Best Foods for Autism

Best Foods for Autism
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The sulforaphane found in five cents’ worth of broccoli sprouts is found to benefit autism in a way no drug ever has in randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study.

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Below is an approximation of this video’s audio content. To see any graphs, charts, graphics, images, and quotes to which Dr. Greger may be referring, watch the above video.

You may remember my series of videos about the engine-of-aging enzyme, TOR. Well, kids with autism tend to have higher TOR activity in their bodies, and this “hyperactive…TOR…signaling” may actually play a role in causing autism, making TOR a potential target to treat autism—or even theoretically reverse it, if we could target downstream TOR signaling, like between TOR and S6K1. Well, that’s actually one of the ways broccoli compounds kill off prostate cancer cells—by inhibiting the “signal transduction between…TOR and S6K1.” Breast cancer too; sulforaphane is “a potent inhibitor” of breast cancer cells, because “it targets downstream elements of the [TOR] pathway.”

So, if we gave broccoli to those with autism, if it blocks TOR, maybe it would block some of the synaptic dysfunction that contributes to the features of autism. And, that’s in addition to blocking autism pathways four other ways: “oxidative stress and lower antioxidant capacity, [the] mitochondrial dysfunction,” the brain inflammation. And, not just in a petri dish: “sulforaphane can cross the blood-brain-barrier.” You eat broccoli, and sulforaphane “quickly reach[es your brain] to exert its protective effects”—in theory, but you don’t know, until you put it to the test.

But now, you can understand why such a study could attract researchers from leading institutions: Harvard, Hopkins, and get published in one of our most prestigious journals: PNAS (the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences). But what did they find? Well, first, what did they do? A “placebo-controlled, double-blind, randomized trial, young men (aged 13–27) with moderate to severe [autism] received…sulforaphane…from broccoli sprout[s], or [an] indistinguishable [sugar pill].” They “were dosed according to body weight.” Those under 100 pounds got about a tablespoon of broccoli sprouts worth of sulforaphane a day, which is about a cup’s worth of broccoli. Between 100 and 200 pounds got about two cups of broccoli’s worth, or two tablespoons of fresh broccoli sprouts, and the big boys got three cups’ worth a day, or a little under a quarter-cup of broccoli sprouts. Why didn’t they just use actual broccoli, or actual sprouts? Because then you couldn’t have a blinded study; the patients, doctors, and parents would know who’s getting the special treatment and who’s not, and that could introduce bias just through the placebo effect. So, instead, no one knew, until the end, who got the sulforaphane, and who just got nothing in a pill.

They chose dietary sulforaphane because of its “capacity to reverse” oxidation, dysfunction, and inflammation. Yeah, but, when put to the test, did it actually work? Well, the placebo didn’t. Give people with autism nothing, and nothing much happens. But, effectively, secretly sneak them some broccoli, and “substantial…improvement…in [behavior], social interaction,…and verbal communication.” But, it all disappeared once the broccoli stopped.

Let me show you what it looks like. This is the ABC score, the “Aberrant Behaviour Checklist,” which includes things like repetitive behaviors. In the placebo group, no big change, which is what you’d expect. But the abnormal behaviors plunged in the sulforaphane group—the group that got the sulforaphane found in about five cents’ worth of broccoli sprouts a day. But, the study ended on week 18, and a month later, things were heading back to where they started.

Similar findings for a “Social Responsiveness Scale”—significant improvements until the treatment was stopped, and then caught right back up to how poorly those in the placebo group continued to function. And, these weren’t just scores on a page. “The substantial improvements…were conspicuous;” the doctors could see them; their parents and caregivers could see the improvements. No drug has ever been shown to have these kinds of effects. And, look, these were young men, starting at age 13. One could imagine it working as well, or even better, for younger children, because their brains are still developing.

And look, what’s the downside? “Broccoli sprouts are widely consumed…all over the world…without any reports of adverse effects.” Now, remember, we’re talking about whole foods, not broccoli or sulforaphane supplements. Remember, I did videos about them. Broccoli sprouts work; commercial broccoli sprout supplements hardly at all. Broccoli has sulforaphane—florets more than the stems. 

Broccoli sprouts have like ten times more, but broccoli pills, powders, and supplements have little or none. So, broccoli and cruciferous vegetables for all kids—autism or not—and hey, maybe pregnant women as well, for potential “prenatal prevention” of autism in the first place.

Please consider volunteering to help out on the site.

Image credit: Kristina DeMuth. Image has been modified.

Motion graphics by Avocado Video

Below is an approximation of this video’s audio content. To see any graphs, charts, graphics, images, and quotes to which Dr. Greger may be referring, watch the above video.

You may remember my series of videos about the engine-of-aging enzyme, TOR. Well, kids with autism tend to have higher TOR activity in their bodies, and this “hyperactive…TOR…signaling” may actually play a role in causing autism, making TOR a potential target to treat autism—or even theoretically reverse it, if we could target downstream TOR signaling, like between TOR and S6K1. Well, that’s actually one of the ways broccoli compounds kill off prostate cancer cells—by inhibiting the “signal transduction between…TOR and S6K1.” Breast cancer too; sulforaphane is “a potent inhibitor” of breast cancer cells, because “it targets downstream elements of the [TOR] pathway.”

So, if we gave broccoli to those with autism, if it blocks TOR, maybe it would block some of the synaptic dysfunction that contributes to the features of autism. And, that’s in addition to blocking autism pathways four other ways: “oxidative stress and lower antioxidant capacity, [the] mitochondrial dysfunction,” the brain inflammation. And, not just in a petri dish: “sulforaphane can cross the blood-brain-barrier.” You eat broccoli, and sulforaphane “quickly reach[es your brain] to exert its protective effects”—in theory, but you don’t know, until you put it to the test.

But now, you can understand why such a study could attract researchers from leading institutions: Harvard, Hopkins, and get published in one of our most prestigious journals: PNAS (the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences). But what did they find? Well, first, what did they do? A “placebo-controlled, double-blind, randomized trial, young men (aged 13–27) with moderate to severe [autism] received…sulforaphane…from broccoli sprout[s], or [an] indistinguishable [sugar pill].” They “were dosed according to body weight.” Those under 100 pounds got about a tablespoon of broccoli sprouts worth of sulforaphane a day, which is about a cup’s worth of broccoli. Between 100 and 200 pounds got about two cups of broccoli’s worth, or two tablespoons of fresh broccoli sprouts, and the big boys got three cups’ worth a day, or a little under a quarter-cup of broccoli sprouts. Why didn’t they just use actual broccoli, or actual sprouts? Because then you couldn’t have a blinded study; the patients, doctors, and parents would know who’s getting the special treatment and who’s not, and that could introduce bias just through the placebo effect. So, instead, no one knew, until the end, who got the sulforaphane, and who just got nothing in a pill.

