Food Synergy

Food Synergy
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Combining certain foods together may be more beneficial then eating them separately.

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Below is an approximation of this video’s audio content. To see any graphs, charts, graphics, images, and quotes to which Dr. Greger may be referring, watch the above video.

There are thousands of phytochemicals that will never make it onto the side of a cereal box, but may play a role in reducing the risk of chronic diseases—and that’s just the ones we know about. We know whole plant foods have consistently been found to be protective. And, so, it’s reasonable for scientists to try to find the “magic bullet” active ingredient to sell it in a pill. But, “pills…simply cannot mimic this balanced natural combination of phytochemicals present in fruits and vegetables.” When isolated out, the compound may lose its activity, or behave differently. The antioxidant and anticancer activities of plant foods is thought to derive from the additive or synergistic effects—meaning the whole may be greater than the sum of its parts. This helps explain why a pill simply cannot replace the complex interaction of phytochemicals present in whole plant foods.

As T. Colin Campbell has pointed out, more than a hundred trials “overwhelmingly show no long-term benefit of vitamin supplements, along with worrisome findings that certain [supplements] may even increase [risk] for diabetes, heart disease, and cancer.” Supplementation with fish oil appears useless or worse; yet, the science doesn’t seem to matter. People continue to buy it. “The public desire for quick fixes through pills…is overwhelming, especially when money can be made.”

Each plant has thousands of different phytochemicals, and each plant has a whole different phytonutrient profile. And so, there may be synergistic effects when consuming different foods together, as well. Just like eating beta-carotene in carrot form is more beneficial than in pill form—because of all the other compounds in the carrot that may synergize with the beta-carotene—when you dip that carrot in hummus, all of a sudden you have the thousands of carrot compounds mixing with the thousands of chickpea compounds. And, that’s what this study was all about. What happens if you mix different fruits, with different vegetables, with different beans?

Combining foods between different categories did indeed increase the likelihood of synergy. For example, here’s the antioxidant power of raspberries alone. And, here’s the antioxidant activity of adzuki beans alone. So, if there was strictly an additive effect, the expected combination would come up to here. But, the observed antioxidant power of the combination came out more than either eaten alone.

What about anticancer effects? What if you repeated this study, but this time tried dripping different combinations of foods on breast cancer cells growing in a petri dish? Sometimes, you can get the same synergistic effects. Here’s what grapes can do to breast cancer cells—suppressing their growth about 30%. But, onions worked even better—cutting breast cancer growth in half. Now, if you added half of each together, right, you’d assume you’d get somewhere in the middle between the two; they’d average each other out. But, instead, the researchers got this—suppressing cancer cell growth by up to like 70%.

So, the whole plus the whole was greater than the sum of the whole parts. So, did they recommend people eat a variety of foods? Maybe, add some raisins along with some chopped red onion to your next salad? Where’s the money in that?

No. The reason they were investigating the different types of interactions was to identify mixtures that could ultimately lead to the development of something like grape-flavored Funyuns, or something.

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Image thanks to Unsplash via Pixabay. Image has been modified.

Below is an approximation of this video’s audio content. To see any graphs, charts, graphics, images, and quotes to which Dr. Greger may be referring, watch the above video.

There are thousands of phytochemicals that will never make it onto the side of a cereal box, but may play a role in reducing the risk of chronic diseases—and that’s just the ones we know about. We know whole plant foods have consistently been found to be protective. And, so, it’s reasonable for scientists to try to find the “magic bullet” active ingredient to sell it in a pill. But, “pills…simply cannot mimic this balanced natural combination of phytochemicals present in fruits and vegetables.” When isolated out, the compound may lose its activity, or behave differently. The antioxidant and anticancer activities of plant foods is thought to derive from the additive or synergistic effects—meaning the whole may be greater than the sum of its parts. This helps explain why a pill simply cannot replace the complex interaction of phytochemicals present in whole plant foods.

As T. Colin Campbell has pointed out, more than a hundred trials “overwhelmingly show no long-term benefit of vitamin supplements, along with worrisome findings that certain [supplements] may even increase [risk] for diabetes, heart disease, and cancer.” Supplementation with fish oil appears useless or worse; yet, the science doesn’t seem to matter. People continue to buy it. “The public desire for quick fixes through pills…is overwhelming, especially when money can be made.”

Each plant has thousands of different phytochemicals, and each plant has a whole different phytonutrient profile. And so, there may be synergistic effects when consuming different foods together, as well. Just like eating beta-carotene in carrot form is more beneficial than in pill form—because of all the other compounds in the carrot that may synergize with the beta-carotene—when you dip that carrot in hummus, all of a sudden you have the thousands of carrot compounds mixing with the thousands of chickpea compounds. And, that’s what this study was all about. What happens if you mix different fruits, with different vegetables, with different beans?

Combining foods between different categories did indeed increase the likelihood of synergy. For example, here’s the antioxidant power of raspberries alone. And, here’s the antioxidant activity of adzuki beans alone. So, if there was strictly an additive effect, the expected combination would come up to here. But, the observed antioxidant power of the combination came out more than either eaten alone.

What about anticancer effects? What if you repeated this study, but this time tried dripping different combinations of foods on breast cancer cells growing in a petri dish? Sometimes, you can get the same synergistic effects. Here’s what grapes can do to breast cancer cells—suppressing their growth about 30%. But, onions worked even better—cutting breast cancer growth in half. Now, if you added half of each together, right, you’d assume you’d get somewhere in the middle between the two; they’d average each other out. But, instead, the researchers got this—suppressing cancer cell growth by up to like 70%.

So, the whole plus the whole was greater than the sum of the whole parts. So, did they recommend people eat a variety of foods? Maybe, add some raisins along with some chopped red onion to your next salad? Where’s the money in that?

No. The reason they were investigating the different types of interactions was to identify mixtures that could ultimately lead to the development of something like grape-flavored Funyuns, or something.

Please consider volunteering to help out on the site.

Image thanks to Unsplash via Pixabay. Image has been modified.

Doctor's Note

Why should we care about the antioxidant power of foods? See:

If you’re not familiar with this concept of “reductionism,” be sure to check out some of these other videos:

If you haven’t yet, you can subscribe to my videos for free by clicking here.

231 responses to “Food Synergy

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  1. Raspberries and Adzuki beans? Grapes and onions? They are not just for breakfast any longer…
    These food combinations sound like the kind of thing I will try after reading an article on nutrition.
    Like turmeric and black pepper with a little almond milk in my morning oatmeal.
    It sounds weird and crazy, but there are good reasons to eat certain food combinations, so why not?
    I guess I am going to just have to try my oatmeal with raisins and onions along with the turmeric and pepper.
    Who knows? I just might like it.




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    1. I think adzuki beans are used in a lot of Asian deserts, no? raspberry / adzuki bean paste… hmm….

      Yesterday I had a bowl full of raw fenugreek sprouts with some raisins and balsamic vinegar, weird but good. Should have thrown some onions in there.




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        1. When I used to take my offspring to the Asian market and she would get a bean bun; she’d let me have a bite. I have to find a reason to go again (since I started making natto I don’t go anymore).

          I’ve been wanting to try bean brownies and found this:
          https://kelliesfoodtoglow.com/2014/02/10/fudgy-black-aduki-brownies-grain-free-vegan-option/

          The recipe calls for some oil, but perhaps upping the date paste and nut butter and omitting the oil would work.




          1
            1. I used the method posted on the amazon Instant Pot reviews by Elena Schott:
              https://www.amazon.com/gp/customer-reviews/R2THCK1072ND6J/ref=cm_cr_getr_d_rvw_ttl?ie=UTF8&ASIN=B00FLYWNYQ

              Instead of a package of natto I used spores purchased from Cultures for Health. I accidentally used about 4x the recommended amount of spores, but the culture turned out fine so that’s what I’ve continued to use.

              The pressure steaming method of cooking beans makes for some nice beans; I’ve used it for navy, pinto, kidney and chickpeas. I suspect it is not the best cooking method for maximizing resistant starch, however.




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    2. But raspberry dressing with a few adzuki beans in the salad, seems nice. Sliced grapes alongside a salad with some thinly sliced onions, spinach and strawberries, maybe some walnuts and raisins with a poppyseed dressing…sounds good too.




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    3. Interesting combos, kind of stretches the possibilities. I just found out you can puree up the peppery seeds of a papaya and use them as a healthy ingredient, and since I have a slew ripening now, I found an interesting recipe for a salad dressing made by pureeing the papaya, the seeds, onion, and a few other ingredients. Might as well try, like you said, just might like it!
      I love savory oats and eat them all the time! Not just a breakfast food, I throw oats into everything to add texture or thicken. I don’t know how beneficial it is once it’s pulverized, but I actually prefer to grind and use oat flour to thicken chowders and stews and make puddings and the like.




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      1. Well, relatively speaking, I’d say oat flour is very healthy. Is it as healthy as whole oats? probably not, but it’s still pretty darn good.

        As fanatical as I am about whole plant foods, I’m just not sure I’m ready to mix fruit and raw onions. I guess they do it in salad dressings. But for any quantities,…….not sure.




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      1. I eat a bean/whole grain mix for breakfast every day. Very satisfying. I prepare a mix of different kinds of beans and different kinds of grains about once a week and it lasts me the whole week.




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        1. That sounds good. I think I’ll try a mix of different beans next time. I buy big bags of different Goya dry beans: red, black, pink, pinto, and use them in different dishes. I use 4 cups of dry beans, soak overnight, and cook them for about 50 minutes. That makes about 3 quarts of beans which I freeze and use for breakfast as needed. 1/2 cup beans with 1 cup dry oats, raisins, and ground flax. Cranberry juice (water and cranberries blended) to wash it down. I save the bean cooking water and use it in my dinner dishes. As I do from any canned vegetables I open. I eat a lot of other whole grains but I get from reading “How Not to Die”, that there is something “magical” about oats. So I try to include them every day. Then most days, beans and cruciferous vegetables for dinner. I was vegan for 15 years but switching to WFPB has dramatically improved my health and fitness in just 1 short year.




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          1. I go through a similar ritual! … steel cut oats and quinoa included in the whole grains. (Great minds think alike ;-) Is the reason that you no longer call yourself vegan because you stopped eating processed foods? I, too, am WFPB but just haven’t changed my name yet :-)




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            1. Yes. On this discussion board at least, I think it’s important and meaningful to distinguish between the two. As I said, I was vegan for 15 years before switching to WFPB last year after reading “How Not to Die” and “The Starch Solution”. I ate a pretty good vegan diet, very low fat and low added sugar. But for example, I ate Zaterain’s beans and rice mix twice a week which uses parboiled rice, and added sugar. Now I make my own beans and rice with no sugar and brown rice. That’s just one example. I generally ate a lot more “Americanized” than I do now. Now I just eat food. The tipping point for me was after reading those books. Before that, to some degree, I ate for happiness. After, I completely abandoned that philosophy and began eating purely for health. (I think my daily meditation practice also helped me view things differently.) The funny thing is, now I like eating more than ever. Everything tastes just fabulous. But I’m leaner and healthier too.




