Preventing Prostate Cancer with Green Tea

Preventing Prostate Cancer with Green Tea
4.4 (88%) 5 votes

A third of men in their 30s may already have tiny cancerous tumors in their prostates. How much tea would one have to drink to build up cancer-suppressing levels in one’s prostate tissue?

Discuss
Republish

Below is an approximation of this video’s audio content. To see any graphs, charts, graphics, images, and quotes to which Dr. Greger may be referring, watch the above video.

“Prostate cancer is a leading cause of illness and death among men in [the Western world].” But, the prostate cancer rates in Asia can be as much as ten times lower. Maybe, genetically they’re just less likely to get it. No. Japanese- and Chinese-Americans have high prostate cancer rates, as well.

In the U.S., up to nearly one in three men in their 30s already have small prostate cancers brewing, and that grows to nearly two-thirds of American men by their 60s. On autopsy, most older men were found to have unknown cancerous tumors in their prostates. What’s remarkable is that Asian men seem to have the same prevalence of these hidden, latent prostate cancers on autopsy, but the tumors don’t tend to grow enough to cause problems. In Japan, men tend to die with their tumors, rather than from their tumors. Of course, that’s changing, as Asian populations continue to Westernize their diets.

What is it about Western diets that’s fueling cancer growth? Well, it could be carcinogens in the diet, accelerating the growth of cancer. “The typical U.S. diet is rich in animal fats and meats…” But, it could also be something protective in Asian diets that’s slowing the cancer growth—like fruits and vegetables, soy foods, or green tea.

How might one figure out if there’s a link between tea consumption and risk and progression of prostate cancer? Well, you could see if tea drinkers tend to get less cancer in the future, and if cancer victims tended to have drank less tea in the past. Dozens of studies have done just that, and although the results were mixed, overall tea consumption was associated with a lower risk of prostate cancer. And so, tea consumption might indeed play a protective role.

But, just because tea drinkers get less cancer doesn’t mean it’s necessarily the tea. Maybe tea drinking is just a sign of a more traditional lifestyle. Maybe tea drinkers are less likely to be patrons of the thousand KFC outlets now in Japan, for example.

To control for as many factors as possible, you could perform in vitro studies in a lab, where you take everything else out of the equation, except green tea and prostate cancer, by dripping green tea compounds directly onto prostate cancer cells in a petri dish—which can cause them to self-destruct. But, are enough green tea compounds absorbed into our bloodstream when we drink it? Looks like it takes about a concentration of 40 (picomoles per milliliter) to cut the viability of human prostate cancer cells more than half in a petri dish. How much green tea would men have to drink to get concentrations that high in their prostate glands?

Well, if you have men drink six cups of green tea a day before undergoing prostate removal surgery, they can build up that 40 picomole cancer-stopping concentration in their prostate tissue. That may explain why some studies failed to find an association between tea drinking and cancer. In the U.S., for example, the high tea-drinking group may be defined as more than five cups of tea a week, which didn’t seem to do much.

But, in Japan, the high tea-drinking group can be five or more cups a day, which appeared to cut the risk of aggressive prostate cancer about in half—not apparently by preventing the formation of the cancer in the first place, but perhaps by slowing or stopping the cancer’s growth. If green tea can stop the growth of prostate cancer, why not try giving green tea to prostate cancer patients to see if it’ll help—which we’ll explore, next.

Please consider volunteering to help out on the site.

Image credits: KFCsign via flickr and the3cats via pixabay. Images have been modified.

Below is an approximation of this video’s audio content. To see any graphs, charts, graphics, images, and quotes to which Dr. Greger may be referring, watch the above video.

“Prostate cancer is a leading cause of illness and death among men in [the Western world].” But, the prostate cancer rates in Asia can be as much as ten times lower. Maybe, genetically they’re just less likely to get it. No. Japanese- and Chinese-Americans have high prostate cancer rates, as well.

In the U.S., up to nearly one in three men in their 30s already have small prostate cancers brewing, and that grows to nearly two-thirds of American men by their 60s. On autopsy, most older men were found to have unknown cancerous tumors in their prostates. What’s remarkable is that Asian men seem to have the same prevalence of these hidden, latent prostate cancers on autopsy, but the tumors don’t tend to grow enough to cause problems. In Japan, men tend to die with their tumors, rather than from their tumors. Of course, that’s changing, as Asian populations continue to Westernize their diets.

