Do Chia Seeds Help with Belly Fat?

Do Chia Seeds Help with Belly Fat?
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The secret to the benefits of chia seeds may be that you have to grind them up.

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Below is an approximation of this video’s audio content. To see any graphs, charts, graphics, images, and quotes to which Dr. Greger may be referring, watch the above video.

In my latest literature review on the “health promoting properties and therapeutic applications of chia seeds,” I ran into a lot of studies like this: “Strategies for incorporation of chia…in frankfurters as a health-promoting ingredient.” After all, in “[r]ecent years [we] have seen increasing pursuit of healthier lifestyles,” healthier “dietary habits. In response to this, there has been a great deal of interest…in…compounds originally present in plants to provide health benefits in [real] foods,” like hot dogs. And, indeed: “Reformulated frankfurters with chia contained significantly greater amounts of [plant] protein, fibre, minerals.” In fact: “Given this [new] nutritional profile, [such hot dogs] could qualify for labelling with a variety of nutrition and health claims.” And, what do you know, the “chia-…enriched restructured pork [a]ffects aged rats fed [bad] diets.” So, let’s slap on a health label.

Chia has been eaten for thousands of years, so that would suggest it’s at least safe to eat. But, does it have any special benefits? It’s certainly nutritious; it’s got lots of fiber, antioxidants—black chia seeds perhaps more than white, plant protein (of course), “a source of B vitamins,” a source of minerals. So, nutritious, sure; just like nearly any whole plant food. But, again, any special benefits? There’s all sorts of claims out there by people trying to sell you chia seeds, but to “definitively establish their actual beneficial effects,” we need a little something called “scientific evidence instead of [just] cultural traditions, personal beliefs, or inaccurate advertising,” which is a redundant term if I’ve ever heard one.

For example, there are about 50,000 videos on YouTube on chia seeds and belly fat. But what does the science say? Dietary chia seed does reduce belly fat…in rats. Does apparently reduce the weight…of chickens. Evidently, people don’t like smelling or tasting fishy chicken; so, by feeding chickens chia seeds, you can boost their omega-3 levels without it turning into funky chicken. But what happens if you just cut out the middle-hen, and eat chia yourself?

What happens if you add a teaspoon or two of chia seeds to yogurt as a snack? After the yogurt with the chia, participants reported significantly less hunger, and that then translated to eating fewer calories two hours later at lunch. Now, my initial thought was, uh, give people more food—add chia to whatever they were eating—and they’re less hungry; duh. But, no, they gave people less yogurt to compensate; so, each snack had the same number of calories. So, we can say at least that chia seeds are more satiating than yogurt. But, at lunch two hours later, they didn’t just eat a little less food, but like 25% fewer calories after the chia. A teaspoon of chia seeds only has like 50 calories; yet, they ended up eating nearly 300 calories less at lunch, way more than compensating. So, if you did that every day, ate some chia seeds as a snack—and one teaspoon seemed to work as well as two—you’d expect to lose weight over time. You don’t know, though, until you put it to the test. “Subjects were randomized” to a whole tablespoon of chia seed twice a day for months “before the first and last meal for 12 weeks.” And, they found: “Chia seed does not promote weight loss” after all. Huh?

Well, we know from the flax seed literature, if you give people muffins made out of whole flax seeds, they don’t seem to really absorb all the benefit, compared to ground flax seed muffins. And, the same appears to be true with chia seeds. Eat whole chia seeds for 10 weeks, and no increase in short-chain omega-3 levels or long-chain omega 3s. But, eat the same amount of chia seeds ground up, and levels shoot up. So, maybe the problem with this study is that they gave people whole chia seeds. But, there’s never been a study on ground chia and weight loss…until, now.

A randomized controlled trial, about two tablespoons of ground chia a day versus a fiber-matched control made of mostly oat bran. That’s how you know it wasn’t funded by a chia seed company, because they put it head-to-head against a real control, not just a sugar pill or something, to control for the fiber content. So, then, if there was weight loss, we’d know it wasn’t just the fiber, but something particular to the chia. And, those eating the ground chia lost significantly more weight, significantly more waist, in terms of waist circumference (a measure of belly fat), and, as a bonus, C-reactive protein levels—suggesting an anti-inflammatory effect, as well. So, maybe some of those 50,000 YouTube videos weren’t completely off.

There is one form of chia powder I’d stay away from, though. I’ve talked about using chia gel to replace eggs or oil in baking; you mix a teaspoon of seeds with a quarter-cup of water, and let it sit for half an hour. Certainly, a way to lower cholesterol, but here you are cutting down on your salmonella risk and, there was an international outbreak of salmonella “linked to sprouted chia seed powder.” Sprouting can create “an ideal environment for bacterial growth.” Ninety-four people infected across 16 states. Granted, not as bad as salmonella-tainted eggs, which may sicken 79,000 Americans every year, but still, I would recommend staying away from sprouted chia seed powder.

Please consider volunteering to help out on the site.

Image credit: fesehe via Pixabay. Image has been modified.

Motion graphics by Avocado Video.

Below is an approximation of this video’s audio content. To see any graphs, charts, graphics, images, and quotes to which Dr. Greger may be referring, watch the above video.

In my latest literature review on the “health promoting properties and therapeutic applications of chia seeds,” I ran into a lot of studies like this: “Strategies for incorporation of chia…in frankfurters as a health-promoting ingredient.” After all, in “[r]ecent years [we] have seen increasing pursuit of healthier lifestyles,” healthier “dietary habits. In response to this, there has been a great deal of interest…in…compounds originally present in plants to provide health benefits in [real] foods,” like hot dogs. And, indeed: “Reformulated frankfurters with chia contained significantly greater amounts of [plant] protein, fibre, minerals.” In fact: “Given this [new] nutritional profile, [such hot dogs] could qualify for labelling with a variety of nutrition and health claims.” And, what do you know, the “chia-…enriched restructured pork [a]ffects aged rats fed [bad] diets.” So, let’s slap on a health label.

Chia has been eaten for thousands of years, so that would suggest it’s at least safe to eat. But, does it have any special benefits? It’s certainly nutritious; it’s got lots of fiber, antioxidants—black chia seeds perhaps more than white, plant protein (of course), “a source of B vitamins,” a source of minerals. So, nutritious, sure; just like nearly any whole plant food. But, again, any special benefits? There’s all sorts of claims out there by people trying to sell you chia seeds, but to “definitively establish their actual beneficial effects,” we need a little something called “scientific evidence instead of [just] cultural traditions, personal beliefs, or inaccurate advertising,” which is a redundant term if I’ve ever heard one.

For example, there are about 50,000 videos on YouTube on chia seeds and belly fat. But what does the science say? Dietary chia seed does reduce belly fat…in rats. Does apparently reduce the weight…of chickens. Evidently, people don’t like smelling or tasting fishy chicken; so, by feeding chickens chia seeds, you can boost their omega-3 levels without it turning into funky chicken. But what happens if you just cut out the middle-hen, and eat chia yourself?

What happens if you add a teaspoon or two of chia seeds to yogurt as a snack? After the yogurt with the chia, participants reported significantly less hunger, and that then translated to eating fewer calories two hours later at lunch. Now, my initial thought was, uh, give people more food—add chia to whatever they were eating—and they’re less hungry; duh. But, no, they gave people less yogurt to compensate; so, each snack had the same number of calories. So, we can say at least that chia seeds are more satiating than yogurt. But, at lunch two hours later, they didn’t just eat a little less food, but like 25% fewer calories after the chia. A teaspoon of chia seeds only has like 50 calories; yet, they ended up eating nearly 300 calories less at lunch, way more than compensating. So, if you did that every day, ate some chia seeds as a snack—and one teaspoon seemed to work as well as two—you’d expect to lose weight over time. You don’t know, though, until you put it to the test. “Subjects were randomized” to a whole tablespoon of chia seed twice a day for months “before the first and last meal for 12 weeks.” And, they found: “Chia seed does not promote weight loss” after all. Huh?

Well, we know from the flax seed literature, if you give people muffins made out of whole flax seeds, they don’t seem to really absorb all the benefit, compared to ground flax seed muffins. And, the same appears to be true with chia seeds. Eat whole chia seeds for 10 weeks, and no increase in short-chain omega-3 levels or long-chain omega 3s. But, eat the same amount of chia seeds ground up, and levels shoot up. So, maybe the problem with this study is that they gave people whole chia seeds. But, there’s never been a study on ground chia and weight loss…until, now.

A randomized controlled trial, about two tablespoons of ground chia a day versus a fiber-matched control made of mostly oat bran. That’s how you know it wasn’t funded by a chia seed company, because they put it head-to-head against a real control, not just a sugar pill or something, to control for the fiber content. So, then, if there was weight loss, we’d know it wasn’t just the fiber, but something particular to the chia. And, those eating the ground chia lost significantly more weight, significantly more waist, in terms of waist circumference (a measure of belly fat), and, as a bonus, C-reactive protein levels—suggesting an anti-inflammatory effect, as well. So, maybe some of those 50,000 YouTube videos weren’t completely off.

There is one form of chia powder I’d stay away from, though. I’ve talked about using chia gel to replace eggs or oil in baking; you mix a teaspoon of seeds with a quarter-cup of water, and let it sit for half an hour. Certainly, a way to lower cholesterol, but here you are cutting down on your salmonella risk and, there was an international outbreak of salmonella “linked to sprouted chia seed powder.” Sprouting can create “an ideal environment for bacterial growth.” Ninety-four people infected across 16 states. Granted, not as bad as salmonella-tainted eggs, which may sicken 79,000 Americans every year, but still, I would recommend staying away from sprouted chia seed powder.

Please consider volunteering to help out on the site.

Image credit: fesehe via Pixabay. Image has been modified.

Motion graphics by Avocado Video.

Doctor's Note

Here’s a link to the video I referred to: Which Are Better: Chia Seeds or Flax Seeds?

Here’s some more on flax:

Salmonella risk is also why we shouldn’t eat raw alfalfa sprouts, and should be wary of poultry (Salmonella in Chicken & Turkey: Deadly but Not Illegal), and even cooked eggs (see Total Recall).

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196 responses to “Do Chia Seeds Help with Belly Fat?

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        1. I grind up my flax, used to grind chia, and grind up other nuts and seeds in my coffee grinder, it definitely does not produce butter, it makes the same kind of powder you get when buying pre-ground flax and chia.

          1. I find even high fat nuts do not produce butter. I make vegan parmesan out of ground cashews, sunflower seeds, and/or pumpkin seeds (and nutritional yeast). I even have ground up hemp which while it doesn’t turn into a seed butter, it does cake up more for whatever reason, but even then that’s only when I grind it for a long period of time.

    1. They will form gel not ground as well. You will get more benefits from them ground. What he is saying that it might be best to grind your own and avoid commercially pre-ground ones.

  1. So I’ve been adding flax seeds (ground) to my morning fruit and oat smoothie, but it sounds like ground chia would do as much good and perhaps even more good. Or should I just add both and make sure I’m getting all of the nutritional bang I can?

    1. Hi Barbie,

      Chia seeds and flax seed have different nutritional properties. I wil say that adding them together is a great idea to boost all the benefits. My recommendation is to stick with small amounts. They are high energy foods, therefore they can add up tons of extra calories without notice.

      Yared, Health Support Volunteer

      1. @Nutriyared: Dr. Greger said, “A teaspoon of chia seeds only has like 50 calories; yet, they ended up eating nearly 300 calories less at lunch, way more than compensating.” I don’t see a need to worry about them being “high energy” foods.

        1. Well, that’s true. But what if someone does not add just 1 teaspoon and add 3 teaspoons instead. This will be a problem.

          1. Nutriyared,

            In theory, I might agree with you, but in the other study they added 2 tablespoons full and there was significant weight loss and waist loss.

            It is an interesting concept, because nuts and seeds turn part of the whole Calorie Density thing on its head.

            If I remember right, I think the one teaspoon of chia seeds accomplished a bigger shift of calories not eaten at the next meal than the salad with no dressing in the Calorie Density studies. I have to go back and watch, but it might have caused a greater shift than the lentil soup or equal to it.