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              1. Blair Rollin: Nice post! I’ve had many a conversation with people on this forum who think that eating a healthy diet means they won’t enjoy their food any more. It’s a tough sell to someone who hasn’t experienced a change in tastes themselves.




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              2. I was whole food plant based for 7 years before becoming vegan in Jan this year. I personally feel that saying I’m vegan is most important as it is primarily about animal justice and liberation. And if you are vegan you are plant based. Note I didn’t say WFPB, since as we know veganism is not a diet. Which you’ve implied anyway.

                I will expand upon my vegan diet and talk about WFPB to those willing to listen.

                So, I’m a little sad that someone would cease to call themselves vegan and go for WFPB. Being WFPB, like I was, means you still can wear animal skins and use products made from them.

                But maybe you mean you’ve changed only on nutritionfacts.org??

                Of course, you can do as you please, I was merely commenting… and kind of rambling lol ✌




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                1. Oh, yea. Wasn’t paying attention. I am, and have been, vegan. I also became WFPB last year. This website is about health, not ecology or ethics so I wasn’t really thinking about that.




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                2. Oh, yea. Wasn’t paying attention. I am, and have been, vegan. I also became WFPB last year. This website is about health, not ecology or ethics so I wasn’t really thinking about that. Actually, that is by far the hardest thing for me about being vegan; finding good vegan hiking boots and trail running shoes. In general, quality vegan shoes are very hard to find. Especially in wide sizes.




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            2. Hi Hal, one thing that I do is blend some ginger with the water that I use for the steel cut oats. This gives it a nice taste and adds various ginger nutrients to the dish, in particular Shogaol and Zingerone which are produced when ginger is cooked.




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  2. Are the ferments in sourdough bread safe for us, or or they sort of like kimchi and other ferments that can be bad for us, according your
    video on kimchi? I do not do well on wheat or grains but have been told that sourdough bread can be a lot easier to digest and causes
    less “intolerance” issues.




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    1. @roxyWei:disqus
      Grains are seeds, and contain “growth blockers” that can function like anti-nutrients when inside us. Phytates are the best-known for this effect. They are not simply detrimental, but too much is frowned upon by several sources, but there are also a few enzyme blockers. I also felt better when I started to tune them down in my diet — initially took the white-flour route for a while, felt improvements and then went back to whole-wheat while taking action against phytates.

      To reduce the level of phytates, the basic approach is to soak your grains, basically bootstrapping the sprouting process. If more than an individual splash of water is encountered, the enzyme blockers are dissolved, as are the phytates, and the seed can finally use the enzymes that spur their lives. This is also why you want to soak beans overnight before boiling them (and killing enzymes).

      Now, if you have old ground wholewheat flour, you are not getting this benefit from soaking, because the phytate-dissolving enzyme phytase is broken down more easily than phytates. Almost as if the grain never meant to be ground and stored :) So either you freshly grind your grain or you apply a trick. That trick can be the addition of lactobacilli, which are also able to break down phytates.

      Sourdough does precisely that — it adds lactobacilli and, perhaps at least as important, it adds the time to work on the phytates. This is relative to a yeast dough, which rises faster and without lactobacilli by cultivating the bread with rather a lot of yeast cells. The breakdown of phytates is also a reason why the nutrients that places whole-wheat ahead of white bread are more bio-available — phytates lock on to minerals and once they’re broken down by either phytase or lactobacilli you get to control where they go.

      by @vanrein — who has given up on the NF login system.




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      1. vanrein: I understand that you are trying to address the question about sourdough, but your argument against phytates does not stand up to the evidence. There is a good sized body of evidence showing that phytates are actually good for us, including helping to fight cancer and prevent osteoporosis: http://nutritionfacts.org/?fwp_search=phytates&fwp_content_type=video

        I think there are plenty of reasons to stay away from flour products, especially white flours. However, concern about phytates is not one of those reasons as near as I can.

        On a related topic, *whole* grains in general are very good for us:

        “The Framingham Heart Study found that three or more daily servings of whole grains were associated with a slimmer waist. Another study found that the eating of three whole grain portions a day alleviated hypertension as much as medication did. Whole grains may help lower risk for prediabetes, Alzheimer’s disease, osteoporosis, cancer in general, and breast and prostate cancer in particular. Whole grains contain beneficial nutrients including magnesium, zinc, ergothioneine and phytates.” from http://nutritionfacts.org/topics/grains/




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      2. Sounds like the convoluted, repetitious, paleo agenda to me, since there is better science that disputes the sole negativity of phytates, and shows many benefits. http://nutritionfacts.org/?fwp_search=phytates&fwp_content_type=video
        We tend to demonize everything based on the extremes and opinions, and forget that plants are a package deal we evolved with. Even too much water or sun can hurt us, but we absolutely NEED them to be alive and healthy.




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        1. Let’s remember that Brenda Davis, author of “Becoming Vegan” stressed how much better intact and sprouted whole grains are than rolled, flour, flaked or even cut. Your point is well taken that phytates have a positive side, but let’s consider that intact and sprouted whole grains may be the most nutritious and least reactive forms to our gut. Paleos throw out all grains, even though some forms seem to be quite healthy, based on the available evidence.
          John S




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      3. This might explain why my body reacts adversely to grains, beans, seeds, and nuts.
        Even raw greens and other raw veggies mess with me at times.




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            1. Rebecca: Many foods we eat contain histamine (eg: spinach), some more than the others. Some others induce cells to release histamine to the blood stream (eg: citrus). Still others contain histamine and induce cells to release histamine to the blood stream (eg: tomatoes). The body uses two enzymes to destroy histamine: diamine oxidase (DAO; functional outside cells) and histamine N-methyltransferase (HNMT; functional inside cells). Evidently DAO is the major enzyme responsible for removing circulating histamine. Some people, due to genetics, aging, or both, don’t produce sufficient DAO. There’re two consequences of DAO deficiency: 1) Histamine in food enters the blood stream. 2) The histamine released by cells due to induction by some foods increases the histamine concentration in the blood. High histamine levels cause all sorts allergic symptoms. This condition is called histamine intolerance, which is not dangerous like antibody-mediated food allergies but is very hard to manage, for two reasons: 1) Symptoms could take hours or days to appear, so it’d be hard to tell which food you’d eaten was responsible. 2) You eat something today and it causes a reaction; you eat the same in two weeks but there’s no reaction. To explain the latter what is known as the bucket analogy is used: Everybody has a histamine bucket, the size of which varies from person to person and gets smaller when people age. On a given day you can eat histamine-containing foods without experiencing any adverse effects until the bucket is full. If you continue to eat histamine-containing foods – that is, if you let the bucket overflow- then you’ll experience the symptoms. I’m familiar with histamine intolerance because I’ve been dealing with it for seven years.

              As for you experience with grains, information I’ve seen, from not very reliable sources, is mixed. Grains are not known as high-histamine foods, nor are they known to induce histamine release. But some paleo followers claim that grains cause inflammation of gut walls, which results in decrease in DAO production.

              Hope this helps.




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      4. Dr. Greger has debunked the phytate myth, in HNTD and on this site. Search “phytates” on this site and correct your comment if possible.




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    2. I am huge on the benefits of ferments from personal experience, and think the detriments may have more to do with the high salt content over time. I am always mindful of the salt and utilize herbs, but have had some amazing health improvements even after going WFPB, so I am very disappointed Dr G has summarily excluded them from a healthy diet based on incomplete information and exceptions. Sandor Katz has written volumes about fermentation and credits it to a great degree to his healthy coexistence with the AIDS virus for many years. I know too many people who have reaped benefits to dismiss them, as they have played a huge role in diets around the world for ages, and continue to in some areas. It was one of the few methods of preservation before refrigeration and even my Polish grandma utilized it regularly…and she lived to 94 by the way. (Not crediting her ferments, just saying it sure didn’t hurt!)
      I only eat sourdough bread, and make it with my own starter that is now around 5 years old. It absolutely is easier to tolerate than regular bread, even homemade, no contest, for me. Try a bit and see what you think?




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      1. ferments is not vitamins, ferments just help you to digest food, if you not capable.
        I don’t see anything wrong with that.
        why don’t just trust your feelings, at last – research works with “big numbers” and only show us the middle range of reaction, but not the all types of it. It’s always be someone who have the different result, but its usually don get to a count as non-typical. may be it’s you.




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  3. The benefits of synergy were earlier noted by Buckminster Fuller, whose geodesic domes are scattered everywhere. Bucky applied it to metal alloys (chrome nickel steel), and might also have considered potentiation, where one substance furthers another’s activity. (pepper for turmeric)
    It’s good to see biology following that path; it’s come a long way.




    0
    1. Synergism is why I eat a variety of veg foods and take a variety of mainly herb based supplements (some amino acids and minerals). I do research on which herbs seem to be most effective and take a reasonable dose of each.

      For instance:

      For this study, the researchers divided 119 participants with mild to moderate Alzheimer’s into two groups. One group received a placebo, while the other group started with 500 mg of resveratrol per day and worked their way up to 1,000 mg twice a day. The researchers found two important things. First, the resveratrol mimicked the effects of calorie restriction, which has been shown to delay and even prevent Alzheimer’s in the long term. Frank Shallenberger, MD

      I take SOME curcumin/some turmeric/some saffron…etc and so forth…..




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      1. Problems with supplements include whether the dose or the form in a pill/capsule are good or best for us. Resveratrol was studied because of its being in red wine (and grapes), but ½ gram’s a bit much, and the dextro- and laevo- (right and left) forms are likely in a supplement, since the source is a weedy bush, not red wine.
        The longevity and Alzheimer connections are fascinating, though… but calorie ‘restriction’ seems to apply less to humans not on an ‘ad lib’ diet like experimental animals.




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  4. Love these videos — I watch them every day. And I love the new green screen; it’s fun to see you! But I’d like to suggest you stop walking whenever your head pops up. Personally, I find it distracting. Unless you’re trying to subconsciously motivate us to walk/move/exercise, why do it? Thank you for your amazing work!




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        1. Be careful, your comment may get deleted!! LOL. They don’t like you to disagree. Look at what they are doing to me – deleting and threatening to ban…




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  5. What about the concept of food combining? I tend to eat mostly fruit in the morning, veggies midday, and heavier proteins late in the day. This is because, in my body, fruit wants to move through quickly, since it requires relatively little digestion. Protein, on the other hand, can require many more hours of digestion. If I eat fruit after the protein, it seems to want to overtake the slower digesting protein in the digestive tract and makes for a less harmonious experience. Is this all in my head?

    I suspect that most of what we think of as appropriate food pairings comes down to cultural conditioning, but maybe there are some cases where a particular prohibition has a physiological basis? If there are synergies, perhaps there are also cases of competitive interference?