What is it about Western diets that’s fueling cancer growth? Well, it could be carcinogens in the diet, accelerating the growth of cancer. “The typical U.S. diet is rich in animal fats and meats…” But, it could also be something protective in Asian diets that’s slowing the cancer growth—like fruits and vegetables, soy foods, or green tea.

How might one figure out if there’s a link between tea consumption and risk and progression of prostate cancer? Well, you could see if tea drinkers tend to get less cancer in the future, and if cancer victims tended to have drank less tea in the past. Dozens of studies have done just that, and although the results were mixed, overall tea consumption was associated with a lower risk of prostate cancer. And so, tea consumption might indeed play a protective role.

But, just because tea drinkers get less cancer doesn’t mean it’s necessarily the tea. Maybe tea drinking is just a sign of a more traditional lifestyle. Maybe tea drinkers are less likely to be patrons of the thousand KFC outlets now in Japan, for example.

To control for as many factors as possible, you could perform in vitro studies in a lab, where you take everything else out of the equation, except green tea and prostate cancer, by dripping green tea compounds directly onto prostate cancer cells in a petri dish—which can cause them to self-destruct. But, are enough green tea compounds absorbed into our bloodstream when we drink it? Looks like it takes about a concentration of 40 (picomoles per milliliter) to cut the viability of human prostate cancer cells more than half in a petri dish. How much green tea would men have to drink to get concentrations that high in their prostate glands?

Well, if you have men drink six cups of green tea a day before undergoing prostate removal surgery, they can build up that 40 picomole cancer-stopping concentration in their prostate tissue. That may explain why some studies failed to find an association between tea drinking and cancer. In the U.S., for example, the high tea-drinking group may be defined as more than five cups of tea a week, which didn’t seem to do much.

But, in Japan, the high tea-drinking group can be five or more cups a day, which appeared to cut the risk of aggressive prostate cancer about in half—not apparently by preventing the formation of the cancer in the first place, but perhaps by slowing or stopping the cancer’s growth. If green tea can stop the growth of prostate cancer, why not try giving green tea to prostate cancer patients to see if it’ll help—which we’ll explore, next.

Please consider volunteering to help out on the site.

Image credits: KFCsign via flickr and the3cats via pixabay. Images have been modified.

Doctor's Note

CORRECTION: Thanks to Darryl’s eagle eyes I realize I my analysis of the in vitro data was off my a mere three orders of magnitude(!) This suggests that the powerful clinical effect of green tea on prostate cancer isn’t a direct effect, since the concentrations of at least one green tea compound within the prostate tissue wouldn’t be high enough to suppress cancer growth (at least in a petri dish).


Green tea is actually put to the test in cancer patients in my next video: Treating Prostate Cancer with Green Tea.

More men’s health videos include:

And for more on tea, check out, for example:

If you haven’t yet, you can subscribe to my videos for free by clicking here.

119 responses to “Preventing Prostate Cancer with Green Tea

Commenting Etiquette

The intention of the comment section under each video and blog post is to allow all members to share their stories, questions, and feedback with others in a welcoming, engaging, and respectful environment. Off-topic comments are permitted, in hopes more experienced users may be able to point them to more relevant videos that may answer their questions. Vigorous debate of science is welcome so long as participants can disagree respectfully. Advertising products or services is not permitted.

To make NutritionFacts.org a place where people feel comfortable posting without feeling attacked, we have no tolerance for ad hominem attacks or comments that are racist, misogynist, homophobic, vulgar, or otherwise inappropriate. Please help us to foster a community of mutual respect. Enforcement of these rules is done to the best of our ability on a case-by-case basis.

  1. I’m a fan of green tea, drinking about three cups a day. A question: since green tea is has anti-bacterial properties, does it affect the gut biome?




    0



    0
    1. Just my thoughts on this:
      Doubt the effect would be large enough to cause problems. Gut bacteria are very good in regenerating and green tea can not be as good as an antibiotic to wipe the bacteria down enough to cause problems.




