if they ended up with less cancer. And, while we’re at it, how about a study where they just used swallowed tea components, since most people don’t fingerpaint with tea in their mouths. We didn’t have such a study, though—until, we did.

Same extraordinary clinical results, with some precancerous lesions shrinking away. And, the study lasted long enough to see if fewer people actually got cancer. But, there was just as much new cancer in the green tea group as the placebo group. So, a higher response rate—I mean, the lesions looked better—but “no improvement in…cancer-free survival,” which is the whole point.

Now, these studies were done mostly on smokers and former smokers. What about lung cancer? Population studies suggest tea may be protective, but, let’s put it to the test.  Seventeen patients with advanced lung cancer given up to the equivalent of 30 cups of green tea a day, but “[n]o objective responses were seen.” Another study of 49 cancer patients—21 with lung cancer—who got between 4 and 25 cups worth of green tea compounds a day, and again, no benefits were found. The only benefit green tea may be able to offer lung cancer patients is to help lessen the burns from the radiation treatments when applied on the skin, as green tea compresses may be able to shorten the duration of the burns.

The protective effects of green tea applied topically were also seen in precancerous cervical lesions, where the twice-a-day direct application of a green tea ointment showed a beneficial response in nearly three-quarters of the patients, compared to only about a 10% response in the untreated control group, which is consistent with the anticancer effects of green tea compounds on cervical cancer cells in a petri dish. But, when women just got green tea extract pills to take, the pills didn’t seem to help.

I’ve talked about the potential benefit of green tea wraps for skin cancer. Is there any other cancer where green tea actually comes in direct contact? Yes, colon cancer, which grows from the inner surface of the colon that comes in contact with food and drink. In the colon, tea compounds are fermented by our good gut bacteria into compounds like 3,4DHPA, which appears to wipe out colon cancer cells, while leaving normal colon cells relatively intact in vitro.

So, 136 patients with a history of polyps were randomized to get green tea extract pills, or not. Now, this was a study in Japan; so, everyone was already drinking green tea. So, effectively, this was comparing those who drank three cups a day to four cups a day. But, a year later on colonoscopy, the added green tea group had only half the polyp recurrence, and the polyps that did grow were 25% smaller. That’s pretty exciting. Why hasn’t a larger follow-up study been done since? Perhaps due to the difficulty in raising funds for the study, because green tea is a cheap beverage, not a pharmaceutical.

But, the good news is that, thanks to a major cancer charity in Germany, researchers are currently recruiting for the largest green tea cancer trial to date, in which more than 2,000 patients will be randomized. I look forward to presenting the results when they come in.

Please consider volunteering to help out on the site.

Image credit: Samout3 via flickr. Image has been modified.

Doctor's Note

What about preventing cancer in the first place? That was the subject of my last video, Can Green Tea Help Prevent Cancer?

What about prostate cancer? I already covered that; see Preventing Prostate Cancer with Green Tea and Treating Prostate Cancer with Green Tea.

Here’s the older video I referred to about skin cancer: Treating Gorlin Syndrome with Green Tea.

If you haven’t yet, you can subscribe to my videos for free by clicking here.

67 responses to “Can Green Tea Help Treat Cancer?

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    1. Jenny, since Dr. Greger doesn’t specify a certain kind of green tea, I think it is safe to assume any green tea is valid.




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  1. From previous videos on green tea I am aware that using milk (nut, soy or bovine) with tea essentially nullifies beneficial antioxidant effects. Does this mean that there is NO beneficial effect of tea if one uses milk? Or are there some beneficial elements/compounds that escape the negative effects of milk? Thanks




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    1. Of course animal milks would reduce any antioxidant effects bestowed by tea as animal products are inflammatory to our systems by their very nature. How or why a soy or nut “milk” would pose the same issue I do not know. And i don’t need to know as I no longer consume any sort of milk. Tea and Coffee I drink and they provide nutrition without calories.