    Finally, must the raspberries and adzukis be consumed together in the same meal? I would be surprised if the synergistic effect could not be obtained from eating them in separate meals.




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    1. I would sprinkle some beans onto a salad with a raspberry dressing? Or make a fruit salad with raspberries and eat alongside a soup or salad with the added beans. I am tempted to make a kind of refried bean with them and add it to a layer in a veggie burrito? Just eat raspberries in a smoothie while I eat the burrito.




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    2. I have no clue really, but I always consider how it would work in nature. Back in the late 60’s we used to go “naked camping”, fully clothed actually, but with nothing else, not even matches or containers, and had to make due with what nature provided. A very educational exercise! My take is, if we came upon a food source, there would never be a question about combining whatever, so I can’t see why we would have evolved to separate them. I think we often underestimate our body’s wisdom and abilities if we show it a decent amount of respect! Now that we have access to just about everything edible (?) whenever we want, your own observations about what makes you feel best personally is probably the most sensible approach.




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      1. There was a book way back when called “Stalking the Wild Asparagus”, that was my intro to edible wild plants: nettles, plantain, cattail roots, burdock root, clover, dandelion, sheep sorrel, puff balls, raspberries, blueberries, wild grapes, mulberries, and on and on.




        1
        1. Ah, good ole Euell Gibbons elucidated my explorations too, though I had managed to survive my own history of eating wild things as a kid! My sister used to tell me I must have been a medicine woman in a former life because I was just too lucky! I spent most of my life up north in New England and had a nice repertoire of foraged edibles…and then moved to south FL. Though stuff grows year round here, I miss so many favorites… milkweed, day-lily, amaranth (pigweed), lambs quarters, blackberries, hen of the woods and on and on. We have some of them in the north of the state, but not here in the south, though I’ve learned to appreciate our nopales, Spanish needles and chaya a lot, and did manage to scout up some purslane. It can be challenging here for the native plants with our monsoon summers and desert dry winters, but the abundance of edible perennials and tropical fruits that grow here more than makes up for it! I just planted a little Jackfruit tree, hope I’m around long enough to reap the harvest! lol My favorite foraging website is… http://www.eattheweeds.com/




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    3. Melon is the only thing I get distress from combining with other foods. (A strong detox-queasiness overtakes me.)
      It would be great to see what combinations of foods work best for each set of genes in various climates, ecosystems and industrial exposures.
      But that research project is called “Life” I think.
      I’m personally of European stock and a soup, a salad, a grainy-beany main course with vegetables followed by a Dessert! of whole fruit and a few nuts and i free traditional as hell.
      The trick is not to add SOS and not to remove water or fiber.
      Watch 1 NutritionFacts.org video a day then run out and play!




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      1. Interesting, since those who believe in food combining rules usually stress that melons should be eaten alone. The reasoning has to do with digestibility, but that may be window dressing.




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        1. Yes, I eat melons alone.
          That was the only thing from “Fit for Life” food combining approach that was true for me. (All the other health benefits were from the emphasis on WFPB.)
          Otherwise I experience discomfort. Continued discomfort leads to disease and then you are in distress.
          As a sommelier I’m trained to not listen to my thoughts or feelings but what my cells are saying. It’s the next step after this site. You can take the info here and sense it’s effects on you. The further study comes down to your life and choices. But if you are not “canary in a coal mine” sensitive and totally scientific about your approach then it’s just all in your head.




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      2. I also get distress from combining melon with other foods. Every food combining chart I’ve seen discourages this combo.

        The western pattern of following a meal with a dessert is not the pattern in Africa and much of Asia.




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      1. Wikipedia describes food combining as “quackery”. Personally, I think this is a bit strong. The Fit For Life Diet, which popularized the concept of food combining, encourages consumption of living (high enzyme containing) fruits and vegetables, discourages dairy, and would seem to be 90% in agreement with the WFPB diet recommended on this site. (I have no vested interest in Fit For Life or any other diet system).

        The medical research has not corroborated the weight-loss claims of these diets, and that seems to be the basis for their rejection. Agreed. But I would just like to see some of the other claims (such as improved digestion) systematically evaluated before entirely consigning the concept to the rubbish heap.




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    4. I share your interest in a research-based answer. Food combining at the same meal turned out to be unnecessary for “complete” proteins. I wonder about this example (as I did in the recent video about grain combining).




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    5. Yes!! I hope somewhere answers this.. I’m a vegan on a budget. Breakfast is frozen blueberry/kale/flaxseed/date or coconut/strawberry/banana/chia seed smoothie. Lunch is teamed spinach/tomato/onion or almond butter + crackers or veggie wrap with hummus. Dinner is beans/pasta or quinoa/mushrooms or onions/potatoes. Am I doing something wrong with this food order or combination ( besides snacking on crackers and chocolate too much in between…) ? My main goal is to feel energetic and maintain a healthy weight (lower than where I am now). I’d love some SUPER easy meal recipes that take LITERALLY 4 minutes to prepare.. Until I grow up and/or get a bigger kitchen this is what happens. : /




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      1. If you are on a budget…consider substituting red cabbage for the kale in your smoothie. The cabbage is likely significantly less expensive and retains nutrients better than kale…Personally I find microwaving spinach to be preferable to steaming from a taste perspective, as steaming adds water to the spinach diluting it’s flavor. You could also microwave the onions and tomatoes too.




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      2. On first glance I’d say you could probably use some more leafy greens in your diet. The smoothies are great but perhaps high in fruit sugar. Adding some volume via nutrient density with large salads at lunch and dinner would fill you up prior to eating the more calorie dense items you are currently consuming. There are lots of recipes on line for free via vegan on a budget or similar terms. If you’d like to invest more time / money get intensive training and videos from Chef AJ in the Ultimate Weight Loss, or learn to batch cook once a week and do your quick prep for each meal after that via the meal mentor menus by Lindsay Nixon AKA The Happy Herbivore




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      1. Strongly doubt our prevention oriented, PBWF doc would get anywhere near the Trump administration’s Surgeon General short list. Or long list. Trump loves fast food so perhaps the CEOs of Burger King, McDonalds, and KFC will vie for the SG role.




        1
          1. Yes!! Though it would be so maddening for her to have to mop up an even bigger mess than Barack had to with W. If Trump tears out Michele’s garden, I am going to be so sad & mad.




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          2. She probably won’t run. There’s a Simpsons episode from 2000 in which Lisa becomes President after a disastrous Trump Presidency (!), and Milhouse tells her, “We’re broke!” Prophecy, TV style?




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        1. Just saw this in the news today:

          “Trump administration will ban lobbyists, enact five-year lobbying ban after leaving government

          Donald Trump’s transition team on Wednesday announced that registered state and federal lobbyists will not be allowed to serve in the Trump administration, and people who leave the administration will have to wait five years before they can become lobbyists.

          “It goes back to Trump’s goal to make sure people aren’t using government to enrich themselves,” transition spokesman Sean Spicer said on a call with reporters. “The key thing for this administration is going to be that people going out of government won’t be able to use that service to enrich themselves for a five-year period.”

          Every person who joins the administration will be asked to sign a lobbying ban form that states they are not a registered lobbyist. If they are, they will have to provide evidence of their termination.”

          Although the Mainstream Media never talks about about it, the elite establishment in both the Democrat and Republican party’s did not want Trump to win. From what I have been reading, he was elected by “the forgotten people”, those who were tired of not being represented at all in government. He’s obviously not a “professional” politician like all the others. It remains to be seen if he will be allowed to make government work for the people rather than the elite establishment and the lobbyists.

          And I have no idea what Trumps eats! Maybe he has been too busy to read Dr. G’s new book yet ;-)




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            1. Interesting article. According to the article, Hillary also eats the same way, ordering a chicken burrito bowl at a Chipotle fast food restaurant. Very sad to see how most Americans eat. Hopefully, websites like this can counteract the way the media constantly advertises junk fast food, and normalizes this kind of behavior.




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                1. One would think that more people would have learned from watching Bill C’s health problems and why he went vegan. Thanks for sharing these articles.




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          1. Doubt they would allow him to ban lobbying. The USDA would actually get to tell the truth about nutrition, people would get healthier, and our entire economy would collapse!




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    1. Absolutely no way a person spouting the truth and “costing” the Corporations of Magnitude a bunch of short-term profits (whilst the population dies a lingering expensive death) is going to become an official official. That’s just not how it works, and is one of the drawbacks of Capitalism- where money rules above all.

      I do much agree that Michael Greger would be the best we’ve ever had, but even on the freakish occurrence he got in I’m sure the Powers would tie his hands and run him out rather quickly.




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  6. This is interesting as a field of research for the future. Maybe after the daily dozen in some years we will have a list with optimal synergistic combinations. Aside from the bad news for isolated supplementation, let’s not forget the positive effect of smartly targeted isolated compounds such as B12 for vegans and the elderly, etc…




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  7. Agree. I will have no problem adding some of these mixtures to my breakfast as my breakfast is usually savory and I love the surprise of new combinations. My most recent one is steel cut oats (soaked in water overnight) blended with chickpea and fruit. I have been adding these oats as my starch in more meals and wraps. Yum! But how perfect mother nature is to make diversity the best option.




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    1. I am totally with you! My current fave savory oat groats are cooked with some moong dal, turmeric, and what ever other spices I want, cooled a bit, and then I add a TBS of miso paste, and let it ferment overnight on the counter. You can heat it in the morning, but not enough to kill the microbes for optimum benefit. (I just like it at room temp, but I’m lazy :)




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      1. Careful with the miso. :-) It has about 640 mg of sodium in each tablespoon. On the other hand, that’s less than soy sauce or (my fav) vegan fish sauce. (Not that I’d put fish sauce on oat groats.)




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      1. It is up to your texture preference. From hard chewy to soft chewy: steel cut oats can be eaten after an overnight soak in water or plant milk, or you can add them to boiling water and simmer from 0 to 5 min before covering them and resting overnight. And, of course, you can cook them as it says on the package (typically a 30 min simmer).




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  8. Oh, I laughed so hard when you showed the carrot and hummus gesture- keep doing that because it brings such a nice connection for me to who you are and what you are doing with this website. And I sure need to smile when taking care of my health. Thank you!




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  9. Vitamins are safe, effective, efficacious, cheap, and beneficial. Dr. Pauling and Dr. Hoffer reported a lifespan benefit from vitamins. Food processing robs many foods of much nutrition. It seems clear to me that disease is based on deficiencies of nutrients and minerals, which is correctable with nutrition and vitamins. It is very difficult to design a diet with enough Niacin or Vitamin E. Humans evolved to live without certain nutrients, like Vitamin C, which can have profound health effects when added back to the diet. Dr. Pauling was convinced heart disease was scurvy. When heart patients were given vitamin C, they’re health improved. In the Tomato Effect, you show that nutrients are at the basis of correcting disease. Sometimes it takes a lot of vitamins.