      0



      0
    2. In traditional chinese medicine green tea is cooling. It helps to clear heat and toxins from the digestive system and help bowel movement. I always have to go within minutes after drinking my tea. :)




      0



      0
    1. Dear Lemonhead, Maureen Okun, and Sallli88 ( whom I cannot find in this thread even though it was an email from discus avout your comment, Et tu, Dr. Greger…”that triggered my post here…) I love to see us helping each other buck the trend of impoverished and decaying English usage! The TV, Movies, and even BBC news has forsaken good, clear, elegant, beautiful English usage for the sake of sounding like the common man. The common man used to speak much better after a high school education. Now there is a race to the bottom and a fear of sounding pretentious. I watch a lot of movies made in the 30s and you could still hear a knock at the door and in response to “Who’s there?” would come the response, “It is I.” ( the verb to be takes the nominative case, only recently has the sloppy use of me (objective case) entered acceptable language. Me was reserved as an object — with me, for me. etc. ( the French had this mis-use problem long ago and simply changed the rules using the objective case and calling it the “disjunctive” case I believe. So Napoleon used common and accepted usage when he said, “L’etat c’est moi!” Or “The state is me!” And indeed, the rhyme is better in the french version.

      So we can’t blame our brilliant and courageous and so generous Dr. Greger for picking up what he hears everywhere! But CHEERS to those who take the time to help us in maintaining or resurrecting a more exact, beautiful English!

      I looked up the forms of drink, sink, etc, and found this wonderful site: https://www.usingenglish.com/reference/irregular-verbs/drink.html. Does anyone reading this know that spin uses “span” in the past simple? I was shocked!!! The site listed “spun” as a possible alternative to span in the past simple and, of course, spun for the past participle. FUN discovery. I can’t wait to try using span in a conversation!

      I know language rules change as they adapt to common usage. But I don’t like it when those changes impoverish the clarity and grace of a language. And I shall do as I wish. And now that we can self-publish, I shall punctuate as I wish too!!




      1



      0
      1. Another grammatical error I see a lot recently is the incorrect use of “your” in place of “you’re”. For example, sme people write: “I heard your a vegan now.” instead of “I heard you’re a vegan now.”




        0



        0
      2. The well-documented written word is the basis for almost everything that is discussed here. Scientific papers must adhere to a manual of style. It’s part of what makes them readable and useful.




        0



        0
    2. lemonhead: Thank you. Never apologize for wanting this site to be as good as it can be. I see many jump immediately to Dr. G’s defense, as if he could not handle, or would not, in fact, welcome, constructive criticism. Feedback is an important function of the comments.




      0



      0
      1. I’m glad you understand my comment was intended to be constructive. My DH said to preface such corrections are better received if they are prefaced with ‘nitpick: ‘, which acknowledges that they aren’t all that important. I’ll try that in future.




        0



        0
      1. Thanks for replying, but I don´t want a wild guess. I´m hoping that one of the NutritionFacts team might be able to answer. Four small spoons would also be very expensive, 10 € a day.




        0



        0
  2. Oh how I hate measuring in cups. What cups? Is it a US measuring cup? is it a british tea cup? Or is it a small japanese tea cup. All of these are very different in size and hold different amount of ml. So what I mean with this rant. How much ml did the participant in the study drink per day?
    I drink a good liter of japanese tea per day. plus the occasional Match. I love it. I also wonder if the traditional way of drinking Japanese tea also has something to do with the low counts of prostate cancer. tea drinking in Japan is like meditating.




    0



    0
      1. I am also wondering about Matcha, and how much of it would be considered theraputic. I would like to switch from black to green iced tea. Can I make it with Matcha? How much?




        0



        0
  3. I’ll be researching to find the actual studies, but is “5 cups of green tea” actually 5, 8 oz servings, or 5 green tea bag equivalent…?