They chose dietary sulforaphane because of its “capacity to reverse” oxidation, dysfunction, and inflammation. Yeah, but, when put to the test, did it actually work? Well, the placebo didn’t. Give people with autism nothing, and nothing much happens. But, effectively, secretly sneak them some broccoli, and “substantial…improvement…in [behavior], social interaction,…and verbal communication.” But, it all disappeared once the broccoli stopped.

Let me show you what it looks like. This is the ABC score, the “Aberrant Behaviour Checklist,” which includes things like repetitive behaviors. In the placebo group, no big change, which is what you’d expect. But the abnormal behaviors plunged in the sulforaphane group—the group that got the sulforaphane found in about five cents’ worth of broccoli sprouts a day. But, the study ended on week 18, and a month later, things were heading back to where they started.

Similar findings for a “Social Responsiveness Scale”—significant improvements until the treatment was stopped, and then caught right back up to how poorly those in the placebo group continued to function. And, these weren’t just scores on a page. “The substantial improvements…were conspicuous;” the doctors could see them; their parents and caregivers could see the improvements. No drug has ever been shown to have these kinds of effects. And, look, these were young men, starting at age 13. One could imagine it working as well, or even better, for younger children, because their brains are still developing.

And look, what’s the downside? “Broccoli sprouts are widely consumed…all over the world…without any reports of adverse effects.” Now, remember, we’re talking about whole foods, not broccoli or sulforaphane supplements. Remember, I did videos about them. Broccoli sprouts work; commercial broccoli sprout supplements hardly at all. Broccoli has sulforaphane—florets more than the stems. 

Broccoli sprouts have like ten times more, but broccoli pills, powders, and supplements have little or none. So, broccoli and cruciferous vegetables for all kids—autism or not—and hey, maybe pregnant women as well, for potential “prenatal prevention” of autism in the first place.

Please consider volunteering to help out on the site.

Image credit: Kristina DeMuth. Image has been modified.

Motion graphics by Avocado Video

Doctor's Note

This is the big finale to my three-part video series. For the background that led researchers down this path of clues, check out Fever Benefits for Autism in a Food and Fighting Autism Brain Inflammation with Food.

Prevent Cancer from Going on TOR is the link for the video to which I alluded.

My video Broccoli: Sprouts vs. Supplements underscores the importance of plants over pills, and Biggest Nutrition Bang for Your Buck tells you how to grow your own.

Update: After this series was published, I did even more videos on autism. Here they are: 

If you haven’t yet, you can subscribe to my videos for free by clicking here.

131 responses to “Best Foods for Autism

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  1. If this is your first video, or first week of Nutrition Facts exposure, please do read the doctor’s notes and note all the supporting/relevant videos he lists there. Also note that the archive is fully searchable and that all sources are listed for YOU to be able to read the reports yourself and answer many of your other questions.

    There is no prohibition against discussion of dissenting ideas and positions but please realize that this site is about the nutrition facts as found by the latest research, and OFTEN these things will be somewhat different from mainstream and popular belief and thoughts. Also that facts are subject to change depending upon findings, and that nutritional research is a difficult task for many reasons.

    Most common questions and conflicts on very many subjects have been previously addressed and can be found, along with the supporting studies and discussion if one will simply take a few minutes to look for them.

    We are glad to have you here with open mind and ready palate. WFPB works for so many of us, and works well! We hope to support your transition and create a tide of change. Thanks for stopping in.




    24
    1. Opportunity for YOU to participate in nutrition research right now. This is off the topic of today’s video but I’ll bet many of you hard core NF geeks like me will want to participate in this research opportunity. Tufts University is launching the ADAPT dietary patterns research project and are still recruiting study participants. The researchers especially want to recruit more men so they have a gender balanced study. Come’on guys! I just joined today. It took me 7 minutes to read the details and decide to join. Here are the details of the study requirements for participants and the consent form. https://tufts.qualtrics.com/jfe/form/SV_2hP3fzEmLnYVhm5
      Go here for general news on the project: http://hnrca.tufts.edu/adapt/news/
      Wouldn’t it be rewarding to know we contributed to the science if Dr. Greger references the ADAPT study findings in a future video!




      2
    2. In the ACP Internist June 2017 there is an article about Iron , in which it is referenced that a Dr Kahn states that iron is “ most effectively “ absorbed when obtained from red meat.
      Being a proponent of a WFPB diet , how can I refute this or is it true?




      0
      1. Thank you for your question. This video from Dr Greger answers your question
        https://nutritionfacts.org/video/the-safety-of-heme-vs-non-heme-iron/
        In summary, yes, haem iron from animal sources is better absorbed than non-haem iron from plant sources, however, there is no evidence that those on a plant-based diet are more likely to be iron deficient. You can obtain enough iron from plant sources and this is supported by all nutrition guidelines
        http://jandonline.org/article/S2212-2672(16)31192-3/fulltext

        In fact, iron from animal sources has been associated with increased risk of cancer, heart disease and diabetes due to its ability to form free radicals and cause tissue damage. Therefore, for optimal health and disease prevention plant sources of diet are more healthful




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  2. This is remarkable! I really hope Dr. Greger continues to explore more nutritional literature on mood and mental disorders. I am one of those individuals who is physically very healthy, but mentally struggles so these kinds of videos always get me excited about getting my zest for life back.




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      1. There are seemingly a million sites out there touting coconut oil and/or ketogenic diets as a panacea. Google can find all sorts of hype and pseudoscience on this topic. However, I am not aware of any good scientific evidence that these approaches are effective. The most credible study of the effects of a ketogenic diet, of 30 children, reported “Significant improvement (> 12 units of the Childhood Autism Rating Scale) was recorded in two patients”. This does not sound very dramatic or convincing and certainly pales in comparison to the improvements recorded in the study reported in the PNAS article and referenced in the video.
        https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12693778




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      2. Marvin, you made a statement for coconut oil at the last video but did not include references there either. You were answered promptly by NFforum participant ‘Darryl’ https://nutritionfacts.org/video/fighting-autism-brain-inflammation-with-food/ who did supply references for coconut oil increasing gut permeability and postprandial endotoxemia. https://nutritionandmetabolism.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/1743-7075-10-6
        and for autism-like disorders being induced by prenatal/neonatal exposure to endotoxins. http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/jnr.23089/full I have just included two of Darryl’s many references. Please see his origional post for his explanation and included references.