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    1. Matthew, it’s been shown repeatedly that vitamins in pills are nowhere near as safe or beneficial as vitamins and nutrients in real food. Though in special cases there may be exceptions, a healthy diet is always the primary goal.




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    2. The phrasing ‘humans evolved to live without vitamin C” is unfortunate. Human ancestors long ago lost the ability to make vitamin C, because it was abundant in foods.




      0
      1. Thank you very much for clarifying my post! I should say humans evolved to not make Vitamin C based on abundant Vitamin C in foods. Dr Pauling argues that Lipoprotein (A) functions as Vitamin C in repairing arteries. He argues that Lysine and Vitamin C can rebuild arteries in those with heart disease. He has a patent on treating donated hearts with Lysine and Vitamin C to repair damage. I do not know if this patent has been used.




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        1. Fascinating, and maybe there are studies that can validate LP’s ideas, though Lp(a) is a risk factor for atherosclerotic ills, independent of LDL.




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    1. *this is a very comprehensive list of foods showing antioxidant levels measured in mmol/ 100gm. Also shows varying levels in different forms of the same food ie fresh, frozen, dried , ground etc.




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  10. Thank you Dr. Greger. I do have a question. If supplements are found to be so consistently ineffective and sometimes disease causing, how is it that the supplements that vegans require for a complete diet profile of nutrients (b12, vit D, dha) are recommended and beneficial? Please do a video and tackle this topic directly. Thank you.




    0
    1. It does seem like there is some amount of inconsistency on the issue of vitamin D supplementation from NF. But vitamin D is absolutely not required to be a healthy vegan. It’s the sunshine vitamin. Dr. McDougall, for example, does not recommend D supplements but rather fresh air and sunshine.

      Vitamin B12 is produced by soil bacteria. As far as I can tell, there’s general agreement by plant based doctors that lack of B12 would not occur were it not for the hyper sanitization of food these days. Interestingly, on page 232 of “The China Study”, T. Colin Campbell states that “Research has convincingly shown that plants grown in healthy soil that has a good concentration of B12 will readily absorb this nutrient.” He cites the paper by Mozafar A., “Enrichment of some B vitamins in plants with application of organic fertilizers.” Plant and Soil 167 (1994): 305-311 Here’s the link.
      http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/BF00007957




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      1. “It’s the sunshine vitamin. Dr. McDougall, for example, does not recommend D supplements but rather fresh air and sunshine.”
        if you live in Florida or the tropics maybe and also not everyone can absorb vitamin D through this process so they may have a hard time getting there levels from the sun alone, its kind of like omega 3 from plant sources, yes its there but not readily available and some people cant’ absorb it efficiently, which is why you need a marine algae oil that can be easily absorbed




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        1. I heard it said that if plants and trees can photosynthesize at your latitude, generally we should be able to get enough sunshine for our less intensive human needs, provided we make an effort to actually go outside and soak up the rays. I’m originally from CT and always wondered if part of the sickly and depressive effect of winter was our tendency to “hibernate” and not go outside until you had to. When my kids were little and I was outside all winter with them sledding and playing in the snow, it wasn’t a problem, until they were old enough to go themselves, and I hung back in the dry warmth! (Now I live in FL and stay inside all summer instead! lol)




          1
          1. There are multiple problems with sunlight as a source of D during winter in northern climes. For most people, school and work keep them indoors from dark to dark, uncovering enough skin can be a serious problem, even if the sunlight were sufficient, which it isn’t from November through March in latitude 30 degrees north and above.




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        2. Dr. McDougall also thinks that the low end of the “reference range” for blood levels of D is too high. That range in the US is currently 30-100 ng/ml. I think Dr. McDougall thinks the low end should be 20, but that’s from memory; I may be wrong. In any case, I don’t think I agree with him on that point.

          There are a lot of factors that affect how much D you can make, even given plenty of sunlight exposure. Obesity interferes with it, for example. So does age. Since D is made from cholesterol, I’d be curious to know whether the low cholesterol levels found in many WFPB people create a problem for D synthesis. I have no data on that but it seems like something worth checking. I’ve done some reading about D and was surprised to learn that D levels below 30 are quite common even in sunny areas like Florida.




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      2. Hi Blair. I am familiar with Dr. McDougall’s opinion. Living a bit north of him I am not confident we share the same levels of sunshine opportunity. As for B12, I have never washed my organic produce, and we grow a lot of our own veggies. Our soil is fabulous. The “sanitation” hypothesis has not worked for me. And it does not explain higher b12 levels in some people eating from these poor soils. So, it’s probably a little more complicated. And, considering the risks of not supplementing, only a fool wouldn’t get tested. Our family does supplement with B12 and it did work to correct our deficiencies. So, that’s an example where a singular nutrient did work out for the body. Many people also report success with vit D and dha supplementation. Dr. Gregor is an advocate of these practices. In my mind, he needs to have his crew tackle the conflict between on the one hand steering people away from vitamin supplementation and on the other advocating vitamin/nutrient supplementation. I assume he would say something like “Hey, if after switching over to the best diet on the planet, you discover you are lacking in some essential nutrients… rather than eat animal products (which historically have provided these nutrients to humans) because our environment is so toxic, the cruelty to the animals so extreme and the long term damage done to your body… find a good provider of the micronutrients from a wholesome source. Accept the world as imperfect.”




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      3. there is no real inconsistency Dr Greger’s book lists it out How not to Die recommends the following supplements
        B12 (soil no longer has it, yes you can grow in healthy soil but average person needs to supplement it)
        Vitamin D (because a lot of people live in northern regions and darker skin blocks good conversion)
        Omega 3 algae oil (plants have omega 3 but is not readily absorbed and as you get older this gets worse)




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    2. Hi Ben
      If you watch some of the videos under the nutrients you list you will see that non-vegans are deficient also. For example my husband rides his bike out doors 3 hours per day, eats some meat and tested below 20 for Vit D. B-12 is just so important for obvious possible neurological issues. We could always drink swamp water though.




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      1. I agree. My question is about the necessity of supplementing. My question pertains to how are Dr. Greger’s recommendations to supplement (as outlined in his book) reconciled with a video like this one making the case that supplements do not work, and sometimes cause harm.




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        1. He is pretty specific. B12 is the big one.
          Vit D if you live too far North or work in an office all day. Omega 3 but I believe that was across the board. WFPB or not until we know differently for brain health.




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    3. Hiya – Veganism isn’t the only reason that one might become deficient in B12. It is well documented that the elderly – and meat-eating elderly at that – become deficient in B12. This can contribute to malformed red blood cells as well as dementia-like symptoms. Physicians know, now, to check B12 in the elderly. I had to give my father B12 shots in his arms for 6 weeks. And he was never vegan.




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    1. I find it so amusing to read the oppositional commentary about them! Maybe I’m just old and cranky but people seem to be getting more and more entitled, and think each video is for them exclusively. I just love what Dr. G. does, and that he does it at all, for US and our benefit, from his generosity and caring! You can never please everyone, so I hope he continues to let his light shine as he sees fit and let it sort itself out. Life is full of angst and seriousness, we need all the humor we can get!




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      1. It’s somewhat supercillious to “be amused” by all the people’s comments and efforts to express their discontent, such as I am doing now in an attempt to contribute positive constructive criticism,. The fact is, for many, the “light-hearted” new format has been stated as being downright distracting and works against the intention of the video which is, surely, to educate and inform, NOT to entertain or promote some kind of clever food comedy. The new format pop-up segments can also come across as sarcastic and aloof and so the video is not worth sharing with the many who are already skeptical as it will really put them off. Even fans on here are put off! If the efficiency of transmission of information is interrupted with completely irrelevant bells and whistles doing little other than exhibiting technical prowess with video editing skills and that causes distraction, memory interference and forgetting, and for some, irritation, then that is a fact that needs considered very carefully. A handfull have said they like the format but more have said they do not. An online vote might be useful. But I would question what it is that those who like the format like and whether they have absorbed the info as well as they would have without the memory interference. There are real cognitive mechanisms at work. Just my 2500 cents worth.




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        1. I find some people’s repetitive complaints to be a needless distraction. The videos are prerecorded… after this, normal programming will resume.




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            1. Ron Ninon: I have previously directed you to the rules for posting on this site. If you read those rules, you would know that you may not call people names. To be very specific: You may not call someone a troll. I can tell who guest is and this person has made many quality comments on this site. Leave the moderating to the moderators.
              .
              Also, I have already warned you about your comments in general. Your opinion on this topic has been noted – multiple times over. No one else is going on and on and on about this topic. Enough already. The decision has been made to discontinue the popups after the current volume of videos has been released. Additional complaints from people who have already voiced their opinion take away from the main focus we should have here. Let it go please.




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              1. Your vendetta continues? First, Dr. Greger invited commentary. Until he himself posts a comment on this and his intentions, and his requests to stop commenting on it, then everyone, including me, has a right to comment on it. You have tried to intimidate me before (to see guidelines etc etc), and you continue to do so. You criticise me ALONE. I am NOT the only one who has criticized the format – and several others have repeated their sentiments across multiple posts on the topic but you do not slap them! This is social media and heavy-handed tactics by admin, although typical of facebook, should not be here. This is a more “professional” forum, at least I had thought. To that extent, your threats are unwelcome: you are targetting me and only me. I repeat, this is unfair! Your support of others who may disagree with me with your “votes up” of them belies a pack mentality – a popularity contest. This forum should not support such bias! I have made detailed and informed copmments. I work in the area of attention and perception…and distraction. Over 50% of drivers now text and drive – an epidemic of deadly distracted driving – many – half or more on this forum will do so while thinking they are just fine and so continue to do so. My point: I have knowledge on human attention. Nobody else has posted the reasons why they feel distracted by the videos. I have done so. If you don’t like my “info”, ignore it – it’s easy to do and easier than ignoring a pop-up! But to delete me or block me is a sad reflection of biased intolerance. I have done more for promoting Dr G’s videos than you will ever know or could ever comprehend. I am a supporter. I also use his info for personal health purposes. But I have a right to emphasize what (I think) needs emphasized (ie, no distractions, keep it professional, etc.). And we do NOT know what his new format, if it comes, will be. Will it also be controversial and problematic. Thus, repetition has value, provided it is not cut-and-paste, and my comments have not been repetitious in their content, if you bothered to read them carefully. I will continue to post if and when I feel it contributes. You must stop intimidating me. This is NF not FB.




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              2. Again, you (so-called, by you, “automatic spam filter”) has deleted my post (after many hours and my edits! Why so long?!??).
                I therefore re-post, and will do to MG @ Cornell if necessary.