    0



    0
          1. I didn’t say NEVER effective, some respond better than others, but overall the treatments are about as effective as most pharmaceuticals, which is to say not very if you’ve seen other videos here. Sometimes it’s the promise of a fix that ramps up the mind and body to cure, shamans and other traditional healers have also succeeded long before modern medicine, healing hands often work miracles. It isn’t a cut and dried issue, but I saw too many people close to me die a miserable death after their treatments began. Not saying they would have been fine without, but their quality of life was stolen from them. I lived with my brother after he was diagnosed and when treatments began, the side effects were horrendous and he was miserable, but I won’t get graphic. At the end he said he wished he had just treasured the time he had left instead of enduring the “torture”. The treatments they gave my dad for his leukemia so depleted his immunity, instead of the “many” years they told him he could live with it, he was dead in a matter of a month from a serious fungal infection from a small sliver in his finger that ran up his arm and infected his brain. My son’s young friend was treated aggressively and survived, but with severe heart and organ damage that made his life a living hell, and he sadly took his own life before his 20th birthday.
            We all want long lives, but quality matters too. It’s an individual choice, but people who switch to an excellent diet often cure or live with their cancers for years, and often die with it, not from it. We certainly can’t prevent all cancers in this progressively challenging environment, but what we nourish ourselves with matters, and prevention is certainly better than trying to cure it with poison and radiation.




            0



            0
    1. LOL, don’t laugh, a Government agency (won’t name for privacy reasons) tried to make turmeric illegal because of turmeric’s strong anti-cancer properties. They couldn’t though, because the Indian Community would be up in arms about their national spice.




      0



      0
    1. I have used saw palmetto (SP), supposed to help put my hair back, too. Because of T. Colin Campbell’s book “Whole”, I am not a fan of supplements but I do take the SP, Mg (soil depletion of that mineral) and B12 (I am on a WFPB diet). It seems to help with the enlargement and urine flow but not the hair so much, as my picture demonstrates :P




      0



      0
      1. Stuff that *might* help with your hair: Edible: porcini mushrooms (ergothioneine), wild blueberries. Topicals: castor oil, niacinamide, caffeine, melatonin. Other: Laser hair comb.

        Topical castor oil is probably the cheapest and most likely to have an effect.

        Re: white tea – don’t know about prostate cancer, but Dr. Gregor states at one point he mixes it in with his hibiscus tea. Cold brew is best.




        0



        0
        1. Laser treatments, seen those and thought about them as they seem to less risky and painful than other options. Do they really work, like the cap or comb?




          0



          0
          1. I have a laser hair comb; it isn’t painful at all. In fact, it feels really relaxing. It works; it take a couple of weeks to notice a difference. I’m female, but I’m pretty sure my thinning hair is caused by the same mechanism as in males.




            0



            0
    2. Dr. Greger had a three part series of videos on BPH (1, 2, 3).

      The take-away is that a plant based diet not only removes those aspects of the diet that stimulate prostate growth, but in vitro tests of the effects of the blood of those eating a plant-based diet directly reduced the growth rate of normal prostate cells. So it isn’t just that a plant based diet displaces harmful substances, but actively regulates the growth of normal prostate cells.

      At the top of each page on this site is a line with links. One of those is “Health Topics” which organizes the videos and blog post by specific healt topics. One of those is Prostate Health.

      These topic pages are assembled by doing keyword searches of the transcript for each video and so in theory each video listed contains the keyword(s) somewhere. Thus the keyword(s) might be where Dr. Greger is mentioning them as a secondary or companion effect to the effect of nutrition on the primary topic of the video. Thus a video on Macular Degeneration is included in the list of video on “prostate health” because the lycopene in tomatoes that helps guard against macular degeneration also helps reduce prostate growth. I still find these tangential videos useful because it helps to remind me that our bodies function as an interconnected whole and not as a bunch of completely independent subsystems. Thus one aspect of diet, exercise, or other environmental contaminants might have a primary effect on one part of our body, but can also affect another seeming unrelated part of the body as well.




      0



      0
      1. Thanks for your comment Matthew. I would remind everyone that supplements (not food) carry their own inherent risks, as they are bioactive compounds. In fact, with zinc, one can easily run into difficulties by supplementing with Zinc. Over certain (not so high) doses, Zinc is known to block the receptor for Copper, creating copper deficiencies which are quite serious. We are a food first site – which is also known to be safe, effective, beneficial and cheap!!