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  3. Question: I’ve heard and read about all kinds of ways of increasing the bioavailability and amount of sulforaphane from broccoli and broccoli sprouts (heating to 158 deg F for 10 min.). But how about grinding broccoli seeds similar to grinding flaxseeds to get the glucoraphanin and the other good compounds directly from the seeds rather than from the sprouts, then mixing the broccoli seed powder with some mustard seed powder to ensure there is enough myrosinase to complete the conversion of glucoraphanin to sulforaphane? Has anyone heard of any good measurements of the amount of glucoraphanin obtained from grinding broccoli seeds ? And the amount of sulforaphane created by combining broccoli seed powder with mustard seed powder? Thanks in advance.




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    1. WFPB-Hal
      Best to be very cautious on that one ,there is a toxic element in the seeds called Erucic acid , which could harm the lungs and heart . In Canada and the USA their is an allowable limit in canola oils , quite of bit of plant breeding and selection was done on canola seed to get the Erucic acid content down so the oil wouldn’t kill people. Wikipedia has a good page on the subject , just type in Erucic Acid. There defiantly is a large amount of Eurcic Acid in the seeds of Broccoli and mustard and not much in the sprouts .




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      1. Like most other toxins, the devil is in the details – or, in this case, the amount. Small amounts are harmless so powdered mustard seed used for flavoring is OK. In Australia the limit is 500mg per day of erucic acid which is quite a lot if you’re just eating powdered seeds.




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        1. Richard38
          according to the Wiley library about 35 grams of broccoli seed would have the maximum amount of Erucic acid one should ingest per week , that is not very much maybe two tablespoons per week




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      2. Indians, especially in the Bengal region, cook daily with mustard oil, where its associated with [halving](http://ajcn.nutrition.org/content/79/4/582.full.pdf) heart disease risk. Myocardial lipidosis hasn’t been observed. Humans are not piglets, and seem to tolerate much larger intakes of erucic acid.

        Yes, I cook with mustard oil too, even though the importers are forced to label it “external use only”. It’s particularly delicious as a [presentation drizzle](http://www.nytimes.com/2011/11/02/dining/american-chefs-discover-mustard-oil.html).




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        1. Thanks for the link to the AJCN article – a very interesting read.

          It may be worth adding that they also “observed a significant and dose-dependent inverse association between vegetable intake and IHD risk. The inverse association was stronger for green leafy vegetables” and “Cereal intake was also associated with a lower risk”/

          i was a little surprised though to see such s small association between vanaspati and trans fat consumption and increased risk. As I was to see increased risk with higher fruit consumption. This latter though may be due to a tendency to consume fruit as part of the sticky high sugar/syrup desserts popular in India




          2
          1. I just went through the abstracts of every study mentioning erucic acid in humans on PubMed. There were no reports of the accumulaton of fat in heart muscle seen in rats and piglets, but there is a thread of studies in which pure erucic acid triglycerides are used to successfully treat the genetic disorder X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy (as in the film Lorenzo’s Oil, but sometimes have the adverse effect of reducing platelet count (thrombocytopenia). Most acute cardiovascular events involve platelet clotting (hence daily aspirin for prevention), and experimental thrombocytopenia suppresses atherosclerosis in animal models (1, 2). Its possible that mustard oil’s erucic acid content (42%) is inducing sub-clinical thrombocytopenia in it’s North Indian consumers, and that accounts for some of the reduction of heart disease risk. Otherwise, mustard oil closely resembles canola (aka low-erucic acid rapeseed) oil, low in saturated fat and with a low omega-6/omega-3 ratio.




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      3. Thank you for this information. I watched an interview between Dr Rhonda Patrick and Dr Jed Fahey on his research with sulforaphane. In it he stated that he and his co-researcher had made a conscious decision to promote sprouts over ground seeds on a taste basis alone. He says that the seeds are bitter and unpalatable. No mention was made of erucic acid. So, I’m always the one person that just has to try it!!!
        I grind them in my coffee grinder and add them to my soup or whatever at the end because I’m not sure about the heat tolerance, and have found them just to give a more broccoli-esque flavour. I had no clue about dosage, so just a tablespoon once a week or so as a booster to my regular broccoli consumption. Thanks to you I will continue to be cautious in my consumption.




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    2. I have been unsuccessful at finding the answer to the following, seemingly, simple question: Does mustard powder and/or prepared mustard contain sulforaphane?




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      1. Mustard seed offers neglible amounts of sulforaphane. But keep reading.

        The bioactive compounds in cruciferous vegetables (isothiocyanates), are produced through an reaction when their precursors (glucosinolates) mix with the enzyme myrosinase, which catalyzes the reaction. This system evolved as a plant defense strategy, as the isothiocyanates would be released when insects chewed on them. Unfortunately, cooking temperatures unfold (or denature) myrosinase, deactivating it.

        Assuming it hasn’t undergone high temperatures during processing, mustard seed powder includes active myrosinase, which acts on variety of glucosinolates to convert them into bioactive isothiocyanates. This includes converting the sinigrin found in mustard to AITC (the pungent flavor of mustard, horseradish, and wasabi), but also converting the related compound glucoraphanin to sulforaphane. What one accomplishes by adding mustard seed powder to cooked (including frozen / flashe cooked) broccoli is replacing the activity of its own inactivated myrosinase with the myrosinase activity from raw mustard seeds.

        Some other cruciferous vegetables, including red cabbage and collards, have also have significant amounts of glucoraphanin (the precursor to sulforophane), almost half as much as mature broccoli. Presumably these would also contribute to sulforaphane intake when eaten raw, or cooked with a topping of mustard powder.

        Unfortunately, prepared mustard has a number of other ingredients such as vinegar and salt that could themselves inactivate mustard, so I wouldn’t rely on it as a source of active myrosinase.




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        1. Darryl, you mentioned that cabbage and collard green contain the myrosinase enzyme or precursor. I read too that coleslaw is listed as precursor to create sulforaphane, but I wasn’t sure that it is due to the fermentation or the cabbage used in coleslaw.but now you mention cabbage, and so cabbage alone is a precursor, correct? I eat fermented vegetables (cabbage mostly) every day and now I need to eat in combination with eating cruciferous vegetables.




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          1. “I eat fermented vegetables (cabbage mostly) every day and now I need to eat in combination with eating cruciferous vegetables.”

            Cabbage itself is a cruciferous vegetable.




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            1. You are correct, I forgot about this. Fermented vegetable is the only way for me to eat raw because otherwise my stomach cannot take in too much.




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              1. Jerry Lewis
                your stomach can’t take raw vegetables ? maybe you could try and eliminate fats from your diet , might help as i know you have posted you eat a lot of fats .




                1
                1. How many IDs do you have, Esben?

                  I only ate some fats like a little bit more than a year ago after I convinced myself that it is harmless. Not only that, I find myself being very healthy and having a lot of energy these days. But even with this, I don’t eat tons of fat, and only eat in the context of some other foods, except for MCT oil which I take tablespoons per day.