                Your vendetta continues? Why??? You “warned” me about my “comments in
                general”? In general?? What?! Explain it. Unbelievable! Thea, you
                deleted my info unfairly before – then you re-instated my comments…and
                now you continue…
                Who is “guest” then if you know? Why does it not
                reveal itself? Hiding behind anonymity and shooting off sarcasm is
                fair? You just promoted it and its disrespectful sarcasm and nastiness
                and deleted my response to it (which was fair and measure)! First, Dr.
                Greger himself (not you) invited commentary on his new format in the
                first video. Until he himself posts a new comment on this issue and his
                intentions, and if he wishes, asks that all stop commenting on the issue
                (but why?!), then everyone, including me, has a right to comment on
                this issue. Don’t like it? Tough.
                Second, you, specifically, have
                tried to intimidate me before, for no good or fair reason I might add,
                after claiming or admitting you had “no idea” why you deleted my
                perfectly valid comments to several members (eg, I merely responded
                “exactly” to them and you deleted me!) and my link to a Dr G
                video…”directing me” instead to the guidelines (as if I had violated
                them! I had not and you did not say how) etc etc, and you continue to
                try to “direct” and bully me!! This is prejudice and bullying. You
                criticise and admonish and slap me – and ONLY me although others, who
                could be named, have complained in their own way. I am clearly only one
                of many who have criticized the format – and several others have
                repeated their sentiments across multiple posts on the topic – but you
                do not slap them! You make me a scapegoat/target. But this is social
                media and heavy-handed bullying tactics by admin, although a disease of
                facebook admin superiority complexes, should not be here! This is
                supposed to be a more “professional” forum, or at least I had thought. I
                now have doubts. To that extent, your threats are unwelcome: you are
                targetting me and only me – that’s bullying. Stop it now! I repeat, this
                is unfair and as much as you monitor us, we are monitoring you and your
                representation of Dr G on this forum. Reconsider that. Your support of
                others who may disagree with me with your “votes up” of their comments
                belies a pack mentality – a silly little popularity contest. This forum
                should not promote such petty bias and as a moderator you should be
                beyond promoting factions and cliques.
                Third, I have made several
                detailed and well-informed comments, not merely opinions, because I
                care. You should know I have previously conducted scientific research
                and now work in the area of practical tuition and education about
                attention, perception…cognitive interference and distraction – in
                driving: over 50% of drivers now text and drive – an epidemic of deadly
                distracted driving. Many – perhaps half or more on this forum – will
                drive distracted while thinking they are “just fine”, can multitask well
                (heads up: you can’t), and so continue to text and drive oblivious to
                the greatest cause of death and disability on our roads today – profound
                inattention. My point?- I have – in fact – actual knowledge on human
                attention! Nobody else has posted detailed reasons (or rather, an
                *explanation*) why they feel distracted or forget the content of the new
                videos. But I have done so – because I CARE. I do not want to see these
                videos become a joke.
                If you don’t like my “info”, don’t read it – ignore it – it’s easy to do so and far easier than ignoring an unexpected pop-up!
                But
                to censor me, delete me or block me – as you are probably weighing up –
                is a sad reflection of biased intolerance. I have done more for
                promoting Dr G’s videos than you will ever know or could even
                comprehend. I have been a supporter. I also use his info for personal
                health purposes – esp. for others. But I have EVERY RIGHT to emphasize
                what (I think) needs emphasized (ie, no distractions, keep it
                professional, etc.). And we do NOT know what his new format, if it
                comes, will be. Will it also be controversial and visually problematic?
                Will it be cutesy and annoying? Until then, we have a right to express
                our opinions. Thus, repetition has value…provided it is not
                cut-and-paste repetition…and my comments have not been repetitious in
                their detail, if you bothered to read them carefully. I will continue to
                post if and when I feel it contributes, as should anyone. I note the
                message has gotten through and the decision to stop the pop-ups has been
                made. But what will follow? People are beginning to post suggestions
                (eg, two video streams – serious and silly, etc). So discussion on the
                topic should be WELCOMED not criticised!!! Show some appreciation – it
                takes time and effort to be bothered – to write a comment. You must stop
                admin-intimidating me…this is NF not FB. “Let it go”??? Gimme a
                break! You stop your biased and heavy-handed intimidation now…and I’ll
                stop showing you how utterly unreasonable you are and have been. YOU
                show some respect; YOU show some appreciation.




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              3. I have been deleted multiple times by “THEA”. Even my response to her unfounded criticism above and accusations of me are deleted! All! Every attempt! There is clearly no democracy and huge bias on here. People should be wary of this.




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          1. “doing little other than…”.
            nc54, Fair comment, but…I still found it distracting as did some others who bothered to vote with a comment. Why do I need to watch a guy eating? Look, many will like it, many won’t. Would a vote help? The majority is not always correct!




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        2. Ron chill! They are prerecorded and released. There is nothing that can be done. Take a break for a month and all will be good when you come back.

          As a side note I went to one of Dr. Greger’s lectures a few years back. Amazing! He has so much energy and is so funny. He makes the entire audience want to be as healthy as he is. You should see if he is speaking in your neighborhood. I know you would love it.




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        3. You find my amusement about the opposing viewpoints supercilious? Now that is funny because I find your reply pretty *super-silly-ous* too!




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      2. I know. I just don’t understand it. It seems like if you’re a regular subscriber to NF, you would have to have signed on and embraced a WFPB diet. regardless of any popups. There are going to be meat industry trolls I’m sure. But if you’re here for a positive reason, then it shouldn’t take long to come over to the WFPB camp regardless of a little bit of goofiness here and there. It’s a chance to see another side of Dr. G., a rare altruistic person. I love the popups!




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  11. Please stop the goofy dr greger popups….really distracts from the video content. I have enjoyed the videos and information for years, but really find the new popups jarring.




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    1. Guest: Have no fears. The large majority of the feedback for the popups has been negative. The NutritionFacts team listened to the feedback. The rest of the videos on this volume are already pre-recorded. But after that, the popups (whew!) will no longer be part of the video.




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    1. Thanks for your question Don.

      Dr Greger has a series of videos that address the consumption of smoothies and health, I highly recommend you to watch them (see here).

      In regards to Maca powder, one review states that (see here):

      “Experimental scientific evidence showed that maca has nutritional, energizer, and fertility-enhancer properties, and it acts on sexual dysfunctions, osteoporosis, benign prostatic hyperplasia, memory and learning, and protects skin against ultraviolet radiation. Clinical trials showed efficacy of maca on sexual dysfunctions as well as increasing sperm count and motility. Maca is a plant with great potential as an adaptogen and appears to be promising as a nutraceutical in the prevention of several diseases.”

      However, like with everything studies may not be of high quality and therefore I prefer caution and suggest that more evidence is required to rate its effectiveness as a health promoting powder.

      Hope this answer helps.




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      1. It would be great if Dr. Gregor could do a video on Maca some day. I have taken it in the past but I always worry about heavy metal contamination. Another herb that people are going crazy about is Ashwagandha. The bodybuilders take KSM 66 Ashwagandha (it’s a more concentrated form and can increase testosterone).




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  12. Every home I visit has rows and rows of supplements and vitamins lining their counters and cabinets, and of course they all eat the Standard American Diet, and know they are deficient, so think this is their saving grace! Heaven forbid a bit of real food sneaks into their diet, let alone a combination! It’s so scary what people consider food, and sadly, I was once one of them, so it’s really hard to shut my big mouth when I know what a HUGE difference it can make!




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  13. Okay, I lied. I cannot just quit the site because there are VERY few other sources I trust to keep abreast of new research and studies AND to do such in a non-commercial (i.e. believable) manner.

    I tried five times to listen to today’s “lecture”, but kept distracting myself. I hide the video behind other tabs now-of course I can still hear the “spots”.

    Now i have a solution. I’ll simply read transcripts. Thanks to those who transcribe.

    After seeing practically every single video Dr. G has made for NF.O and most of the other videos he has been in on Youtube, I don’t need any “extra” Dr. G in my videos. I liked the first 1,000 or 2,000 videos, but just can’t watch them any more.

    I hate that I cannot share the new videos. There are so many “nut jobs” out there selling ideas about foods and supplements and nutritional concepts that I fear Michael Greger would EASILY get lumped into that category if I shared the greenscreened videos. I had some hopes that I could help a few folks, friends, family, and others find a better way to eat, and was persistently pestering my FBF’s with video links from here with my own commentary, also some comments from here were shared in my short tenure as a WFPB eater.

    I’ll just cut and paste transcripts. I don’t want anyone thinking I’m “following a nut job”, rather that Dr. G is a real MD with real information that can REALLY help nearly everyone. I understand that many folks enjoy the cutesiness and such, but it cheapens the whole experience for me. I’m not a fan of gimmickery and distractions. As you were.




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    1. Wade Patton: I hear you. The NutritionFacts team heard you too. The rest of the videos in this volume are pre-recorded and already have the popups. That will not change. However, after that, the new videos will not have the popups. Thank you for your patience.




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    2. Wade you quit? Dang I wasn’t aware. So yes Dr. Greger got the message but as you know they are made ahead of time. So be patient! I actually like reading the transcripts.




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        1. I see, in tiny font on the actual video window below social media. There are a lot of places it could have been…such as “Doctor’s Note”. Perhaps enlarging font would make it easier to find – good web design caters for all, esp. those with reduced visuial acuity 9big fonts, good contrast, few distractions, etc).




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            1. Ron your posts make me sad. So let me understand this. You are upset about Dr. Greger’s popping in and out of video-or rather don’t like them and the moderators don’t like you talking about them? I don’t really understand the conflict. I have been here pretty much from the websites inception and it is so valuable I don’t want anyone banned.

              The rules have always been as long as your aren’t being disrespectful to other posters things were fine. Is that what happened?

              However if it was about him popping out of the videos people’s comments did become kinda like beating a dead horse. (Crazy saying)

              Either way it is obviously upsetting to you. Sorry.




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          1. Hi Ron.
            I accidentally posted below to myself instead of you. So please read below.

            Ron! What the heck. Dr. Greger got the message. We don’t like the popping in and out. But really!! After reading your posts regarding how much you hated them it did become too much. A series of videos are made at one time and released. What would you expect the poor man to do? Chill already. Be patient! Yikes.

            That being said I am sorry if you were banned. We try to keep it nice between us all and that includes picking on Dr. Greger.




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      1. I was once confused and thought I had had a post deleted but that the sorting order wasn’t set as I was used to. Methinks there are two or three ways to sort the comments and I’d make certain I had that squared away before getting too bent over missing posts. That being said, I’ve been reprimanded but never had one deleted. And I post a lot, and sometimes I make some noise and sometimes I’m not super nice-but of course I tries to be. Cheers.




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        1. They confuse, lie, and obfuscate. They pretend it is all automatic spam filtering taking no responsibility. Don’t be fooled by this pernicious lack of accountability. It’s sick, twisted, and disgusting.