        0



        0
  4. How about White tea (which is lower in caffeine)? Researchers at Linus Pauling Institute (c. 2000) tested four kinds of white tea on rats to assess benefits for colon cancer protection. Because of white tea’s higher content of some polyphenols, the scientists found it was better than green at mitigating harm done to DNA — a type of cell damage that can be a precursor to cancer. However, the researchers cautioned that additional studies would be needed to confirm the same benefits in humans. Does it destroy prostate cancer cells better?




    0



    0
    1. Here is a study on “The Chemopreventive and Chemotherapeutic Potentials of Tea Polyphenols” from 2012. Interesting one of the authors is Sanjay Gupta (The Dr. Gupta?). The interesting part is this statement: “Based on the manufacturing process used tea is available in four different forms such as green, black, oolong, and white tea. The process of preparation of green tea prevents the oxidation of green leaf polyphenols; in black tea most of these substances are oxidized; and in oolong tea they are partially oxidized. White tea is made from newly growth buds and young leaves by inactivating polyphenol oxidation through steaming and drying.”

      Maybe it is better? But I see no research on it…

      https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3161164/




      0



      0
    2. I remember reading years ago about a study that tested various kinds of green tea against breast cancer. What they found was that sencha tea gave a protective factor of let’s say X and regular jasmine scented green tea gave a protective factor that was approximately the same. However, when they gave both together or alternated them, the protective factor was almost double, suggesting that there are different phytonutrients in each one.




      0



      0
      1. I have read a few articles and most say the ratio is 1 matcha = 3 green. A few say 1 matcha = 10 green. They all talk about how consuming too much matcha for too long might hurt your liver. I guess we will stick do drink a couple of cups per week.




        0



        0
    1. You could grow a couple of tea plants (Camellia Sinensis) and find out on Youtube how to harvest and treat them to turn them into your preferred form. You may have to order the plants online. I asked for one for my birthday last year but nobody could find them locally. Maybe Santa will bring me one. Other camellias do great here, so I think the tea camellia will as well.




      0



      0
      1. Rebecca Cody: Great idea! I have a friend who grows her own tea plants in NW America. She harvests the leaves, and I think dries them out in the microwave. She says it works fine. I think the idea of growing one’s own tea leaves is pretty cool.




        0



        0
        1. Love this idea – what part of the country does your friend live? I wonder about the Colorado area . . . ??
          Makes me think that one could grow a hedgerow of tea plants rather than plain old shrubs, no?




          0



          0
          1. GEBrand: My friend lives in Oregon. She says that her bushes are lush and thriving. I do terrible growing things, so I’m the last person to ask if it would work in Colorado. I do love the idea of a a hedgerow of tea plants. Why not?




            0



            0
          2. Do other camellias grow there? Your weather is very different from ours here in the Pacific Northwest. I lived in Denver years ago and I remember the extreme changes from high to low, especially in winter – like a 40 degree difference. Also how snow can come, and has, in any month of the year. You would probably have to amend your soil so it is acidic. There is bound to be a gardening website specializing in your weather conditions, where you could read or even ask questions.




            0



            0
  5. Et tu, Michael??? “…if cancer victims tended to have drank less tea…” What’s happening to our past participles?! I’m not surprised that some uneducated people are substituting past tense froms for past perfect – it’s happening more and more – but, really, Doc, you should know better! [Yes, languages change…but I don’t want it to happen on my watch!]




    0



    0
    1. Yes, . . and I find that dangling participles leave me squirming like the Princess and the Pea along with the strong remembrance of my 10th grade English teacher informing me that there is no such word as “gotten”, which I see everywhere of course.
      I am going to join Dr. G and go drank myself a good one.




      0



      0
    2. To that, I say amen. I see terrible grammar in scientific papers, books, newspapers, and magazines increasingly these days. whatever happened to editors?




      0



      0
  6. I watched a TED video where the medical doctor researching said that they tested different kinds of green tea and the only ones that were effective against cancer of all types was either Matcha or Sencha. Costco sells a brand that I buy. Its $14 for 100 not cheap but worth it because it has both of these teas that this TED researcher found to exceed all the other green teas. I don’t work for Costco and don’t get anything out of this I just am a long time customer and trust the buyers.