            1. The nuts logic already had a “nutty logic” to it, but two tablespoons of seeds caused weight loss and waist loss. That’s nuts. (And apparently, that’s seeds, too.)

              Sorry, I don’t have the comic timing to match “funky chicken” and “middle-hen” but I have the genuine head scratching response wondering if they added 4 tablespoons would they lose even more weight?

              1. Going back to the nut theories.

                Not chewing and the calories pass through.

                But with seeds it only works with the ground seeds. They didn’t lose weight with the whole seeds.

                So…. this one would be a fiber thing, rather than a metabolism thing…. right?

                Sorry, trying to catch up to the logic.

                    1. Worsening prostate cancer would be a big deal if I was a guy.

                      I remember years and years ago when SNL had a skit where artificial sweeteners cause Cancer, and the character said but men prefer women thin or something like that.

                      The actress, whose name escapes me right this minute, wrote a book about her battle with cancer and how those words came back to haunt her.

                    2. Gosh, YeahRight, you’ll be complaining that people don’t seem to know what an adverb is these days….. but, hey, you did good.

                    3. Deb, regarding the SNL skit, I think it was Gilda Radnor who said that line and cancer was her fate if I’m not mistaken.

                    4. They had a skit as well with John Bulushi dancing on the graves of all his cohorts at the end, forget the full plot however…….strange.

                    5. The side effects ited in that article seem pretty minor or even non-existent to me. However, I did like the way that it provided the refernces for its statements. However, my reading of the links was that flax seed consumption is actually protective vis-a-vis prostate cancer, despite the shock-horror headline.

                      The high blood omega 3 levels in advanced prostate cancer patients were thought to be a consequence of the cancer’s metabolic effects on the body, not an indication that high blood omega 3 levels promote prostate cancer. It’s a bit like saying that since weight loss is associated with cancer, weight loss must promote cancer.

      2. I try for 2 Tablespoons of one or the other in smoothie or oatmeal. Are you saying 1 Tablespoon of each ground chia and flax is sufficient

        1. watercress, in Dr. Greger’s daily dozen he recommends getting 1 tbsp of ground flax a day. In a lecture of his back in… 2010, 11, 12, or 14 or something like that, he recommended 2 tbsp/day of ground flax everyday. In a live Q&A over the winter, I believe I remember him recommending possibly adding more flax in order to help someone lower their BP (I believe that what it was; going solely on memory).

          My take is he wants us to make sure we’re at least getting 1 tbsp. I like to do a minimum of 2 tbsp/day for all that great ALA.

        2. Hi this is Dr. Daniela Sozanski PhD Naturopathy and Health Support volunteer for Nutritionfacts.
          I appreciate the comment below on Dr. Greger’s recommendation. I personally recommend 2 tablespoons of flax and one of chia daily. The benefits are priceless. Adding the freshly ground mix to half a cup of almond milk, together with, let’s say, one tablespoon of raw whole oats and a handful of blueberries would make a great snack and a daily exercise that could be sustained. Dr. Sozanski

          1. Thanks for this response Dr. Sozanski. I actually have a question I’m wondering if you could answer. I don’t supplement with algae oil and just rely on flax and things like that that for my omega-3, so I tend to avoid pairing my daily intake of flax with nuts or anything high in omega-6 due to worrying about competition for absorption and not getting enough of the omega-3… I know our bodies prefer omega-3 over omega-6 when they’re simultaneously being absorbed so it’s quicker to pick up the omega-6, but in Dr. Greger’s same lecture that I learned that from, he talks about how people on a SAD overwhelm their bodies with omega-6 and in that case you might not absorb the omega-3 enough. So I’m probably being paranoid because almonds are different than potato chips cooked in sunflower oil, for example, but do you think it’s at all necessary to separate one’s daily intake of these omega-3 seeds from whole plant foods with naturally high levels of omega-6?

            Sorry for the lengthiness, I’ve just wondered about this for a few years now.

    2. Barbie, flax is one of the most beneficial things we can add to our diet, it can’t be replaced with something and then expect to get the same benefits. I highly suggest you check out all of Dr. Greger’s videos in flax.
      For the most health benefits, I believe flax is the better option.

      1. I disagree about them adding extra calories without noticing. I find flax and chia to both be extremely filling in small amounts (2-3 tbsp, ground). I make sure not to consume too much flax if I don’t want to spoil my appetite for something later.

    3. That’s what I do, I grind up 4 tablespoons of flax and 4 tablespoons of chia in my coffee grinder and use that during the week for my wife and I. One tablespoon per day of that omega 3 powder mixture.

      1. Hi this is Dr. Daniela Sozanski PhD Naturopathy and Health Support volunteer for Nutritionfacts.
        I love what you do and keep doing it. The health advantages are priceless. I hope you keep the mix in the fridge in an air tight container. Dr. Sozanski

    4. I’ve been using both in my smoothies but whole….. I guess I’ll grind them! I need to know about storage tho

  2. You never fail to crack me up, Dr. Greger. “‘inaccurate advertising,’ which is a redundant term if I’ve ever heard one.” Hilarious! I agree.

    1. Someone may certainly correct me on this as I am by no means a standard or qualified to state any definitive thing but..
      I think the tendency for salmonella depends a bit upon the structure of the sprout. I have heard alfalfa seed sprout structure is particularly prone to have bacteria adhere to it so it may be more likely.
      I have not heard that is the situation with rice. But basically anything can carry salmonella and warm moist environments favor bacteria.

      A company is now producing sprouts by some robotic means, which translates to no human ever touching the thing. I think that may be a good technology seemingly for protection from bacterial invasion.

      1. Salmonela can seemingly stay alive for quite some time on even thought of inert things. Cutting boards that have chickens cut up on them can pose a potential for transmission to my recollection for quite a time after the cutting.
        The problem as I read it on grown things, there was a problem here in NM with peanuts, is exposure to bird droppings. That place had the trucks of peanuts out in the open where the birds would occasionally poop on it. I had a relative of mine get water from a bird bath directly in her eye and mouth a bit ago and sure as shooting she developed salmonella like symptoms a few days after. Not bad enough for a doc visit but I think that not coicidence.

        But again I am just depending on things I have heard and am no expert.

      2. Making sprouts at home is so easy! You can smell them and then you know if something’s wrong. Normally I use filtered water, but if they start to smell a little off, I rinse them more frequently in the chlorinated water. These are the adjustments you can make at home. Double your food size, cut your costs, be much safer. Sounds like a good deal to me. Plus, it’s fun.
        John S

    2. on the subject of sprouted rice, doesn’t sprouting rice increase the bioavailability of arsenic present in rice? Or am I remembering wrong?

    3. Hi this is Dr. Daniela Sozanski PhD Naturopathy and Health Support volunteer for Nutritionfacts.
      Indeed it seems that rice can also become infected with various pathogens, to the point to where disinfection methods have been studied. I found two such discussions for you, one Infections associated with eating seed sprouts, https://wwwnc.cdc.gov/eid/article/5/5/99-0503_article#r32, which quotes the second study: https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/abs/10.1111/j.1365-2621.1997.tb04443.x. I hope this helps, Dr. Sozanski

  3. I always just threw chia seeds in the bin of why bother, they seemed so faddish.
    I guess they do serve to loose weight by this, but as I don’t find that a problem, I will just stick to flax.
    Good video though informative.

    It amazes me that national media wise the egg thing just gets totally unreported as per salmonella.
    Probably one single item(putting kind of meat in each separate category not together)…it is far and away the greatest common cause by my read and most hazard.

    1. AS I read the video this shows chia as probably more helpful with loosing weight and they provide good nutritional content, but does it say they are more nutritionally beneficial than flax?

        1. I use flax. If a thing of weight ever presented I would just exercise more. Seems the more reasonable and healthy approach to weight management than adding one dietary ingredient or not.

          And I firmly feel it is not with exercise, a thing of caloric drain when doing the exercise. Exercise translates down to increased caloric use even when resting some time after the exercise has concluded. Exercise in extreme heat I know of no study, but guarantee you there exists increased caloric consumption. I cannot keep any weight on if I do such a hour or so a day.

          I really think this is a component americans are loth to engage in for effective weight management.
          Yes biggest loosers they all gain the weight back…they all stop the exercising.

          A teaspoon or two of chia and I will be presto change slim…..don’t think so. A unreasonable expectation. But a hour or so of good hard exercise which even disabled peoples can do in some form(with very rare exception)….and yes that will usually happen, though it may take a while. Not happening, increase the duration or intensity.
          And it….will aid to remediate the presence of most disease process we think of as diet only, alzheimers diabetes and heart disease. A teaspoon of this or that…I think faith in that is misplaced. Though of course exercise must be added to remedy with diet.

          No offense, but just to be real for most in this thing of weight loss as result of dietary singular inclusion element..

          1. From USA today on this observation phenom….” The average man’s waist grew from 38.9 inches to 39.7 inches; the average woman’s belly expanded even more, from 36.3 inches to 37.8 inches.
            Those are just averages. The study shows that more American guts are official health hazards – in an “abdominal obesity” zone that starts at 40.2 inches for men and 34.6 inches for women. Bellies that big are linked with increased risks of diabetes, heart disease and premature death.
            The new study shows 43% of men and 64% of women are in that zone. That’s up from 37% of men and 55% of women in 1999.

            All of this expansion, which the CDC is documenting for the first time since 2008, happened even as overall adult obesity appeared to level off.”

            Ok increased waist size at the same weight…in most every general form means, you are exercising less. Chia seed consumption having little to do with that phenom as well as typically actual dietary componants in general.
            American claim quite often to exercise in study stating or considering low movement activity of little effort to be exercise…but the reality seems to be few do exercise proportionally in the real.

            1. To add I personally see very many heavy peoples who want to loose weight on treadmills and such swimming perhaps with no improvement.
              The ones that do improve to my observation are those who do things such as lift weights to increase muscle mass. Muscle mass as opposed to fat even at rest has, more caloric consumption in a body.

              Chia seeds or lift and increase muscle mass….my bet is the exercise will produce more in the way of long term consideration. Is not fullness a learned thing….we get used to a level of being full…how long would this dietary affect upon fullness with chia seed inclusion persist anyway?

              1. To add for clarification…lift and do aerobic exercise. One or the other seemingly does not really provide good sustained weight loss progress.

                Could be isometrics calastenics or any number of things which grow muscles…just doing the aerobic componant seems to not suffice. Nor would just doing the muscle growing part as aerobics provide the caloric consumptive side.

                1. Look at those waist size numbers…Americans are not all 7 ft tall…by my read most by vast majority are grossly obese. Those are abnormally big both men and women .

                  Bet surveyed all would say…exercise regularly yes I do. ;) Forgot to eat my chia seeds however.

              2. ron, about 20 years ago, I was overweight and out of shape. So I started an exercise program (at home) — and within 1 year I was much more fit, but had lost no weight. So then I started practicing portion control and making healthier choices (I was already vegetarian, but as we all know, there are a lot of vegetarian and even vegan junk “food” products), and I gradually lost 25 pounds over about 18 months. I did continue exercising, I just added better eating habits.

                “Get Fit in the Gym; Get Thin in the Kitchen”

                1. Well Dr J what was your program?
                  I cannot count how many people I see doing one of the other with no success.
                  Mostly it is the aerobic kind which they do for hours and hours trugginig along on a treadmill usually with not sprints thrown in just long long mostly real slow stuff. I think caloric consumption wise that was is strictly how much used when exercising, which is not much. One candy bar after the workout, and the whole lot is overrun.

                  But if one combines the actual loss of a aerobic sort with a increased and increasing muscle mass, then we see weight loss.

                  Just liftiing or like exercise of course, one misses the overt loss per hour of a aerobic sort.
                  And to cause a increase in muscle is overall very uncomfortable. How many exercise to max effort ever? Some may not by illness or other limitation but by far and large most can. Being big is not preclusion of max effort attempt. To increase muscle mass as with aerobics with the initial there is some slight gain, but then it quickly levels off as there is not a increased stressor. So at rest caloric consumption remains the same.

                  I find that adage false.