          The moderator “Thea” up-votes your comment just now to maintain the
          clique and vendetta on here and the popularity contest against me (But
          Hey! you’re “in”! obviously!)…but she deletes my criticisms multiple
          times EVEN saying publicly that I “go on and on”!! Real professional!
          Real non-confrontational! Real disgusting. I try to explain why I am not
          in fact going “on and on” and that I take offense at the pettiness of
          her slapping me (and ONLY me – not you, or others) and that I am adding
          much expert opinion (I am a doctor). But to no avail. She and other mods
          here are defensive and unfair. Then today she has her superiors
          involved who contact me – by email – and threaten me with being banned
          if I continue to “argue” saying that “‘Thea” “already explained” to me
          it is an “automatic” spam filtering system (it’s not only automatic
          unless the moderators here are in fact robots), while I show EVIDENCE of
          them personally blaming me unfairly (see her “on and on” criticism of
          my style on a recent thread). They don’t care. To be told such untrue
          disingenuous cover-ups such as “I understand that you feel you are being
          wrongly censored, but this is not the case. Disqus does mark certain
          comments as spam, and now you have become argumentative with the person
          who has explained this. ” is utterly disingenuous – “explained THIS”???
          It’s a lie. It’s unacceptable.
          Email goes on: “As is in line with our code of conduct (found here http://nutritionfacts.org/faq/), any comments attack to our team of moderators, other commenters, or staff will be removed.”
          Attacks?
          You have attacked me! Publicly!! SUCH VILE HYPOCRISY. I have lost all
          respect for you and your team – offer up a sincere public apology or
          suffer the consequences you and your site deserves.

          Dr MG will be
          contacted about this. Their explicit targeted post-by-post censoring of
          me is bullying, belittling, discriminatory and prejudicial behavior; it
          won’t be tolerated. We have enough corporate intimidation in the world
          and don’t need more of these pathetic little bullies.
          READ FULL DETAILS OF THEIR INTIMIDATION AND PREJUDICE ON MY OWN CHANNEL:
          https://disqus.com/home/channel/bullyingbymoderatorsatnf/discussion/channel-bullyingbymoderatorsatnf/bullying_at_nutritionfactsorg_dr_m_greger/




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      2. Yeah, I stir up enough crap on my own. I don’t need to jump into this. At this point your posts are quite confrontational and I’m not motivated to dig deeper into the controversy. I hope it works out for the best of all parties. Sincerely.




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  14. I was shocked, SHOCKED I TELL YOU, when Dr. Greger appeared to be eating peeled carrots in the pop-up video! So I Googled peeled carrots and was told that, for veggies whose peel is the same color as the flesh, the flesh probably has the same nutrients as in the peel, so peeling is OK, especially for non-organic specimens that may have toxic chemicals on the surface. But I need more convincing. True?




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    1. True that peeling is okay…however I am somewhat skeptical about the peel having “the same nutrients” or the same density of nutrients. For example, the outer layers of onions have a higher density of organosulfur compounds than the inner layers despite the fact that the color is the same. Another example is red cabbage, or kale or lettuce. Of course, orange peel has greater density of various nutrients as the orange flesh and the same can be said for probably all citrus fruit. : )




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  15. Hm. But if some combinations are synergistic, whats not to say that other combinations create the opposite effect? Does a higher number translate into a longer life?




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    1. Thanks for your comment Panchito.

      I think such harmful combinations of nutrients found in some foods have been previously addressed in other videos (see here for example).

      By higher, are you referring to Total Antioxidant Power? I think if we are referring to food alone (not supplements), it seems that a diet high in fruits, vegetables, grains, legumes, nuts, seeds and other whole food plant items appears to increase total antioxidant intake and people who focus their diet on this type of diet do seem to live longer (see here).

      Hope this answer helps.




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  16. Hi. Sorry, this is off topic, but I wanted to post where some smart people would see and help me. My question is: Do some people need to consume cholesterol to be healthy?
    My background:
    About 6yrs ago I had endometriosis. As a result of treatment with the drug Lupron, I ended up with premature ovarian failure. I’m 31 and haven’t had periods for the past 6yrs. I’ve also had chronic constipation which has been getting worse over the past 5yrs and I’ve been searching for a cure for many yrs. I switched to a WFPB diet 2 years ago but I’m still constipated (and infertile). I’m in crisis now because I’m seeing a naturopathic Dr for my constipation and he is urging me to eat animal products “medicinally” and to eat more saturated fat. He ran a myriad of tests on me (blood, stool, urine, saliva) and found several things wrong. He said my immune system is very confused now and I have Lupus-family antibodies (but I don’t have lupus). I also have the MTHFR mutation and a bunch of other bad stuff. He’s saying my cholesterol is too low and I need to eat saturated fats so my body can make hormones again. I said I’m concerned about heart disease but he’s not worried about that. I want to trust this doc because he’s the local expert on digestive stuff and mystery illness. But I’m super stressed that he wants me to eat saturated fat and animal products. If anyone has some expertise, I’m happy to give more info (tons of test results). Sorry for the long post, but I’ve been freaking out since Monday when I saw the doc.
    THANKS!!!
    Mary




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    1. Unfortunately many naturopaths subscribe to unscientific, umproven and even disproven theories about health and nutrition. It can be dangerous to rely on their advice. Your naturopath sounds like he holds unscientific beliefs about cholesterol and saturated fat. I would strongly suggest that you see a medical doctor, preferably one with expertise in plant-based diets.

      I am not aware of any scientific evidence that low cholesterol is unhealthy and people with genetically low cholesterol tend to live longer than average. However, some diseases can cause cholesterol to decline and constipation can also be symptomatic of certain diseases. Consequently, it is important that you discuss your symptoms and medical history with a licensed physician.




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      1. We are in of a bit a difficult spot when it comes to some of these doctors. I just saw an MD for my yearly and she is also an Integrative doc. So I was pretty excited. She ran all kinds of stuff and determined I was really healthy. But some of the stuff she ran and talked with me about was crazy. I just sat there straight faced but my thought bubble was-“you must be kidding.” One of her recommendations was to add meat because I was of a particular gene type. 2/2 or something like that. And she really looked at all my various cholesterol types and let me know I had the bad kind which put me at danger for a heart attack after a run. So I pointed out that wouldn’t really make sense for me to add cholesterol and saturated fat would it? Anyhow I have always wanted to have a conversation with one of these MDs. I think I’ll keep looking though!




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    2. Hi Mary, – I would echo Tom Goff’s comments (below). Another option would be to add about 400 mgs of magnesium citrate to your diet. It helps with “moving things along”. ( I take it, seems to help.). I, also, am not aware of any science showing that a certain cholesterol level is too low. Don’t forget that our livers make our own cholesterol so it is not a required nutrient. Also, here is some information on a variety of things you can consume to enhance peristalsis (the movement of the intestine that moves food along).

      1. Fennel as fresh vegetable and the seeds. Crush seeds to make into a fast acting tea.
      2. Raspberry as fresh fruit and crushed for tea.
      3. Celery fresh or cooked.
      4. Lemon, fresh.
      5. Horseradish is also digestive stimulant in small amounts.
      6. Chili or cayenne also act as digestive stimulants.
      7. Carrot fresh or cooked is also a cleansing digestive tonic.
      8. Grape is also bile stimulant, cleansing for sluggish digestion, and laxative.
      9. Enjoy chamomile tea after eating to promote digestion and reduce gas.

      I recently had need to use the grape option – worked like a charm :-)




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      1. Thank you to both Rachel and Tom for your thoughtful replies. I also sent a message via Dr Esselstyn’s website and Dr. E called me this morning! He recommended the book 10% Human by Allana Collen. It talks about the gut microbiome. I know that my gut biodiversity of good bacteria is low (from my stool test). So I’ll give the book a read and try some of your suggestions too. Thanks! Be well :-)




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        1. Mary I forgot to tell you something else that I do that helps me. I build into my day a minimum of 12 hrs fasting period at night, every night. More if I can get it. I limit my eating window to 8-12 hrs. So, for example, if my evening meal finishes at 6pm, I do not eat before 6 am the next day. This gives the digestive track a good long period of time to do its job. I try to go for longer periods if I can. If I get hungry after my evening meal, I brew up some chamomile tea with a little sweetener of choice, lemon, etc. For some reason the chamomile tea makes the stomach feel full without eating. And of course there is one more thing that helps – a little exercise. I try to walk – even for just 10 minutes if I can – in the morning after the nighttime fasting. That also really helps to move things along.
          My last suggestion is to look into fasting. TrueNorth, in California, Dr. Alan Goldhammer does amazing things. Watch him on Youtube Also – Valter Longo, Ph.D. also on Youtube. Longo has shown that fasting can reverse many diseases of our times as well as restart the immune system. They are doing clinical trials now with cancer patients using fasting before chemo to both protect the good cells of the body (which hibernate during fasting) and restart the immune system by killing off old immune cells and initiating new immune stem cells. The immune system is rejuvenated. These two sources – Longo and Goldhammer are excellent resources for you. There is also a book by Michael Moseley, M.D. that he wrote on fasting in its various forms. Worth reading for you. Good luck. And I hope you feel better. Constipation is no fun. You will come through this :-)




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          1. Rachel, thank you so much! This is very applicable to me. Lately, I’ve been especially bad at timing my eating. I don’t always let myself digest fully because I have half-assed meals and snack a lot. oops. I’m going to work on planning better and having good meals ready before I get so hungry I just eat whatever. I’m going to take your advice on nighttime fasting and I’ll look up those youtube vids too. I really appreciate your support! Not feeling so bad now. :-)




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            1. Hi Mary – So nice to have this conversation with you. I, too, have struggled with how, when, what to eat and constipation issues. Women sometimes have difficulties that cycle with our monthly cycles as well. But for myself, I finally figured out that I should not eat in the morning until I am feeling really good and hungry. (and sometimes that means not until 2pm). As a child my parents always had breakfast for us even though I felt nauseous forcing myself to eat (but we were told “3 meals per day”, right?). And once I ate in the morning my hunger drive kicked in and I was hungry all day and into the evening. And constipated. And this was true for me whether SAD or WFPB diet. So I try to just pay attention to how my gut is feeling. . .do I feel empty and light? full? bloated? And after a lifetime of stuffing myself (3 plus meals per day!!) it took me a while to enjoy and feel comfortable with an unstuffed gut. The 12-hr-at-night fasting “rule” helps me to tune into whether or not I’m hungry. . . or just feeling like I SHOULD eat.
              Like you, when the hunger kicks in. . . boy there had better be something in the fridge that I can eat quickly!! omg! So I try to keep a big pot of something around that I can delve into like soup or chile (eat it cold in summer – great!!), ready-to-eat salad with a can of beans, etc. But my most favorite I-have-to-eat-now life saver is mashed potatoes :-) I keep a bowl of cooked potatoes (whether boiled or baked) in the fridge. Yukon Golds are my most favorite. I put the cold potatoes in a serving bowl, smash with a fork and add plant-milk (smash again), nutritional yeast, salt, pepper, granulated onion and/or garlic and throw it in the microwave. It’s ready to go in 3 minutes or less. You can doll it up from there of course with pasta sauce or salsa, green chili, whatever. Quick and yummy and perfect for those “OMG I’m out of control” times. I cook the potatoes in the evening when I’m home watching tv. Sometimes I just put them in the Toast-R-Oven on the timer and go to bed. Retrieve them in the morning. But they are always on hand, now, in my fridge. Dr. McDougall says you can live on potatoes alone if needed.
              I just listened, yesterday, to a webinar that Dr. McDougall put on through his center. Doug Lisle, Ph.D., who works with McDougall and True North did a Q&A on eating and the hunger drive which I found really helpful and enlightening. Here it is:
              https://www.drmcdougall.com/health/education/webinars/webinar-11-17-16/
              I also forgot to tell you that both Goldhammer and Longo, referenced above, are WFPB although Longo, on occasion, eats a little fish. Longo is an esteemed professor at U -California (Davis) in charge of the Gerontology program but his focus is on nutrition and aging. He also has a lab and teaches in Italy. Longo fasts twice per year.
              http://gero.usc.edu/faculty/longo/
              Dr. Goldhammer has one case report, accepted for publication in the British Medical Journal, documenting how fasting reversed a patient’s basically incurable lymphoma. Here’s a link to the quick version but watch Goldhammer’s long versions on the web also:
              https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fSH4vBBSDmg
              Anyway, . . sorry we couldn’t take this conversation off-line. But maybe others have similar experiences and thoughts. I’m going to pick up and read the book you shared on the gut. Thank you for that. Nice chatting with you.
              And thank goodness – once again – for Dr. Greger and staff for this site. The holiday’s are coming up aren’t they?
              Best –