    0



    0
    1. I like Costco, too. They have more and more organic foods all the time, but I’ve never looked at their teas. Are they organic? I wonder if decaf sencha, which I buy from a local tea seller, would be as good. Not that I have a prostate, but other body parts are involved, of course.

      I was at the grand opening of the original Costco store in Seattle many years ago! I think I bought a giant jar of roasted and salted cashews.




      0



      0
      1. I also buy the Sencha/Matcha tea mix from Costco. I think the manufacturer is ITO EN but it’s sold under the Kirkland name. The box has no indication that it’s organic, so I would guess it isn’t. The bags are made using nylon instead of paper, which gives a really good infusion.




        0



        0
  7. How many infusions to a cup? I do about three. So, when compared to the studies cited in the video, should I count this as 1 cup or 3 cups?

    Inquiring minds would like to know!




    0



    0
    1. Hi there – it would be helpful to know from the studies how many grams, or ounces of green tea were used for the studies. I can check the actual studies and see what is there. You can, too – look at Sources Cited tab for a listing of the studies and use Google Scholar to see if you can retrieve the studies without academic access. Let me know what you find.




      0



      0
      1. Thanks for tip. Regretfully my source, deepdive, does not have access from the publisher. As the common recommendation is 2 – 4 infusions per cup of green tea, it would be important to know the number of infusions per “cup” in the study especially if it turns out to be only 1/cup. I greatly appreciate your assistance in this matter as I think it would be a helpful clarification for others. Green Tea Consumption and Prostate Cancer Risk in Japanese Men: a Prospective Study.




        0



        0
  8. Hi, I am a new vegan and I am trying find a concise list as to what I need to supplement my nutrient dense plant based diet with. Here is what I am adding daily:
    500 mcg B12
    2 TBS Ground Flax
    1TBS Amla powder
    2 caps Deva epa dha
    I would love it if a doctor would write an article that updates what vegans should be supplementing with at a minimum and maximum, every day to help summarize all of the scattered info on sites like this.




    0



    0
      1. Hi Thea – I took a look at the link you suggested because sometimes I’m a little fuzzy as well. So the link was helpful. I still have a couple of questions though. As far as this quote:
        “Calcium
        At least 600 mg daily via calcium-rich plant foods—preferably low-oxalate dark green leafy vegetables, which includes all greens except spinach, chard, and beet greens (all very healthy foods, but not good calcium sources due to their oxalate content). ”

        When Dr. G. say “all greens” . . . could you/he be more specific? are we talking romaine lettuce? arugula? asparagus? I would really like to know what he is referring to more clearly.

        Also, regarding symptoms of B12 deficiency he states:
        “Tip: If experiencing deficiency symptoms, the best test is a urine MMA (not serum B12 level)”
        What would deficiency symptoms be?

        Thanks!




        0



        0
        1. GEBrand: Both good questions. For the calcium question, I do believe that Dr. Greger does mean pretty much all greens. But if you have a question about a particular food, you can look it up. One site to look it up on is the NutritionData Self website. To take your examples, I looked up 100 g asparagus and compared to 100 g romaine lettuce. It is 23 mg vs 33 mg. Depending on how you look at it, these are in the same general ball park or very different. Either way, you are getting some good calcium. From: http://nutritiondata.self.com/facts/vegetables-and-vegetable-products/2312/2 vs http://nutritiondata.self.com/facts/vegetables-and-vegetable-products/2475/2
          .
          Another option: The book Becoming Vegan, Express Edition is a book that Dr. Greger recommends, especially as a reference for specific nutrients. The book specifically mentions the following veggies as good sources of calcium: broccoli, box choy, kale, napa cabbage, watercress, collard, dandelion, mustards, and turnip greens. The authors also write that “Other good sources are fresh and dried fruit, …, almonds, and tahini. Calcium is added to fortified nondairy milks and tofu, and in both cases, calcium absorption compared favorably with that of cow’s milk. …” They have more details in the book if anyone is interested.
          .
          For the B12 question, there are videos on this site about B12 that explain the symptoms of B12 deficiency, but it would take me some research to find the specific ones. I don’t have time that for at the moment. I’ll leave finding those videos as an exercise for you. :-) I’m guessing that WebMD, while not the best general resource in the world, probably has a decent answer to this question and here is their answer: http://www.webmd.com/food-recipes/guide/vitamin-b12-deficiency-symptoms-causes#2-3
          .
          Hope that helps.