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  2. The topical and direct contact benefits of green tea seems consistent with the possibility of an effect from one of the many minerals absorbed by the leaves, which might even mean trace lead.




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    1. hi Melody, in the previous video’s comment section, JoanneB responded to Cheryl who had a question about decaffinated green tea. http://nutritionfacts.org/video/can-green-tea-help-prevent-cancer/ Apparently the decaf process removes the catechins.. substances to which we attribute the health benefits

      Since I personally dislike green tea, I looked around for alternatives. Dr Greger has videos on herbal teas, the top 5 of which include camomile, lemongrass, rosehip, and dandelion. I make a nice one with lemon grass, peppermint and sometimes raspberryleaf .




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      1. i also dislike green tea. rather than using alternatives, i simply add just a few leaves of either louisa or lemon grass or even earl grey.
        they cover the disflavorable taste of the green tea to the extent that i find it enjoyable.




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    2. Melody, decaf green tea may not be so bad. From a 2013 study: “Antioxidant activities of decaffeinated green teas exhibit approximately the same values in caffeinated green teas of the same brands.
      ” Although the phenolic substances are reduced with the decaffeination process there is no decrease in antioxidant activity.”
      http://www.isaet.org/images/extraimages/IJCEBS%200101112.pdf

      I’ve also read that the CO2 decaffeination process saves much more phenols than the process using ethyl acetate.




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    3. Melody, decaf green tea may not be so bad. From a 2013 study: “Antioxidant activities of decaffeinated green teas exhibit approximately the same values of caffeinated green teas of the same brands.”
      ” Although the phenolic substances are reduced with the decaffeination process there is no decrease in antioxidant activity.”
      http://www.isaet.org/images/extraimages/IJCEBS%200101112.pdf

      I’ve also read that the CO2 decaffeination process saves many more phenols than the process using ethyl acetate.




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  3. Jurgen
    I was just pointing out that milk from any source apparently binds with antioxidants essentially nullifying their effects. I personally use soy however many of us tea drinkers use a variety of milks. My question was/is are we basically nullifying ANY positive affects of tea? Its great if you like it straight, but many don’t.




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    1. Dr Greger has talked about animal milk negatively impacting tea antioxidant potency and others tea benefits. However, I’ve not seen any info on non-dairy milks doing the same. Perhaps soy milk has an effect but I can’t remember and don’t want to guess. Can you share the research/studies you have showing that non-dairy milk negatively impacts the benefits of green etc tea? Cheers, Scott




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  4. For those who use milk or plant milk in their green tea, I suggest trying your tea with a quarter tsp of ground ginger, a slice of lemon and a generous spoon of erythritol. I find this delicious and I get the benefits of ginger and the antioxidants of vitamin c (albeit very little) and erythritol. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19632091




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  5. yw Milt. My beverage of choice is coffee with soy milk, and to be honest, it wouldnt matter to me if someone said the soy blocked phytonutrients in the coffee. Without the one, I wouldnt be drinking the other. Occassionally I like a nice black tea , even a little sweet with a plant milk. In the context of all that we do right, it doesnt matter. (LOL but what do I know ? it appears I cant even spell my name right, above)

    I did find an interesting abstract this morning https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/10691606 . Since I am an avid blackberry picker and freeze many for the winter, I was happy to see that they are up there in antioxidant value. Also.. they say the LEAVES are even more packed full of goodness! Since spring is around the corner, just thought I would mention that it will soon be a good time to forage for stringing nettle shoots, and perhaps first leaves of raspberry and blackberry bushes to give your smoothies an antioxidant boost! Just a suggestion anyway..




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  6. Hi Dr. Greger,
    I love your daily snippets.

    Are there any studies that look at drinking green tea instead of the extract. I drink two cups of green tea daily to reduce my genetic colon cancer risk. In previous studies for other natural components, you have reported that taking the actual food substance was effective where a pill extract was not. Thoughts? Thank you.