                  1. I will allow or concede medical problem remediation as a result of diet and exercise or only diet. Fat loss, I just don’t see it unless one is grossly overeating which usually is not the case. Most all overweight people eat way way less than me.

                    And I see that with virtually everywhere. Fatter peoples usually eat less actual content and calories. Exempting morbidly obese.

                    1. The same people proporting that adage are usually the same who apply a caloric consumption metric by activity endeavored when exercising only.
                      Not accounting for at rest increase by resting increase in metabolic activity which persists, and increase in caloric consumption by muscle mass content as opposed to fat content.

                  2. So Dr J truthfully…. did you have max effort which directly always produces muscle gain incorporated into your exercise regime?
                    I mean by max effort a time when you could not for one second more run one step faster, nor if lifting do not one more rep or even part of a rep without collapseing, nor if for instance doing a squat jump a period when you could not jump one more time or remain lying on the floor writhing in pain….with regularity in your work out?

                    it is painful but we must do such things to increase muscle mass. Of course some with disability or illness may not do such things but for the rest of us just big.

                    1. This comment on study by the University of NM, is not a good one..it for instance mentions a 50 kilocalories per day increase in resting metabolic consumption with a little bit of added muscle and then goes on to say that is not much. 50 KC would be a gross amount. It is nothing close to that in the real being much much less but it is still significant and is present all day all the time every day.

                      But it speaks of what I am talking about the principles.
                      I had a as fiend back in the day a professor who had this study as specialty and attended his lectures on a side note.

                    2. I use that to speak to the principles I mention. But would not consider that as any definitive study in the specific. The contributors are simply not qualified to make definitive conclusion nor is the research cited necessarily conclusive in determination.
                      For principal only mention.

                    3. Michael Phelps famously in his run up to the Olympics of 2008 was eating 12,000 calories a day. A more reasonable amount of exercise what may constitute a very active exerciser not a olympian… lumber jacks under study back in the day, were found to be consuming 8000 calories in a day.

                      The Phelps thing was widely known, the lumberjack study may be to long ago and remote to reproduce by link.
                      How much food does one have to consume to consume 12,000 about six times the normal dietary intake. Imagine eating for each meal you eat six times the amount or for three meals 18 meals of equal amounts.

                      Could one not loose weight on that exercise regime..virtually impossible… unless one is making special attention to eat inordinately to retain weight.

                      Athletes often have to force themselves to eat more than normal to maintain weight.

                  3. Sorry Ron, I’m going to have to side with Dr. J here. It is absolutely possible to use exercise to lose weight. It is however a lot easier to lose weight by eating better (WFPB) imho. Why struggle to sweat out the calories (figuratively), when you can just not eat them in the first place? Dr. Greger even has videos showing that improving your diet can improve your resting heart rate and blood pressure as much or even more than exercise in some cases.

                    1. Exercise has many proven benefits that are auxiliary to diet. Alzheimers high blood pressure this and that are all positively affected by exercise.

                      One may say well I get in select fashion the same benefit from diet, and that is true…but how much is the effect from diet and exercise improvement. One invariably compounds the other.

                      And Dr J’s statement was this… “Get Fit in the Gym; Get Thin in the Kitchen” which is a claim not of equal result but of lesser result of weight loss from exercise than diet. I have shown how exercise of the right kind, high intensity, with little time expended, one half hour, may significantly result in caloric expenditure. The difference by individual in doing one half of a hour in exercise and going from a 2200 calorie diet to a 1700 calorie diet in the intention to loose weight, may indeed be a choice not made in the favor of diet..
                      One half hour of exercise which by my calculation with significant intensity may result in the loss of 500 actual calories and as well result in additional caloric loss as one accumulates more muscle and looses more fat, and has a carry over increased metabolic effect long beyond the exercise period, cannot be discounted.

                      And generally one feels better and looks better as well with better toned muscles and stronger less fatigued by exertion muscles.

                      And there is psychological benefit as well. What overt benefit for mood enhancement when one does not eat a thing as opposed to the feeling of accomplishment and a temporary stay in the rat race one engages when involved in exercise.
                      WE are all vein to a degree. And peoples do not look at resting heart rates and blood pressures when one is walking about town. They do however notice a fit person from a out of shape person and not to say it is fair or right but favor with their opinions in many ways the fit over the not fit. And auxiliary benefit itself is to be able to walk or run up stairs quickly play with children well and in all sorts of ways a fit person engages over a not fit person. Diet does not confer fitness. Exercise does.

                      So you are of course entitled to favor your opinion in any manner you suppose.
                      The benefits of exercise considered I personally consider that opinion faulted., I am inclined to greatly enjoy doing things of the physical with little diminishment of time. However some do not care for such things. Keep in mind however things such as fractures from falls and such, the falls themselves may be prevented with exercise rendering one fit. It helps stability and movement. In general any trauma situation the fit person is advantaged. And with age exercise is the thing which keeps up mobile and able to function without walker or wheelchair.

                      But perhaps others do not care about such things. I think it a very poor decision to not exercise and so endeavor so little time of high intensity but only one half hour to create such a caloric deficit.

                      Each to their own.But do not tell me diet is the way to loose weight as Dr J attests…it is simply not true

                  4. Ron

                    I know that we talk about cardo and resistance type exercise as though they are competely different. However isn’t walking/jogging/aerobics also resistance exercise as well as cardio? Your leg, back and core musces are all lifting a lot of weight one way or the other – 20 stones of potatoes weigh exactly the same as a 20 stone man. And carrying one or the other about is going to build leg and bck/core muscle as well as exercising the heart.

                    Also, armies have been turning fat recruits into slim soldiers for decades if not centuries by a lot of ‘cardio’ exercise in the form of marching,and PE type aerobics despite feeding them 5,000 calorie diets. They don’t do it by weight lifting or bag work.

                    Isn’t the point that your ‘cardio’ exercise has to be long enough and intense enough in order to deliver effective weight loss – not that it is inherently less effiient than ‘resistance’ training in slimming people down?

                    Also, the focus on weight loss seems misguided to me. Muscle weighs more than fat (or so I have read), so exercise isn’t your best bet for weight loss as such because you could conceivbly be heavier after going on an intense exrcise regime despite losing a lot of fat.

                    1. Tom good points all.
                      As to military training the resistant part of it is found with the various calisthenics type exercises they do and in the drills obstacle course and such which invigorate muscle growth. Yes it does not have to amount to doing lifting or hitting a bag. The key to muscle growth is habit formation of muscles. It prevents muscle growth so variance is the key.
                      Cardio functions quite well, but for one who has that as a steady diet for years and years, and expecting to loose weight from it..no usually not. And as mentioned to serve as significant drain there must be a intensity part. Or simply the caloric drain is not equal. Equal time at exercise caloric drain is increased always with intensity.
                      A backpack in military recruit training forms as a sort of weight training. the weight backpack and rifle are weight carried for long distances.

                      Long distance runners are all very thin. But they do extensive time at it and they include very much intensity to it. A typical long distance runner has but one or two long distance runs per week, filling in the rest with fartlek speed tempo runs and this and that of high intensity. The long runs are called the base. One extends from the base into the speedwork in time. The speed work intensity increases closer to the event but declines totally a week or two prior to add reserves. Long slow distance little serves a competitive runner even of the marathon. Extreme long distance ultra runners it may. they do not tend fat but are always heavier than comparable level marathoners.

                      We don’t in general care so much how much we weigh in absolute terms, but how fat we are or appear. Exercise in fact better reaches that aim in specific.

                      Health benefits of exercise are well substantiated and dr Greger supports that in video. I think he says 90 minutes is optimal, which I would say may be, but only if one is exercising at low to moderate intensity.Functional adaptations to exercise like increased VO2 max are only found with high intensity. No amount of slow running will improve it over a base established in a completely unfit individual. For some unfit people merely walking up a stairs may improve VO2 mas but that is not really most of us.
                      Lifting a bag of groceries may be weight lifting for some. But little is served by lifting groceries to increase muscle mass in other than a completely untrained person. With increased muscle mass is as well increased caloric consumption at rest.

                      Armies never just run. It is only part of their whole package of training. Which speaks to my favor on the issue..if it was that simple likely that is all they would do .PE is first in basic training to start the day, and it is always pushups sit ups this and that followed by a run. And then specifics like obstacle course this and that are thrown in during the day usually with academic learning of how to shoot and others.

                      In general the more involved a exercise the more muscles it involves, the less likely a habit is formed with it. Running is relatively easy to form muscle habit from, swimming is better, sprints added to a long run is better, weights with a run is better and on and on by principal. With habit less energy is put out over time at exercise.
                      And again intensity is most important for caloric outlay per exercise.
                      Could one totally habit form and loose vast amounts of weight regardless just by doing the thing at high intensity…sure, the lumberjack caloric consumptive study shows that.

                      With lower intensity variance assists caloric consumption. Which is why plodding along on a treadmill sipping a water and talking on the cell phone serves not weight loss. It is both a example of habit formed muscle use and low intensity…which is what the studies that show weight loss is not possible by exercise prove. Not that exercise can prove out more in weight loss than diet. Of course best is both combined. Diet only is rare as usually revert to their normal diet with time.

                      Those like vegans or WFPB may be only as much as 3 or so percent of the population. And really most of them by study are not trying to loose weight it just is not a problem. But that is not the UK or US circumstance.

                      Trying to loose weight usually infers past prior poor dietary choice. But that does not infer diet be necessary or primary to loose weight. Exercises suffices and to my opinion mostly exceeds diet if approached as I describe.

                      Take that person plodding along overweight for years and years found on a treadmill….improve their diet, they will loose weight. Add a bit more plodding…not at all. Add six sprints to their plodding a bit of weight work they will likely improve as much if not more than just diet change if approached with intensity.

                    2. One may counter that military training is duty specific. But no….. all recruit training to include police training fire training special forces training and all the rest, follow the combination exercise metric to get recruits in shape and loose weight.
                      Most of them, time may be constrained in which to eat but in general, and there are times when they practice with little to no food to simulate battle conditions or other conditions but all groups considered, they in general eat and drink in mess hall, as much as they want.

                      Any governmental boot camp excluding military, police fire like, it is assured they may eat as much as they want, and they all loose much weight and get in shape. It is all about intensity and variance. But it may be all intensity as well; Diet no they do not starve people in boot camp ever.

                    3. Some services employ fat camps to make peoples with significant problem with weight loose weight. There we may find more caloric restriction but really they exercise way way more in those camps as well. Exercise is really the thing.The diet is just to see to it they do not overeat which confounds the exercise.
                      But that is not boot camp.

                    4. A whole industry is concerned with weight loss being totally connected to diet and little about exercise.
                      These places what are they selling…meals by mail or fedex at your door you eat to loose weight.Or they market a brand you may find in your local food stores. That is it the game.

                      That is the game all the players/corporations in the space do it. Tom Brady the QB…started his own line (mostly vegan) a couple of years ago.
                      What does Tom Brady have to do with weight loss, he is a thin guy who has to eat to gain weight at football/ the same thing Dr Phil had to do with writing a diet book, he is fat….money in their pocket.
                      The muscle gain by diet is the same. Protein supplements to make big muscles…big muscles on the cans and such the pictures of guys …steroids.

                      So there is much pressure to produce and prove with study the need for diet as opposed to exercise to loose weight. Planet fitness is not in a position to do or sponsor any study related to weight loss, it is secondary to them most work out to feel better. People are going to exercise it is really not necessary in this life of no exercise in work to advertise it. It sells itself.
                      Other diet companies may very well have to advertise and sponsor indirectly if not directly…selling the meals is it for them.
                      Would Nutrisystem find it necessary to employ a scientist who did a study of caloric consumption by exercise in weight loss as opposed to weight loss by diet…sure why not it is their field. Is conflict present..no not technically. Depends a bit on when the study was done, present or past employment.(I am not saying they do that just as a example of a possible)

                      It is a very big industry with deception as character like as not. Atkins and them are their sort, though he did mostly just books. He overtly deceived. Study related to his work is found now not sponsored by his group but related to it. Junk science.
                      It is far worse to my opinion with much more influence than the new age stuff.