          0



          0
        1. GoGreen_GoVegan: Not so fast there partner! Have you heard of Dr. Greger’s Daily Dozen? The Daily Dozen is the 11 foods/food groups, plus exercise, that Dr. Greger recommends be eaten each day. As you know, Dr. Greger has great respect for and has highlighted many plants. And he only had room for foods to highlight in the Daily Dozen. He considers flaxseed to be so important that he recommends 1 tablespoon of ground flaxseed every day. Here is an overview of the benefits of flaxseed: http://nutritionfacts.org/topics/flax-seeds
          .
          Dr. Greger explains the Daily Dozen in detail in Part 2 of his book. You can also get a quick overview of the Daily Dozen from a free smart phone app.




          0



          0
  9. I fear this videos concentration calculation is off by 3 orders of magnitude. Micro (μ) is the prefix for “millionth”, whereas pico (p) is the prefix for “trillionth”, a million times smaller still. Hence the 40 μM concentration for inducing PC apoptosis at 2:40 would require ~40,000 pmol/g tissue (if we assume the density of prostate tissue is about 1 g/mL). This is far beyond the 0.1-0.7 μM plasma peak seen after food scale green tea, green tea extract and pure EGCG doses (in 16 studies as of 2005). That’s not to say there aren’t interesting things going on with dietary EGCG and prostate cancer, but its more subtle and indirect than effects seen in vitro with concentrations far above what’s possible IRL.




    0



    0
        1. Holy moly–you’re right! (or should I say holy MOLEy! :). I mixed up my nano with my pico. (I was wondering why my nano de gallo sauce jar was WAY too large :) What’s 3 orders of magnitude, between friends, though, right? Seriously thank you SO much for catching this. I’m going to put a thing in the Doc Note and add the video to my rerecord list. As is tradition here at NutritionFacts.org, anyone who finds an error gets a free DVD of their choice, or a signed book AND my eternal gratitude. Email me (mhg1@cornell.edu) and I’ll set you up!




          0



          0
    1. Are there any methods of increasing bioavailability under investigation that you think are promising, Darryl? For example, I recall reading somewhere that delivering small molecules through the nose (e.g.,via nasal sprays) may help them cross into the brain more quickly. Second question: Are there any studies looking at the possible synergy of nutrients working together to improve bioavailability? In the green tea studies, for example, might other phytos work synergistically with EGCG to increase plasma levels of EGCG? Has that been studied?




      0



      0
  10. Don’t we have to be concerned about the lead and fluoride in tea if we drink so much of it, especially if its from China? I tend to avoid all food from China, so I make sure my green tea is from Japan, where studies show the tea has less lead and fluoride, but still present though.




    0



    0
    1. Sidney, you are correct to be concerned about heavy metals contaminating items from China. It is quite pervasive so you are wise to obtain items for consumption elsewhere.




      0



      0
    1. for Matcha, only Tencha tea leaves are used. Tencha leaves are being kept in the shade 4 weeks before harvesting. So pulverizing Sencha or Gyokuro will not give you real Matcha. Also the Tencha leaves are beeing ground very slowly between two stones. But you can eat all green tea leaves nevertheless. I usually keep my used tea leaves in the fridge and throw them in my smoothies.




      0



      0
    1. I prefer black tea also. However, the evidence regarding black tea is mixed. Some studies even show an adverse effect.. For example.a Scottish study showed that heavy tea drinkers had a 50% increased risk of prostate cancer (virtually all tea drunk in the UK is black).
      http://www.gla.ac.uk/news/archiveofnews/2012/june/headline_236268_en.html
      http://www.nhs.uk/news/2012/06june/Pages/tea-raises-prostate-cancer-risk.aspx

      However, in the UK , Australia etc, black tea is usually drunk with milk and sugar. Therefore, heavy tea consumption is often a marker for heavy sugar and milk consumption which may confound the results. Nevertheless,even excluding British etc studies, there is no consistent evidence that black tea consumption decreases prostate cancer risk. It is still a healthy drink though since it reduces heart disease risk – or, at least, it is associated with .reduced CVD risk.
      http://www.nature.com/ejcn/journal/v61/n1/full/1602489a.html/

      You could throw some green tea (ir white tea) in with your usual black tea leaves when you make a pot of tea. Or break open a (green) tea bag and throw the leaves in a smoothie.