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    1. Hi Chris – your comment made me think you might be interested in watching this TedTalk by William Li, M.D. He researches the antioxidant-anticancer effects of various foods and asks the question “Can we Eat to Starve Cancer?”. In his presentation he shows that green tea and white tea, both, have anticancer effects individually. But, when you brew the two together, the antiangiogenic activity of the tea becomes greater than either one alone. This means that one food potentiates the other (one makes the other greater when the two are together). So you might consider adding white tea (which is about flavorless) to your green tea.
      I work off of a similar theme. I brew tea, especially in the summer when I’m working outdoors, with the synergistic effects in mind. I start with basic old Luzianne cold brew black tea. I add a few bags of green and a few bags of white. I also add a teaball full of chai spice blend (clove and cinnamon being huge antioxidants per Dr. G’s videos). For more fun I add a few orange peels. I throw the whole jar out on the back deck to slowly brew in the heat of the sun and I end up with a very nice spiced tea with lots of goodies in it. I mention this because others have stated they don’t like the taste of green tea. I’m not excited about it either, but putting it into the spice tea mix lets me consume it while enjoying a taste that I like better. And getting lots of antioxidants and hopefully a synergistic effect as well. Here is the William Li Ted Talk:
      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OjkzfeJz66o




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      1. Better way to brew is to use a gallon jug with spout at bottom….use filtered water and put it in the fridge to brew? I do this with a ginseng/green tea mix.




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  7. Can the volume of the videos be increased a little? I could barely hear this one, and the volume controls on my computer are at the maximum. Videos from a year ago are much louder.

    Thank you for making and posting all these interesting videos.




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    1. Karen: Thank you for your post. You are not alone, though not everyone is experiencing this problem. Staff have told me that the audio problems should be cleared up for the next volume of videos, though that won’t be until volume 36 as volume 35 has already been made. This means that it will be a few months until the audio is fully fixed. Hang in there. I’ve been told that volume 35 might be a little better. – Volunteer Moderator




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    2. I agree 100% with this. The volume has definitely decreased over the past month or so and on a smart phone it’s simply not loud enough even with volume at full.




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      1. Scott: The volume might continue to be a problem over volume 35 (so a few more months), but they think they have it fixed for volume 36.




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  8. It seems that the active compounds in the tea are subject to some sort of first pass effect, which may explain why topical application or direct contact is beneficial, but the systemic effects are less than expected. Are there papers which report a time course of plasma concentrations of green tea metabolites after ingestion of pills / tea?




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  9. Are some food waxes similar to a trans fat and therefore unhealthy? The Wikipedia descriptions don’t make them sound benign to me but I have no clue. A video would be great.




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  10. The idea of using individual dietary components to treat serious disease is foolishness and it needs to stop YESTERDAY. It is a gigantic waste of money and junk science besides. It is totally unreasonable to expect one or just a few classes of plant compounds to inhibit complex pathways like cancer growth or inflammation. It’s contrary to a systems biology approach, which we should be smart enough to embrace by now. When will these researchers stop doing clinical trials in a reductionist fashion and start applying foods in combination, the way we usually ingest these?




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    1. I’m biologist and I don’t see anything wrong with this studies.
      Can you please give me some reasons why it waste of money?

      For example shiitake in food gives people only slowing of cancer growth but lentinian that is 1 component that taken from the mushroom and placed directly to the blood is actually gives people complete stop of growing cancer and even it’s reversal.
      What’s wrong with this?

      Or with the tea – we see that tea works only in the direct contact with cancer, not wen it is digested. Some active compound(s) cannot come into the blood from your intestine.
      If it’s only one or few components, may be we can take it out, make a bigger concentration and give it into patients blood, or directly into his caner region. It could save life for someone.
      What’s wrong with this for you?

      Vit C is good in treatment of cancer too ( at least it really helps for my friend) but it is not a natural thing too, it was firstly take out from berries and the made chemically. And I really thankful for people who allow me to made injections of vit C for my friend.