                  But my problem with eating raw vegetables started a while ago when I ate no fat and I was almost a vegan. I followed Dr G but ate more than the daily dozen. Twice a day, at breakfast and lunch, I drank raw veggie smoothie on top of other plant foods I ate. Then at dinner time, I followed Dr Mercola advise and drank raw veggie juice. I bought a juicer for that purpose.

                  Overall, I was healthy and had no sickness but I was not quite healthy. I felt uneasy in my stomach and I had low energy.

                  A little bit more than a year ago after I did a lot of research, I came up with the perfect diet for me. WFPB with lightly cooked vegetables + some raw vegetables, plus some fat and including saturated fat, plus bone broth and selective meat + supplements. I think I am at the top of my health right now, better than when I was younger.




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      1. Concentration of sulforaphane and its precursor glucoraphanin decline for at least the first 7 days as broccoli seeds are sprouted, and it isn’t at all clear to me that total amount increases (1
        2
        3). These are sulfur containing compounds, and its not clear whether the seeds have alternate stores. Indeed, glucophanin degradation may provide itself provide sulfur for plant growth (4). As for mustard seeds, they don’t contain glucoraphanin (5), but instead the related compound sinigrin, the glucosinolate precursor of allyl isothiocyanate (AITC). AITC is also Nrf2 inducer, but considerably less potent than sulforaphane, and its attracted less than a fifth the medical research interest judging by its appearances in titles on PubMed.




        0
  4. avocado consumption concerns, anyone?
    By the way, avocado also reported to dramatically reduce HDL levels, maybe not so good.
    Historically, avocados only harvested for short time each year, and in very very few places
    on earth. Maybe the person-thing is way bigger issue, or some other hormonal effect.

    Not So Suitable For Pregnant And Nursing Mothers

    Although avocados are very well loaded with vitamins and minerals but still it is not suitable for pregnant and nursing mothers, and they should avoid avocados completely. This is because avocados are known for reducing milk production and can even cause damage to the mammary gland. If a breastfeeding mother consumes avocado then it can upset the stomach of the baby. As an unborn baby and a newborn baby get all its nutrition from his mother so it becomes highly risky to consume avocados during pregnancy and nursing stage, and should be avoided.




    1
    1. Shelby, Please tell us where your information came from. This site is dedicated to learning from science and separating fact from folklore the same way. If you would please cite research showing this I’m sure we’d all be very interested.




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        1. Shelby. I may have missed it but that article didn’t appear to say that avocados reduce HDL cholesterol. Instead, it said only that avocados reduce cholesterol without stating whether this meant total, LDL or HDL cholesterol.

          An experiment 20 years ago did appear to show that a diet high in avocados reduce total and LDL cholesterol. However, it also showed that the same diet produced a “significant increase” in HDL cholesterol.
          https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/8561655




          3
    2. As Rebecca Cody said, please cite the research that backs up your statements.

      Also, Dr. G covers avocado consumption in one of the upcoming videos in this series. I always get the DVD ahead of time. You can also stream the series. For me, it solves the cliffhanger dilemma, all while supporting NF.org & the terrific research they do.




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    3. I’m concerned about avocado’s pectin leading to genomic instability. This has yet to be proven outside the petri dish though. I really wish there was some conclusive study on this because it could be potentially a big problem.




      0
        1. Dr. Greger reported about it here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LFCy5mJ2BWQ

          There isn’t much money to do further research though so all we have is the observation that cultures eating more avocado don’t appear to have higher cancer incidence. However, it’s really hard to isolate why that is. It could just be that people eating more avocado are generally wealthier and thus may have improved healthcare/dietary options/lower stress etc. It could be a bit like how brown rice might be slightly protective but arsenic probably cancels out the benefits.

          I love avocados and there are definitely a lot of good things about them but until this aspect is clarified, it’s hard for me to be 100% sure they’re healthy long-term (not just for weight management and cholesterol).




          0
  5. Off topic but hoping for some support and encouragement…..Trying not to give in to the gloom I am feeling at not being able to more quickly resolve my reflux issues (GERD) by converting to a WFBP approach especially in the light of so many posts about how quickly symptoms of reflux abated once they started eating that way. I am loath to go back on PPI’s but wondering why I am not getting the same swift results as others have on this forum.




    1
    1. Lee Kreiger, Do you eat wheat? Many years ago a naturopath told me that reflux is a problem with wheat and/or overweight. I stopped wheat and within two or three days the reflux was gone. I then went on to lose weight and I’ve never had it again. I think we know more now, and there are no doubt other causes, but it would definitely be worth going without wheat for a week to see if that helps.




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      1. Thanks, Livewire.  I do eat wheat but in very small portions such as sprouted wheat toast and organic granola.  I suspect that would be the only way to find out is by the process of elimination.  It looks to be a long road ahead.
        Lee




        2
      2. That’s interesting about wheat although there is considerable evidence that whole grain consumption on balance is healthy for most people. I am sure you are aware of this but just mention it here because of a finding from the very interesting Indian study that Darryl mentioned a few posts ago:

        “Most of the apparent effect with cereal intake was attributable to consumption of roti (wheat flat bread) (data not shown). In multivariate analysis of roti intake (with additional control for other cereal foods), we found that persons consuming 9 servings/d had an RR of 0.38 (95% CI: 0.15, 0.92; P for trend 0.01) compared with those with no intake.”
        http://ajcn.nutrition.org/content/79/4/582.full.pdf

        I don’t have reflux or overweight so I’d need a very good reason to avoid whole wheat bread.




        3
    2. Lee Krieger,
      You can do it! It probably took me 6 months before I was able to identify all my triggers with GERD. There’s a book called “dropping Acid” that helped me heal and in it they discuss why certain foods may trigger reflux in some people–this includes foods like onions and tomatoes. This book recommends a “heart-healthy diet” + reduction of reflux inducing foods and additions of gut healing foods. Many professionals also recommend not going to sleep or laying down 3 hours after you’ve eaten, though i unfortunately have to wait 4. Just because certain foods may be triggers doesn’t mean you cannot eventually add them back into your diet, but you want to give the body time to heal first. PPI’s should never be a long term solution to reflux, your doctor should work on a plan to get you off of them…but they almost never do.