      0



      0
      1. Tom, thanks for the suggestion and I never use milk in my tea. I went out today and bought some Bigelow Plantation Mint green tea today, it’s good on it’s own.

        For my iced sweet tea I will still only use black tea, it’s just not the same with green tea.




        0



        0
    2. Jeff: to add to Toms’s comment, most of the black tea sold in the US comes from China and the Chinese black tea has more arsenic than green tea of any origin.




      0



      0
      1. Yes, that is the conventional view.although this Polish study noted
        “Green teas were found to be more highly contaminated with both total and inorganic arsenic than black teas.”
        https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25526572

        Personally, I drink Ceylon (black) tea usually although I also drink green and white tea.

        I should add that, according to this Brazilian study, there is “almost no transfer from tea leaves metal content to infusion”.
        http://www.ss-pub.org/wp-content/uploads/2015/06/BCR2015022701.pdf

        In other words, drinking tea isn’t really going to give you a high dose of arsenic because it basically stays in the leaves. However, it is possible that by “eating” tea (ie putting tea leaves in a smoothie etc) we could be increasing the bioavailability of heavy metals in tea.




        0



        0
  11. To me, the statistics given for the rate of prostate cancer in the western world is enough incentive right there to raise children in the wfpb eating style and to encourage drinking healthy beverages. I prefer matcha, or a ‘spice tea’ like I shared with the grandneice this morning – great stuff!




    0



    0
  12. My Argentinian friends have addicted me to Yerbamate. Have to drink from a special container and pass around and share the same straw(!) but when I drink I become quite omnipotent if you know what i mean. I hope it is good for me too. Rowrrr




    0



    0
    1. You have to be careful of those gauchos. Or “sheepshaggers” as they were not so fondly called when I was down in the Falklands.

      Incidentally, when I was there (1984), everybody but everybody listened to the 6 o;clock news from New Zealand on the wireless (no TV or internet then) because it reported the daily wool prices.

      I tried yerba mate as a tea a long time ago but it never did much for me.

      According to WebMD
      “When taken in large amounts or for long periods of time, yerba mate is POSSIBLY UNSAFE. It increases the risk of mouth, esophageal, laryngeal, kidney, bladder, and lung cancer. This risk is especially high for people who smoke or drink alcohol.

      When taken in very large amounts, yerba mate is LIKELY UNSAFE, due to its caffeine content.”
      http://www.webmd.com/vitamins-supplements/ingredientmono-828-yerba%20mate.aspx?activeingredientid=828&activeingredientname=yerba%20mate




      0



      0
  13. Can Dr. greger address the issue of Parathyroid gland and effects of parathyroid hormone on increased level of Calcium in Blood and Urine and as a result Osteoporosis. It is caused by overworking of one of the gland and there is no treatment for it except for removal of one or more of the glands. Is here any nutritional links here?




    0



    0
  14. What’s the chance of organizing vegetarians (and vegans of course) into a political body to lobby the government to our benefit? I’m concerned mainly because of big business moving into the Organic Market without abiding by past organic practices.




    0



    0
    1. Thomas Hanson: The group: Physician’s Committee for Responsible Medicine (PCRM), head up by Dr. Barnard, watches, lobbies (I think), and sues the government as needed. Here is an example:
      https://www.pcrm.org/media/news/physicians-committee-sues-usda-and-dhhs
      PCRM does not always (or ever?) win, but they do get some movement from the government based
      on PCRM’s efforts. I see PCRM as a good watchdog.
      .
      I’m a big fan of PCRM. They take donations if anyone is interested…




      0



      0

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Pin It on Pinterest

Share This