      Want you go back to the “natural” and don’t cook you food and don’t wear a clothes (isn’t its unnatural too?).




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        1. I think you don’t have to make it like some dogma or religion.
          Sometimes take extreacts is stupid ( I don’t like it either when people eat strawberry pill, just go and have some real berry!)? Many extracts not better than placebo,so why do people take them.

          Sometimes it’s really usefull, for example vit C take away my postvaccinal symptoms and to do it with orange or lemon I need it so many that my stomach made me cry.

          In general – if real food works better, eat it, if you can’t get smth directly from food in a terapeutical amont – try pills and still eat food :)




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  11. Yes, Rick, I agree,
    but I think you said it a little bit too harshly. Most of us come from a Western philosophy, that says to stop each individual disease with a silver bullet.

    Green tea comes from East Asia, and in traditional Chinese medicine, they don’t use it that way. There are many healthful foods, herbs, and medicines that they just use to strengthen the body in general and they don’t worry that it has to have an exact match to a particular disease at an exact time. The body is a dynamic system within other dynamic systems.

    I drink green tea with hibiscus tea, which Dr. Greger has written about before. They are both very healthy, but green tea doesn’t have much of an interesting flavor, but I think hibiscus tea does. It does make it harder to empirically prove that one item is making the difference when you deal with the whole system, but Dr. Greger has made videos about the synergistic effect of foods together upon the body.
    John S




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  12. Green tea extracts were used in a trial with CLL (Chronic Lymphatic Leukemia). The results were positive, but the trial did not go to phase 3 because the manufacturer of the extracts quit the trial. As noted in the video, there is not much profit to be made from cheap materials that are not subject to patents. So expenses trials are difficult to sponsor on low cost generic products.




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  13. My question is unrelated to this video, but I am hoping Dr Gregor or a moderator will see it. Can a WFPB diet do anything specific to treat POTS (postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome)? Nutritional recommendations include increasing water intake, increasing sodium, smaller meals (non-specified diet), and reducing dairy. Is Dr Gregor aware of any research showing POTS sufferers saw improvements on a WFPB diet?
    Thank you




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  14. Hi, I just read a facebook post that declared – supposedly with multiple sources – that soy milk is bad for the thyroid. I did a sight search on nutrition facts and couldn’t find any reference to this topic. I know that there is a lot of mis-info on the net, but here is the link… https://www.healthandlovepage.com/popular-drink-destroys-thyroid-drink/?c=nsm
    I don’t expect a response to someone else’s stuff – nor for you to rubutt their ‘research’, but since we are trying to eat a plant-based diet, learning so much from Dr Greger, and I air your videos (audio) on our radio station twice daily and believe in the science, I was hoping you could give me any truth on this subject.




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    1. Hello Racgtpc,
      I just carefully read the post you referenced, from http://www.healthandlovepage.com. It is stunning for its complete lack of backing up anything with actual science. It is not even signed, and the only statements made about any scientific backing are these: “According to studies….”, and “Many studies have confirmed that…”, with NO actual studies cited.