                      To conclude…. exercise is by my opinion far more conducive of permanent weight loss done in the proper fashion than any singular dietary addition and in most cases diets in general. Now if one changes ones entire diet as in WFPB that may produce very similar permenant weight loss similar to exercise. But sans exercise as Dr Gregers work attests, the healthiest of diets is still not the healthiest choice in lifestyle. We do not see him on treadmill doing his videos call in as it is fun…..it is as he is exercising and this fills in well with time constraints. Lifestyle to produce the healthiest adults…. exercise is included with diet always.

                      Those who think it not are mistaken, and disregarding a important part of his work. Those that are disabled ill disease whatever, diet is it for them. In general form in the UK and US most can exercise with intensity without a problem.

                    5. Here is the latest CDC study on exercise in America from CBS. Combine this with body belly size I cite earlier(a sure proof of body fat in most all)….and the grouping of those who do cardio as opposed to weight work, which show as the fattest.
                      But few are exercising at all which by my read is a proof on not poor diet in whole, we have had poor diets in some variance since mcD was introduced forty years ago to the general public, but lack of exercise. The fat American who weighs the same as they did some years ago, now has a bigger belly. If it was diet..the weight would increase not the belly.
                      .
                      And exercise those plodding along on a cell phone on a treadmill in a airconditioned gym never forbid getting out of breath consider that exercise. And though I like to garden know full well that is really not exercise to qualify it more than to say use. One is using muscles but it is really not exercise to garden.One is getting exercise, but really it is not stressful enough to be called exercise unless one is just out of bedrest in a hospital.

                      “Researchers at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) analyzed survey data collected from more than 450,000 U.S. adults ages 18 and older who were randomly phoned across all 50 states.
                      They were asked how often they engaged in aerobic physical activity outside of their jobs and for how long.
                      The U.S. government recommends adults get at least 2.5 hours of moderate-intensity aerobic exercise each week or one hour and 15 minutes of vigorous-intensity activity, or a combination of both. Adults should also engage in muscle-strengthening activities like lifting weights or doing push-ups at least twice per week.

                      Physical inactivity can lead to obesity and Type 2 diabetes, according to the CDC, while exercise can help control weight, and reduce the risk for developing heart disease and some cancers, while providing mental health benefits.
                      A study last year linked physical inactivity to more than 5 million deaths worldwide per year, more than those caused by smoking.
                      The survey revealed that only 20.6 percent of people met the total recommended amounts of exercise — about 23 percent of all surveyed men and 18 percent of surveyed women. People most likely to exercise were between the ages of 18 and 24 (almost 31 percent of exercisers). Those least likely to engage in physical activity were ages 65 and older (nearly 16 percent of exercisers).
                      Not all was bleak, the CDC said. About 52 percent of surveyed adults said they met only the aerobic activity guidelines while 29 percent met only the muscle-strengthening components.
                      “Although only 20 percent of adults are meeting the overall physical activity recommendations, it is encouraging that half the adults in the United States are meeting the aerobic guidelines and a third are meeting the muscle-strengthening recommendations,” Carmen D. Harris, an epidemiologist at the CDC’s physical activity and health branch, said in a statement. “This is a great foundation to build upon, but there is still much work to do.”
                      …”
                      Sure great..look at those waist sizes, they are fat. Political correctness fat shaming aside…they are fat it is simply a statement of fact.

                      Above the age of 24…..geeze louise it is amazing the few people who exercise even that small amount. To loose weight much more must be endeavored. To keep it off much less.

                    6. See any loss in belly size since 2004..no the inverse is the case…
                      Weight, any great loss in body size a say 9 percent lowering of consumption by child would indicate? 2015 Seems not.
                      So what are we being sold on this weight and weight loss as opposed to observational data?

                      NYT..

                      l After decades of worsening diets and sharp increases in obesity, Americans’ eating habits have begun changing for the better.
                      Calories consumed daily by the typical American adult, which peaked around 2003, are in the midst of their first sustained decline since federal statistics began to track the subject, more than 40 years ago. The number of calories that the average American child takes in daily has fallen even more — by at least 9 percent.
                      The declines cut across most major demographic groups — including higher- and lower-income families, and blacks and whites — though they vary somewhat by group.
                      In the most striking shift, the amount of full-calorie soda drunk by the average American has dropped 25 percent since the late 1990s.

                    7. ABC reporting on CDC data.
                      When the caloric consumption appeared to peak in this 2002 very close to 2004 maximum amount recorded in current data, American males increased in weight 5 average pounds since that time. 2016, I think was this reporting window.
                      Caloric consumption clearly did not cause this five pound increase….it has to be exercise..Coupled with belly size increase that is a virtual guarantee. That latest data showed recently no increase in weight a remaining at weight but belly increased.

                      What is obviously happening..less exercise..

                      “But the news isn’t all bad. According to CDC data, the rate at which American men are gaining weight is slowing down. Since 2002, men in the U.S. increased their average weight by just 5 pounds. ”

                      The article then goes on suggesting one take a walk around a block to loose weight and of course eat much less ..as if that does a thing at all….comical.

              3. It is well-known that diet has a much greater impact on weight than exercise; in fact it’s about 80% to 20%. I’ve seen this in myself. I have a chronic health condition and am often forced to be sedentary for months at a time. When that happens, I never gain weight – and by weight, I’m talking solely about size, not weight on the scale – because my diet remains the same and I’m probably eating a bit fewer calories because I’m just less hungry overall.

                1. In select study this has been shown true…”that diet has a much greater impact on weight than exercise; ”

                  But all science is not good science. The studies of caloric drain by types of exercise are proven by things I have cited here, some above and some below this post, to be untrue and in general to be grossly underestimating caloric loss when exercise is done in a high intensity fashion..

                  Disprove them in other than a personal fashion, and I may agree with your based upon the personal claim.

                  1. In a personal basis I am exactly the weight I want to be at any time and day and have been so for the last thirty years..
                    My weight I self determine based upon what hobby of exercise discipline I choose to endeavor as priority at the present time.

                    At present I am very light, being lighter this past year than 20 years prior. But ten years ago I was significantly heavier as I was doing competitive powerlifting training of very significant poundage. Now I am focusing on mixed martial arts heavy bag training and running to include sprints as focus including lifting as secondary. But I still lift, todays was about 2 hours in total with significant rest breaks.

                    And years prior to that I was much lighter as mountain running and competition formally was my chief hobby.
                    And I was employed in a field that required testing for admission and testing for continuance of employment at times.
                    So personally on that basis I offer counter. I am old.

                    1. I am personally willing to exhibit my performance capeability overall weight and fitness to any that are in or may care to visit this general area, when it is allowable for me. I have various pursuits so am not here often for weeks at a time but I can make arrangements when I am. The general area is Albuquerque but I am in a rural area about a 20 minutes drive from it.

                      I am not just claiming these things is my point.
                      I expect there is a bias supporting diet as opposed to exercise on this board membership which is to be expected as it is about generally nutrition. But keep in mind Dr Greger is always seen on a treadmill, not as it is easy to do videos upon one, but as exercise is a important component of his regime which is part exercise and part diet.

                      I contend for many, excluding disability and medical condition or disease which prevents exercise, exercise may be a preferred method for weight loss. Of course the preference is a individual choice. To state weight is lost by simple dietary modification in a lasting fashion and in a greater fashion, as opposed to exercise, I have shown as untrue. Generally the caloric loss determinations are in many cases simply to low in varying forms of exercise. This is as the exercisers are either not pushing into a maximum intensity level or they are habituated to the particular movement and not hence expending as much energy as possible. These two factors have not been accounted for in caloric drain by particular exercise activity study. Of course timewise, if rapid weight loss is preferred, dietary modification and exercise are equally important.

                      For those who cannot exercise of course diet is the only option. For those that can, exercise is equal if not better than diet for weight management. I support those through the study of Phelps and lumberjacks both shown here.

        2. I remember videos here on flax and chia showing that flax had a lot more benefits than chia not only in higher ALA but other impacts on health flax is known to have as well. Based on all the info provided here on the subject I decided to stop spending so much money on chia and just stick to flax.

      1. Why are people saying chia versus flax? That’s like saying leafy greens versus berries! They are both good! Eat both! It’s not a fight between them!
        John S

        1. True, John S. But I think the reason people do it is they typically will choose one over the other as a source of omega-3 to add habitually to the diet. At least that is my impression.

  4. What about soaked chia seeds, as in chia seed ‘puddings’ in the morning after soaking all night? Do I still need to grind them to get the improved nutrition? (don’t like it as well when ground)

    1. Good question, I wonder if they ever tested that. I’d like to know as well. Those chia pudding recipes look good, and pretty!

  5. Hi,

    Dr. Greger claims is better absorbed and used by the body when ground, but I think is okay if you alternate, one day you eat a chia pudding and another day you add chia to your smoothie.

    Yared, Health Support Volunteer

    1. Well he’s not just saying it’s better absorbed, but that the omega fatty acids aren’t absorbed. And the above studied indicated as much in showing there was no effect unless the chia seeds were ground. I’d say it’s a waste of money to not grind them. Why eat something that just passes through you.

    2. Putting chia seeds in a blender – even a high-speed blender like a vitamix – won’t grind them. You’d need a coffee grinder most likely.

  6. My best use of chia is for dry bowels. It’s not just the fiber either, it’s the moisture. Was hoping to see that in the research too. Maybe next time.

  7. I used to use chia but I just stick to flax now because it has more omega-3’s and it’s so much cheaper, plus it has a plethora of other benefits. Chia is expensive!

    Is it just the satiated feeling (feeling full) that causes weight loss or is there a more unique factor? Apologies if that’s covered in the video, multitasking now so I might have missed it.

    Personally I’m not attracted to the idea of feeling fuller than I would, I like to eat lol. But I’m also not worried about weight.

    Chia seems like a great way to add calcium for those needing extra, if memory serves I believe it’s pretty high in calcium for such a small serving.

    1. Flax is about almost as cheap as dirt, even Walmart sells them…which confirms the real reason I would never consider chia. how could it be cheaper than flax?

      A pretty good size package my health food store…usually under 2 USD.

    2. Have you tried getting the organic chia seeds from Costco – they are insanely cheap!!! Also, does anyone find flax seeds to taste fishy? I simply cannot stand them.

      1. No Gina, I never looked or them there, thanks for the tip! Funny, I actually don’t think that at all, they have a very bland, mild nutty flavor to me. I actually think the brown flax (as opposed to the golden) smells a lot like bananas when I grind it up! Haha.

        Yeah ron, the organic flax I get is usually between 2-3 USD/lb. For whatever reason, the golden is a few cents more expensive at some stores in the bulk section. I typically get golden because I believe there’s a slightly higher omega-3 content.

  8. Seven grams of chia seeds is TWO teaspoons, not one as stated in the video (3:07).
    Similarly, in the weight loss study (4:18) subjects consumed 30 grams of chia seeds per day, which is THREE tablespoons whole or about FIVE tablespoons ground, not two as stated in the video.

    All calculations were done on my kitchen scale, but 1 teaspoon = 3.4 grams was also validated online
    http://convert-to.com/527/chia-amounts-conversion-black-or-white-chia-seed.html

    1. If you look at the latest release (2018) of the USDA Nutrient Database you can see the density of chia appears to vary all over the place, from a teaspoon weighing as little as 2.5 grams (https://ndb.nal.usda.gov/ndb/foods/show/45105744?fgcd=&manu=&format=&count=&max=25&offset=25&sort=default&order=asc&qlookup=chia&ds=BF&qt=&qp=&qa=&qn=&q=&ing=) all the way up to 15 grams (https://ndb.nal.usda.gov/ndb/foods/show/45086718?fgcd=&manu=&format=&count=&max=25&offset=75&sort=default&order=asc&qlookup=chia&ds=BF&qt=&qp=&qa=&qn=&q=&ing=). Sounds like the ones you have in your house fall toward the lower end.

      1. Well geeze louise…..who said you could post things here…my word;)

        Hope you day is going well doc, thanks for all you do, as usual.

      2. That’s interesting. Thanks for your response, Dr. Greger! So I guess if we want to be really accurate, we should weigh our chia seeds, otherwise we could be off by quite a bit.