      5
      1. Jessig7 thank you for your kind response.  I have eliminated many of the food triggers that you mentioned and I also do not eat past 6-7 o’clock which is well before bedtime.  As you rightly pointed out, most doctors do not approve of getting off PPI’s and my gastroenterologist is no exception.  He refutes every study that I have brought to his attention about the dangers of staying on PPI’s long term.  I suspect he may wash his hands of me soon as being non-compliant.  I am somewhat relieved to hear that it took you as long as it did to become free of GERD and reflux issues because so many others have made it seem as if it was an overnight miracle to eat only plant based.
        Thanks,Lee




        4
      2. Jessica: you mentioned onions. I couldn’t eat onions for years. If I ingested even just a small amount, they would repeat on me for days to the point where I couldn’t even look at an onion. At that time, I consumed a lot of dairy products. Not so much meat, but I had a real penchant for dairy. My transition to WFPB has been slow over the years, reaching back as far as the 80s when I went on the Pritikin diet with my father after he had a heart attack. In the early to mid 2000s, after eliminating pretty much all animal products from my diet, I tried eat small amounts of onions again & realized that they no longer made me sick. My guess is that the change in my diet helped produce the right bacteria in my gut to be able to digest the onions. I now eat them regularly – raw or cooked – with no problem.




        3
        1. WFPB-Nancy – I just wanted to echo the topic that, while some people see really fast change when going WFPB, it took me a while. My issue was the gas. . . and boy do I mean gas. Others talked about how the gas went away after about 2 weeks. Not for me!!! I had so much gas, especially at night, that I just became a hermit for a while. But, . . I stuck to it. It really took about 2 years for my system to change sufficiently to not product so much gas. Now I can eat an entire can of beans and produce simply normal amounts of gas. Every once in a while I might have an increase for a day or two depending on what I’m eating. But, overall, my system is now settled. So I encourage you to stick with it. My only other suggestion for those with GERD is to also walk after a meal. I find that to also be helpful.




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      1. Thank you for your interest.  I am keeping my fat intake quite low though I do not keep track of numbers or percentages I am quite sure it is within the parameters you suggested.
        Thanks,Lee




        1
    3. Dr Greger has a video on mineral water or club soda , watch that . you can also try a homemade recipe of two tablespoons of milk of magnesium in a one litre bottle of mineral water ,drink a half cup twice a day . good also for people who are not getting enough magnesium too.




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  6. Is the 1 TBS the actual amount of sprouts or the sulforophane. If so, how many TBS or cups of spouts per weight (50/75/150 pounds) does that equate to?




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    1. hi Alys. In the third paragraph of the transcripts of today’s video, Dr Greger tells us the researchers used sulforaphane supplements (so to keep the trial blinded) but gives us the equivalent amounts used in broccoli sprouts and broccoli. For under 100 lbs body weight, 1tbsp sprouts or 1 cup broccoli; for 100 to 200 lbs, 2tbsp sprouts or 2 cups broccoli ; for over 200 lbs 3tbsp sprouts or 3 cups broccoli. Hope that helps.




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      1. Susan, I know what you meant, but just for accuracy’s sake, I believe they used sulforaphane extract from broccoli sprouts that they more than likely made themselves for the study. The word supplement could lead some people to believe that they used commercial supplements, which I doubt was the case. I know I’m splitting hairs here… lol.




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        1. Thanks Nancy ! I appreciate you mentioning. I saw that in the study and assumed they had made the extract (in one study they detailed the process) themselves since the commercial supplements tested were ineffective. I use a tablet and sometimes word economy rules over detail – and it shouldn’t. I realise that many folks don’t enjoy perusing through studies and look to the comments for brief overviews of ideas.




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    2. A Tbsp of pure sulforaphane would be quite the amount (and would cost $5000+ at research chemical costs). No, the three doses were 50/100/150 µmol, or 9/18/27 mg. If pure, these amounts would have the volume of a small pinch of salt.

      The researchers made their extracts by boiling pureed broccoli sprouts in water, filtering the solution, adding a daikon radish extract containing myrosinase to convert the glucoraphanin to sulforaphane, then freeze drying it, and assaying it. The extract powder was a mix of soluble broccoli sprout compounds, some 3.8% sulforaphane by weight.

      Unfortunately, “sulforaphane is only moderately stable over time, especially in aqueous solution. The reactivity of sulforaphane is exacerbated by the fact that (freeze-dried) extracts are hygroscopic, and as water is adsorbed during protracted storage or formulation, their useful shelf-life is limited unless chemically stabilized, kept cold, or made frequently during the study. It is difficult and expensive to stabilize and formulate sulforaphane for extended clinical trials and particularly for long-term interventions.” (from Sulforaphane bioavailability from glucoraphanin-rich broccoli, 2015). This may account for why commercial supplements have so little bioavailable sulforaphane. They aren’t shelf-stable.




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      1. That said, higher bioavailability sulforaphane supplements may be on their way, that 2015 Johns Hopkins paper reports that either quick frozen and freeze-dried whole broccoli sprouts, or broccoli seed powder are shelf stable and the sulforaphane is 40% and 36% bioavailable, compared to about 69% for their own freshly made extracts described above, or 10% for commercial extracts.

        Not all of us are the creatures of habit to prepare fresh broccoli sprouts every day, and I run out of broccoli on ocassion. The shelf stability and relatively high bioavailability from broccoli seed powder opens the way to making our own sulforaphane supplements. Broccoli seeds generally have 40-105 µmol/g of the sulforaphane precursor glucoraphanin (highest in Premium Crop, San Miguel, Arcadia, Gypsy, and Everest varieties), and offer about half the sulforaphane bioavailability as the extract used in the autism study. Assuming merely an average glucoraphanin content seed, with 70 µmol/g, then achieving similar uptake as the 50, 100, or 150 µmol doses in the study would require 1.4, 2.8, or 4.3 g of seed powder. These are small amounts, fractions of a teaspoon, and would roughly fill 2, 4, or 6 ’00’ sized capsules. Or one could add the seed to the blender and powderizing before adding other smoothie ingredients, as with flaxseed.

        Note that when John Hopkins prepared their broccoli seed powder, they took precautions against microbial contamination, which amounted to soaking them in 25% Chlorox bleach, rinsing them, and drying them. It would also be important not to expose them to high heat (which would denature their myrosinase). I doubt a quick spin in the blender/spice grinder would pose problems.




        3
  7. Thanks for this information. I have a daughter with autism who has exhibited improved behavior with fevers. I’ll promptly start adding broccoli sprouts to her smoothies, and broccoli to her snacks (fotunately she’ll eat almost anything if she can dip it in hummus).




    10
    1. Chris, I am hoping this is beneficial for your daughter. How fortunate to have the humus for camouflage! Please let us know how this goes for her.




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  8. Phenomenal piece of reporting here – thank you, Dr Greger. I will be forwarding this video to lots of friends with children on the Autistic Spectrum.