      It starts out with the title stating “This popular drink destroys your thyroid”, with absolutely nothing to back up this claim. Then there are a series of lies and half-truths:
      1) soy contains hemagglutinin, which “causes clots”: this is at best a half-truth. If A contains smalls amount of B, and B sometimes can cause C, that doesn’t mean that A will cause C.
      2) phytoestrogens cause female infertility and breast cancer. This is a complete lie. The opposite is true, as discussed in these videos by Dr. Greger:
      http://nutritionfacts.org/video/is-soy-healthy for-breast-cancer-survivors/
      http://nutritionfacts.org/video/who-shouldnt-eat-soy/
      3) soy contains aluminum in “abundant amounts”: where is the evidence? The statement that aluminum has been linked to the occurrence of Alzheimer’s disease is true, however.
      4) soy contains “antinutrients” or “natural toxins” that can have “adverse effects on the menstrual cycle.” This is so vague as to be completely non-helpful. What “toxins” are they talking about, without naming them. What “adverse effects”? Where is the data?
      5) “According to studies”, soy consumption increases the need for Vitamin B-12 and Vitamin D. Well, we do know that vegans need to take supplemental vitamin B-12, because they don’t get enough of it from their diet. So this is maybe a half-truth. I’ve never heard that soy increases the need for Vit. D. Again, show me the data!
      6) soy contains “toxic isoflavones.” Isoflavones are just a type of phytoestrogen. See #2 for their BENEFICIAL properties.
      7) soy is very contaminated with pesticides, and most soy is genetically modified. This may be true, which is why you should buy organic soy products — in which the use of GMOs is specifically outlawed.
      8) phytic acid (phytates) inhibit the absorption of various minerals. This may be true, but the effect is not significant. Furthermore, phytates are extremely protective against various cancers. See this video by Dr. G.:
      http://nutritionfacts.org/video/phytates-for-the-prevention-of-cancer/
      9) “Many studies have confirmed that” carrageenan (component of seaweed) can cause ulceration, colon cancer, and GI inflammation. Where is the evidence? Here is a video by Dr. G about beneficial effects of seaweed:
      http://nutritionfacts.org/video/how-to-treat-endometriosis-with-seaweed/

      In summary, I think the website you reference is an example of the absolute worst type of misinformation that is polluting the internet these days. I hope this helps. Dr. Jon, Family physician and volunteer moderator for NutritionFacts.org




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  15. Hello Dr. Greger! I have a few questions. Is drinking cannabis tea healthy and why? Also, is overeating on a plant based diet beneficial to your health? What are the positives and negatives? Controlling how much I eat is hard, but I’m making the right choices. No animal protein or processed junk.
    Thank you sir!




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    1. Thanks for your comment Andrew.

      I tried to research the topic a bit and I only found one paper that analysed cannabis tea (see here) & I quote:

      Although cannabis, which is locally known as ganja, is mostly consumed by smoking, drink- ing of ganja tea is common among non-smokers (Boekhout van Solinge, 1996) and is consumed even by young children and the elderly. The tea is attributed various therapeutic and prophylactic qualities and is used as a remedy for fever, cold and stress.

      Cannabis tea can be considered as a contemporary exam- ple of a widely used, but poorly understood herbal medicine. A major concern with the medicinal use of cannabis is the risk of (accidental) overdosing of THC, which could lead to psychotropic effects. However, our results show that moderate changes in the standard preparation protocol for cannabis tea do not result in dramatic changes in the composition of the tea, neither quantitatively nor qualitatively. Rather, the results indicate that cannabis tea has only limited potency, and that probably a saturated solution of THC forms.

      Despite this data, there is a need to further investigate the effects of cannabis tea on the various aspects of health and therefore the precautionary principle should be applied.

      I think regardless of source, there is always the need to portion control in order to avoid exceeding you daily energy requirements, which is a phenomenon harder to do when you are eating a whole food plant based diet due to the low energy density and high fibre content of most whole plant based foods (with the exception of nuts). If you are following a plant based diet but it’s high in saturated fat and trans fat, then there will also be a problem. As a RD, the answer to that question will depend on a number of different factors and ultimately each case needs to be assessed individually.

      Hope this answer helps.




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  16. I wonder if green tea would be helpful for Barrett’s Esophagus and esophageal cancers, since topical tea seems to be beneficial?




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  17. Dear Dr. Greger and/or Volunteers, would you please comment on whether YERBA MATE green tea is safe/healthy to drink for vegans? I eat only plant-based foods without oil and salt, but have not given up yerba mate tea yet… In short, is it safe to drink yerba mate tea when it is said to contain elements such as potassium, magnesium, and manganese, plus a variety of polyphenols such as the flavonoids quercetin and rutin; and three xanthines: caffeine, theobromine and theophylline, the main one being caffeine, etc.?