  9. Would blending well in a smoothie work as they do get ground up that way, or I am guessing best to buy a grinder? Thoughts?

    1. Cindy, for best absorption I would just get a cheap coffee grinder and use that, that’s what I use and it works great. – I use it for other seeds and nuts as well and make my own oat flour with it.

      What I remember when just blending whole chia seeds in my high speed blender is they stuck to the sides a lot and I don’t think they got ground up that well because they’re so tiny and then their gel coating when wet seems to protect them a bit.

    2. I use a blender to grind up my flax seeds which by observation seems to work quite fine. I do have to stir the top to the bottom and start stop the thing to do that. I expect chia would be the same.

      Just thrown in a blender flax and expect with the smoothie they would get crushed up….I say no. They are to small to my opinion they would largly not get ground up mixed in.
      But never considered buying say a coffee grinder to grind flax seeds. Seem chia are of the same type size, but others may correct me as honestly I don’t use them.

  10. There is present proof in study and observational date, to include diet as a sole remedy for many disease processes, in many circumstances of diabetes high blood pressure and heart condition. There is also study to include diet and exercise as combination remedy which provides superior remedy in many circumstances. Both are not to disallow drug treatment which is a necessity for some to endeavor to remedy.

    However as regards diet to loose weight, in this specific shown as reduction in body fat and waist size.
    I say we should consider Michael Phelps for discussion.
    There is some debate, but not a whole lot, that his caloric intake may have been slightly less, perhaps 9 or 10,000 as opposed to the more widely stated 12,000 on a daily basis. But quite probably he ate around 12,000 calories a day.

    He exercised typically weights pool work out running this and that on average, 6 hours per day in the lead up to the 2008 Olympics.

    Assumeing at his height and weight a probable normal weight maintence level of 3000 calories per day. That means he expelled approximately 9,000 calories per day in exercise, or roughly 1,500 per hour.

    How is this possible it corresponds not with our graphs and this and that study….well I say in response, it is all about intensity. It is apparent fact he did this or pretty close to this in hours and in what he ate. It was widely reported with amazement in general media back in the day.

    A Olympic athlete in waiting, he had no option but to exercise to failure every day and did each exercise with maximum intensity.
    WE may not have the same results in performance, certainly we are not Olympic hopefuls and can not expect we will somehow become excellent athletes at all.
    But exception disability and or medical disease or condition….we can exercise with similar intensity.

    If we did so it seems we may expect, even if the calculations are to the downside, a expenditure of 1,000 to 1,500 per hour in similar of intensity exercise.
    Which means in general there is no better way to loose weight. To assume even 2 hours of such would be a 2,000 or 3,000 calorie deficit. To exercise with less intensity probably we would see less caloric expenditure. Likely the studies which show minor amounts expended in running, or this or that exercise, are of the lesser intensity sort, or with people who have habituated to the stress by continual daily performance.
    One pound equals 4000 calories roughly.
    The key and only limitation would be ability to do so and remain with that as a discipline. With injury which would be expected, one would have to remedy with other skill sets exercise to avoid the area injured.

    There is some variance in psychology and some deviance would probably present in all subjects studied. But in general eating chia seeds seems little favored to produce similar results as these. Not to state Dr Greger is saying that, he is not. This is useful dietary information. But to say, I am saying… those expecting remedy to overweight may be overconsidering this effect, compared to other known means of reduction.

    Dietary solution may of course provide remedy as well but singular substance would provide marginal loss.

    In fact it seems dietary improvement as opposed to exercise, unless one is morbidly obese and consuming vast quantities, I venture to say exercise has the potential to win hands down, if one may exercise without risk due to existant medical condition.
    Of course exercise and dietary improvement would be most beneficial. But a couple of tablespoons of chia seeds as opposed to high intensity exercise of even a half hour…I venture to say exercise will provide more benefit. Diet or exercise head to head without consideration of health benefit from diet..my guess is weight loss only exercise wins hands down.

    1. Half hour high intensity Olympic athlete intensity….500-750 calories expended.

      There may be a contributory affect due to compounding muscle fatigue with more exercise later into a 6 hour session but to a degree this is habituated with a well conditioned athlete who is used to doing this day after day.
      I would expect with similar intensity we untrained may expect a similar caloric expenditure.
      This is a known he is and his diet…I say disprove not the specific, it may have been as low as 9000 and certainly he did not exercise every day 6 hours, but in concept.

      Why would not this be so with us, barring the situation he may be a alien from a distant planet ;)
      I expect I could come up with some other examples if that alien counter is presented.

      1. And yes if he is a alien, there is this from a piece centering on lumberjacks. Which states basically a lumberjack working at a moderate pace chopping down a tree would expend about 10 calories per minute or 600 per hour. Which is about midrange for my calculations of Michael Phelps, stating 500-750 per hour. Keep in mind this is lumberjacking before the incidence of equipment.

        “According to the British physiologists, J.V.G.A. Durnin and R. Passmore, ‘There is probably no harder physical work than lumbering in the forest, particularly in winter.” Based on research among woodsmen in eight European countries and Japan, they calculate that chopping a tree at a moderate rate of 35 strokes per minute burns 10 calories per minute. (At 50 strokes per minute-contest speed-usage rises to an astounding 19.3 calories). Bucking burns 8.6 calories per minute (lending scientific corroboration to Anna Linds observation that the fallers and buckers were the biggest eaters); trimming, 8.4; and barking, 8.0. There are no data, unfortunately, on river driving, but “carrying logs” and “dragging logs” burn 12.I calories per minute! For reference purposes, this compares to 6.1 calories per minute drilling coal, 4.0 laying bricks, 2.0-2.9 at general housework, 2.3 working on an automobile assembly line, and 1.4 sitting at a desk writing an article on an electric typewriter”

        There is a whole industry based on consideration of diet as the sole way to loose weight. It is the sports supplement industry. Which of the industry of supplements is the worst of the worst. If one did know or it became widely known exercise with intensity was the best way to loose weight and keep it off in many cases the only way to do so permenantly…they would all be out their jobs.

        There were at the peak 500,000 or so lumberjacks. they were notorious for big meals and in fact in consideration of the importance of meals would commonly prohibit talking in their camps when eating. Typically five meals per day fit the bill. And a pot belly or overweight person was so rare as to be considered a portend of impending bad luck.

        But our things tend to diet as being it. No accident that as I read eat consumed things, fitting right in with supplements.
        No offense to Dr Greger his mention here is not that, nor is he selling anything.

        You may ask yourself why is this so amazing to us this thing on Michael Phelps?. Once 500,000 thousand of us on any given day had the same experience.
        And those poor people some of which obtain benefit by being in a zone on a treadmill devolving stress..but most of which are expectant they will loose weight by plodding along usually sipping water attached to a shelf by the treadmill front, for hour upon hour barely ever out of breath and usually talking on phone as they plod away…..they will generally not loose a bit.
        It is all about intensity..
        Lumberjacks had to be intense and provide the cuts or whatever they did…. it was a competitive environment similar to sports in our day.

        1. Sorry, 20 calories per minute at high pace equal to 1200 calories per hour or 600 per half hour. In any event ballpark to Michael Phelps consumption pattern and expected caloric outlay. Assumeing they did not saw in every minute of a hour but probably at least to my experience seeing this done in wilderness areas currently, which prohibit machines for use in felling trees on federal lands……50 of the 60 minutes.

          The lumberjack results are consistent with Michael Phelps result. Very consistent.

        2. Phelps is in COLD WATER. You can’t compare that to normal exercise. Cold causes burning of calories and weight loss – Dr. G did a video on this.

          1. I have addressed the anticipated challenge to Phelps with the counter already of the lumberjack caloric expenditure determinations.

            Cold water/air does infer increased caloric loss. That does not infer the same general amounts will not occur with the specific of Phelps if he engaged warmer waters.. Much of his training is not pool training, He is not swimming for six hours a typical training day. it includes weights running and all sorts of things. And the water is not ice cold but a temperature that is cold to prevent heat exhaustion, but not cold enough to make a appreciable difference. If it was so it would cool muscles result in decreased circulation and the potential of injury.

            1. Here are some notations on his workout..”Phelps recently added a weightlifting regimen to his dry-land work, which is evident by his ripped six pack abs and body. He lifts weights 3 days a week, preferably on Monday, Wednesday and Friday. However, Phelps prefers bodyweight exercises like pushups and weighted pull-ups for muscular strength and endurance. These bodyweight exercises won’t bulk Phelps up like if he were doing more compound based weight exercises (squats, deadlifts, bench press, etc.). Phelps keeps a great balance between bodyweight exercises and weight exercises. Relying more on bodyweight exercises will keep Phelps lean and will not add too much additional weight where it could affect his swimming speed and movement in the water. The less weight you have to drag in the water, the quicker you can swim.”

              Dry land work refers to the other dry land exercise regime he already engages in.

              1. Here is a reference to a pool Phelps was training at in Tampa bay…they are heated training pools..
                ” Bowman swam for Florida State University in the early ’80s and coached for the University of Michigan and every U.S. Olympic team since 2004. Some speculate that he is now helping Phelps prepare for the 2015 World Championships in Kazan, and after that possibly the 2016 Olympics in Brazil.
                Meanwhile, Mike Jefferis, parks and recreation superintendent, dismissed rumors that the public pool was closed to accommodate the teams. The pool’s heating system broke during two of the coldest days of the season, he said, and parts of the facility were closed to all swimmers at times for repairs.”

                The pros seek out tampa for the heat compared to other areas of the country. It makes other training easier..

                1. British physiologists, J.V.G.A. Durnin and R. Passmore, ‘were the gold standard for many years on caloric expenditure and their work on lumberjacks has never had even the remotest of challenge in this field. It is accepted as good solid science by their peers and has stood since 1967 or so. Though the observational data was produced much earlier, as the lumber camps were almost entirely devolved in many places by 1948 or so. IN fact their hayday was around 1900 which produced about 500,000 of them as mentioned.

                  From a excerpt of a book about the lumber camps food….
                  For a society that feels compelled to run around in sweatsuits in order to shed a few pounds, it may be difficult to imagine a “lifestyle” in which vast fueling was essential to survival. But the old lumberjacks bolted three, four, and, on some river drives, five enormous meals per day. And they used them. One can leaf through as many stacks of old photographs as a proud archivist can trot out without seeing a potbelly. Indeed, a common superstition among loggers was that when they saw a fat man in the woods it was time to blow the whistle. There would be three accidents in quick succession.”

                  Yes I have seen the photos they are fact. To note, it is as a component of lifestyle proven that exercise is a necessary part. Dr Gregers video, “how much should you exercise” available in a search on this site, speaks to this directly. It is not, could you or would you exercise, but should you exercise. Mandatory…should. He came up with moderate exercise 90 minutes to my dim recollection in video.

                  There is no reason under the sun if one is already engaged in exercise for 90 minutes, and one has no confounding medical difficulties, one could not reasonably take 30 minutes of this time, inspire intensity, and delegate that time to loosing weight.

                  A healthy person following Dr Gregers guidelines which extend beyond diet alone, would be tasking that time already.
                  Some here seem to forget he has made that recommendation of exercise as core to health.
                  The movements one finds in a logging camp I actually find them in gym I have visited throughout and in the most remote areas. A gym in the heart of Navajo country Shiprock NM, has a bulldozer tire that they flip back and forth many times which approximates the movement one would find in a lumberjacks moving of logs. That is also found in a gym in Albuquerque. And the pounding of a sledge hammer on the same tire a common practice in many gyms which also approximates the motion of a axe in a tree..So we can reasonably expect similar result as to caloric expenditure that lumberjacks found. To combine with Michael Phelps experience, it is estimated the field work of lumberjacks approximated 6,000 calories per day. That is not the complete amount daily, they consumed 8,000 per day, but solely from the work. It was not continual as Phelps training is with few breaks, but caloric expenditure to task as one would find in a gym setting, I would say 500 to 750 calories per half hour would be quite possible with intensity. Moderation would produce less expenditure.

                  These numbers are also consistent with very hard to perform endeavors such as mountain climbing at extreme altitude. This caloric amount is probably the max one may reduce. The numbers seem fairly consistent in high intensity endeavors.