    4
  9. I’d say this video confirms my personal anecdote. I used to have most of the check marks on the DSM-V for asperger’s along with some bad anxiety as well. After changing to a whole food plant based diet with a focus on the GBOMBS/Daily dozen those systems, unknowingly, started to disappear. Sadly most people won’t even try this, just so many excuses… I already talked to one person about their son, they don’t like vegetables.. so why bother right? Obviously going to school meetings and planning your life around an autistic child is easier than slightly changing your diet.




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    1. Nick P, thanks so much for sharing your experience with us. It was also kind of you to talk about it to your friends. All we can do is put it out there. The rest is up to them.




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  10. I’m curious to know more about how much broccoli sprouts to add. Any thoughts or suggestions? Should I use the same amount as mentioned in the video or more?




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    1. My normal consumption is about 1 or 2 fistfuls of sprout per day. Dr Rhonda Patrick said to consume one jar for cancer patients, so my 2 fistfuls are about 1/2 a jar. Just for precaution, because too much of a good thing is not always good, don’t go over a jar or 4 fistfuls but consume at least one fistful, which is a little bit more than 1 measurement cup.




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  11. I think it worth mentioning that in his book How Not to Die, Dr. Greger has a section “Strategies to Enhance Sulforaphane Formation” with important information regarding preparation/cooking of cruciferous vegetables to make sure one is getting significant sulforaphane. Briefly, cooking inactivates the precursors to sulforaphane formation, so either chop the veggies and let stand for ~40 minutes, then cook or add some raw cruciferous to the meal (does not take much to activate the chemical reaction).




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    1. “chop the veggies and let stand for ~40 minutes”

      Yes, it’s what Dr. G’s refers to as the ‘hack & hold’ technique for cooking cruciferous vegetables.




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  12. There is no doubt that we better eat the real broccoli sprout and no take the sulforaphane supplement.

    But for people who are hard at eating, especially for kids with autism spectrum, then according to Dr Rhonda Patrick, they can take the sulforaphane supplement and then eat a small amount of raw broccoli sprout on the side. Apparently, what is missing is the enzyme to make the sulforaphane to work.

    And this comes from a Doctor and so don’t lurk insults at me as usual (and it comes from supposedly pacifist vegans).

    Since this series of articles from Dr G on autism, I pay more attention to how I eat cruciferous vegetables and I now always eat them along side with some raw arugula to get the enzyme.




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    1. If you’re going to try high protein/lower carb for weight loss, I’d suggest the approach one of or eminent nutrition academics, David Jenkins (inventor of the “glycemic index):

      Jenkins et al, 2009. The effect of a plant-based low-carbohydrate (“Eco-Atkins”) diet on body weight and blood lipid concentrations in hyperlipidemic subjects. Archives of internal medicine, 169(11), pp.1046-1054.

      Jenkins et al, 2014. Effect of a 6-month vegan low-carbohydrate (‘Eco-Atkins’) diet on cardiovascular risk factors and body weight in hyperlipidaemic adults: a randomised controlled trial. BMJ open, 4(2), p.e003505.

      From the first paper:

      A low-carbohydrate plant-based diet has lipid-lowering advantages over a high-carbohydrate, low-fat weight-loss diet in improving heart disease risk factors not seen with conventional low-fat diets with animal products.

      Metabolically controlled diets in which all food was provided were consumed by the participants. The low-carbohydrate diet provided the minimum level of carbohydrates currently recommended (130 g/d)14 and eliminated common starch-containing foods, such as bread, baked goods, potatoes, and rice. The protein content was provided by gluten (54.8% of total protein), soy (23.0%), fruits and vegetables (8.7%), nuts (7.5%), and cereals (6.0%). Gluten was provided in the nut bread and wheat gluten (also called “seitan”) products and, together with soy, in burgers, veggie bacon, deli slices, and breakfast links. In addition, soy was provided as tofu and soy beverages. Nuts included almonds, cashews, hazelnuts, macadamia, pecans, and pistachios. The fat was provided by nuts (43.6% of total fat), vegetable oils (24.4%), soy products (18.5%), avocado (7.1%), cereals (2.7%), fruits and vegetables (2.3%), and seitan products (1.4%). The diet was designed to provide 26% of calories as carbohydrates, 31% as protein, and 43% as fat.




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    2. You can dress it up & change its name, but it’s still the Atkins diet. Just a few ‘gems’ from the Bazaar article:
      “If heart disease is in your family, be very careful with this diet. It’s important to get your lipid levels tested and to consult with a dietitian if you’re trying this, or any, diet.” (Mascha Davis, MPH, RDN)
      Heart disease runs rampant in my family, so no thank you. And since heart disease is the No. 1 killer in the US, then it probably runs rampant in most people’s families.

      The (Dutch) study they cite says the low-carb dieters experienced increased muscle breakdown.
      It also makes you dehydrated & you have to take all these supplements, including artery-hardening salt, to replace lost electrolytes.

      Here’s their bottom line:
      “Bottom line: It’s just not for everyone, and it’s not always something you can stick to forever.”

      It also cites the Lancet study, which has already been debunked.

      I also love how they use supermodels & other 20-year-olds to plug it. Any diet other than the SAD would make 20- & 30-year-olds lost weight for as long as they adhere to it. I wonder how people in the middle-aged-plus age group would fare on this diet after decades of beating up their bodies with the SAD.

      I’ve never been one for fad diets, so I think I’ll stick with eating WFPB. It’s simple, I don’t have to bother with a bunch of commercially made, costly supplements, it’s not dangerous to my health, it got rid of my arthritis, my doctor is always amazed by how good my blood work looks, it gives me plenty of energy, and there’s so much variety! But some people just can’t bear the thought of having to give up animal products & other fatty foods. It makes me feel terrific, I’ve been doing it for years now & will continue for many years to come.




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  13. 1. Don’t brussel sprouts have more sulforaphane in them than broccoli(I know they still have less than broccoli seed sprouts in the same amounts).

    2. How many brussel sprouts would I have to eat approximately, would steaming/boiling them in my pressure cooker destroy it or would I just have to add broccoli(or cut them in half a while before eating or I wonder how a raw brussel sprout smoothie would taste lol)?

    3. Is most organic mustard seed powder suitable?

    4. How much mustard seed powder do I need to eat(for cooked cruciferous vegetables) to get the maximum benefit?




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    1. hi Daniel, I had this page http://www.brainprotips.com/sulforaphane-supplements/ which, if you scroll down a bit, does show brussel sprouts , 1/2 cup, having 104 mg glucosinolates (the precursor to sulfurophane) . Top of the list! As for cooking, it doesn’t take much to cook sprouts so here is what I do. About an hour before dinner, I trim the ends of each brussel sprout, and make a shallow x cut at the end. This helps the sprout to cook more evenly, and will start the formation of sulfurophane. I usually just steam them for about 6 or 7 min depending on how big they are, or plop them in boiling water and cook maybe 4 or 5 min til bright green and fork tender. The sulforaphane is stable during cooking. You could just sprinkle on dry mustard on cooked sprouts if you’re in a hurry and didnt pre-cut. I hope this gives you some ideas Daniel! All the best in health,




      1
      1. On this page: http://www.brainprotips.com/sulforaphane-supplements/

        “Sulforaphane appears in the bloodstream 1 hour post-ingestion. Peak plasma levels are reached after 4 hours4. The elimination half-life of sulforaphane is 2.2 hours and it becomes undetectable in blood 12 after consumption 4.