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              1. Hi Mary,
                In addition to 12 hours fasting period as described by Rachel, I drink 8 – 24 oz of filtered water first thing in the morning, 1,5 – 3 hours before breakfast. I picked this up from yoga. Although yoga said to have a glass of water on your night stand before going to bed and then drink it slowly when you wake up, I usually don’t feel like to drink full glass when I wake up, so I do a few sips, then go to work and drink slowly 8 – 24 oz (depending on my appetite for water) first think after coming to work.
                On weekends I drink slowly 24 – 48 oz after I get up.
                ‘Drink slowly’ is very important as you are not forcing yourself but rather enjoying it.
                1,5 – 3 hours before breakfast is a must.
                It helped me with constipation more than anything else I tried.




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              2. Hey Rachel, it’s so great to get your insights on this topic. I’m enjoying some chamomile tea right now (cheers!). Most folks do not understand that I’m eating the way I do and still constipated. You’ve helped me see a lot of things I could be doing better. I usually eat breakfast even if I’m not hungry because it’s part of my routine of starting the day. That will be something to experiment with.
                I get a ton of bloating, especially later in the day/evening. Tests show that I don’t digest protein well. I started on some digestive enzymes and I think those, along with spacing meals out and not snacking too frequently, is really helping.
                Mmm mashed potatoes. One of my favorites too! I love McDougal too. I’ll check out that QnA. And the youtube vids you noted. So much good info out there, I love it. I was able to find the 10% Human book at the library, yay!
                Yup, Dr. Greger is a life saver. And thank you again for being so supportive and sharing so much. I’m confident that I will be feeling much better soon. Best wishes!




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    3. Hello Mary, Looks like you’ve gotten lots of good advice already, especially about treatment of constipation. I am a family doctor in private practice. I think that maybe the reason your naturopathic doctor recommended increasing your fat intake is because of lots of research over the years showing that women who are very thin — usually athletes, have problems like late menarche, and irregular or absent menses. I just did a PubMed search (used “amenorrhea” and “dietary fat” as my search words), and found a decent article on dietary intakes in infertile women; look at the “Background” section.

      There is clearly a link between inadequate calorie intake and menstrual irregularities. But I have not seen any recent studies showing that women need to eat diets high in saturated fat or cholesterol in order to maintain normal menstruation.

      You should be aware that prolonged amenorrhea (lack of menstruation) puts you at increased risk of osteoporosis. So, you would be wise to get advice from both a good nutritionist, and a good gynecologic endocrinologist. You might have trouble finding one of the latter who also understands plant based nutrition. You certainly do not need to eat animals nor saturated fat. Hope this adds a little light to your search.




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  17. Numerous attempts to post a comment by me are flagged “Detected as spam” (see screen grab) and have been anonymously deleted by a moderator, obviously, although they have claimed to me before they know not why and it was “automatic”! Who exactly are you fooling? When will you front up?? When will there be some transparency on such a supposedly ethics-based site? This is atrocious! This is abysmal! https://uploads.disquscdn.com/images/7d6ac06c4910836a7462fa6eb3941d0ef5e79d200c25097009af16757345a758.jpg




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  18. I love your videos . . . and now with the extra endorphins I received from watching you pop up eating your carrot and hummus. Chuckle chuckle chuckle




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    1. ira: ;-) The popups have been pre-recorded in the videos in this volume. That means that the popups will be with us for a while. But after that, new videos will not contain the popups. So, bear with us a bit more. It’s not forever.




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  19. RE: MODERATOR HEAVY-HANDEDNESS ON CONTINUAL DELETION OF COMMENTS
    As per NF Guidelines:
    “Vigorous debate of science is welcome so long as participants
    can disagree respectfully.”

    The below response to unfair and unfounded criticism by “Thea” was deleted multiple times by her. I have no alternative but to INSIST I am allowed to exert my rights of response and to have this post REMAIN. You wrote yesterday:
    Thea NF Moderator 21 hours ago
    Ron Ninon: I have previously directed you to the rules for posting
    on this site. If you read those rules, you would know that you may not
    call people names. To be very specific: You may not call someone a
    troll. I can tell who guest is and this person has made many quality
    comments on this site. Leave the moderating to the moderators.
    Also,
    I have already warned you about your comments in general. Your opinion
    on this topic has been noted – multiple times over. No one else is
    going on and on and on about this topic. Enough already. The decision
    has been made to discontinue the popups after the current volume of
    videos has been released. Additional complaints from people who have
    already voiced their opinion take away from the main focus we should
    have here. Let it go please.


    HERE IS MY POST THAT THEY KEEP DELETING:

    https://uploads.disquscdn.com/images/8756e624db3bf4a92683c151871180023ff5d8fc0ab6f54c841a972d508a9fb2.jpg
    I re-post:

    Again, you (so-called, “spam filter”) has deleted my post (after many hours).
    I re-post, and will do to Dr Greger @ Cornell if necessary.

    Your vendetta continues? Why??? You “warned” me about my “comments in
    general”? In general?? What?! Explain it. Unbelievable! Thea, you
    deleted my info unfairly before – then you re-instated my comments…and
    now you continue…
    Who is “guest” then if you know? Why does it not
    reveal itself? Hiding behind anonymity and shooting off sarcasm is
    fair? You just promoted it and its disrespectful sarcasm and nastiness
    and deleted my response to it (which was fair and measure)! First, Dr.
    Greger himself (not you) invited commentary on his new format in the
    first video. Until he himself posts a new comment on this issue and his
    intentions, and if he wishes, asks that all stop commenting on the issue
    (but why?!), then everyone, including me, has a right to comment on
    this issue. Don’t like it? Tough.
    Second, you, specifically, have
    tried to intimidate me before, for no good or fair reason I might add,
    after claiming or admitting you had “no idea” why you deleted my
    perfectly valid comments to several members (eg, I merely responded
    “exactly” to them and you deleted me!) and my link to a Dr G
    video…”directing me” instead to the guidelines (as if I had violated
    them! I had not and you did not say how) etc etc, and you continue to
    try to “direct” and bully me!! This is prejudice and bullying. You
    criticise and admonish and slap me – and ONLY me although others, who
    could be named, have complained in their own way. I am clearly only one
    of many who have criticized the format – and several others have
    repeated their sentiments across multiple posts on the topic – but you
    do not slap them! You make me a scapegoat/target. But this is social
    media and heavy-handed bullying tactics by admin, although a disease of
    facebook admin superiority complexes, should not be here! This is
    supposed to be a more “professional” forum, or at least I had thought. I
    now have doubts. To that extent, your threats are unwelcome: you are
    targetting me and only me – that’s bullying. Stop it now! I repeat, this
    is unfair and as much as you monitor us, we are monitoring you and your
    representation of Dr G on this forum. Reconsider that. Your support of
    others who may disagree with me with your “votes up” of their comments
    belies a pack mentality – a silly little popularity contest. This forum
    should not promote such petty bias and as a moderator you should be
    beyond promoting factions and cliques.
    Third, I have made several
    detailed and well-informed comments, not merely opinions, because I
    care. You should know I have previously conducted scientific research
    and now work in the area of practical tuition and education about
    attention, perception…cognitive interference and distraction – in
    driving: over 50% of drivers now text and drive – an epidemic of deadly
    distracted driving. Many – perhaps half or more on this forum – will
    drive distracted while thinking they are “just fine”, can multitask well
    (heads up: you can’t), and so continue to text and drive oblivious to
    the greatest cause of death and disability on our roads today – profound
    inattention. My point?- I have – in fact – actual knowledge on human
    attention! Nobody else has posted detailed reasons (or rather, an
    *explanation*) why they feel distracted or forget the content of the new
    videos. But I have done so – because I CARE. I do not want to see these
    videos become a joke.
    If you don’t like my “info”, don’t read it – ignore it – it’s easy to do so and far easier

    than ignoring an unexpected pop-up!
    But
    to censor me, delete me or block me – as you are probably weighing up –
    is a sad reflection of biased intolerance. I have done more for
    promoting Dr G’s videos than you will ever know or could even
    comprehend. I have been a supporter. I also use his info for personal
    health purposes – esp. for others. But I have EVERY RIGHT to emphasize
    what (I think) needs emphasized (ie, no distractions, keep it
    professional, etc.). And we do NOT know what his new format, if it
    comes, will be. Will it also be controversial and visually problematic?
    Will it be cutesy and annoying? Until then, we have a right to express
    our opinions. Thus, repetition has value…provided it is not
    cut-and-paste repetition…and my comments have not been repetitious in
    their detail, if you bothered to read them carefully. I will continue to
    post if and when I feel it contributes, as should anyone. I note the
    message has gotten through and the decision to stop the pop-ups has been
    made. But what will follow? People are beginning to post suggestions
    (eg, two video streams – serious and silly, etc). So discussion on the
    topic should be WELCOMED not criticised!!! Show some appreciation – it
    takes time and effort to be bothered – to write a comment. You must stop
    admin-intimidating me…this is NF not FB. “Let it go”??? Gimme a
    break! You stop your biased and heavy-handed intimidation now…and I’ll
    stop showing you how utterly unreasonable you are and have been. YOU
    show some respect; YOU show some appreciation of our input to YOU.




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    1. Ron, I sent you an email earlier today. I’m sorry, but we can’t allow these posts to continue. You are welcome to remain a commenter on the site if you keep it respectful (as you pointed out in the guidelines). Until then, any comments that are argumentative in nature (as these are), will be removed by staff and moderators.