                  Other studies that show lesser expenditure..well I say once again it is all about intensity. In todays physical environment we find it very hard to replicate the intensity of Olympic athletes lumberjacks and mountain climbers in study. Study in that regard that show lesser expenditure is obviously to extreme extend not a read on maximum intensity workouts. They are of the sort walking on a treadmill while conversing helpful for this or that but not going to produce weight loss. When studied as with Phelps(no it is not the cold water that is absurd)….always like caloric expenditure is found.

                  We may replicate not Phelps achievement, the lumberjacks felling of trees, nor climb a mountain, but we very well may workout with maximum intensity in gym or out in the open. We are according to Dr Greger, exercising anyway. So if one desires to loose weight why not maximum intensity and allay the addition of chia seeds entirely, found then not necessary. With time and continual indulgence in intensity exercise trust me…the question will be how to find enough to eat to maintain weight, not what can I eat to exclude this item or that by being artificially full.

                  And there are auxiliary effects. Ones O2 assimilation a key componant called VO2 max in the field of exercise study, will be improved greatly when endeavoring high intensity exercise. What importance that…..it is a read on the bodies ability to assimilate O2, your getting out of breath when doing anything.Want out of breath consideration to remediate…simply improve Vo2 max.
                  As well as bone health and overall health by inclusion of weight bearing exercise in a high intensity regime increased.
                  Want to play with your grandkids run along with them play catch and this and that….exercise is the key, diet will not suffice.
                  Without exercise component you will degenerate with old age and become functionally with time immobile. Age does that, gross muscle mass disappears. Peoples do not use walkers because they like to, we must endeavor means to not use them exercise is one means.
                  Muscle loss may be delayed greatly. Age without exercise component is a grim result.

  11. I am underweight and finding it difficult to gain weight. I eat ground flax and soaked chia seeds daily with no weight gain.

    1. Are you vegan fruitarian raw foods only vegetarian standard American diet or what?. Age general size and occupation or exercise pattern would be helpful.And or do you have any medical condition on any meds or have any allergies?

    2. Have you tried adding more nuts, seeds like sunflower and pumpkin and nut/seed butters? I would imagine if I were trying to gain weight I’d add more of that but I’m not expert!

    3. First, you’d want to medically verify that you’re underweight. Getting on a scale is not an accurate way to do it. You’d need body fat and fat-free mass testing. This can be done with DEXA or MRI. If you can find a licensed doctor that specializes in Preventive or Functional Medicine, they may be able to help. If your body fat percentage is too low, you can increase it with nuts as another poster wrote, and other higher calorie density foods such as grains and beans and dried fruit. Make sure you get weight bearing exercise and eat your unprocessed whole food protein sources within about 1/2 hour after your exercise.

      Dr. Ben

    4. Underweight is defined as having a body mass index less than 18.5. If your BMI is under 18.5, it’s best to meet with your doctor to investigate whether there is a medical and/or psychological reason for your being underweight. There is a long list of problems that can lead to underweight. If there is no particular reason, the next step would be to figure out your metabolic rate and how many calories you need to get to a healthy weight and then how many to take in to maintain a healthy weight. Then, sit down with a dietician to compare how may calories you’re taking in now compared to how many you need to gain some weight. There are many healthy, plant based sources of calorie- and nutrient-dense foods, including avocados, nuts, seeds, and whole grains.

      Hope that helps! Dr Anderson, Health Support Volunteer

  12. Ron, I am 76. Retired. Vegetarian for 50 years, vegan for last 8 years. Fairly active. Small framed Never smoked rarely drank alcohol, but I have long term bronchiectasis which has improved since becoming vegan. Slightly allergic to dairy but that is not an issue now.

    1. Hmm…. the presence of bronchiectasis would complicate any suggestion I may make. Cause can be so variable, I can only suggest at your age, with the medical condition, to advise your MD of the situation and have him refer you to a doc with nutrition as speciality or a nutritionist.

      Just curious are you whole foods plant based vegan or just vegan but still consuming processed things?

      I could not really be just a whole foods plant based vegan without some processed foods and maintain my weight. I am younger however male and have a very active lifestyle so likely my experience does not translate to yours. I will tell you what works for me if that would help. Otherwise you may be better helped by anothers recommendation.

      Congratulations on being vegetarian for so long.. I have been vegetarian since 86 vegan since 90, but that is way way less than your 50 years.
      Without asking to much but just curious, and feel free to respond that this is to personal…but did you do it for health or for reasons of considered morality?

      I am fascinated by such stories.

      1. First I went vegetarian out of compassion for animals. Later I read a lot about health benefits. Vegan after learning about the dairy and egg industry and for further health benefits.
        Forget the Doctors, they tell me to eat more Maccas. My reply is, “No chance” I have been referred to dieticians but generally they don’t understand vegan lifestyle. I don’t take medication for my lungs or anything else, but do inhale colloidal silver. I try to eat as much whole foods as I can but do have some processed foods. I regret not becoming vegan sooner. I don’t have a very big capacity to eat a lot. This doesn’t help. Being thin doesn’t worry me as much as it does friends and relatives.

        1. Well Janet I did both for the same reasons. When I saw the harm in dairy animals I put the 2 and 2 together. But that took 4 years or so.
          I had to do it barring gross harm to body. Karma considered for me, it was do it or die. I was going south quickly not knowing the why. Made the change and it all made sense and karma resolved.

          Aside your medical condition, my general feel is low weight often translates to low muscle mass which is not a good thing. Some study suggest vegans may be more prone to fractures of the hip, a todo with calcium. And muscles are what keeps us balanced and when falls do happen, help prevent fractures as much as the bones themselves do.

          I put a check on it today and my weight varies by hobby sport of focus. But the variance is 60 pounds or so, which means I vary 1/3rd of my total body weight on a desired basis over the years. Heavier for this lighter for that, sport. So I know how to eat ;)
          A processed food like spaghetti I eat even though of a veggie or whole grain composite now. I find protein is a essential element and is necessary as we age by study to retain muscle mass. Spaghetti, a meat substitute will be added on top or in the sauce added.
          So I put a bit of protein into virtually all meals even the snacks by large. My smoothie in the morning will include a bit of soy protein thrown in. A tofu processed food or homemade, breakfast, I throw in protein with some of the processed substitute meats, beyond beef has a good protein to fat ratio.

          Protein protein protein is my thing to maintain or gain weight. I think the studies demonizing it are demonizing in the real, animal protein. Soy has some like kind problems at very high intake levels but one has to consume like 15 servings or such to see it.

          So I can not officially advise you in any manner and am just a blogger….. but my thing this is what I do…some protein with every thing eaten.
          Snacks I vie occasionally for just salsa and chips but almost always hummus and chips which is protein, beans. I buy always processed, the natural organic healthful by study of salt sat fat and fat levels.
          Some of the processed vegan stuff like miracle burger is total garbage nutritionally. One must check ingredients and nutritional profile.

          As to junk I do resist the overt things with sugar…I think that is inflammatory and not good for me, particularly the ice creams made from almond and cashew and such.. I will eat a thing of chocolate by a company called Lillly’s they make a vegan chocolate bar with no sugar…can you imagine??
          It kills me how good it is ;) I don’t worry about saturated fat or calories(this has a bunch of both) if I stay below half the recommended amount sat fat per day. That thing has a enormous amount of fiber for some unknown reason, so I suspect it may a bit make the sat fat not so harmful. I try to eat some of a bar every day. I don’t worry about stevia or ereytherol as long as I don’t go overboard. Diet drinks I can really taste the stuff and have to dilute them to drink.

          And I think sat fat is the missing ingredient that helps our immune system, but that is just personal assumption. Key components of our immune system are cholesterol in nature. I do notice vegans of long term duration do tend to get hit hard by colds flu and such, and think that may be the why. Short term a couple of years it seem to help. I was in hospital about 5 years ago for flu and rethought that at that time. I add some other things, but have not had even so much as one slight cold in two years,(knock on wood) despite being continually exposed to always getting sick, three young girls in grade school and various sport of close contact..And the three years before some were likely flu but none put me down and out.

          I have a history of exposure to chlordane as a young child so perhaps my immune system is not as good in any event.

          So that is what I do….protein protein protein. Some on this board are now probably quakeing in anger and/or fear for me and any that take my advice as the community considers overall protein a big no no…..I think their fear is greatly misplaced. Other things in study to my opinion are producing that result not plant protein. Pea soy powders, as long as one checks if one uses a supplement thrown in with a smoothie, for quality with tests for purity I think it may be used. Protein powders particularly those from areas that grow things with leaded gas permissible in area, may be contaminated.
          So organic American grown and tested for purity is essential.

          But if one throws protein in all things, with beyond beef or similar product, Yves has some great stuff, I think any protein powder is not necessary. they may be high in salt so that bears caution, but fat most of them are way low.
          I just finished hitting the heavy bag and kicking it, did some ab work and back work, neck work and will now probably go on a run with dog, Yesterday was all lifting weights, 2 hours or so. So muscle things are important to my diet. But I can keep the weight on with protein.
          I was whippet thin when I had mountain running as my hobby of priority. A heavy weight when powerlifting was it. Now in the middle with mixed martial arts as number one. I weight what I want by manipulation of diet. It is all functional.

          Hope that helps. I am very glad to hear of your choice of compassion. Todays politic and all
          a thing like that particularly in a older person who had to fight the thing as none did it back then, and none understood it, there was no Dr Greger, makes me feel good about things. It was hard I had to make all my stuff back in the day..now it is easy.

          Any new people tell you what it is that is vegan, try to define you?…..I find that curious…. they do it for a year or five, and think they know..it was hard very hard to do once. Now it is easy. I think most of them in another five will again eat meat, hope I am wrong. Under fire one develops character and resolve, not found today I think in veganism so much, though I am glad they do it.

          1. I am so glad you have provided a chance I may help you. Karma helping those who help…. is so much more in that fashion then just helping.

            You have done a great great thing and probably don’t even know how great it is. I know because I am so close to my karma, if I did this not now at this age…dead in a month or two I would be. Such are the constraints of my present life, but I don’t mind them a bit. The good thing keeps me here. I fall apart immediately if I intentionally harm or want to harm others….such is my karma. So I must not eat filth.

            So I help you….. so happy I will run with dog and have not a word of thought. Such result you have provided…you good good person in this land of a primitive type, who mean good and do good, but miss greatly in this thing. How many are like me and suffer but know not why…it took me years so I wonder. It is not the diet, it is that comes after the thing of compassion. Once compassionate of course the diet reflects health with study and attention.

            So thanks

            1. If you have any other questions on the nutritional side of this, I will tell you what I do.

              Again I have no special qualification and am just another blogger.

              1. Thanks for those tips. I will try them but I find it difficult to eat large amounts of food. I try to eat several small meals a day. I think I have neglected protein as I am not keen on fake meats. I eat lots of beans, some nuts and seeds. A couple of days ago I found Hemp protein powder with no added ingredients so I am trying that. I don’t drink any fizzy or soft drinks. I need more motivation to keep exercising. I think my bones are ok as I have had a few heavy falls, (tripping due to reduced eyesight.) One off a ladder, landing on my hip, nothing broken.

                1. Janet, you definitely don’t need fake meats for protein, eating plenty of whole plant foods and incorporating beans and legumes in your diet should be more than efficient. Have you seen Dr. Greger’s Daily Dozen video?
                  I see nothing wrong with pure hemp powder.
                  Whole hemp seeds are high in fat and calories so the seeds may help you out with weight gain. Hemp milk might be an easier way for you to get more. For example, if I eat a regular 3 tbsp serving of hemp seeds I get fuller quicker but when I make hemp milk, I sometimes add even more and it doesn’t feel as heavy. I just blend the seeds with water in my high speed blender (you don’t need to strain the hemp seeds cause they’re so small).