        Once in the bloodstream sulforaphane rapidly enters cells.

        In the intracellular space, Sulforaphane interacts with glutathione, a cellular antioxidant, to form a glutathione-sulforaphane conjugate.

        This process is catalyzed by the enzyme glutathione-s-transferase5. Finally, once the glutathione-sulforaphane conjugate is formed, it exits the cell via the efflux protein MRP (Multidrug Resistance Protein), and to a lesser extent, P-glycoprotein5.”

        So if I were to take this supplement:

        http://www.raysahelian.com/glutathione.html

        “Eur J Nutr. 2014. Randomized controlled trial of oral glutathione supplementation on body stores of glutathione. Glutathione, the most abundant endogenous antioxidant, is a critical regulator of oxidative stress and immune function. While oral GSH has been shown to be bioavailable in laboratory animal models, its efficacy in humans has not been established. Our objective was to determine the long-term effectiveness of oral GSH supplementation on body stores of GSH in healthy adults. A 6-month randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled trial of oral GSH (250 or 1,000 mg / day) on GSH levels in blood, erythrocytes, plasma, lymphocytes and exfoliated buccal mucosal cells was conducted in 54 non-smoking adults. Secondary outcomes on a subset of subjects included a battery of immune markers. GSH levels in blood increased after 1, 3 and 6 months versus baseline at both doses. At 6 months, mean GSH levels increased 30-35 % in erythrocytes, plasma and lymphocytes and 260 % in buccal cells in the high-dose group. GSH levels increased 17 and 29 % in blood and erythrocytes, respectively, in the low-dose group. In most cases, the increases were dose and time dependent, and levels returned to baseline after a 1-month washout period. A reduction in oxidative stress in both GSH dose groups was indicated by decreases in the oxidized to reduced glutathione ratio in whole blood after 6 months. Natural killer cytotoxicity increased >twofold in the high-dose group versus placebo at 3 months. These findings show, for the first time, that daily consumption of GSH supplements was effective at increasing body compartment stores of GSH.
        This study was supported by Kyowa Hakko USA, Inc. and Kyowa Hakko Bio. Ltd. Setria Glutathione can be found in select supplement manufacturers.”

        * So if I were to take this supplement…would it tend to increase or decrease the effectiveness of sulforaphane.* Seems like higher levels of GSH would remove sulforaphane more rapidly.




        1
        1. Hey Marv, thanks for writing. You are correct when you suspect that nutrients like glutathione that have a role in metabolizing xenobiotics certainly has the potential to more rapidly eliminate phytochemicals like sulphoraphane from the blood. How TISSUE levels of this phytochemical are affected by this is probably not known; certain tissues might ‘grab on’ to sulforaphane and concentrate it, while others may not. Think about why you would want to take glutathione; if its for detoxification, wouldn’t a WFPB diet be adequate for this purpose?




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    2. Daniel, there are a lot of foods with sulforaphane and brussel sprout is one. But broccoli is the most popular and for simplicity, it is talked about by the Doctor, I guess. For instance collard green has more nutrients than kale but kale is the most talked about.

      And cauliflower is a cousin of broccoli but it contains slightly different nutrients.

      It’s best to eat a variety of cruciferous vegetables. If you go to a seed place, you will find all kind of seed. The only seed to avoid is alfalfa because it tends to be contaminated with e-coli for some reason.

      http://www.broccolisproutshop.com/nutrition/list-of-14-sulforaphane-foods/




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      1. Alex,

        I tried to find some source for that information but I was unable to do so. I found a few articles but they simply state it without any research/data to back it up. Do you have some source for that information?

        Hope it helps,

        Moderator Adam P.




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  14. I started eating broccoli sprouts daily after watching one of your other videos. However, I had an incident of gastrointestinal muscle spasms that I believe were from eating the sprouts. I am not accustomed to any sort of G.I. issues and the only thing that I could attribute it to was eating the sprouts. Is it possible that my broccoli sprouts were contaminated? I definitely do not want to experience that pain again and so I am afraid to grow them anymore. Is there any substitution for broccoli sprouts that might be safer? I was considering using my broccoli sprout seeds and growing micro greens with them.




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    1. Kristen, you may want to cook the sprout lightly, 160 deg F for 10 minutes. Some people can’t eat too much raw foods, including myself and I don’t have any digestive issue and I am not allergic to anything and can eat any foods. But for raw vegetables, I can only eat some, such as arugula and celery, but when I used to drink glasses of blended raw kale or other vegetables, it gave me an uneasy feeling.




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    2. Hey Kristen, thanks for writing! Of course it’s possible that your sprouts were contaminated; in the food chain, ANY food can be contaminated. Cooking food reduces the possibility that we will suffer from this contamination, but some foods (broccoli included) provide phytochemicals in greater amounts when uncooked, so washing foods carefully becomes important. I am not aware of broccoli sprout substitutes, but if you’re including other crucifers (cauliflower, Brussels sprouts, cabbage, etc) as well as carotenoid-containing veggies (carrots, sweet potatoes) you should get a similarly beneficial increase in antioxidant/detox enzymes.




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  15. We order broccolli sprout JUICE directly from http://www.vegusjuices.com – their claim, they are the only manufacturer of broccolli sprout juice in the world. They are based in Ireland. (My husband often travels for work and takes a supply with him as he has a prostrate cancer tumour and we believe it has helped keep his psa at around the same level of 5 for the last two years. You take it like a shot. Who really knows ,but with a plant based diet too something is working and we are big fans). I am aware there are many benefits from sulphrophane in broccolli and broccoli sprouts and it is great to see this linked in the videos to autism. I just asked Vegus this morning if I could share the Pin number I have shared a few times with friends who just want to TRY it. PIN is 778899 and you get 20% off the first order. Not sure if this is okay to do Dr Greger. If not then please just remove this. We add a little lemon juice to get over the taste as concentrated broccollu sprouts is not the best taste in the world. Sometimes I just add it to a glass of water to dilute it. Maybe apple juice could help? It;s not so pleasant but you get used to it. Thanks for all your amazing work over the years Dr Greger about which I am very passionate and extremely grateful.