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  20. Is it possible for the body to “store” micronutrients on days of nutrient-excess so that they can be utilized on days of nutrient-deficiency? Greger has written that b12 can be consumed on a weekly basis, and I’m basically wondering if it’s possible to do the same thing with other vitamins as well. For example: can I eat rice from monday through friday and then load up on vitamins on the weekand by consuming kilos of broccoli and kale? Thank you.




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    1. That is a GREAT question. I can tell you that there are some vitamins/antioxidants that are water soluble and some that are fat soluble. So some can be stored and and some you really need to get daily through diet. Our bodies are under attack daily from free radicals, oxidation, etc. With that in mind, the simple answer would be…you really want to feed your body everyday (as best you can) with antioxidant/vitamin rich foods.




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    2. The fat-soluble vitamins, A,D,E, and K, as well as B12, are stored in the liver. There’s even a little vitamin C in there. This is no doubt why liver is a prized animal food. Liver is also the only significant animal source of starch. I’m not arguing in favor of eating liver here, just pointing out that this helps to explain why we find ways of preparing liver (pate, sausages, etc) in just about every culture. And just as the liver we eat (or don’t eat) stores the fat-soluble vitamins, so do our own livers, assuming we get those vitamins in sufficient quantities in the first place.

      The fat-soluble vitamins are stored in body fat as well.




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  21. If one were to look at the traditional preparations, such combinations (fruits and legumes) doesn’t exist (just google for sources). In fact, these particular combinations pose significant challenges for the digestive system (yes, oatmeal w/fruit too) and is a breading ground for a disease development. Fruits are lighter and digest faster, traditionally eaten separately, otherwise impair complete digestion of proteins (legumes). Naturally, one can eat at his/her free will. Just saying.




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      1. you’re requesting citations, like double blind placebo controlled trials, no one will pay for such studies.

        the key words: food combining, may not be in the modern world, but ancient civilizations do have something to say.

        So I did a bit digging and there are two sources you can look at, Personally, I stick to my comments earlier, My digestion is better that way, everyone’s physique is different, experiment what feels right..

        http://articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2013/10/27/food-combining.aspx

        https://chriskresser.com/ask-the-rd-all-about-food-combining/




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  22. Dr. Greger. I love your work. I think the “synergistic effect” suffers from the same reductionist methodology as the pill or synthetic. I believe that whole plant foods that grow naturally in the wild can be found to be even more beneficial than those artificially produced through agriculture. The synergistic effect I believe is just our best theory given our lack of awareness of underlying “energy” if you will of reality. I believe this “energy” alone is responsible for the health benefits and thus why the more artificially produced (agriculture -> laboratory, etc.) the less healing. It would be of value to see studies of consumption wild foraged plants compared to agriculturally grown.




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    1. Robert,

      Indirectly to address your concept may I suggest that you might want to consider weather patterns, types, timing and other agricultural inputs and then look at the resultant “health” effects. One of the glaring issues in our trying to address the WFPB diet is that lack of ability to standardize our information with reference to the many underlying food factors. As an example, try finding very controlled experiments in humans with the same kale from the same growing area….etc., etc. Clearly not a real potential, however, we can infer and look at the averages and understand the chemical composition. In reference to wild sourced products, it would be an inappropriate exercise as we don’t typically have adequate access to what might have been considered wild and undisturbed. I already hear the exception, ie. where we have supplies of limited seeds from ancient times. The problem is the darn confounding other inputs. Not to be extending this dialogue, however….. even the wildlife dropping and other inevitable fertilization of the plants have changed their characteristics. Our evolutionary experiment is ongoing and inevitable. So if you feel that the wild foraged plants are more energetic, forage forth but recognize our current inability to conduct great experiments and provide better nutrition via this means is very limited. Dr. Alan Kadish Moderator for Dr. Greger




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  23. Can you eat it in the same day, but not necessarily at the same meal with the same benifits. No offense, but those combinations sound horrible. I will eat hummus on a sandwich with veggies like lettuce and tomatoe… I can do carrots on the side. But I can’t do an onion and grape salad. I can eat something with onions then grapes as a snack or desert. My nutritionist did say to eat a variety of colors when planing my meals. She said think of the rainbow everyday and try to eat a variety and change it up or eat seasonal foods. She did wait for me to say I can’t eat 4-5 proteins per day before changing my diet plan. And she went over alternatives that meat with me. And she went over a serving size. So i think we need to speak up because pills are marketed to consumers not doctors. The patients are asking to be on these drugs! If patients demand alternatives than doctors will have to learn to adjust because they don’t want to loose patients.




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    1. Some of the seaweed is better than none. It is absolutely an acquired taste and some are easier to eat than others. The most common method of incorporating wakame is to put a little bit in a salad. If you chop it finely it should be more palatable. Likewise, chopped and added to other types of food can work.




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  24. What about combining foods in a blender as in smoothies? I have been wondering if this process cause any positive or negative effects, namely oxidation of the food itself.




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    1. The longer the food is exposed to air, e.g. after cutting or blending in the blender the faster it will oxidize. That’s why it’s usually recommended to drink your smoothie right away. Combining in this way will probably increase the synergistic effect that he is describing in this video.




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      1. Thanks docbeccy, im so glad to hear that. I use the nutribullet rx every morning for 2 years now. It realy makes getting good food into your body in the morning so much easier. I put a cup of whole organic oats in as well as the fruits, veggies, nuts, and seeds. It just works better than any other breakfast.




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  25. What about bad combinations? Is it true for example, that fruit has to be eaten alone, because if you mix the fruit with other food, the sugar is fermented and releases toxins, alcohol…?




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    1. Hi, Elias Duran. I am Christine, a NF volunteer moderator. Very little research has been done in this area. One of the studies cited in the video above mentions antagonistic combinations, but no specific information is provided in the abstract. It is generally accepted as true that some nutrients compete with each other for absorption, and that supplements of these nutrients should not be taken together for this reason. For example, it is not recommended to take calcium and iron supplements together. As far as fruit is concerned, the only study I found suggested that some fruits could actually help the body get rid of alcohol, while others did not. The authors suggest that some fruits should not be consumed with alcohol. You can read more here, if you’re interested: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4847061/ I hope that helps!




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      1. Thank you for the answer Christine. I am a bit confused.
        The food combining proposed by Herbert M. Shelton followed by many people has no evidence behind it?




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        1. I have not done an exhaustive search on this topic, but I found few studies even addressing this idea. A couple of studies I did find refuted Shelton’s theories, but did not test digestion of whole foods in humans. Much of what we know about human digestion comes from in vitro studies, using cells or samples in a dish, or animal studies, which may or may not represent what actually happens inside the human body. While it is currently popular to refer to certain foods as “proteins,” “carbs,” and “fats,” the truth is that many foods include all of these macronutrients to some degree. I think it is more important to eat a wide variety of whole plant foods than to worry too much about how they are combined. I hope that helps to clear up some of your confusion!




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            1. Our bodies are very intelligent. Look at the way nature itself is designed, like Christine pointed out, many foods in nature contain proteins, carbs and fats in one food source. That theory not only suggests that nature itself is flawed (which is such a joke), but also that our bodies are pretty dumb and that our ancestors must have carefully timed their eating which is simply not the case as they ate what was available season to season, region to region, in large amounts. I can’t stand that kind of false information as I’ve seen it cause people to eat less potentially life saving fruit and other foods! Not to mention the stress it adds which alone is unhealthy. Eating is not that complicated and was never meant to be.




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        2. Elias, from all that I’ve read on this, that archaic theory of bad food combing has been debunked. The idea is that our bodies can’t digest multiple substances at once, such as fat, protein, carbohydrates, etc. Yet in nature, plant foods (the foods we should be eating) contain ALL of these things. Actual scientific evidence goes to show that combining fruit with other foods is highly beneficial. Our bodies are not stupid and could you imagine if our ancestors had worried… “gee, I just ate this handful of leaves, I better not eat that fruit over there for a few hours” we’d have died long ago.. we did not evolve to be that simplistic or unintelligent in design. And one man’s theory certainly doesn’t hold a handle to nature’s design itself.
          I get angry at that theory as I feel not only is it baseless, but dangerous. For a very short time before I knew better, I took someone’s advice about not eating fruit with other foods, well what happened was I ended up reducing my fruit consumption drastically. Not eating enough fruit has been deemed one of the biggest killers in the western world.




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  26. does anyone have any comment on “The blood type diet”.I was going to ask Dr.Greger but he is not taking questions from anyone anymore and they tell you to post a question under one of his videos and ask the community.I recently saw a homeopathic doctor and they told me since my blood type is A that they believe in the blood type diets and feel that they work.I had some blood work done and did find that I had allergies to wheat,gluten,night shade vegetables but not sure about this blood type diet “thing”,I have my doubts.Does anyone have any comments about this. thanks




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  27. Hi Dr G, most of the people do not know what food combos are good for them. Could you kindly publish a list of combinations? That would very helpful!!
    Thanks.




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    1. Neela, I think the point here was simply that combining whole plant foods in general is highly beneficial. I think the list would pretty much be endless. However there are some studied incidents which he does talk about in various videos here, such as grapes/onions, raspberries/adzuki, black pepper or cardamom/blueberries, vitamin c rich foods and onions/garlic helping with mineral absorption, etc. So a list could be pretty cool for sure, but in general I think combining whole plant foods has some pretty amazing benefits no matter what the foods.




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  28. i have a friend who is an ayurvedic practitioner and he learned in ayurvedic school that eating fruit with other stuff is bad. something to do with the ph of stomach acids. for some reason, they think the only fruit that’s ok to combine with other foods is raisins. can you comment?




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    1. Hi, eve levrae. I have not been trained in Ayurveda nor, to my knowledge, has Dr. Greger. I am not aware of any scientific evidence that fruit should not be eaten with other foods. That does not necessarily mean that these teachings are wrong. It may simply be that we have not tested the theory yet, nor found a good way to prove or disprove it. Who knows? Some day, someone might in fact uncover scientific principles to explain and validate many time-tested practices. If that happens, you may hear about it on NutritionFacts, so stay tuned! Meanwhile, speaking of Ayurveda, check this out!
      https://nutritionfacts.org/2012/01/17/amla-indian-gooseberries-versus-cancer-diabetes-and-cholesterol/




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      1. thanks christine.
        i’m wondering though if it’s known how food is digested enough to know how fruit with other food interacts. is the digestive system savvy enough to know how to parse them out. it would seem to me that as gathering peoples we would have been eating a variety of food. it seems impractical to not be able to handle the digestion of different things at the same time.
        thanks again eve levrae




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  29. This is one of my favorite videos. Nature is amazing!! Dr. Greger demonstrating the carrot and the hummus was HILARIOUS LOL. Coincidentally, I shall be eating hummus and carrots shortly!




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