                  Here are some of my favorite hemp milk and smoothie recipes I’ve made up except the banana smoothie which I tweaked slightly from one of Nutiva’s recipes…

                  Banana cacao hemp: a banana, 3 tbsp of hemp seeds, 1-2 tbsp cacao powder, cold water – I’ve also used coconut water for this

                  Chai hemp milk: hemp seeds, a 1/2 or 1 tsp ceylon cinnamon, 1/4th tsp or less (depending on taste… I love spices) of ground clove, vanilla (either a dash of extract or powder or from the bean – I’ve used about a third from fresh vanilla bean, would have used more but it’s expensive!), sweetened with a small amount of real maple syrup to taste, cold water

                  Matcha hemp milk: hemp seeds, a tsp or more (matter of taste preference) of matcha tea, small amount of maple syrup to taste, cold water, can also try adding vanilla

                  Smoothies are another great way to get more food in you.

                  If you eat small frequent meals, mabye eating more often could help getting more food in.

                  Good for you for going vegan for the animals! That’s pretty much how it went for me too; was vegetarian since I was little due to compassion for animals, learned about the cruel reality of dairy and eggs, went vegan, then learned about all the health benefits.

                  1. Yes I have seen the daily dozen video and I have the books, How not to die and the How not to die cook book. The amounts of food are a bit daunting.

    2. Janet,

      This question gets asked now and then. How to gain weight.

      I think you would have to reverse the principles of Calorie Density and make sure you aren’t Intermittent Fasting.

      Meaning, when they added watery foods, people got full faster and lost weight. Dryer foods, they ate more. Things like juice, which had its fiber removed, they tended to add the calories to a meal and not have the effect, like the chia drop in how much people ate.

      I would learn about Calorie Density and reverse it, but, be careful about too many fats.

      I just watched a Dr. McDougall video about whether sugar causes Cancer and he showed videos of the sludge in the blood after a high fat meal.

      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OM0BP_6Xj7Y

      I actually came back to this topic, wondering if seeds and nuts and avocado cause any sludging of the blood.

      The answer to that question would determine my diet and those types of fats are my question marks about how much and how often.

      I have been giving my poor dog flaxseed oil the past week for his cancer, but I just took him off and the sludge video helped me. If the lack of oxygen turns cells cancerous and fats, even flaxseed oil causes there to be less oxygen to the cells, then I can’t risk it.

      I watched a video on YouTube where a woman wanted to do Budwig protocol and her breast cancer got much bigger. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eVHM2mGhu5c The doctor treating her thinks it is because of estrogen in flax, but the whole oil thing could increase the Cancer, too, if Dr. McDougall is right and his imagery was good enough to cross it off my list.

      1. Budwig was hard for me to understand.

        If oil is carcinogenic and dairy is carcinogenic, then how could it conceptually be a Cancer cure?

        Is it oil or fats causing Cancer, or the whole Omega 3 / Omega 6 ratio thing?

        Dr Greger has a video with that in it. Somewhere.

        1. If anyone with Breast cancer ever sees these comments, look at William Li’s anti-angiogenesis TED Talk.

          He has the tumors disappearing in the same amount of time that the Budwig Protocol grew the tumor.

          1. Dr McDougall doesn’t believe that the sugars in things like potatoes and rice are carcinogens and he has healed people with Cancer, but Keto people are healing dogs with Cancer using Keto, even though IGF1 and oils and animal proteins also cause Cancer.

            Dr Greger, how does that work like that?

            It has to be the low sugars also starve it? Or is there another mechanism?

            The ketones kill Cancer even though oil causes Cancer?

            If they start succeeding more at it, someone needs to do the logic out.

            Alkalizing has one logic for killing Cancer, but the chemo drugs, which sometimes work often kill it by acidity and that could work if Cancer has a PH range with the ability to kill it from either extreme is my theory of a potential way both sides could be right.

            Not saying that they are, but I am grappling with how Keto possibly succeeded getting rid of the tumors, if it isn’t sugars in grains.

            1. And, yes, I know there are lots of other reasons to not go Keto and I am not going Keto.

              The answer to why they succeed might help me to understand why they are succeeding if there isn’t any problem with all the carbs and it seems like it would be good to understand the carbs better.

              Right now, I am doing low glycemic index carbs.

              1. Is it that glucose is one of the things in the Cancer metabolism diagrams and you can inhibit that if you do it low enough long enough or you could do protease inhibitors or methionine or growth hormone and some of the things work better than others?

                And some are more sustainable?

                That is gonna be my totally uneducated guess.

    1. Rhodes, I cannot speak for Dr Greger nor am I associated with this site in any formal way. I am just another blogger expressing opinion.

      First Dr Greger to my knowledge is not and has not had in the past, a official involvement with PETA. He did have a employment history with the animal humane society as medical director, but that position has been eliminated and the relationship as a result severed. To my knowledge. Has he said some things to PETA upon request….. I would say probably he has, but cannot personally affirm that. He voices opinion to very many vegan and vegetarian groups all the time, I expect PETA would be no exception. That does not mean he is associated formally with them. Human society, yes, we was formally a employee.

      On the issue of creatine,. Dr Greger takes a adverse opinion on creatine on the basis of potential contaminants. And the contaminants were to my recollection in the study cited present in all creatine samples, exempting one. And there were quite a few creatine samples tested. The result was the one exception, was of German manufacture, found pure, the rest were not. I do not think Dr Greger is in opposition to any study showing benefit in the manners you cite, cognitive enhancement and strength enhancement.

      I have personally considered this situation, and simply approached the issue by seeking out the creatine manufacturing process of Germanic origin, which does not seem contaminated. It was relatively easily tracked down.

      I don’t want to produce the actual supplement company which I found here in America, to obtain creatine through this GMP process, nor the testing of this sample by HPLC means, as I don’t want to appear to be selling the thing. But a little research will find at least one major company producing this and retailing it in such fashion. And it is available on Amazon and other common retail outlets.

      The problem with creatine and with many supplements is the manufacturers are not paying strict attention to quality control. As such transmission of product from prior batches to present batches occurs. So one finds things present in them of a untoward result. The UFC is finding this presenting in fashions with other supplements which are not creatine, but do present in marketed retail products. Two drug tests of major fighters have been found to have shown a positive result to steroid test. But the findings of steroid like compounds were found in over the counter legal supplements the fighters were taking. I am not saying this is the specific of creatine in any manner, but to state the gross contamination problem that is present at times in the supplement industry. One UFC commentator was himself involved in marketing a line of supplements through a manufacturer and he found gross contamination of other materials in them, due to lack of quality control.

      Again not the specific of creatine contamination itself, but this speaks to the instance of contamination that is found at times in the supplement industry.
      So we must express purchase of creatine supplements with some caution. In this, probably cheapest is not the way to go, though that is often stated as the way to go with creatine in youtube or on line review.

      So hope that helps and again I am just another blogger here but am vegan am a fan and do use creatine mostly daily for cognitive and strength benefit. My hobby for years and years was powerlifting training, though I have now branched out into MMA training as primary with lifting and running as secondary.

      So that is the issue as I apprehend it. To repeat I am not representing this site nor Dr Greger.
      Good video you have a good stage presence.

      1. As a addition I remember dimly, it has been a good year since I reviewed study materials, creatine as per cognition seemed to benefit only the vegans not the omnivores.
        Supplement information you may find interesting is, I have found some suggestion caffein hinders the absorbing of creatine.

        I have taken the stuff for years. One caution as you probably know, is to make certain one is well hydrated when one is taking it. Gross cycling was recommended in a specific manner (called creatine loading) but that appears not appear necessary by present literature that I have found. But some still do it.
        Vegans I always recommend it. But it must be pure. Impurities may be found even in American manufactured products. Specific forms of creatine are available. One is claiming better absorbing and one is claiming absorbing with no fluid weight gain.In light of the contamination issue I have steered clear of both. But did try the no fluid weight gain type for a little bit (forget the name) it was pricy and did not seem worth it. The first seemed junk and not to work and also pricy by reports I followed.
        Most all creatine is produced I think by biological fermentation process and isI am certain vegan.
        Its original source was in meat but that is way to expensive to synthesize in supplement form.
        .

        1. Occasionally the capsules if one takes it in that form (which is more expensive than powder), they are made of gelatin which is a animal product.
          So if vegan be advised that has to be looked for. It is marked in the container content material on the side. Powder is way cheaper anyway.

    2. Rhodes,

      I watched Dr Greger’s video and it was so neutral that I don’t know that he could be called wrong.

      He pointed out that the body produces Creatine and then gave the study that Creatine potentially gives a cognitive boost to vegetarians and harms meat eaters. Then he said 50% of the supplements are tainted by heavy metals and he gave Harvards expert opinion that the risk of contamination means that until more research is done they don’t think people should take it.
      The thing for me is that the potential benefit of a cognitive boost is weighed against a fifty percent chance of a cognitive decline long term from heavy metals in the brain, which I spent months removing with a liter per day of FIji water, so that supplement would have me spinning in circles mentally of whether I am getting smarter or injuring my brain and whether the $20 to $40 a month for the supplement, to make me smarter, plus the annual cost of the silica water to make me smarter again is a wise process to even enter in to. Plus, I would drive Dr Greger crazy if I start doing the Princess Bride logic process about that on top of every other topic. Seeds, Nuts, Fats and Oil is already complicated enough.

      1. And Fiji water is the water, which failed the bad bacteria test, but Volvic water costs over $6,50 per six pack and doesn’t come in liter sizes so I would have to drink 3 bottles to clean my brain out and it would be $24 per week and I would have to take more Creatine and more Volvic water to make me smart enough to figure the whole potential benefit thing out or I could do the Fiji water and add in something else to kill the bad bacteria and very quickly it becomes the old woman who swallowed a fly song and you know how that one ends.

  13. Hello Guys!
    I know my comment is not relevant to chia seeds but im trying to find some articles or piece of information about microscopic polyangiitis and plant based diet, sadly my brother in law has it and i’s like to know if eating plant based will get the condition better or cure it!
    Thanks!

    1. Francesco It has been quite a while and none has responded. Often when I respond others will then respond to correct my claims, if nothing more.
      So in that vein I will respond. To qualify as only another blogger here.

      Whole foods plant based diet seem to help most all health conditions. So I always advocate for their employment.
      However this illness is immune system in relation and I know of no specific known benefit by study that shows a WFPB will cure it. There is a specific course of drug treatment which is steroid based to cure it. So WFPB base in diet always makes sense for all. Specific to this I personally know of no known cure potential.

      1. Hello Ron, Thanks for your email I really appreciated !
        I’m sure if he goes plant based some kind of improvement will happen!
        Thanks again

        1. Francesco,

          I looked it up and it said that the majority of people go into remission with the course of treatment doctors use.

          That being said, there is often kidney involvement and that is where WFPB really will help and, also, it is where not changing the diet to WFPB will harm and may lead to things like dialysis and kidney transplants in the future.

          Dr. Greger has a lot of good kidney health videos and I think also TMAO might be a topic to look up here, but the kidney videos for sure.

          I am not a medical person or a science person, so if a moderator or Dr. Greger shows up and topples my answer, believe them, but plant proteins and plant sources of phosphorous don’t harm the kidneys the same way as animal sources, plus, having the good gut bacteria from eating WFPB seems to me like the way to go.

          You might also look up The Rice Diet. Dr. Greger has that as a topic. Dr. John McDougall has several videos on it. He has long videos interviewing people who are still using it in clinical practice with people who come to them in kidney failure and with diabetes and hypertension, etc.

          Learning about what makes The Rice Diet successful long before the kidneys are in failure seems like a good concept.

          1. I am not saying that your relative has to do The Rice Diet.

            But if your relative ever gets to serious kidney failure, The Rice Diet is still an option, which is out there.

            I watched some of the videos with the practitioners and Dr. Kempner chose White Rice, because he was trying to go low enough in sodium and he double rinsed the rice.

            I suspect that I would be doing double rinsing and eating it as leftovers to get the whole resistant starch benefit for my gut bacteria, but that is my totally uneducated take on things.

            1. Hello Deb, Thank you very much for the info you gave me really appreciated!
              My bro in law is indeed doing the therapy which it is slowly working, I just want him to go WFPB to get better quicker and to adopt a better lifestyle.
              I’ve sent him a copy of how not to die in Italian and I hope this will encourage more to switch.
              Again really thank you for your help, you made my day here in London!