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  16. The most incredible thing I heard on this video was that the price of 1 tablespoon of broccoli sprouts/1 cup of broccoli is 5 cents!!! Please tell me where in the US broccoli sprouts are that cheap and I will move there !! They are exorbitant in my local Whole Foods!




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    1. yep Al, I can relate. Here, broccoli sprouts go for 3.99 per 60 gm container , and broccoli for 2.99 per lb usually. Organic broccoli? Out of the question at $4 to $6 in season! 6 collard leaves for 2.99 ? Not happening. Thanksgiving is coming up for us in Canada though, and that means brussel sprouts and yams on special. Aside from occasional sales, it can be expensive.

      Have you tried sprouting your own broccoli sprouts Al? The seeds are very expensive here initially, but it might work out great as per Dr Greger’s comments https://nutritionfacts.org/video/biggest-nutrition-bang-for-your-buck/ I’m going to try it!




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    2. Broccoli seed or any seeds are kind of expensive, but you don’t need a lot of seeds for your sprouting. I go through like a $20 bag in about 6 months. Go to Todd seeds for instance to buy seeds fairly cheap. Just make sure to ask them if the seed comes from the USA. For instance the broccoli seed are from the U.S. but the mung bean seed is from China. Alternatively when I don’t have time to sprout, I buy it from a local store a large bag for a few bucks. Homemade sprout is always the best but it is still better than nothing with store bought sprout.




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  17. Is the same pill (sulforaphane extracted from broccoli sprouts) they gave test subjects available for purchase to the general consumer? I would buy this for my autistic son in a heartbeat!




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    1. Ina,

      they used pill form so they could make the study double-blinded. Broccoli will have the best results for your son. :)

      Please let us know how your son is doing!

      Moderator Adam P.




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  18. John Rodakas wrote an opinion in the WSJ (Sept 19) as to why
    metabolic investigation of autism is not funded. It does not fit
    the established paradigm of a genetic disorder. Rodakas also
    mentions a clinical trial of autistic boys whose behaviors
    improved while taking antibiotic vancomycin (study not cited).
    He felt that the antibiotic caused the benefits and should be
    investigated rather than the likely fever symptoms of their
    illness.




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  19. Aberant Behavior Checklist? Wow

    How could i find which behaviors are normalized? That concerns me as an ASD person since some of my behaviors result in art and some cause me to waste time online. Also how might this improve the ability to understand the social part of communication which is a critical downside for ASD and others. Aberant seems a strong word
    definition of aberrant
    adjective
    departing from an accepted standard.
    “this somewhat aberrant behaviour requires an explanation”

    I do wish that the NON asd folks would consider how their behavior seems aberrant to us Oh well.

    In any case i need to find brocolli sprouts.

    Thank you




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  20. A little more here. This tells me what folks consider aberrant but how can i comly when i didn’t understand what you said in the first place. How would you know that i was not complying with what i thought you wanted. How would you know if there was a reason i did not comply that you were not understanding?
    Seems like this is social and not need based.

    I’ll try and control my aberrant behavior with obessing on a topic now. And I won’t cry or be sterotypic either. At least not on this webpage I probaly already did the Inappropriate Speech thing. LOL

    Here is the abstract:

    Aberant Behavior Checklist
    The development of a scale to assess drug and other treatment effects on severely mentally retarded individuals was described. In the first stage of the project, an initial scale encompassing a large number of behavior problems was used to rate 418 residents. The scale was then reduced to an intermediate version, and in the second stage, 509 moderately to profoundly retarded individuals were rated. Separate factor analyses of the data from the two samples resulted in a five-factor scale comprising 58 items. The factors of the Aberrant Behavior Checklist have been labeled as follows: (I) Irritability, Agitation, Crying; (II) Lethargy, Social Withdrawal; (III) Stereotypic Behavior; (IV) Hyperactivity, Noncompliance; and (V) Inappropriate Speech. Average subscale scores were presented for the instrument, and the results were compared with empirically derived rating scales of childhood psychopathology and with factor analytic work in the field of mental retardation.




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  21. This is not directly related to the topic of the video, but rather to the general topic of the connection between food and mental health: I have been suffering from a quite severe depersonalization (DP) disorder since 2003, and my general experience of life was quite a living hell — until I transitioned to a WFBP diet. Before this, veganism did only little to alleviate the disorder, but it turned out that oil is a major culprit for me. The symptoms are always aggravated by any factor that causes fatigue and heaviness, e.g. too little sleep. When I consume even a small bite of vegan food prepared with oil, I begin deteriorating to worse DP within minutes. I then have a hellish experience for several hours, after which it relaxes but does not return to the improved state before ingesting that food. I am not completely sure whether past fevers alleviated the symptoms to some extent, but I do seem to remember an improved feeling; this could be the opposite state of fatigue and heaviness, since fever is a quite lively state. This is absolutely not to imply that autism and DP are related.

    Sadly, so little research is being done on DP, since it is not a very common disorder. I believe the connection between the disorder and oil could educate about the nature of DP, but researchers need to focus their attention on DP for this to happen.




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  22. There actually is one supplement which *should* provide active sulforaphane in capsule form (Broccomax by Jarrow Formulations), since the SGS and myrosinase are compartmentalized and released to react together after the capsule disintegrates. Obviously whole foods are preferred, but I throw a couple of these capsules into my kale smoothie in the morning for a little extra nutritional boost, and I use them when I travel (similarly to how Dr. Greger uses whole turmeric capsules in a pinch).




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  23. Please, talk & listen to people who are actually autistic about these videos. Autistic adults are the experts on what support we want & need from doctors.




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  24. Perhaps I missed something in the video: It is stated the experimental subjects were given a brocolli supplement, but then it is stressed that whole food brocolli sprouts, not supplements, have a far greater concentration of sulforophane. Which is it?




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    1. Hey Gary, thanks for writing! In clinical studies, the amount of a substance given to subjects usually needs to be constant and quantified specifically for the study to be approved. To assure compliance as well, it’s easier to get people to swallow a capsule than to eat a certain amount of broccoli sprouts.




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  25. I have refrained from giving my 3-year-old broccoli sprouts because of their contamination risk. I remember seeing here that broccoli sprouts are much less risky than other sprouts. Do the benefits offered warrant any contamination risk from broccoli sprouts for my (non-autistic) 3-year-old?




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  26. how do we get sulforaphane? I not sure if eating lots broccoli everyday is doable for some. Is it correct that pills, capsules and tablets wouldn’t work or have very low sulforaphane?




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  27. Sulforaphane is found in all cruciferous vegetables so other sources include brussel sprouts, kale, collards, cauliflower, cabbage. Always best to get nutrients from whole foods rather than in pill form.




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