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  18. Hi Dr. Greger, I found this interesting article regarding green tea’s ability to kill multiple myeloma cells in vitro and in vivo (mouse studies). “Specific killing of multiple myeloma cells by (-)-epigallocatechin-3-gallate extracted from green tea: biologic activity and therapeutic implications” [https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1895573/#]




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  19. I want to know if NutritionFacts.org is listed as a charity in the annual federal fund government fundraising campaign? The name of the fundraising is Combine Federal Campaign (CFC). Vegan Outreach is listed, but not NutritionFacts.org.

    The registered charities appear to be run by Combined Federal Campaign – OPM https://www.opm.gov/combined-federal-campaign/




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    1. Blake: According to the NutritionFacts staff, NutritionFacts is not part of that yet, but they are looking into it for next year. Thanks for asking.




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  20. Hi there, I read under the “Contact Us” link to write a question under a video. As someone that wants to major in Nutrition and is a plant-based vegan, are there particular nutrition programs you can recommend for an undergrad degree? I’d love to work for a company like NutritionFacts.org one day and so I figured you’d be the best to ask! Thank you so much in advance for any recommendations.




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    1. Hi Lori! I am a registered dietitian and I don’t know of any undergrad programs that are 100% focused on plant-based nutrition. But, here are a few resources that might be helpful. You can search for all undergrad nutrition and dietetic programs here. Check here if you’re interested in becoming a registered dietitian. Here are a few plant-based certificate programs that you might be interested in as well: eCornell Plant-Based Nutrition Certificate and Rouxbe’s Plant-Based Professional Certification Course




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  21. I was wondering if Dr. Greger (or anyone else here) knows anything about the potential benefits of “twig tea”, also called Kukicha. It’s made from the stems and stalks of the tea plant. It’s low in caffeine and has a very earthy, almost coffee/chocolate-y flavor. I first came across it at a Himalayan restaurant and have started drinking it at work as my second mid-morning cup. Thanks in advance!




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  22. This was an interesting search. It seems some of the more scholarly data bases I searched through did not delve into types of green tea and I found the most specific information on a website that provides tea for sale, but also has very detailed descriptions of types of green tea. I believe you’ll find this website helpful and reassuring that Kukicha is indeed a form of green tea and is a very healthy drink for you:
    “Kukicha is a type of tea made using the tea tree’s stems, stalks and twigs. Also known as Bocha (stick tea), Kuckicha is derived from the production of Sencha and Gyokuro. It uses four kinds of stems, stalks and twigs. Kukicha has a creamy, nutty flavor, and a light colored brew. For the best results, use water at 85°C (185°F), as higher temperatures make the tea too strong.

    Kukicha is one of the teas that is preferred for those on the macrobiotic diet, as it helps calm the stomach and the nerves. Kukicha is unique in that it is very low in caffeine – naturally, without any industrial decaffeination.

    Sencha tea is the fully sun-grown variety of Japanese green tea. It is the most common and popular variety of green tea in Japan.

    Gyokuro is rolled form of shaded Japanese green tea leaf. What makes the Gyokuro tea leaf unique is that, for the final month before harvesting it is covered by shade”.
    https://www.chadoteahouse.com/types-of-japanese-tea
    Hope this is helpful.




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  23. Any research regarding consumption of hot food or drinks? Some claim the heat causes a problem. Some claim the same for cold drinks even water.
    Is there a scientific basis for this?




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    1. Sefi,

      hot drinks and foods are associated with cancer:

      https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26590941

      Cold drinks could in theory result in increased thermogenesis but it’s not amazing:

      https://nutritionfacts.org/video/the-ice-diet/

      https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4735055/

      https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3809630/

      http://www.burnthefatinnercircle.com/members/Cold_Water_Induced_Thermogenesis.cfm

      I hope you find this information useful :-)!

      Moderator Adam P.




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