  14. I put my chia seeds ( and pre ground flax seeds) in my am smoothie daily and blend thoroughly with lots of other ingredients before consuming. Is this sufficient to extract all the benefits from chia or do I need to start pre grinding them also?

    1. Hi this is Dr. Daniela Sozanski PhD Naturopathy and Health Support volunteer for Nutritionfacts. If indeed the whole chia seeds have the ability to absorb about 10 times their volume in water (to quote several sources), water which cannot be reabsorbed until the seed is broken down by digestive process, far along into the digestive tract then this quality together with high levels of fiber (50% more than flax) may account for digestive benefits. However grinding them has the ability to make other wonderful nutrients more bioavailable. So if you want the best of two words, why don’t you just do both. I hope it helps, Daniela

      1. Thanks for your reply. What I was trying to figure out is if Chia is ground, will it still have those water absorption properties? Adding more adds more calories which I would prefer not to do, if I could get the nutruent and BM benefits by grinding. Thanks

      1. Nel, Yeah Right,

        I watched the Funky Chicken video on a learning about Cancer pause break and it is just as odd and not all that funny as I remember it, but I laugh, because pairing the words “funky” and “chicken” together is funnier than the song and video put together. The letter “k” is funny and I think it goes back to phonics videos. I watched a lot of funny ones with a seven year old who skated through Kindergarten without learning her alphabet, last Summer. This Summer, she is reading and writing.

        She hated me making her think over the Summer, last year, and highly rebelled, but by the middle of the school semester, she was calling to read books and do make pretend math homework. Phfew! I thought we were going to be thumb wrestling about it for years.

        My favorite kids phonics videos:

        https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=c3oA4wfUBak

        https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qKi-kmgnuuo

        https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4TjcT7Gto3U

        https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=k-n_LHGseNk&t=61s

        https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eTqgFj-gWek

        https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lNJGKrs8BGA

        https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5yqcZRjSGKI

        https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lIGDpEVPzCw&t=50s

  15. So I have been eating Chia Seeds since my eye doc recommended it for dry eye. And then I also do about 1/2 & 1/2 flax seed because of the Daily Dozen info. I grind the flax seed but not the Chia seed. One interesting side effect of the Chia is that it creates lovely BMs (sorry about topic – but hey). I recommended my hubby try Chia for the great BMs as he often struggled with that (pun intended). No more struggles! The Chia seeds have that lovely coating that swells up and likely contributes to this side benefit. Not so great for getting stuck in teeth, but great for the bowel. My question is will the Chia Seeds still produce the same lift/float/flow for BMs if they are ground as when they are whole? Would not want to loose that part of the Chia Benefit! Thanks in advance for anyone who knows about this one. Deb

    1. Hey, another Deb.

      I will have to differentiate myself as the talkative one.

      I do use ground chia and ground flax, but have never had BM problems since I got off cheese, excepts for an accidentally eating the non-vegan Go Veggie.

    2. I would GUESS that you’ll get all the benefits from ground, but that’s interesting! I’d say the only way to find out (unless it’s been tested already) is to experiment a bit.

    3. Hi this is Dr. Daniela Sozanski PhD Naturopathy and Health Support volunteer for Nutritionfacts. So you are doing 1/2 table spoon whole chia seeds a day?…. Admitedly, the whole chia seeds have the ability to absorb about 10 times their volume in water (to quote several sources), water that cannot be reabsorbed in the body until the seed is broken down by the digestive process, which happens only far along in the digestive tract. This and the high levels of fiber (50% more than flax) may account for the BM benefits. So if you want the best of two worlds, why don’t you just add 1/2 table spoon of ground chia to your already existing routine instead of substituting. Dr. Sozanski

  16. My dog has started eating broccoli again.

    I think he looks like he feels better.

    No more bleed collapses.

    What excited me the most is that I found Swanson GMP Wormwood for $9 and there was a testimony of a woman who had a grapefruit sized tumor, which shrunk to a baseball in 3 weeks.

    So my dog had a basketball sized tumor, according to my vet, and it has been 3 weeks and if I didnt make too many mistakes with things like oil or too many nuts or soy, it might be “grapefruit” size by now.

    I am taking him off turmeric for the next few weeks, because the wormwood works in cancets with iron and the turmeric leaches iron out.
    Mostly, the turmeric might make any bleeds worse if I go too long with it.

  17. If any other Debs show up, the Deb comments are going to be the X-men character who splits into many duplicate copies and then comes back into one person.

  18. One of the Deb’s — the REALLY talkative one! — could call herself Deb With the Dog. Of course, there may come a time when … (But let’s not go there.) She is a good doggie mama, though — giving it her all.

    1. YeahRight,

      I like that.

      Deb with a Dog.

      Tonight, I found out that they used Fenofibrate (a cholesterol fighting drug?) on dogs with Hemangiosarcoma and the dogs survived significantly longer.

      “Fenofibrate is used along with a proper diet to help lower “bad” cholesterol and fats (such as LDL, triglycerides) and raise “good” cholesterol (HDL) in the blood. It works by increasing the natural substance (enzyme) that breaks down fats in the blood.”

      After all the talk about them wanting to put everybody on statins, they haven’t offered it to my dog who has Cancer. That caused me to come back and watch the Cholesterol and Breast Cancer link video. If I can’t get him Fenofibrate, I wonder if I can just increase the enzyme that breaks down fat in the blood some other way.

      https://www.researchgate.net/publication/283017640_Increased_Survival_after_Treatment_of_Canine_Hemangiosarcoma_with_Fenofibrate

      1. Looking at how to change cholesterol levels, I was so happy.

        I feel like God had me do a lot of things right, before I even started looking at anything.

        I looked at foods to lower cholesterol and they talked about Barley, Beans, Nuts, Artichoke and Soy and things like that and I have him on half of the list.

        Beans lower it 15% and he is getting beans.

        I need to get some lipase, because enzyme supplements worked according to one clinical research group. It could be a scam, but it is easier to get Lipase than to get Fenofibrate.

        “Clinical work at the Transformation Enzyme Corporation now reveals that most high cholesterol sufferers respond well to treatment with lipase enzyme supplements because lipase control and remove fats, such as LDL cholesterol, from our blood and helps reduce the absorption of dietary cholesterol.”

        1. Dr. McDougall doesn’t believe in doing vegan for animals. That is what my take on what I just heard him say in an interview, when he talked about his cat.

          The thing is….

          T. Colin Campbell was doing animal studies and my dog is an animal.

          That plus, having cholesterol drugs prolong life, I have to go low fat with him and I don’t want to go high animal protein, so vegan it still is.

          Even though Keto has succeeded at least once.

          1. Cats have a certain necessity in amino acid which they cannot provide naturally, they are not like us(it may be lysine I forget).
            In any event they have to have that supplemented or they linger and get sick. Vegan supplementation is available. Or they have to eat meat or fish.
            Dogs can make it on their own like we can, and have not a necessity to eat meat.

            1. Thanks Ron.

              I am reading the cholesterol and Cancer debates and how high cholesterol, no lowering cholesterol, or both contribute to Cancer.

              Complicated answers.

              Lowering his cholesterol, which I already did with diet, may increase mortality according to one side of the argument.

              The lowest cholesterol groups have the least Cancer, but lowering cholesterol could increase the rate of Cancer by 24% or something.

              Then, they say, but don’t be afraid to treat high cholesterol levels.

              If the Pritikin site is accurate, I have already lowered his cholesterol by 23%.

              And I can’t find my heat sensitive camera.

              I need to figure out where it was placed, when we were checking attic insulation.

              That is the kind of camera for thermograms, right?

              I need to start seeing whether it is working so that I can make decisions.

            2. You might be thinking of taurine for cats, incredibly important. Dogs need it too though and need to be supplemented if they’re not eating raw meat though, I believe. Taurine is easily destroyed by heat which is why it’s added in supplement form to all “pet” foods both conventional and vegan types. But with cats, putting them on a plant based diet can be dangerous and could lead to kidney damage. I read from one vet that you have to be very careful about not over-alkalizing a cat – they need a more acidic ph. One vet said that if you were to put a cat on a plant based diet, they would have to be carefully monitored by getting regular (I think it was weekly) urine tests for the first year or 2 (I believe they said 2 years) of being on the diet and then regularly after that (I believe once a month or maybe it was once or a couple times a year… totally going on memory as you can see).
              Dogs are much easier to put on a plant base diet but I would talk to my vet and make sure they were getting everything they needed via supplements or a high quality vegan dog food.

              1. No not true dogs do not need meat.
                American kennel club source…
                “fact: Dogs are omnivorous (as are people), so a vegetarian diet may be acceptable. Though some strict vegetarians would argue with me, cats are born carnivorous and require high amounts of animal dietary protein, and should not be fed totally vegetarian diets.

  19. Can someone help me understand this or assure me I’m understanding it right… it’s a pretty quick read. In this study, it’s suggesting a correlation of vitamin D insufficiency and less photo aging and those with more vitamin D showing more signs of skin aging. I’m not sure if they measured the amount of time spent in the sun and most likely did not measure for diet and all kinds of other relevant things. But wouldn’t the simple take away be the higher vitamin D is due to greater sun exposure? I just want to make sure there’s no superficial harm in taking my 5,000 IU vitamin D/day.

    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3042365/

    1. Yes Robert, seeds are for birds, greens are for bunnies, fruit is more butterflies and humming birds, nuts are for squirrels… Check out Dr. Greger’s other videos and read “How Not To Die.” There is a plethora of evidence on the health benefits of various seeds. In reality, seeds are plants, plants are for herbivores, humans are herbivores.

          1. I’m all for sky burials… if one should happen to be near Tibet upon death. I’m dead anyway, may as well nourish some birds!

        1. Sky burial.

          I thought it was going to be when the ashes fly back in your face if you scatter them on a windy day.

          Eaten by buzzards or coyotes or stumbled over by mountain climbers is so much more graphic of an image.

        2. Bardol Thodol….which is part of which I have, a dikini script part of it,(dikini’s are spirts of sorts who have their own language) tattooed upon my entire back, the liberation thorough wearing part….

          and this though I claim no authority in this..” Jhator is considered an act of generosity on the part of the deceased, since the deceased and his/her surviving relatives are providing food to sustain living beings. Such generosity and compassion for all beings are important virtues in Buddhism.[19]

          is providing your body to usually vultures and winged birds of various sorts to include mice and such as you no longer need it.
          What better to do with it use it as food for other things.
          Burn it bury it why?
          Padmesambhava who wrote that thing, was a firm vegetarian who considered meat eating to be a minor cause of bad effect or karma.

          1. His American followers(and occasionally Tibetans as well) will often try to deny that as fact as they prefer the taste of that thing to my opinion.
            The seventeenth Karmapa the leader of the Kagyu sect has however declared for his monks, it is a necessity..

  20. Can someone explain please – is it ok to soak chia seeds and consume the formed gel – without grinding the chia seeds at all? Or is it better to grind the seeds anyway? Thank you in advance!

    1. From the evidence, seems it’s much better to grind the seeds. I’m not sure that soaking makes their nutrients any more bioavailable than consuming them whole and dry. But I don’t know if the soaking method was tested. It doesn’t seem to soften the shell but rather just forms a gel around it so I don’t see how it would work for bioavailablity, but would be interesting to know for sure.

    2. While we can absorb whole chia seeds, we know that grinding them make their nutrients more available for use. The same is probably true when comparing whole chia seeds to soaked seeds. When soaked, the remaining seed inside the gel is very soft, and easily broken down. Because of this, it’s likely that soaked chia seeds have a high nutritional value. That said, I couldn’t find studies comparing ground vs soaked chia seeds for nutritional benefit. And as you know, soaked chia seeds are a great egg replacer.

      -Dr Anderson, Health Support Volunteer

  21. When you say we can absorb whoel chia seeds, this is confusing because Dr. Greger showed in another video that the omega-3’s in chia seeds are not absorbed unless they’re ground up which is attributed to their hard shells so then why would other nutrients from unground whole chia be able to be absorbed? Is there evidence showing that nutrients from unground chia are absorbed into the body? And is there actual evidence that the nutrients in soaked chia seeds are able to be absorbed?

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